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Google, the company that’s making money from ads tailored to your preferences, will finally be more transparent about how ads work. Google, the company that has been involved in various privacy scandals that revealed the novel ways it was tracking your online activity or your location to improve its ads, will tell you exactly how ad tech works. And it’s all happening in Google Chrome, the world’s most popular web browser. It’s not exactly coming from the goodness of its heart. Google still wants to make money off of your anonymized data, and I often explained that the data-for-free-apps trade-off does make plenty of sense for several of Google’s class-leading apps. But competing browsers that offer the user analytics about online ads and trackers, as well as ad blockers that threaten Google’s bottom line, forced Google to rethink its ad-related policies. In recent years, Google announced and implemented several measures meant to allow it to police the bad ads that ruin the internet-browsing experience, and the latest move further complements those efforts.

 

However, the Ads Transparency Spotlight (ATS) comes as a Chrome add-on that you’d have to install from the Chrome Web Store rather than becoming a built-in feature of the browser.

The new ATS add-on was built around an API called the “Ad Disclosure Schema” that allows advertisers to disclose how their ads work. However, ATS will pull information from Google’s ads initially, per ZDNet. Google hopes that other advertisers will expose a similar API/schema for their own system.

The ATS add-on will show you the following information:

  • Detailed information about the ads on the web page, including how many ads are on the page.
  • A list of ad providers responsible for serving the ads on the page. These companies serve ads or provide the ad technology to help ads appear on this page.
  • The reasons why ads are shown on a page. A combination of several factors that decide which ad will be shown on a page:

– Your demographics: May include age, gender, and other information (provided by you or inferred).
– Marketing Campaign: A visit to the advertiser’s website added you to a marketing campaign.
– Your location: General: Broad location, such as country or city.
– Your interests: Topics related to websites you have visited or interests you provided.
– Context: Topics shown to anyone who visits this page.
– Other information: All other reasons.
– Your location: Specific: Your specific location.

Google will also list companies in the ad tech business that deal with social media buttons, web analytics, or tracking scripts. Google will offer links to the privacy policy of each of these countries, where you’ll be able to see what data they collect about you.

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Screenshot shows Google’s new Ads Transparency Spotlight for Chrome. Image source: Google

The ATS add-on will not let you take any action against any of the companies, ads, or trackers found on the page. It just presents the information in a neatly arranged format. Should you not like something that you see, you’ll either have to change browsers and/or install programs that can block trackers and ads.

Google did build its own ad blocker in Chrome, a program meant to police the ads that misbehave, and announced that ads would no longer be able to consume resources and drain battery life. Google also announced a new Privacy Sandbox last year that’s meant to add a further layer of anonymity to the data that advertisers collect. Finally, Google last week announced a new Trust Token API tech intended to replace third-party cookies in the future, so the functionality of some websites doesn’t break once the cookies are gone.

Check out the Ads Transparency Spotlight at this linkAnd here is the manual for it.

 

[Source: This article was published in bgr.com By Chris Smith- Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Having a website has long been thought of as the key to doing business with the world. But most businesses aren’t global – they’re local – so ranking on page one of Google globally isn’t nearly as valuable as having a strong strategy for local search engine optimization (SEO).

Local SEO is a catch-all for various digital practices designed to help your website rank higher in local searches, which increases your chances of being found by internet users more likely to actually patronize your business. Here are a few simple ways to instantly improve your company’s local search visibility:

Google My Business
Google is the search giant, and Google My Business (GMB) is its most powerful local tool. To start, log into (or create) your free Google account, visit GMB, add all of your locations, verify them and share photos. GMB also allows for customer reviews, so ask for them! This will help build your reputation and, in the eyes of Google’s algorithm, your chances of being listed higher in local search results for relevant terms.

Localize Your Website
Simple things like adding your city and state to the title of your website pages can make an impact. Instead of just “Tom’s Flower Shop,” titling your site something like “Tom’s Flower Shop | Florist in Miami, FL” helps search engines locate you. Then, go through your whole site and see where you can add localization language. There are probably dozens of opportunities to mention the city and neighborhoods you serve.

Get into Local Directories
Google actually refers to Yelp and other localized directories to assess how important your business is to the local area. Ask your web firm to research which online business directories are popular with local users and make sure your business info is listed completely and accurately on all of those websites.

Get Local on Social
Creating and maintaining social media pages can help localize your business, but you need to go beyond that and engage locals online. People talk about business, new developments and products on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and more, and these social mentions are picked up by Google. If a lot of people talk about your business and/or link to your website, search engines will assume that you are relevant.

This is just an intro to the practice of local SEO. If you’re struggling to get on people’s radar, get in touch with Brand Poets. We can point you in the right direction.

 

[Source: This article was published in communitynewspapers.com By Tana Llinas- Uploaded by the Association Member: Anthony Frank]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google is rolling out a new mortgage information search. The new feature contains a calculator, videos, and step by step content.

Google announced they are rolling out a mortgage information search product. The new service will show in mobile searches.

Google Mortgage Information Search for Mobile

Google’s new service is a collaboration with Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

The CFPB is a United States government organization that regulates the consumer financial products and services.

The new mortgage search tool is available in mobile.

According to the CFPBs About Us page:

“We protect consumers from unfair, deceptive, or abusive practices and take action against companies that break the law. We arm people
with the information, steps, and tools that they need to make smart financial decisions.”

Google is partnering with the U.S. government to provide information that is meant to benefit consumers.

 

Google Mortgage Information Search

The tool has a tabbed interface. It currently only shows in mobile devices. General mortgage related keywords trigger the new mortgage search engine results page.

The new search feature can be seen as a way to funnel users from high level mortgage related search queries to more specific information, but not necessarily to more specific websites.

Screenshot of Tabbed Interface of Google’s Mortgage Information Search

screenshot-google-search-mortgage-5f19b8ebc5e7e.gif

Four Ads Above Mortgage Tools

In a search for mortgage, I had to scroll past four ads before I could get to Google’s new mortgage tools.

Screenshot of a Google search ad above the mortgage information tools:

screenshot-mortgage-search--5f186fa39cd5c.png

The search results are beneath Google’s mortgage search tools.  But you have to scroll past multiple mortgage related Google features before you get to two search results that in my case was from the same domain.

Then that’s followed by FAQs that have no links to the website of origin.

Did Google “Borrow” Content Without Attribution?

One of the FAQs has content that appears to have been sourced from BankRate.com. But there is no link to the source of the information or any other attribution.

 

It’s possible that BankRate is not the original source of that content. But a search for a snippet of that phrase shows BankRate as the likeliest source.

One Section from Google’s Mortgage Search FAQ:

google-mortgage-faq-5f1873fc085f2.png

Screenshot from a BankRate.com Page:

bankrate-snippet-5f18745813570.png

The content from Google’s FAQ exactly matches the content on BankRate.com. But there is no link or attribution from Google to BankRate.com.

The page is visible here.

How does Google’s Mortgage Search Work?

Google’s new mortgage information search provides multiple choices for finding more information about mortgages.

The information is designed to funnel consumers from every point of their mortgage research journey.

According to Google:

“For those looking for insights on how to get started or preparing to close, we collaborated with the CFPB to surface the key steps
involved in getting a mortgage under the process section. No matter what phase of the journey you’re on, you can select a step to find a
list of relevant documents and helpful tips from the CFPB. “

What is Google Mortgage Information Search?

The mortgage information search offers the following tools:

  • Mortgage calculator
  • Mortgage rate tool
  • Step by step mortgage tool
  • Videos with How-to and 101 level information

Mortgage Calculator Keyword

The mortgage calculator keyword phrase drives traffic to Google’s information search tool.

While Google previously had featured their own calculator, this change may represent a greater disruption in the mortgage calculator search engine results pages (SERPs).

The new mortgage information feature pushes organic listings further down the page.

screenshot-mortgage-calculator-5f19b0f958e62.png

Mortgage Related Videos

The mortgage related videos seem to be focused on how-to and beginner level information.  Those seeking to gain traffic via videos may do well to focus on that kind of video.

screenshot-google-mortgage-video-tools-5f19b271e3d09.jpg

Disruption in Mobile Mortgage SERPs

This may cause disruption in the mobile SERPs for mortgage related keywords. This does not currently affect the desktop SERPs.

The disruption appears to be on general high level type keywords.

A search for Mortgage Rates will trigger the tool. A search Mortgage Rates Massachusetts will also trigger the tool.

But more granular searches like Mortgage Rates Northampton Massachusetts or Mortgage Rates Charlotte North Carolina do not trigger Google’s mortgage information search tool.

So it looks like local related and granular keywords will not trigger the tool.

Those seeking to pick up mortgage related traffic may want to consider pivoting to more granular keyword phrases.

What’s Next from Google?

Does this tool signal the future of Google search?

It’s possible that something like this might pop up in other finance and Your Money or Your Life related topics, where a complicated topic needs a more comprehensive approach.

 

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Roger Montti - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne]

Categorized in Search Techniques

As Web Stories become more popular, Google now supports labeling them as such in Google Search Console and its testing tools.

Google announced that its testing tools and the Google Search Console Performance report will recognize if your AMP document is a Web Story.

Google said, “In our testing tools and Performance report we’ll use the term Web Story to identify this format.”

What is a Web Story? In its developer document, Google said that “a Web Story is a visual storytelling format in Google Search results that immerses the user in a tap-through full-screen experience. Web Stories can also appear in Google Images, Discover, and the Google app. This guide explains how Web Stories appear on Google, and how to enable a Web Story on Google.”

 

What a Web Story looks like. They come in many variations and Google is testing multiple layouts. They can show in web search, Google Discover, Google Images and many other places. Here is one example of what it looks like.

web-stories-single-result.png

Testing tools. The AMP testing tool and the other testing tools will now label these as a “Web Story.” Here is a screen shot from the AMP testing tool that shows a “valid web story”:

google-amp-test-web-story-555x600.jpg

Performance report. In Google Search Console, the Performance report, Google will also show how much of that traffic is from a Web Story. So you can filter it out even more:

Screenshot 4

Why we care. Google is now giving SEOs and site owners even more refined breakdowns of how a Web Story published on your site can send you traffic from Google Search and Google Discover. Google will also properly document in its testing tools if it is a Web Story, how those web stories previews may show up in search and more ways to debug your web stories.

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jasper Solander] 

Categorized in Search Engine

The updated doc has guidance around article titles, enabling high-quality large images and having timely, engaging content.

Google has made significant updates to the Google Discover help document designed to help publishers learn about how to get their content to show up in Google Discover. The document was updated a few days ago, as Kenichi Suzuki first noticed, and Google has now officially announced the change.

Google Discover is the content feed that appears on Google’s mobile home page on the web and its apps. Discover feed are personalized based on users’ search history, interests, as well as topics and places they follow.

 

E-A-T gets mention. The main thing most SEOs noticed is that Google has mentioned “expertise, authoritativeness and trustworthiness” in the document: “Our automated systems surface content in Discover from sites that have many individual pages that demonstrate expertise, authoritativeness and trustworthiness (E-A-T). Those looking to improve E-A-T can consider some of the same questions we encourage site owners to consider for Search. While Search and Discover are different, the overall principles for E-A-T as it applies to content within them are similar.”

More optimization suggestions. Google also updated most of the other parts of the document to provide publishers guidance on the proper use of article titles, enabling high-quality large images and having timely, engaging content.

How to get your content in Google Discover. Google’s new guidance says to focus on these elements:

  • Having page titles that capture the essence of the content, but in a non-clickbait fashion.
  • Avoiding tactics to artificially inflate engagement by using misleading or exaggerated details in preview content (title, snippets, images) to increase appeal, or by withholding crucial information required to understand what the content is about.
  • Avoiding tactics that manipulate appeal by catering to morbid curiosity, titillation, or outrage.
  • Having content that’s timely for current interests, tells a story well, or provides unique insights.
  • Providing clear dates, bylines, information about authors, the publication, the publisher, company or network behind it, and contact information to better build trust and transparency with visitors.
  • Including compelling, high-quality images in your content, especially large images that are more likely to generate visits from Discover. Large images need to be at least 1200 px wide and enabled by the max-image-preview:large setting, or by using AMP. Avoid using a site logo as your image.

Why we care. Google Discover can send publishers immense traffic. It can also be a very unstable traffic source. These guidelines could help publishers garner more visibility on the Discover feed on a more consistent basis. Be sure to familiarize yourself with Google’s help document and guidance and hopefully your site can benefit from traffic via Google Discover.

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne] 

Categorized in Search Engine

Are you wondering how to do a reverse image search on the web? Fear not. This article is made for you. The Internet is a wild place, to say the least. Files come, and files go on a daily base, and it’s not always easy to keep track of everything. There can be various reasons why you’d want to do a reverse image lookup, but whatever your reasons might be, the following steps should walk you through the basics.

How to find image resources by using a reverse search

A reverse search is unlike a normal image search like the one that you might know from Google. Your starting point is that you have an image and want to find out more about it or find more websites that have also used the same or a very similar image.

  1. Load up TinEye in your browser
  2. Upload your image or enter the image URL
  3. Let the search engine do its magic
  4. It’s done, and you can browse the results

TinEye-Reverse-Image-Search-Engine-Picture-Lookup-Free-Web-Tool.jpg

In the example above, I have tried to look up a photo I took during an automotive fair, to see where else it would end up. While the image happens to be under a creative commons license, it is interesting to see who gives proper credit and who does not. If someone does not make their images available under such a license, they might want to sue or press charges for copyright infringement. Using a reverse image search engine such as TinEye would help you to find out where your pictures went and how they were used.

Are there any alternatives for reverse image lookups?

I found TinEye to be quick and user-friendly, but it’s not the only one of its kind out there. Google does also offer a reverse image search, but it is a bit difficult to get to the right menu while you’re on a computer. You can also give the reverse image search by Dupli Checker a try. It will work in a similar fashion but lets you browse the results of Google, Bing, Yandex, TinEye, Sogou, and Baidu instead of using an own technology. The results might take longer to browse through, but it is possible that different engines find different image locations.

Photo credit: The feature image has been done by Diogo Castro. The screenshot shown is owned by TinEye.

 

[Source: This article was published in techacute.com By Christopher Isak - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google is such a powerhouse search engine that it has not only injected itself into our everyday lives, it’s even a verb now.

But just because we Google things a lot doesn’t mean that that we do it as effectively as possible. So here are some tips to help maximise and improve your Google search results.


Dashes

If you want to exclude a word from your search results, put a dash in front of it.

Example

Watch West Wing online -Netflix

Google-Trick-.png

Quotation Marks

Use quotation marks to search an exact set of words, such as song lyrics.

 

Example:

“You must remember this” song

google-quotation.jpg

Asterisk

Speaking of exact swords, what if you can’t remember them all? No problem — just use an asterisk in place of the unknown word/s. Again, this is great for song lyrics or quotes that you may have only half heard. Alternatively, ones that are often misquoted, like below.

Example:

“Play * Sam”

google-asterisk.jpg

Tilde

Use a tilde before a word to include all of its synonyms.

 

Example:

Star Wars ~Presents

As you can see, it has scraped ‘gifts’ as well:

google-presents.jpg

Double Full Stop

Use a double full stop between two numbers to convey ranges. This is handy for pricing, dates and measurements.

Example:

HP Spectre buy $1000..$2000

google-price.jpg

Site: Query

You can search for something within a specific website by using ‘site:’

Example:

John Wick site:gizmodo.com.au

google-john-wick.jpg

Link: Query

You can find sites that have linked to a specific URL through ‘link:’

Example:

link:https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2018/06/theres-a-possible-paypal-scam-happening-in-australia-right-now/

google-link.jpg

Related: Query

If you’re looking for websites that are related to a specific site, you can use ‘related:’

 

Example:

related:boardgamegeek.com

google-related.jpg

Reverse Image Search

This is incredibly handy if you want to find the origin of a photo you have randomly stumbled across on the web. For example, a plate of delicious looking food that you would love to know the recipe for.

Reverse image searching is also great for tracking down original photographers, identifying things (celebrities, flora and fauna, unlabelled clothes or products you want to buy), discovering where your own work may be getting used, and debunking fake social media posts and profiles.

You can do a reverse image search by going into the ‘images’ tab on Google and clicking on the camera icon in the search bar. You can then either upload an image or insert an image address (right click on an image and hit ‘copy image address). Google will then deliver its best guess on the image.

Example:

I went to Pinterest, searched ‘Ramen’ and chose this image:

1db1d6577ad9b645dbdfd39d781e85db.jpg

I then reverse image searched it on Google to find the recipe.

 google-reverse-image.jpg

This post was originally published on March 29, 2019.

[Source: This article was published in gizmodo.com.au By Tegan Jones - Uploaded by the Association Member: Olivia Russell]

Categorized in Search Engine

Update: July 15, 2020 at 5:29 PM ET: In an email, Microsoft confirmed the news to Android Authority that Bing has indeed been added to the list of search engines in certain parts of Android after installing the Outlook app. The company claims this addition has no impact on users’ default search engines on their phones.

Original article: July 13, 2020 at 9:40 PM ET: If you use Outlook for your Android phone’s email and calendars, you might see an unexpected sales pitch for Microsoft’s search engine.

Android users have discovered that Outlook slips a “Bing search” option into the long-press menu you see when you select text. Tap it and it will open your default browser with a Bing query for whatever words you had selected. It’s helpful, but likely not what you wanted if you live in a Google-centric world.

 

The menu option doesn’t appear for everyone, and some have reported success in getting rid of it by uninstalling Outlook. It might not even be visible if you reinstall the app. It doesn’t appear to be available when you install other Microsoft apps beyond Bing.

We’ve asked Microsoft for comment, although this isn’t a completely novel strategy. The company slipped suggestions for its own apps into Android’s share menu in 2019.

There is an incentive for the company to experiment with features like this.

Microsoft is using built-in Android functionality to add the Bing search option. It’s not compromising your device or otherwise going out of bounds, then. However, the practice might not find many fans. The company is promoting Bing to users who didn’t expect it (and frequently didn’t want it) on their devices in any form, let alone system-wide.

There is an incentive for the company to experiment with features like this. Bing had just under 2.8% of search engine usage share in June 2020, according to StatCounter. While that’s larger than most of the competition, it pales compared to Google’s 91.75% share. Microsoft has a lot of ground to cover if it’s going to be more competitive, and suggesting Bing searches to millions of users there have been over 100 million downloads as we write this) theoretically helps close the gap.

 

[Source: This article was published in androidauthority.com By Jon Fingas - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google is adding new features to RSA ad copy options with dynamic features, and increasing its helpfulness with cross-campaign results and asset suggestions.

Google has announced it’s increasing the features of their responsive ads today by adding two features: location insertion and countdown customizers.

There are also now improved copy suggestions and recommendations, and the launch of cross-campaign asset reporting.

What are Responsive Search Ads?

Commonly called “RSAs,” this ad type automatically assembles the ad copy a user sees by bringing together copy elements the advertiser specifies.

In normal ads, full ad copy must be written out for each version to be tested. RSAs takes the heavy lifting out of that process by breaking the components of a text ad into “assets.”

It essentially treats headlines and body copy as two different elements or “asset,” where versions of each are listed out. The Ads system then pulls an asset from each list (headline and body copy), and combines them to make a full text ad.

It provides for testing at scale, and gives fast insights into which copy and combinations are resonating for searchers.

 

RSAs can feel limiting to some advertisers, since the copy has to be mix and match. Overly themed text ad types may struggle if there’s a strict relationship between headlines and body copy that have to be adhered to.

However, they are a great way to test for things like different value propositions, sale messaging, and other items to learn the phrasing users prefer.

Location Extension Insertion

This feature allows the advertiser to insert a placeholder telling Google to display the City, State or Country based on where the potential customer is searching from, or where they’re interested in. (This is based on your campaign’s location targeting type.)

It’s  inserted with the command {LOCATION(City)} reference, where “city” can be changed out for State or Country via a radio button selection:

sej_rsa_locationext-5f0f041cb5954.png

Countdown Customizers

Frequently used for things like creating urgency around sales, Countdowns let the advertiser enter an end date for something. The ad then calculates the amount of time left between that specific time and when the searcher sees the ad, updating it dynamically.

The Countdown time specification can be adjusted to the timezone of the searcher, or set at a global level to end without making any timezone adjustments. (For example, if something ends at 1am on the east coast, it would still end at 10pm for the west coast searcher.)

Countdown options are brought up by typing in the {COUNTDOWN command. A menu will pop up walks the user through the details, and populates the rest of the command based on those choices.

sej_rsa_countdown-5f0f08ea4aa0e.png

New Copy Asset Suggestions

When creating RSAs, the system populates a dropdown of suggested copy to test. This feature has been updated for the Covid-19 era, with new suggestions for things like Contactless delivery and curbside orders.

 

Adding your final URL to your ad copy unlocks additional options based on what Google discerns your offerings are.

q.png

Cross-Campaign Asset Reporting

To aggregate results per asset faster, Google Ads now also offers cross-campaign reporting for these copy assets. This aggregates the data for each asset, regardless of campaign, and gives the user one snapshot of total performance.

This can be helpful to understand best performers much faster, versus going into each ad group or campaign separately to see results. For small advertisers that have tinier amounts of data per asset, this combines all the data for seeing larger trends.

ad.png

The full announcement of these features are on Google’s blog.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Susan Wenograd - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

These days, you can’t get hardly anything done without a good, working web browser, but what do you do when Google Chrome starts acting up? Here’s a guide for how to clean up some of Google Chrome’s most common issues including slow loading, excess notifications, using the wrong search engine, and more.

Note: This guide is only intended for Google Chrome for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS. The instructions here do not apply to Chrome on smartphones, but do let us know in the comments or on Twitter if you’d like to see a similar guide for Android or iOS.

Google vs. Google Chrome

Before we dive in, I want to make sure we all understand that there’s a difference between “Google” and “Google Chrome.” “Google Chrome” is a web browser, the tool you use to view sites on the internet, including the one you’re on right now! Google Chrome is used for the same things as Safari, Microsoft Edge, and Firefox.

 

Meanwhile, “Google” is the company that makes the Chrome browser. Commonly, though, when folks think of “Google,” they’re thinking of the “Google.com” search enginegoogle_search_desktop_1.jpg

More importantly, you can use Google as your search engine in other browsers like Edge and Safari. You do not need Google Chrome to use Google Search.

Similarly, just because you’re using Google Chrome does not mean your searches will always go through Google Search.

How to switch Chrome search engines

Are you looking to remove Yahoo from Google Chrome? What should you do if your searches in Chrome are going to Yahoo or Bing instead of Google? Sometimes people will change this on purpose, simply because they prefer another search engine over Google, but other times a program will ask to switch Google Chrome’s search engine to something like Yahoo without your notice.

No matter how your search engine got changed, there’s a few different things you can try to remove Yahoo or any other search engine and switch back to using Google Search in Chrome.

Method 1: Switch to Google

First, click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then click Settings. On this page, scroll down to “Search engine.” Make sure that the setting labeled “Search engine used in the address bar” is set to “Google.”

google-chrome-switch-search-engine.png

If all goes well, your searches in the address bar should now default to Google Search.

Method 2: Reset to default settings

If switching the search engine manually doesn’t change things, the next step we recommend is to reset Google Chrome’s settings to default. Open the Settings page again, and on the left-hand side of the page, click “Advanced” then “Reset settings.”

Next, click on “Restore settings to their original defaults” and you’ll be offered to confirm that you really do want to reset your customized settings. Click the “Reset settings” button to confirm.

chrome-reset-settings-2.png

Once done, your Google Chrome should be most of the way back to the way it was on day one. All of your Google Chrome extensions will still be installed, but will be “disabled” after reset. For help on how to re-enable them, look through our guide to removing/disabling Chrome extensions down below.

Method 3: Check for malware

If your searches in Chrome are still going to Yahoo or another search engine instead of Google, even after resetting to default, you’ll want to check for malware using a program like MalwareBytes or seek professional tech support.

How to update Google Chrome

There are many, many reasons why Google Chrome can act up or feel slow, but before we dive in to more advanced methods, it’s important that we cover the easiest thing to check first and that’s whether or not you’re on the newest update. By default, Google Chrome should keep itself updated automatically, but sometimes this doesn’t happen. Here’s how to manually check whether Google Chrome is up to date.

Windows/macOS

First, click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then hover over “Help” and click on “About Google Chrome.” When the next page opens, Google Chrome will immediately begin checking if you need a new update. Simply follow along with what it asks. Or, if you’re already up to date, you’ll see “Google Chrome is up to date.”

update-google-chrome-desktop-2.png

Chrome OS

Click the clock in the bottom-right corner of your screen, this will open the notification list and Chrome OS’s quick settings panel. In this panel, click on the gear icon to open the Settings app. On the left-hand side of the page, click on “About Chrome OS.”

update-google-chrome-os-1.png

At the center of the new page that opens, click the button labeled “Check for updates.” If an update is available, your Chromebook will begin downloading and installing it immediately, then prompt you to restart. If there’s no update available you’ll see “Your Chromebook is up to date.”

update-google-chrome-os-3.png

That said, not every update to Chrome OS arrives for every device right away. Sometimes Google’s Pixelbook and Pixel Slate devices will get Chrome OS updates a few days earlier than others. It’s also important to check whether your Chromebook is still eligible for updates.

How to remove/disable Chrome extensions

When used wisely, extensions can be a fantastic way to add new features to your Google Chrome browser. However, some extensions have been shown to drastically slow down Google Chrome or even hijack your searches.

 

If your Google Chrome is acting weirdly or is being very slow, it’s probably time to look at your installed extensions and remove anything you don’t truly need. First, click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then hover over “More tools,” and click “Extensions.”
chrome-open-extensions-menu.png

In the page that opens, you’ll see a list of every extension you’ve installed for Google Chrome. Next to each extension, you’ll see a handy “Remove” button. After you click the button, a pop-up will appear asking if you’re sure you want to remove. Click the “Remove” button on the popup to confirm.

remove-chrome-extension.gif

We strongly recommend that you remove every extension that you don’t recognize, as any one of them could be the culprit for Google Chrome being slow or any other issues.

If Google Chrome is still slow or acting strangely, you can try disabling your other extensions one-by-one. Open the Extensions page, as described above, and at the bottom right of each extension, you’ll see a little switch. Click the switch to turn that extension either on or off.

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If you’ve removed or disabled all of your extensions and Google Chrome is still loading slowly or behaving strangely, you’ll likely want to check for malware using a program like MalwareBytes or seek professional tech support.

How to stop Chrome pop-ups and notifications

Notifications are without a doubt one of the most controversial additions to web browsers like Google Chrome in the last few years. On the one hand, notifications are necessary for the web to have the app-like experiences that developers have long dreamed of.

Conversely, some websites have abused notifications, making them one of the worst features of Google Chrome today. Luckily, it’s not too hard to turn off notifications for websites in Google Chrome.

 

First, remember that Google Chrome’s notifications are accepted on a per-site basis, which means you can turn off notifications from a bad website while still keeping notifications from Gmail or Twitter, if you so choose.

Click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then click Settings. On the left-hand side of the page, click “Privacy and security,” then in the center of the page click “Site settings.”

On the page that opens, scroll down to “Permissions” and click on “Notifications.” At the top of this page, you’ll see a switch labeled “Sites can ask to send notifications.” If you turn this switch off, Google Chrome will never again ask if you want to receive notifications from any website.

1) Privacy and security

google-chrome-notification-settings-1.png

2) Site settings

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3) Notifications

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4) Notifications permission toggle

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However, this switch does nothing about the sites you’ve already agreed to receive notifications from. To turn those sites’ notifications off, scroll down to the section labeled “Allow.”

In the Allow section, you’ll find the list of websites that you’ve agreed to receive notifications from. Next to each of these, you’ll see a three dots menu button. To disable Google Chrome’s notifications for a particular site, click that menu button, followed by “Block.”

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If you’re still receiving unwanted notifications from Google Chrome after cleaning out this list, your next step would be to try removing any extensions that may be misbehaving.

 [Source: This article was published in 9to5google.com By Kyle Bradshaw - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dana W. Jimenez]

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