Source: This article was Published techworm.net By Payel Dutta - Contributed by Member: Jasper Solander

Reverse image search is a technique wherein it allows people to retrieve content that is relevant to a particular image. It is also known as content-based image retrieval a method that eliminates the need for a user to identify keywords that may or may not provide an accurate result. The user only needs to supply the sample image to make a search or query.

We know that Google images can provide us with any photo, but we need to write the keyword or the terms associated with it to be able to proceed with the search. While using a reverse image search tool we will just provide a sample image. It is helpful in locating the source of an image or the content creator, search for the image in terms of popularity, extract details that are related to an image, look for similar images that have higher resolution, locate the web pages where the photo is displayed, and look for manipulated versions of the image.

If you are into social media and you want to find if a person’s account is legit, you can use a reverse image search tool for this purpose. You only have to supply the photo of the person, and it will show you the information that you need to check if the account is legit or not. Verifying account using a reverse image search tool can save you the trouble of being connected with an impostor or scammer. At present, many people are using fake accounts that is why you must be cautious and check the profile of the person first before adding them.

Photographers spend a great deal of money to buy their equipment and to attend workshops. They also exert a lot of time and effort in their craft to be able to produce quality and beautiful pictures that is why it is only right that they get the proper compensation for their work. They can use the reverse image search tool to discover if someone is using their pictures without their permission. By not giving credits to the owner, one can be accused of false ownership.

Whether it is for personal or public use, it should always be a practice to attribute the source of an image. To be able to get the information that you need, you can use a reverse image search from SmallSEOTools.com. This specific website offers many helpful tools that anybody can use online. One of the most popular tools from Small SEO Tools is the reverse image search because it is simple and easy to use. All you have to do is to upload an image or paste the URL where the image is located, and then it will give you the results in a flash. It will show you similar images and their sources.

Also, if you want to get any information about a particular image like a famous person, place or product you can run it through a reverse image search tool. It can help you save a lot of time looking for answers if you want to know more about the photo. You don’t have to go through an intensive research by typing different keywords to get the information that you need from the image.

There are many reverse image search tools on the internet today, but the one that I always use is from SmallSEOTools because it is user-friendly and gives me the results that I need in just a few seconds. Not to mention that this online reverse image search tool is readily available and can be used free of charge.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published zdnet.com By George Anadiotis - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

Did you ever need data on a topic you wanted to research, and had a hard time finding it? Wish you could just Google it? Well, now you can do that.

With data science and analytics on the rise and underway to being democratized, the importance of being able to find the right data to investigate hypotheses and derive insights is paramount

What used to be the realm of researchers and geeks is now the bread and butter of an ever-growing array of professionals, organizations, and tools, not to mention self-service enthusiasts.

Even for the most well-organized and data-rich out there, there comes a time when you need to utilize data from sources other than your own. Weather and environmental data is the archetypal example.

Suppose you want to correlate farming data with weather phenomena to predict crops, or you want to research the effect of weather on a phenomenon taking place throughout a historical period. That kind of historical weather data, almost impossible for any single organization to accumulate and curate, is very likely to be readily available by the likes of NOAA and NASA.

Those organizations curate and publish their data on a regular basis through dedicated data portals. So, if you need their data on a regular basis, you are probably familiar with the process of locating the data via those portals. Still, you will have to look at both NOAA and NASA, and potentially other sources, too.

And it gets worse if you don't just need weather data. You have to locate the right sources, and then the right data at those sources. Wouldn't it be much easier if you could just use one search interface and just find everything out there, just like when you Google something on the web? It sure would, and now you can just Google your data, too.

That did not come about out of the blue. Google's love affair with structured data and semantics has been an ongoing one. Some landmarks on this path have been the incorporation of Google's knowledge graph via the acquisition of Metaweb, and support for structured metadata via schema.org.

Anyone doing SEO will tell you just how this has transformed the quality of Google's search and the options content publishers now have available. The ability to markup content using schema.org vocabulary, apart from making possible things such as viewing ratings and the like in web search results, is the closest we have to a mass-scale web of data.

This is exactly how it works for dataset discovery, as well. In a research note published in early 2017 by Google's Natasha Noy and Dan Brickley, who also happen to be among the semantic web community's most prominent members, the development was outlined. The challenges were laid out, and a call to action was issued. The key element is, once more, schema.org.

schemaorgattributes.png 

Schema.org plays a big part in Google's search, and it's also behind the newly added support for dataset search. (Image: Go Live UK)

Schema.org is a controlled vocabulary that describes entities in the real world and their properties. When something described in schema.org is used to annotate content on the web, it lets search engines know what that content is, as well as its properties. So what happened here is that Google turned on support for dataset entities in schema.org, officially available as of today.

The first step was to make it easier to discover tabular data in search, which uses this same metadata along with the linked tabular data to provide answers to queries directly in the search results. This has been available for a while, and now full support for dataset indexing is here.

But is there anything out there to be discovered? How was Google's open call to dataset providers received? ZDNet had a Q&A with Natasha Noy from Google Research about this:

"We were pleasantly surprised by the reception that our call to action found. Perhaps, because we have many examples of other verticals at Google using the schema.org markup (think of jobs, events, and recipes), people trusted that providing this information would be useful.

Furthermore, because the standard is open and used by other companies, we know that many felt that they are doing it because it is 'the right thing to do.' While we reached out to a number of partners to encourage them to provide the markup, we were surprised to find schema.org/dataset on hundreds, if not thousands, of sites.

So, at launch, we already have millions of datasets, although we estimate it is only a fraction of what is out there. Most just marked up their data without ever letting us know."

NOAA's CDO, Ed Kearns, for example, is a strong supporter of this project and helped NOAA make many of its datasets searchable in this tool. "This type of search has long been the dream for many researchers in the open data and science communities," he said. "And for NOAA, whose mission includes the sharing of our data with others, this tool is key to making our data more accessible to an even wider community of users."

Under the hood

In other words, it's quite likely you may find what you are looking for already, and it will be increasingly likely going forward. You can already find data from NASA and NOAA, as well as from academic repositories such as Harvard's Dataverse and Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), and data provided by news organizations, such as ProPublica.

But there are a few gotchas here, as datasets are different from regular web content that you -- and Google -- can read.

To begin with, what exactly is a dataset? Is a single table a dataset? What about a collection of related tables? What about a protein sequence? A set of images? An API that provides access to data? That was challenge No. 1 set out in Google's research note.

Those fundamental questions -- "what is topic X" and "what is the scope of the system" -- are faced by any vocabulary curator and system architect respectively, and Noy said they decided to take a shortcut rather than get lost in semantics:

"We are basically treating anything that data providers call a dataset by marking schema.org/dataset as a dataset. What constitutes a dataset varies widely by discipline and at this point, we found it useful to be open-minded about the definition."

That is a pragmatic way to deal with the question, but what are its implications? Google has developed guidelines for dataset providers to describe their data, but what happens if a publisher mis-characterizes content as being a dataset? Will Google be able to tell it's not a dataset and not list it as such, or at least penalize its ranking?

Noy said this is the case: "While the process is not fool-proof, we hope to improve as we gain more experience once users start using the tool. We work very hard to improve the quality of our results."

google-data-tech-analytics2-ss-1920.jpg

Google and data has always gone hand in hand. Now Google takes things further, by letting you search for data.

Speaking of ranking, how do you actually rank datasets? For documents, it's a combination of content (frequency and position of keywords and other such metrics) and network (authority of the source, links, etc). But what would apply to datasets? And, crucially, how would it even apply?

"We use a combination of web ranking for the pages where datasets come from (which, in turn, uses a variety of signals) and combine it with dataset-specific signals such as quality of metadata, citations, etc," Noy said.

So, it seems dataset content is not really inspected at this point. Besides the fact that this is an open challenge, there is another reason: Not all datasets discovered will be open, and therefore available for inspection.

"The metadata needs to be open, the dataset itself does not need to be. For an analogy, think of a search you do on Google Scholar: It may well take you to a publisher's website where the article is behind a paywall. Our goal is to help users discover where the data is and then access it directly from the provider," Noy said.

First research, then the world?

And what about the rest of the challenges laid out early on in this effort, and the way forward? Noy noted that while they started addressing some, the challenges in that note set a long-term agenda. Hopefully, she added, this work is the first step in that direction.

Identifying datasets, relating them, and propagating metadata among them was a related set of challenges. "You will see", Noy said, "that for many datasets, we list multiple repositories -- this information comes from a number of signals that we use to find replicas of the same dataset across repositories. We do not currently identify other relationships between datasets."

Indeed, when searching for a dataset, if it happens to be found in more than one locations, then all its instances will be listed. But there is also something else, uniquely applicable to datasets -- at least at first sight. A dataset can be related to a publication, as many datasets come from scientific work. A publication may also come with the dataset it produced, so is there a way of correlating those?

Noy said some initial steps were taken: "You will see that if a dataset directly corresponds to a publication, there is a link to the publication right next to the dataset name. We also give an approximate number of publications that reference the dataset. This is an area where we still need to do more research to understand when exactly a publication references a dataset."

pasted-image-0.png

Searching for datasets will retrieve not only multiple results for your query, but also multiple sources for each dataset. (Image: Google)

If you think about it, however, is this really only applicable to science? If you collect data from your sales pipeline and use them to derive insights and produce periodic reports, for example, isn't that conceptually similar to a scientific publication and its supporting dataset?

If data-driven decision making bears many similarities to the scientific process, and data discovery is a key part of this, could we perhaps see this as a first step of Google moving into this realm for commercial purposes as well?

When asked, Noy noted that Google sees scientists, researchers, data journalists, and others who are interested in working with data as the primary audience for this tool. She also added, however, that as Google's other recent initiatives indicate, Google sees these kinds of datasets becoming more prominent throughout Google products.

Either way, this is an important development for anyone interested in finding data out in the wild, and we expect Google to be moving the bar in data search in the coming period. First research, then the world?

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Publishedfastcompany.com By Steven Melendez - Contributed by Member: Martin Grossner

VirusTotal, which is a product of Chronicle, a company created within Alphabet’s fabled “moonshot factory,” has been described as “Google for malware.”

Earlier this year, Google parent Alphabet unveiled a new, top-level company called Chronicle that would be dedicated to cybersecurity.

Initially created within X, Alphabet’s so-called “moonshot factory” unit, Chronicle has said that it’s developing a security analytics platform for corporate customers, harnessing the company’s strengths in search, artificial intelligence, raw computing, and data storage power. But Chronicle also includes an often-overlooked security product called VirusTotal, sometimes described as “Google for malware.”

Acquired by Google in 2012, the Malaga, Spain, based company was first created by cybersecurity developer Bernardo Quintero in 2004, who’s worked on antivirus technology since he was a teenager. Quintero’s earlier projects included a Spanish-language cybersecurity newsletter and a tool designed to defeat dial-up-era malware that ran up charges calling premium toll hotlines. VirusTotal enables anyone to upload a file they suspect may contain malware to have it scanned by dozens of antivirus tools from vendors like Symantec, TrendMicro, Kaspersky, and Avast.

“When I started [VirusTotal] there were eight or nine antivirus companies working in the first version of the service,” says Quintero.

Now, there are more than 70, and the tool can extract other metadata from files as well, whether it’s a photo or an executable program, studying the uploaded content in secure virtual cloud machines. Security experts can also use the platform to share information about potential new malware files.

“They can have fast access to the malware samples to improve their product,” Quintero says.

VirusTotal played a role in the analysis of the infamous Stuxnet worm, when it collected some of the first samples, and it’s been cited in commercial and academic security research, including recent work on cryptocurrency-stealing malware.

Since Alphabet’s acquisition, VirusTotal has been largely independently managed, but it’s been able to take advantage of the larger company’s cloud computing and search capabilities—some of the same strengths that Alphabet intends to leverage for its larger Chronicle efforts.

“We’ve increased search capabilities,” says Chronicle CEO Stephen Gillett. “We’ve invested a large amount of infrastructure to make scanning faster and better.”

More fundamentally, Alphabet has also helped VirusTotal, which prior to Chronicle’s debut was administratively part of the company’s internal cybersecurity unit, combat denial of service attacks that had threatened it as an independent platform.

“For us, it was a way to perfect our mission,” says Quintero.

VirusTotal Graph [Image: courtesy of VirusTotal]
VirusTotal has also added a data visualization component, called VirusTotal Graph, that can help suss out the relationships between malware files and the URLs and IP addresses that distribute them. And this year, it unveiled a feature called VirusTotal Monitor, which lets legitimate software makers upload their applications and information about them so participating antivirus companies can avoid mistakenly flagging them as malware. The innocuous software samples are stored in a secure, private cloud, and antivirus vendors are only given access to the data if their software begins to mistakenly flag the files as viruses.

Another feature, called VirusTotal Intelligence, lets security researchers sift through the set of uploaded files to find ones matching certain criteria. A bank, for example, could spot malware trying to interact with its websites.

Gillett declined to comment too extensively on plans for Chronicle’s next project, though he emphasized it would also take advantage of Alphabet’s strengths to help customers sift through vast quantities of security data.

“We should be able to help teams search and retrieve useful information and run analysis in minutes, rather than the hours or days it currently takes,” he wrote in a January blog post. “Storage—in far greater amounts and for far lower cost than organizations currently can get it—should help them see patterns that emerge from multiple data sources and over years.”

Chronicle isn’t Alphabet’s only high-profile security project—the company’s Jigsaw unit focuses on tools to make the world safer, including combating misinformation and radicalization, and Google’s Project Zero team has focused on spotting bugs in software before they can do harm. More recently, Alphabet has announced plans to help safeguard elections, including by helping keep Google accounts safe from unauthorized access.

Contributing to cybersecurity in a world where it’s often lacking is an important mission for the company, Gillett says.

“For Alphabet, and for me personally as the founder and CEO of Chronicle, I believe there’s no better moonshot for Alphabet to be going after,” he says.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Source: This article was Published hub.packtpub.com By Sugandha Lahoti - Contributed by Member: Carol R. Venuti

Google has launched Dataset Search, a search engine for finding datasets on the internet. This search engine will be a companion of sorts to Google Scholar, the company’s popular search engine for academic studies and reports. Google Dataset Search will allow users to search through datasets across thousands of repositories on the Web whether it be on a publisher’s site, a digital library, or an author’s personal web page.

Google’s Dataset Search scrapes government databases, public sources, digital libraries, and personal websites to track down the datasets. It also supports multiple languages and will add support for even more soon. The initial release of Dataset Search will cover the environmental and social sciences, government data, and datasets from news organizations like ProPublica. It may soon expand to include more sources.

Google has developed certain guidelines for dataset providers to describe their data in a way that Google can better understand the content of their pages. Anybody who publishes data structured using schema.org markup or similar equivalents described by the W3C, will be traversed by this search engine. Google also mentioned that Data Search will improve as long as data publishers are willing to provide good metadata. If publishers use the open standards to describe their data, more users will find the data that they are looking for.

Natasha Noy, a research scientist at Google AI who helped create Dataset Search, says that “the aim is to unify the tens of thousands of different repositories for datasets online. We want to make that data discoverable, but keep it where it is.”

Ed Kearns, Chief Data Officer at NOAA, is a strong supporter of this project and helped NOAA make many of their datasets searchable in this tool. “This type of search has long been the dream for many researchers in the open data and science communities,” he said.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published qz.com By Dave Gershgorn - Contributed by Member: Dennis Smith

Ten years into its life, Chrome is the most widely-used internet browser in the world. But the stock features aren’t what make it so popular. There’s also a thriving community of developers adding onto the browser with extensions, little pieces of software that add features Google hasn’t dreamt up yet.

The Quartz staff like their extensions. After all, we all spend a borderline unhealthy amount of time on the internet, whether it be researching, writing, or fact-checking stories. Here are the ways our favorites have helped us out:

Clutter/tab maintenance

If you’re like us, you have way too many tabs open. The holy trinity of tab maintenance can help: The Great Suspender pauses tabs after a certain amount of time so they don’t use processing power in the background, OneTab is great for condensing all the tabs you’re keeping open “to read later” into one summary tab, and Clutter Freemakes sure you don’t have duplicate tabs open.

Productivity

Sometimes you want to jot down a quick note but don’t want to open a word processor. Papier turns each new tab’s homepage into a notebook for recording quick thoughts or distraction-free writing. And everything is backed up to Chrome, so you won’t lose it later.

Search

The Personal Blocklist extension, made by Google, filters out certain domains from your searches, so if you don’t like a certain site you don’t need to see it. (Keep qz.com, please.) A Quartz developer says that it’s useful to block out certain unhelpful sites when Googling through a web development problem.

Writing

Sometimes a hand you need with grammar. Grammarly.

News

Use Pocket to save good stories and NewsGuard to fend against bad ones. Quartz science editor Elijah Wolfson also sends longer stories he really wants to read to his Kindle using Push to Kindle. It’s distraction-free reading at its best, with no notifications or ads or messages.

Password management

A password manager is just basic internet hygiene—use one to maintain strong passwords for every one of your internet accounts. The most popular ones are 1Password, LastPass, and Dashlane— there are pros and cons to each, and the Quartz staff uses them all. Just remember the master password—your digital life depends on it.

Archive search

Once it’s on the internet, it lives forever. That’s pretty much due to Archive.org, which stores decades of revisions to websites, as well as preserved copies of sites that don’t exist anymore. The Wayback Machine extension allows you to see saved versions of web pages that have been either taken down or are otherwise unavailable, a boon to any internet historian.

Money Saver

Get around academic paywalls with extensions like Kopernio and Unpaywall, which search for accessible PDFs of the paper online. Or, find out if you’re actually getting a good deal with a price tracker like CamelCamelCamel.

GIFs

My trustiest Chrome extension is called MakeGIF, and it’s very simple. It makes GIFs. It’s particularly good at capturing and converting YouTube videos.

Fun

Inject a little bit of simple internet nostalgia into your life with Tabogotchi, which makes a game out of how many tabs you have open, or Tabby Cat, which generates an internet cat you can virtually pet for every tab you open.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published computerworld.com By Mike Elgan - Contributed by Member: Dorothy Allen

If you think a search engine exists as an index to the internet, it’s time to update your thinking.

This column is not about politics. It makes no political judgments and takes no political positions. No, really! Stay with me here.

President Trump this week slammed Google, claiming that the company “rigged” Google News Search results to favor stories and news organizations critical of the president.

To drive home his claim about bias, Trump posted a video on Twitter this week with the hashtag #StopTheBias (which, at the time I wrote this, had 4.36 million views), claiming that Google promoted President Barack Obama’s State of the Union addresses, but stopped the practice when Trump took office.

In a statement issued to the press, a Google spokesperson said that the company did not promote on its homepage either Obama’s or Trump’s first “State of the Union” addresses because technically they are considered mere “addresses to a joint session” of Congress, the idea being that brand-new presidents are not in a position to reveal the “state of the nation.” Google also claimed that it did promote Trump’s second and most recent State of the Union, a claim that screenshots found on social media and pages captured by the site Wayback Machine appear to confirm.

The facts around this incident are being funneled into ongoing, rancorous online political debates, which, in my opinion, isn’t particularly interesting.

What is interesting is the Big Question this conflict brings to the surface.

What is a search engine?

A search engine can be four things.

  • An index to the internet

When Google first launched its search engine in 1996, it was clear what a search engine was: an index of the internet.

Google’s killer innovation was its ability to rank pages in a way that was supposed to reflect the relative relevance or importance of each result.

Both the results and the ranking were supposed to be a reflection or a snapshot of the internet itself, not an index to the information out there in the real world.

  • An arbiter of what’s true

In this view, Google Search would favor information that’s objectively true and de-emphasize links to content that’s objectively untrue.

  • An objective source of information

The objective source idea is that Google makes an attempt to present all sides of contentious issues and all sources of information, without favoring any ideas or sources.

  • A customized, personalized source of information

The personalized source concept says that a search engine gives each user a different set of results based on what that user wants regardless of what’s true, what’s happening on the internet or any other factor.

This is all pretty abstract, so here’s a clarifying thought experiment.

When someone searches Google to find out the shape of the Earth, how should Google approach that query? It depends on what Google believes a search engine is.

(Note that it’s likely that flat-Earth proponents generate, link to and chatter about the idea that the Earth is flat more than people who believe it’s spherical. Let’s assume for the sake of argument that, objectively, the content and activity on the actual internet favors the flat-Earth idea.)

If a search engine is supposed to be an index to the internet, then search results for the shape of the Earth should favor the flat-Earth idea.

If a search engine is supposed to be an arbiter of what’s true, then search results should favor the spherical-Earth idea.

If a search engine is supposed to be an objective source of information, then search results should provide a balanced result that equally represents both flat- and spherical-Earth theories.

And if a search engine is supposed to be a customized, personalized source of information, then the results should favor either the flat-Earth idea or the spherical-Earth idea, depending on who is doing the searching.

I use the shape of the Earth as a proxy or stand-in for the real search results people are conducting.

For example, searches for your company, product, brand or even yourself are still subject to the same confusion over what a search engine is supposed to be.

When your customers, prospective business partners, employees or future prospective employees and others search for information about your organization, what results should they get? Should those results reflect what’s “true,” what’s false but popular, or what’s neutral between the two? Or should it depend on who’s doing the searching?

The truth is that Google tries to make Google Search all four of these things at the same time.

Adding to the complexity of the problem is the fact that search engine results are governed by algorithms, which are trade secrets that are constantly changing.

If you were to ask people, I suspect that most would say that Google Search should be Model No. 1 — an index to the internet — and not get involved in deciding what’s true, what’s false or what’s the answer the user wants to hear.

And yet the world increasingly demands that Google embrace Model No. 2 — to be an arbiter of what’s true.

Governments won’t tolerate an accurate index

Trump has claimed repeatedly that, in general, news media coverage is biased against him. If that’s true, and if Google News Search was a passive index of what the media is actually reporting, wouldn’t it be reasonable for Trump to expect anti-Trump coverage on Google News Search?

By slamming Google News Search as “rigged,” Trump appears to reveal an expectation that Google News should reflect what’s happening in the real world as he sees it, rather than what’s happening on news media websites.

Or it reveals that regardless of the weight of activity in favor of news sources Trump believes are biased against him, Google News Search should provide a balanced and neutral representation of all opinions and sources equally.

The rejection of the search-engine-as-internet-index model is common among governments and political leaders worldwide.

One famous example is the “right to be forgotten” idea, which has been put into practice as law in both the European Union and Argentina. The idea is that information on the internet can unfairly stigmatize a person, and citizens have the right for that information to be “forgotten,” which is to say made non-existent in search engine results.

Let’s say, for example, that a prominent person files for bankruptcy, and that 100 news sites and blogs on the internet record the fact. Twenty years later, well after the person has restored financial solvency, the old information is still available and findable via search engines, causing unfounded stigmatization.

A successful right-to-be-forgotten petition can remove reference to those pages from search results. The pages still exist, but the search engines don’t link to them when anyone searches for the person’s name.

The advocates of right-to-be-forgotten laws clearly believe that a search engine exists to reflect the real world as it is, or as it should be, and does not exist to reflect the internet as it is.

Google was recently caught in a controversy over an assumed return to the Chinese market with a custom China-only search engine that censors internet content in the same way that domestic sites are required to by the Chinese government. Hundreds of Google employees signed a letter in protest.

Google wants to “return” to the Chinese market. The Chinese government would not allow Google to operate a search engine accessible to Chinese citizens that accurately reflected what’s actually on the internet.

The examples go on and on.

What governments tend to have in common is that in political circles, it’s very difficult to find people advocating for the index-to-the-internet conception of what a search engine should be.

Why the search-engine-as-index idea is dead

Google’s self-stated mission is to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

Nebulous, yes. But for the purposes of this column, it’s telling that Google says that its mission is to organize, not the internet’s information, but the “world’s.”

The reality is that people search Google Search and other search engines because they want information about the world, not because they want information about what the internet collectively “thinks.”

And, in any event, the point is growing moot.

What the internet “thinks” is increasingly being gamed and manipulated by propagandists, bots, fake news, trolls, conspiracy theorists, and hackers.

Accurately reflecting all this manipulated information in search engines is valuable only to the manipulators.

Also: With each passing day, more information “searching” is happening via virtual assistants such as Google Assistant, Siri, Cortana, and Alexa.

In other words, virtual assistants are becoming the new search engines.

With augmented reality glasses and other highly mobile sources of information, search engines such as Google will have to increasingly become arbiters of what’s true, or supposed to be true, because the public will increasingly demand a single answer for its questions.

That’s why the old initiatives for your company’s presence on the internet — SEO, marketing, social media strategy and all the rest — have new urgency.

With each passing day, search engines exist less to index the internet and more to decide for us all what’s “true” and what’s “not true.”

It’s time to redouble your efforts to make sure that what Google thinks is true about your company really is true.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published gizmodo.com By Brent Rose - Contributed by Member: Deborah Tannen

So, Chrome is ten years old. Officially in the double-digits. Soon it’ll be getting wispy chin-hairs and its voice will be cracking. That said, Google’s browser has accomplished a lot in the ten years that it’s been around. It went from a latecomer in the Browser Wars, with just a 1-percent market share early on launch, and now it’s the most-used browser in the world, with around 60-percent market share. We thought we’d take a look back at the few of the ways it became so dominant.

The Omnibox.png

1. The Omnibox

Children, you will not believe it, but once in web browsers, there was a field for entering the web address and a very different field for the search! Can you believe that? What a bunch of dirty animals we were then. However, when Chrome launched in 2008, it really tried to emphasize a "clean, simple, and efficient interface," and one of the options was to combine the URL box and the search box into one. Suddenly, users could enter a web address or simply switch off the search terms in the same place. It has saved a lot of clicks from the start and has only been improved by additional auto-complete capabilities. It's even able to answer questions and solve math problems before pressing Enter. "The Omnibox handles more than just URLs," Google said in its comic announcement to the world. "It also offers suggestions for search queries, top pages you've visited before, pages you've not visited yet but are popular, and more … you'll have a full-text search of your history You will not have to bookmark this page for digital cameras, just enter "digital camera" and quickly come back to it. "Ten years later, and it's amazing how much I still rely on these features, It's worth noting that all of this information went back to Google by default, but you could use other search engines (Yahoo, Ask, etc.) if you wanted.

2. Incognito mode

Google did not invent the concept of private (or more private) surfing. Apple's Safari actually had a privacy mode before Chrome, but that just shows what a good name can do. Incognito mode has become one of the Q tips of … well, there's a reason why some people still refer to it as a "porn mode". However, it can be used for much more, including checking out websites and profiles through the eyes of an anonymous third party or getting around the paywalls of news organizations.

3rd speed

You may forget that the biggest initial benefit of Chrome was not just that it was fast, but also that stupid fast, Thanks to very intelligent programming, Google claimed that Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine could work ten times faster than Safari or Firefox, and approximately 56 times faster than Microsoft's IE7 (then the dominant browser). This kind of speed paved the way for better in-browser applications like email, calendars and spreadsheets, which of course Google would do

Speed.jpg

4. Each tab is a separate process

This is one of those situations that you take away. Chrome has taken the revolutionary approach of making every open tab its own process. This meant that if a website had a berth code that would simply crash one tab and the other 19 open tabs would stay quiet and function normally. As a result, fewer browsers were completely reset, and as long as your computer had sufficient RAM, each tab was much less prone to delays than other browsers at the time. The other side of this coin is that Chrome can make a metric shit sound out of your computer's memory, especially if you tend to have many tabs open at the same time as I am. In the last few years, much has been done in favor of Google to minimize the amount of background tabs that can impact your system and battery life, but there are still many rivers crossing at this front. Other browsers, such as For example, Opera now has this approach, "Every tab is a process," but most are based on the open source Chromium architecture.

5. Make the web less annoying

It's easy to say how much the web sucks today, but the truth is that it used to suck a lot worse. How do you remember videos that automatically hunted stupidities into your eardrum for 30 seconds before you even found out which tab they came from? Chrome has set it up to mute these videos by default for an entire domain. Or how about extremely annoying popup and banner ads? Maybe fake play buttons that have taken you to a sketchy website? Google gave the sites 30 days to settle for a set of web standards. If it did not, Chrome automatically blocked the offensive content. In this way, 60 percent market share can choose to use their influence to get people to change their evil ways.

os.jpg

6. It is the first browser to become an operating system

What is the claim to fame? This small web browser became the basis for a whole operating system. Firefox, IE, Safari, Opera … none of them can claim the same. It is not an insignificant operating system either. Chrome OS runs Chromebooks, which account for approximately 60 percent of all mobile devices shipped to K-12 schools in the United States (as of Q4 2017). This will be a first computer experience for many of these children at a very formative time in their lives. Whether this will pay off for Google, remains to be seen.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published phys.org By Marc Saltzman - Contributed by Member: Issac Avila

Whether you already own one or have thought about it, you probably know Google Home ($129) is one of those popular voice-activated personal assistants for the home.

After saying the wake words "OK, Google" (or "Hey Google"), ask a question or give a command, and you'll hear a human-like female voice respond from its clear speaker—whether you want to hear a specific song, set a timer for the oven, or control your smart devices in your home (such as a Wi-Fi-enabled thermostat).

But you already know all this, you say?

The following is a handful of lesser-known Google Home features, including a few tips and tricks, and hidden Easter Eggs.

Google Home can help you remember where you left things. Say something like "Ok Google, remember my passport is in the top drawer." When you need it in the future, ask "OK Google, where's my passport?" and it will tell you where it is, and what date you asked it to remind you.

Funny sounds. Want to entertain the kids? Google Home can play you recordings of animal noises and vehicle sounds. For example, ask what a horse or train sounds like. Google will sing for you, too! Simply say "Hey Google, sing a song" or "OK Google, serenade me," and you'll hear the assistant belt out a ditty. Ask it to do it again and it'll likely be a different tune. You can also ask it to drop a beat if you want to rap on top: say "OK Google, beatbox."

Play that song. Speaking of music, Google Home will find a song for you—even if you don't know the title. For example, say "Ok Google, play that song that says 'passionate from miles away'" and it will play Drake's Passionfruit. Your personal assistant can also be an instrument tuner; if you have a guitar on your lap, say "Hey Google, start an instrument tuner" and it will ask what musical note you want to hear.

Get flight prices ASAP. Say something like "OK Google, how much does it cost to fly from Los Angeles to New York today, returning Monday?" and you'll hear the lowest roundtrip cost. It can keep track of the cheapest flights for those dates and even email you a summary to your Gmail account.

Play games with Google Home. Say "OK Google, Mad Libs" ("the world's greatest word game") or "Hey Google, play Lucky Trivia." Expect more games to be added over time.

Personalize. You might've heard Google Home can detect different voices in your home. Therefore, if you ask how long it'll take to get to the office this morning, you'll hear a different response than if your partner asks the same question.

Shortcuts. Did you know you can create custom shortcuts for long phrases you commonly ask? For example, instead of "Hey Google, turn off all the lights in the house," you can say something like "OK Google, good night." To create a shortcut, open the Google Home app on your smartphone, enter Settings, and you'll see "Shortcuts" under "More" settings.

Google Home helps with homework. You can ask math questions ("OK Google, what's the square root of 729?"), get history help ("OK Google, who founded the United States?") or learn geography facts ("OK Google, what's the capital of India?"). You can even ask how to spell something, such as "OK Google, how do you spell 'emancipation'?" Try something trickier like "OK Google, what's 'quantum theory'?" or "Ok Google, search for monkey facts."

Weather forecasts. You likely know you can ask for weather information, but you can also for multi-day forecasts, too, in any city. For example, say "OK Google, "what will the weather be like over the next 5 days in Kingston, Jamaica?"

Voice volume. You can adjust Google Home's volume by swiping your finger on top of the unit, but you can also use your voice to change volume. Say something like "OK Google, volume at 50%," if you're not near the speaker.

Random. Google Home has a Magic 8-ball, of sorts. Say "OK Google, Crystal Ball" and ask a yes or no question.

Get organized. Google Home lets you access your calendar by simply asking for info like "OK Google, what meetings do I have today?" But you can also add events to your calendar using Google Home, too, such as asking "Ok Google, add dinner with Kellie tomorrow at 8 PM to my calendar."

My day. When you wake up, say "OK Google, tell me about my day," and you'll hear the date and time, weather, calendar events, and news. You can also change where you get your news from by opening the Google Home app and selecting desired sources.

Jetsons skills. If you own a Roomba, you can now initiate the vacuum cleaner using your voice. After you pair your Roomba with Google Home, say "Ok Google, ask Roomba to start cleaning." The future is here!

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published irishtechnews.ie By Sujain Thomas - Contributed by Member: Carol R. Venuti

Well, Google does not know you personally, so there is no reason to hate you. If you are writing and still not getting that first ranking on the page of the search engine, it means something is not right from your side.  First of all, let’s just get some ideas straight. How do you think search engine ranking is effective a web page? Being in the few lines of code will not always determine whether the page is capable enough to be placed on the first page of the search engine. Search engines are always on the lookout for signals to rank any page. So, it is easier for you to tweak an article and give those signals to search engines for enjoying a huge round of traffic.

Starting with the primary point:

To get that huge round of audience, you need to start with keyword research. It is one such topic which every blogger might have covered at least once. They need to work on that from the very first day of their blogging life. Every SEO blog or blogger might have used Google Keyword Planner for sure. You might have heard of it, because if you haven’t then you are missing out on a lot of things for your massive business growth.

More on Google Keyword Planner:

There are so many types of keyword research tools available in the market but Google Keyword Planner is at the top of the list. It is also one of the major keyword spy tool names you will come across recently. Google Keyword Planner is an official item from Google, offering you a traffic estimation of targeted keywords. It further helps users to find some of the related and relevant KWs for matching your niche. There are some important points you need to know about Google Keyword Planner before you can actually start using it.

  • For using this Google Keyword Planner tool, you need to register your name with Google and have an AdWords account. The tool is free of cost and you don’t have to spend a single penny on using this item. You have every right to create an AdWords tool using some simple steps and get to use it immediately.
  • If you want, you can clearly search for the current Google AdWords coupons, which will help you to create one free account for your own use. It will help you to use the Google Keyword Planner tool on an immediate count for sure.
  • The main target of this tool is towards AdWords advertisers. On the other hand, it is able to provide some amazing deals of information when it is time to find the right keyword for the blog and the relevant articles to your business.

Log online and get a clear idea on how the homepage of this tool from Google looks like. You just have to enter the target keyword in the given search bar and start your search results quite immediately.  Later, you can add filters if you want to.

Categorized in Online Research

Source: This article was Published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: Rebecca Jenkins

Remember the early days of "not provided"? Well, Google Search Console has begun removing some query data for "privacy" reasons.

Google has quietly posted that they are now removing query data from the Google Search Console reports that they identify as “anonymous queries.” Google said, “an anonymous query is a query submitted only a few users.” Google added that they “omit these queries from results to protect user privacy.”

Google said the amount of queries removed depend on the site, Google said: “some sites will have very few unique queries; other sites will have a large proportion of anonymous queries.”

Google wrote on the page:

Chart totals no longer include anonymous* (rare) queries when you apply a query filter. Previously, the chart totals included all anonymous queries when a “Queries not containing:” filter was applied. Because of this, you might see a drop in clicks and impressions when adding a filter that excludes specific queries. We believe that omitting anonymous queries from all query-filtered results is more consistent.

Back in 2011, Google removed query data from their reports when they began moving Google search results to HTTPS. When Google made this move, it was about protecting user’s privacy to disallow people from sniffing Google’s searches. But Google told webmasters that they will be able to get all this data securely in Google Search Console. Now, with this change, Google is now also removing some query data from Google Search Console as well.

Categorized in Search Engine

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