Source: This article was Published hackercombat.com By Julia Sowells - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

When we have to search for something on the Internet, our mind by default goes to Google or Bing. Obviously, our mind is tuned that way, and we get the results we seek. But how often do we consider that the information we are really looking for might be available on the deep web?

The major search engine keeps meticulous details of our movement on the Internet. Well, if you don’t want Google to know about your online searches and activities, it is best to keep anonymity.

Now, what about those huge databases of content lying in the repository of ‘Invisible Web’ popularly known as the ‘Deep Web’ where the general crawlers are not able to reach? How do you get them?

Deep web content is believed to be about 500 times bigger than normal search content, and it mostly goes unnoticed by regular search engines. When you look at the typical search engine, it performs a generic search. For example, there are huge personal profiles, and records of people related documents on static websites, and this high-quality content is invisible to the search engines.

Why is a Deep Web search not available from Google?

The primary reason Google doesn’t provide deep web content is that this content doesn’t index in the regular search engines. Hence, these search engines will not show results, or crawl to a document or file which is unindexed by the world wide web. The content lies behind the HTML forms. Regular search engines crawl, and the searches are derived from interconnected servers.

Interconnected servers mean you are regularly interacting with the source, but when it comes to the dark web this does not happen. Everything is behind the veil and stays hidden internally on the Tor network; which ensures security and privacy.

Only 4 percent of Internet content is visible to the general public, and the other 96 percent is hidden behind the deep web.

Now, the reason Google is not picking up these data, or why deep web content does not get indexed is not a hidden secret. It is mainly that these businesses are either illegal or bad for the society at large. The content can be of things like porn, drugs, weapons, military information, hacking tools, etc.

Robots Exclusion

The robot.txt that we normally use is to tell the website which of the files it should record and register that is to be indexed.

Now we have a terminology called ‘robots Exclusion files’. Web administrators will tweak the setup in a way that certain pages will not show up for indexing, and will remain hidden when the crawlers search.

Let’s look at some of the crawlers that go deep into the internet.

List of Best Deep Web Search Engines of 2017
  • Pipl
  • MyLife
  • Yippy 
  • SurfWax 
  • Wayback machine 
  • Google Scholar 
  • DuckDuckGo 
  • Fazzle 
  • Not Evil 
  • Start Page

Pipl

This is one of the search engines that will help you dig deep and get the results which may be missing on Google and Bing. Pipl robots interact with searchable databases and extract facts, contact details and other relevant information from personal profiles, member directories, scientific publications, court records and numerous other deep-web sources.

Pipl

Pipl works by extracting files as it communicates with the searchable database. It attempts to get information pertaining to search queries from personal profiles and member directories, which can be highly sensitive. Pipl has the ability to deeply penetrate and get the information the user seeks. They use advanced ranking algorithms and language analysis to get you the results closest to your keyword.

MyLife

Mylife engine can get you the details of a person, viz-a-viz personal data, and profiles, age, occupation, residence, contact details etc. It also includes pictures and other relevant histories of the person latest trip and other surveys if conducted. What’s more, you can rate individuals based on the profile and information.

mylife

Almost everyone above 18-years-old in the United States has a profile on the Internet, so one can expect more than 200 million profiles with rich data on Mylife searches.

Yippy

Yippy in fact a Metasearch Engine (it gets its outcomes by utilizing other web indexes), I’ve included Yippy here as it has a place with an entryway of devices a web client might be occupied with, for example, such as email, games, videos and so on.

Yippy

The best thing about Yippy is that they don’t store information of the users like Google does. It is a Metasearch Engine, and it is dependent on other web indexes to show its results.

Yippy may not be a good search engine for people who are used to Google because this engine searches the web differently. If you search “marijuana,” for example, it will bring up results that will read ‘the effects of marijuana,” rather than a Wikipedia page and news stories. So it’s a pretty useful website that can be good for people who want their wards to know what is really required and not the other way round.

SurfWax

SurfWax is a subscription-based search engine. It has a bunch of features apart from contemporary search habits. According to the website, the name SurfWax arose because “On waves, surf wax helps surfers grip their surfboard; for Web surfing, SurfWax helps you get the best grip on information — providing the ‘best use’ of relevant search results.” SurfWax is able to integrate relevant search based with key finding elements for an effective search result.

SurfWax

Wayback machine

This engine gives you enormous access to the URL information. It is the front-end of the Internet Archive of open web pages. Internet Archive allows the public to post their digital documents, which can be downloaded to its data cluster. The majority of the data is collected by the web crawlers of Wayback machines automatically. The primary intention of this is to preserve public web information.

Wayback Machine

Google Scholar

Another Google search engine, but quite different from its prime engine, Google Scholar scans for a wide range of academic literature. The search results draw from university repositories, online journals, and other related web sources.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar helps researchers find sources that exist on the internet. You can customize your search results to a particular field of interest, region, or institution, for example, ‘psychology, Harvard University.’ This will give you access to relevant documents.

DuckDuckGo

Unlike Google, this search engine does not track your activities, which is the first good thing about it. This has a clean UI and it is simple and yes, it has the ability to deep search the internet.

DuckDuckGo

Having said that you can customize the searches, and even enhance them according to the results and satisfaction. The search engines believe in quality and not quantity. The emphasis is on the best results. It does this from over 500 independent sources, including Google, Yahoo, Bing, and all the other popular search engines.

Fazzle

Accessible in English, French, and Dutch, this is a meta web index engine. It is designed to get quick results. The query items include Images, Documents, Video, Audio, and Shopping, Whitepaper and more.

Fazzle

Fazzle list most of the items that may look like promotion, and like to know meta web indexes available, this search engine does not cover supported a connection in searches. So it looks like the first search results on any keyword could likely be a promotion. Nevertheless, among all the Deep Web Fazzle stands apart when it comes to giving you the best pick on searches.

Not Evil

The not for profit ‘not Evil’ search engines entirely survives on contribution, and it seems to be getting a fair share of support. Highly reliable in the search results, this SE has a functionality that is highly competitive in the TOR network.

Not Evil

There is no advertising or tracking, and due to the thoughtful and continuously updated algorithms of search, it is easy to find the necessary goods, content or information. Using not Evil, you can save a lot of time and keep total anonymity.

This search engine was formerly known as TorSearch.

Start Page

Startpage was made available in the year 2009. This name was chosen to make it easier for people to spell and remember.

Startpage.com and Ixquick.com are both the same and run by one company. It is a private search engine and offers the same level of protection.

Start Page

This is one of the best search engines when it comes to concealing privacy. Unlike popular search engines, Startpage.com does not record your IP and keeps your search history a secret.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published seroundtable.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: James Gill

Google announced that they will now begin automatically verifying some users in Google Search Console, which will open up access to Google Search Console to countless (I don't even know the figure, hundreds of thousands, millions?) of webmasters, site owners and more. In short, if you are a verified owner of a Google Analytics property, Google will automatically verify you for that same website in the Search Console.

This is very big news, probably not for most of you, since you all are on top of making sure the right people have access to Google Search Console. But this is very big news, in general, to get more people to access to Google Search Console. As I said at Search Engine Land "those with Google Search Console access will get emails and notifications of issues in their inboxes. These messages can include manual actions, hacks, WordPress and other CMS upgrade alerts, as well as other notifications - all aimed at helping you keep your website healthy, indexed and ranking." Yea, I quoted myself - sue me. But it is important, this opens up super important notifications and reports to many people who had no idea this tool existed.

Everyone knows about Google Analytics, it is a given. But Google Search Console - not so much. I know many SEOs who have been telling Google to auto-verify people this way and Google has finally done it. You no longer need to manually go and verify your site in Search Console, Google will do it automatically if you are the site owner in Google Analytics!

This is what it looks like when you get notified of being automatically verified. Sergei Ivanov posted on Twitter some screenshots.

This is the notification telling the site owner they are now verified because of the collaboration with Google Analytics:

Here is the notification in Google Search Console of this:

 

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published ifsecglobal.com By John Mason - Contributed by Member: Grace Irwin

Google voice search makes finding what you need even easier.

Just say “OK Google,” tell your phone or tablet what you want to find, and you’ll get results. Or use the microphone icon in your browser.

There’s even an official Chrome extension that combines voice search with Google Docs dictation, so you can type a document without touching a keyboard.

It’s really cool technology, but like most convenient tech, there are some tradeoffs.

In this case, the biggest trade-off is privacy. Voice search comes with some “features” that you might not be aware of, and privacy enthusiasts find those features a bit worrying. (Fortunately, you can mitigate them with a few clicks if you know where to look; we’ll get to that in a moment.)

First, let’s talk about how Google voice search is changing human-computer interaction.

Google Voice Search: The future of search

For years, Google has been making it easier to find the information you want on the internet. Extremely refined algorithms, sophisticated tracking and scoring, and integration with a variety of other services all remove barriers to getting great search results.

Voice search is an extension of that. If you can’t – or just don’t want to – type your query, all you need to do is speak it and Google will take a look. You can use it to search other search engines (like DuckDuckGo, which is much more privacy-focused), Wikipedia, YouTube, Wolfram Alpha, and a wide variety of other sites.

Google Assistant, a more powerful companion to simple voice search, will help you find photos, send text messages, keep your shopping list, and even order products.

It’s clear that Google is betting heavily on voice technology, and that it’s working. A 2018 survey by Stone Temple found that 16% of people prefer to use voice search over any other method.

And 60% used voice search at least some of the time. Users also took advantage of voice tech for sending texts, making calls, getting directions, and setting reminders.

Google stores every voice command that you’ve ever given your device

Why do so many prefer voice-enabled apps? Mostly because it saves time. Over 60% said that they use voice because it’s fast. But the fact that it’s accurate, doesn’t require typing, and results in an audio answer were mentioned, too.

The past few years have seen increased usage of voice search and other voice-enabled technologies, and it’s unlikely to slow down any time soon. Google is leading the way in making it easier for users to interact with their devices using their voice.

But this convenience has a cost that many people aren’t aware of: privacy.

Why privacy advocates are wary of Google Voice Search

Most people using Google’s voice products without much thought. They say “OK Google,” or hold down the home button on their device, and start talking. When they’re done with the search, they forget about it.

But Google doesn’t.

It stores every voice command that you’ve ever given your device, plus a few seconds of audio before you gave the command. Which means that Google is always listening through your phone. They might not be saving everything you say near the device, but they’re always listening.

And much of it is saved. In fact, you can see how much. Head to myactivity.google.com and you’ll see the data that Google has stored. If you’ve used voice search recently, you should be able to find a record of it and even listen to the stored audio.

It’s a little unnerving, hearing the things you said to your phone played back to you from your computer

It’s a little unnerving, hearing the things you said to your phone played back to you from your computer, and knowing that it’s coming from Google’s servers.

And, of course, we all know what Google does with your information that’s stored on its servers: analyzes it and uses it to serve you ads. That, combined with the fact that your phone is always listening and ready to record audio, has privacy enthusiasts worried.

What you can do to protect your privacy from Google Voice Search

The most obvious thing you can do to mitigate the privacy concerns of using Google voice search is to simply not use it. If you turn Google Assistant off, it won’t be listening, and it won’t be recording anything.

To turn it off, open Google Assistant, then tap the blue icon in the upper-right corner. Hit the three dots in the upper-right corner of the resulting screen and select Settings. Tap the name of your device, and move the slider for Google Assistant to the off position.

Of course, that means you won’t be able to use the full power voice search. And that’s inconvenient. But if you’re concerned about privacy, it might be worth it.

Especially because Google’s voice search capabilities may not work very well when you’re using a VPN. And using a high-quality, secure VPN is one of the most important things you can do to keep your mobile data safe.

If you want to keep using voice search, you can tell Google to stop recording and storing what you say. You can do this by going to myactivity.google.com, selecting Activity Controls from the sidebar menu, and scrolling down to Voice & Audio Activity. Click the slider to pause it.

This will prevent the storage of your voice searches and activity. That means Google won’t be using it to target ads . . . but it also means that it won’t be as good at recognizing your voice, have as much data for learning speech recognition, or learn things that might help it solve your problems.

But it’s a step in the right direction for privacy.

Weigh the options

Unfortunately, keeping your data secure means not getting as many benefits from Google’s voice-recognition technologies as you might otherwise. So you’ll have to weigh the pros and cons of privacy versus the convenience of Google voice search and similar services.

In an age when privacy is increasingly threatened, it’s easy to assume that all of your data will end up in Google’s hands anyway. But if you put up a bit of a fight, you just might be able to maintain a bit of control over your data.

Categorized in How to

Source: This article was Published technode.com By TIANYU FANG - Contributed by Member: Corey Parker

Since Google Search’s exit from China in 2010, homegrown tech giant Baidu has absorbed most of the Chinese search engine market, dominating over 70% of its market share. With rumors that Google is making a return and a state media commentary welcoming its re-entry, Baidu’s CEO Robin Li appears confident about defeating its past rival again; “If Google decides to return to China, we will fight and beat them again,” Li said in a WeChat post.

Many – including the 86% of participants in an internet poll who indicated their preference for Google over Baidu – would encourage Li to reconsider his statement. Even when the two search engines are subject to the same level of control, one could propose a handful of reasons to choose Google Search over Baidu: the Chinese tech giant’s innumerable copyright infringements, blatant disregard for user privacy, and equivocal ethical standards have constantly put it on the spotlight of public outcry.

Be that as it may, it is likely that Google will not beat Baidu in the search engine sector if it returns. Prior to Google’s exit in 2010, Baidu had a significantly larger market share than did its American rival. In China, user acquisition follows a different set of rules than the US, making the turf war between Google and Baidu not a competition between product qualities, but localized marketing strategies.

Long before $99 Xiaomi smartphones became ubiquitous nationwide, China’s internet industry heavily relied upon internet cafés, where many Chinese consumers from lower-tier cities first accessed the internet. The company paid internet café franchises to switch the default homepage of their browsers to Baidu, whereby increasing its visibilities and successfully reached China’s new internet users, as Quartz’s Josh Horwitz concluded.

What accompanied this marketing strategy was the success of Hao123.com, an online listings portal owned by Baidu with a search bar that redirects users to Baidu’s search results. While Google subsequently launched a similar service known as 265.com, Hao123.com’s expansion was way more “aggressive” – it was constantly accused of unauthorized hijackings of browser homepages, and many considered it malware. In fact, if one entered “Hao123” into Baidu’s search bar, “how to remove hao123” would appear in the dropdown list.

Google did not follow Baidu’s path to success for two reasons. First, the company had made little effort building its visibility in less developed regions. At the time when Baidu had built a sizable sales team of four thousand marketers, Google’s China branch had only a few hundred employees, primarily operated through third-party partnerships, and did not even build its own marketing team.

The second was the significant discrepancy between Baidu’s ethical standards and Google’s. The latter is known for its Code of Conduct – the noble motto “don’t be evil” being the most often quoted line – which heavily influenced the corporation’s decision-making. In 2008, the scene in China would be better characterized as “when Baidu went low, Google went high.” As China’s internet industry was back then largely ruled by the law of the jungle, Baidu chose to acquire users by taking advantage of gray areas in China’s legal system, such as offering illegal mp3 downloads.

Eight years later, many of these principles still hold true: as a significant part of its penetration strategy, Baidu expends more than 10% of its yearly revenue on mobile carriers and smartphone manufacturers, which in turn pre-install Baidu’s mobile apps on brand-new Android phones. An inattentive user intending to load one Baidu tool on a Windows laptop but forgets to unselect a hidden box in the corner may end up having five Baidu apps installed and default browser changed.

Baidu has seen its fair share of backlashes, but Chinese users have always had other alternatives, such as the Tencent-backed Sogou, the runner-up in China’s search engine market and a version of Bing has been operating in China for years. There is little chance that Google’s return will change the established scene in China’s search engine sector, although Google might have a better shot in more technically specialized areas: artificial intelligence, news aggregation, autonomous driving, and of course, advertising.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published voip.review By RUGILE BERTULE - Contributed by Member: James Gill

According to a recent report from The Intercept, Google is planning to relaunch its search engine in China, meeting all the Chinese government’s censorship requirements.

Back in 2010, the Internet giant withdrew its services from China due to strict censorship. Now Google is clawing its way back into the world’s largest Internet market, with a censored version of their search engine under the codename “Dragonfly”. The first platform to be developed is an Android app that is expected to be finalized in the upcoming six to nine months, claims The Intercept.

The appeal of 750 million Internet users would be quite tempting to anyone, yet this news about Google has been met with some negativity and may be considered as showing support for the totalitarian regime in China. “This has very serious implications not just for China, but for all of us, for freedom of information and Internet freedom. It will set a terrible precedent for many other companies who are still trying to do business in China while maintaining the principles of not succumbing to China’s censorship. The biggest search engine in the world obeying the censorship in China is a victory for the Chinese government – it sends a signal that nobody will bother to challenge the censorship anymore,” said Patrick Poon, a researcher for Amnesty International in his comment to The Intercept.

This renewed drive by Google is said to be initiated by Sundar Pichai, who started his position as CEO of the company in 2015. In 2016, Sundar openly expressed his intentions to return to the Chinese market, and recently the company rolled out their Files Go app and Guess the Sketch game for the WeChat application in China. Despite the lack of official announcement regarding this subject from Google, it is clear that the tech titan is on the way to expand its horizons in the massive Chinese market.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published cbsnews.com - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

Even if "Location History" is off on your phone, Google often still stores your precise location.

Here are some things you can do to delete those markers and keep your location as private as possible. But there's no panacea because simply connecting to the internet on any device flags an IP address, a numeric designation that can be geographically mapped. Smartphones also connect to cell towers, so your carrier knows your general location at all times.

To prevent further tracking

For any device:

Fire up your browser and go to myactivity.google.com . Sign into Google if you haven't already. On the upper left drop-down menu, go to "Activity Controls." Turn off both "Web & App Activity" and "Location History." That should prevent precise location markers from being stored to your Google account.

Google will warn you that some of its services won't work as well with these settings off. In particular, neither the Google Assistant, a digital concierge, nor the Google Home smart speaker will be particularly useful.

On iOS:

If you use Google Maps, adjust your location setting to "While Using" the app; this will prevent the app from accessing your location when it's not active. Go to Settings - Privacy - Location Services and from there select Google Maps to make the adjustment.

In the Safari web browser, consider using a search engine other than Google. Under Settings - Safari - Search Engine, you can find other options like Bing or DuckDuckGo. You can turn location off while browsing by going to Settings - Privacy - Location Services - Safari Websites, and turn this to "Never." (This still won't prevent advertisers from knowing your rough location based on IP address on any website.)

You can also turn Location Services off to the device almost completely from Settings - Privacy - Location Services. Both Google Maps and Apple Maps will still work, but they won't know where you are on the map and won't be able to give you directions. Emergency responders will still be able to find you if the need arises.

On Android:

Under the main settings icon click on "Security & location." Scroll down to the "Privacy" heading. Tap "Location." You can toggle it off for the entire device.

Use "App-level permissions" to turn off access to various apps. Unlike the iPhone, there is no setting for "While Using." You cannot turn off Google Play services, which supplies your location to other apps if you leave that service on.

Sign in as a "guest" on your Android device by swiping down from the top and tapping the downward-facing caret, then again on the torso icon. Be aware of which services you sign in on, like Chrome.

You can also change search engines even in Chrome.

To delete past location tracking

For any device:

On the page myactivity.google.com , look for any entry that has a location pin icon beside the word "details." Clicking on that pops up a window that includes a link that sometimes says "From your current location." Clicking on it will open Google Maps, which will display where you were at the time.

You can delete it from this popup by clicking on the navigation icon with the three stacked dots and then "Delete."

Some items will be grouped in unexpected places, such as topic names, google.com, Search, or Maps. You have to delete them item by item. You can wholesale delete all items in date ranges or by service but will end up taking out more than just location markers.

Categorized in How to

Source: This article was Published legalreader.com By Olivia Ryan - Contributed by Member: Barbara Larson

Can you imagine life without Google or spending more than a few seconds searching for any information? I bet you can’t because it’s a privilege that makes your life much easier and more comfortable. But there is a big problem with search engines – they damage privacy and it becomes an issue.

It’s almost impossible to protect personal data since everybody is collecting information these days. For instance, Facebook recently announced that it can track even non-users when they visit a site or app that uses their services.

In such circumstances, it is crucial to understand how search engines function and what they do with your personal data. This post will explain to you how things work in this field.

How Search Engines Collect Data

Search engines possess every user’s browsing history. It may not sound like much, but let’s see what it really means in case of the biggest player on the search engine market, Google.

This company collects all sorts of user-related data, but it can be divided into three basic sections:

  • Things you do. Google monitors every action you take online, including search queries, websites you visit, videos you watch, ads that you click on or tap, your location, device information, and IP address and cookie data.
  • Things that you create. This section consists of emails you send and receive on Gmail, contacts that you add, calendar events, and photos or videos that you upload. Besides that, it holds documents, sheets, and slides on Drive.
  • Things about you. These are essentially personal information such as your name, email address and password, date of birth, gender, telephone number, and location.

It’s a short list of data mining units, but it obviously consists of everything you’ve ever done online. Unless you’ve been living in a cave for the last couple of decades, Google knows a lot about you and uses this information to provide you with tailored online experience.

Why Search Engines Accumulate Personal Information

The more you know about users, the easier you can approach them. Search engines know this very well and so they collect personal information to enhance their services. First of all, they do it to improve website ranking.

According to SEO specialists at aussiewritings.com, Google analyzes user behavior and learns how people react to online content, which helps this company to upgrade search engine algorithms. As the result, only the best and most popular websites can make it to the first page in search results.

Secondly, Google can serve you personalized ads because it knows what you do, feels, and like. It can put things into perspective and display the right advertisement at just about the right time. That way, Google drastically improves the effectiveness of digital advertising.

How Does It Jeopardize Privacy?

With so much information hovering around the Internet, it is reasonable to assume that security breaches will happen from time to time. Identity theft is one of the biggest concerns because it’s getting easier to find someone’s personal information online and use it to steal their money.

Most websites ask you to leave your name, email, and birthday. Although it seems like nothing more than useless basic information, hackers can easily exploit it to access your bank account or any other digital property for that matter.

At the same time, continuous data accumulation also means humans are being treated primarily as consumers. You can’t hide from search engines – they will always find you and serve you customized ads.

If you are a 30-year-old mother, they will offer you baby clothing. If you are a high school boy, they will suggest you buy video games. In each case, there is no way to hide from search engines and that’s something that scares us all.

Final Thoughts

Search engines damage privacy and it becomes an issue because there is no way to protect yourself completely. Google and other platforms use personal information to improve user experience and customize advertising, but it comes with a cost.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published thehayride.com By Bethany Blankley - Contributed by Member: Alex Grey

DuckDuckGo is a search engine that doesn’t track its users and offers a level of privacy– for free– that hasn’t existed on the Internet because of Google.

Gabriel Weinberg, CEO & Founder at DuckDuckGo gives 10 reasons why DuckDuckGo is a better, safer service for users. Below are five:

DuckDuckGo doesn’t track its users. Google does.

All of a user’s personal information: medical, financial and anything else should be private, but on Google, it’s not. On Google, your searches are tracked, mined, and packaged up into a data profile for advertisers to follow you around the Internet.”

Weinberg says, “To keep your searches private and out of data profiles, the government, and other legal requests, you need to use DuckDuckGo. We don’t track you at all, regardless of what browsing mode you are in. Each time you search on DuckDuckGo, it’s as if you’ve never been there before.”

DuckDuckGo blocks Google trackers lurking everywhere.

Google tracks users on more than just their search engine. They track everyone on YouTube, Gmail, Chrome, Android, Gmaps, and all the other services they run.
Private alternatives like DuckDuckGo can enable people to live Google-free. Google trackers lurk behind the scenes on 75% of the top million websites. Facebook is the next closest with 25%.

DuckDuckGo provides unbiased search results.

Weinberg notes that when people google information they expect to find unbiased results, but that’s not what they get. On Google, results are tailored to what Google thinks the user is likely to click on, based on the data profile its built on each user over time from tracking everything everyone does online.

Users can search without fear.

“When people know they are being watched, they change their behavior” Weinberg notes. Called the chilling effect, an MIT study found that people began searching less online after Snowden revealed they were being watched. People became afraid that their personal medical issues might be publicized. It reported:

“Suppressing health information searches potentially harms the health of search engine users and… In general, our results suggest that there is a chilling effect on search behavior from government surveillance on the Internet.”

Weinberg says, “Your searches are your business, and you should feel free to search whatever you want, whenever you want. You can easily escape this chilling effect on DuckDuckGo where you are anonymous.”

Google is simply too big, and too powerful.

Weinberg notes that Google is a monopoly, with a market cap of at least $750 billion (at the time of writing) with at least 75,000 employees that dominate search, browsing, online advertising, and more. Its tentacles are in everything tech, online and offline Weinberg warns.

Because of their size, their influence on politics is disproportionate. Last year Google outspent every other company lobbying in Washington, D.C.

DuckDuckGo is a team of 45 worldwide. Its focus is narrow: helping people take control of their personal information online. “The world could use more competition, less focus on ad tracking, fewer eggs in one basket,” Weinberg says.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: Clara Johnson

Some SEOs are seeing more fluctuations with the Google rankings now, but Google has confirmed the August 1 update has been fully rolled out.

Google has just confirmed that the core search algorithm update that began rolling out a week ago has now finished fully rolling out. Google search liaison Danny Sullivan said on Twitter, “It’s done” when I asked him if the rollout was complete.

Danny did add that if we are seeing other changes, “We always have changes that happen, both broad and more specific.” This is because some of the tracking tools are seeing more fluctuations today, and if they are unrelated to this update, the question is what they can be attributed to.

Here is Danny’s tweet:

@dannysullivan is the rollout of the core update complete? Seeing fluctuations today.

It's done. That said, we always have changes that happen, both broad and more specific.

Based on our research, the August 1 update was one of the more significant updates we have seen from Google on the organic search side in some time. It continued to roll out over the weekend and has now completed.

Google’s current advice on this update is that webmasters do not need to make any technical changes to their websites. In fact, the company said, “no fix” is required and that it is aimed at promoting sites that were once undervalued. Google has said that you should continue to look at ways of making your overall website better and provide even better-quality content and experiences to your website visitors.

Now that the rollout is complete, you can check to see if your site was impacted. But as Danny Sullivan said above, there are always changes happening in search.

 

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published techworm.net By DION DASSANAYAKE - Contributed by Member: Logan Hochstetler

GOOGLE Chrome users can now download a new update which could make surfing the web on the market-leading browser faster than ever before.

Google Chrome is undoubtedly the world’s most popular browser - and it doesn’t look like it will be giving up that crown anytime soon.

Latest figures from NetMarketShare analyzing web browser usage for the first seven months of 2018 put Google Chrome in a hugely commanding lead.

Their stats give Google Chrome a massive 62.43 percent slice of the web browser market.

Chrome’s nearest rival, Internet Explorer, languishes behind on 11.90 percent with Firefox is not far off on 10.30 percent.

Microsoft’s newer Edge browser, which is bundled in with Windows 10, has just a 4.38 percent share of the web browser market.

But despite having such a huge lead over the competition, Google isn’t resting on its laurels.

The search engine giant has just pushed out an update for Google Chrome which could make web browsing faster than ever before.

Chrome version 68 was rolled out recently and brings with it a number of improvements to the browser.

And one of the update’s most eye-catching features was revealed by a programmer working on Chrome.

The new feature, revealed by Philip Walton, is called Page Lifecycle API.

But while it doesn’t have the catchiest of names, the update could bring a big performance improvement to Chrome users.

The new feature helps with RAM usage, suspending web pages which Chrome is not using so the browser doesn’t take up memory unnecessarily.

On Twitter, the Google engineer posted: “I just published a massive article on the new Page Lifecycle API, which allows browsers to better manage resources if you have a zillion tabs open!

“It's full advice + best practices that's the result of months of research & cross-browser testing”.

Google Chrome extensions explained

In a post online, Walton added: “Modern browsers today will sometimes suspend pages or discard them entirely when system resources are constrained.

“In the future, browsers want to do this proactively, so they consume less power and memory.

“The Page Lifecycle API, shipping in Chrome 68, provides lifecycle hooks so your pages can safely handle these browser interventions without affecting the user experience.”

The catch, however, is that web developers have to enable this as well on their end for Google Chrome to help free up RAM resources.

In other Chrome news, Express.co.uk recently reported on how the browser has been given a hidden new redesign.

However, it is only available to users that navigate through some simple tricks.

Google has been busy at work on the huge new look for Chrome and now iPhone users can get their hands on an early version.

Chrome has now moved the tab button to the bottom of the screen in addition to the forward and back buttons on the iOS app.

Google Chrome

Google Chrome - Latest update includes the feature to help free-up RAM (Image: GOOGLE)

A search feature also sits in the middle of the two for quick Google queries.

While the top of the screen stays mostly clear when browsing and is only disrupted to bring down the URL bar.

And Incognito mode is easily accessed from the top of the tab page while a large blue button exists at the bottom to open a new web page.

Apple users need to head to a special URL to access the redesign.

If you’re wondering how to access the new look Chrome on your iPhone then click here.

Categorized in Search Engine

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