Source: This article was Published computerworld.com By Mike Elgan - Contributed by Member: Dorothy Allen

If you think a search engine exists as an index to the internet, it’s time to update your thinking.

This column is not about politics. It makes no political judgments and takes no political positions. No, really! Stay with me here.

President Trump this week slammed Google, claiming that the company “rigged” Google News Search results to favor stories and news organizations critical of the president.

To drive home his claim about bias, Trump posted a video on Twitter this week with the hashtag #StopTheBias (which, at the time I wrote this, had 4.36 million views), claiming that Google promoted President Barack Obama’s State of the Union addresses, but stopped the practice when Trump took office.

In a statement issued to the press, a Google spokesperson said that the company did not promote on its homepage either Obama’s or Trump’s first “State of the Union” addresses because technically they are considered mere “addresses to a joint session” of Congress, the idea being that brand-new presidents are not in a position to reveal the “state of the nation.” Google also claimed that it did promote Trump’s second and most recent State of the Union, a claim that screenshots found on social media and pages captured by the site Wayback Machine appear to confirm.

The facts around this incident are being funneled into ongoing, rancorous online political debates, which, in my opinion, isn’t particularly interesting.

What is interesting is the Big Question this conflict brings to the surface.

What is a search engine?

A search engine can be four things.

  • An index to the internet

When Google first launched its search engine in 1996, it was clear what a search engine was: an index of the internet.

Google’s killer innovation was its ability to rank pages in a way that was supposed to reflect the relative relevance or importance of each result.

Both the results and the ranking were supposed to be a reflection or a snapshot of the internet itself, not an index to the information out there in the real world.

  • An arbiter of what’s true

In this view, Google Search would favor information that’s objectively true and de-emphasize links to content that’s objectively untrue.

  • An objective source of information

The objective source idea is that Google makes an attempt to present all sides of contentious issues and all sources of information, without favoring any ideas or sources.

  • A customized, personalized source of information

The personalized source concept says that a search engine gives each user a different set of results based on what that user wants regardless of what’s true, what’s happening on the internet or any other factor.

This is all pretty abstract, so here’s a clarifying thought experiment.

When someone searches Google to find out the shape of the Earth, how should Google approach that query? It depends on what Google believes a search engine is.

(Note that it’s likely that flat-Earth proponents generate, link to and chatter about the idea that the Earth is flat more than people who believe it’s spherical. Let’s assume for the sake of argument that, objectively, the content and activity on the actual internet favors the flat-Earth idea.)

If a search engine is supposed to be an index to the internet, then search results for the shape of the Earth should favor the flat-Earth idea.

If a search engine is supposed to be an arbiter of what’s true, then search results should favor the spherical-Earth idea.

If a search engine is supposed to be an objective source of information, then search results should provide a balanced result that equally represents both flat- and spherical-Earth theories.

And if a search engine is supposed to be a customized, personalized source of information, then the results should favor either the flat-Earth idea or the spherical-Earth idea, depending on who is doing the searching.

I use the shape of the Earth as a proxy or stand-in for the real search results people are conducting.

For example, searches for your company, product, brand or even yourself are still subject to the same confusion over what a search engine is supposed to be.

When your customers, prospective business partners, employees or future prospective employees and others search for information about your organization, what results should they get? Should those results reflect what’s “true,” what’s false but popular, or what’s neutral between the two? Or should it depend on who’s doing the searching?

The truth is that Google tries to make Google Search all four of these things at the same time.

Adding to the complexity of the problem is the fact that search engine results are governed by algorithms, which are trade secrets that are constantly changing.

If you were to ask people, I suspect that most would say that Google Search should be Model No. 1 — an index to the internet — and not get involved in deciding what’s true, what’s false or what’s the answer the user wants to hear.

And yet the world increasingly demands that Google embrace Model No. 2 — to be an arbiter of what’s true.

Governments won’t tolerate an accurate index

Trump has claimed repeatedly that, in general, news media coverage is biased against him. If that’s true, and if Google News Search was a passive index of what the media is actually reporting, wouldn’t it be reasonable for Trump to expect anti-Trump coverage on Google News Search?

By slamming Google News Search as “rigged,” Trump appears to reveal an expectation that Google News should reflect what’s happening in the real world as he sees it, rather than what’s happening on news media websites.

Or it reveals that regardless of the weight of activity in favor of news sources Trump believes are biased against him, Google News Search should provide a balanced and neutral representation of all opinions and sources equally.

The rejection of the search-engine-as-internet-index model is common among governments and political leaders worldwide.

One famous example is the “right to be forgotten” idea, which has been put into practice as law in both the European Union and Argentina. The idea is that information on the internet can unfairly stigmatize a person, and citizens have the right for that information to be “forgotten,” which is to say made non-existent in search engine results.

Let’s say, for example, that a prominent person files for bankruptcy, and that 100 news sites and blogs on the internet record the fact. Twenty years later, well after the person has restored financial solvency, the old information is still available and findable via search engines, causing unfounded stigmatization.

A successful right-to-be-forgotten petition can remove reference to those pages from search results. The pages still exist, but the search engines don’t link to them when anyone searches for the person’s name.

The advocates of right-to-be-forgotten laws clearly believe that a search engine exists to reflect the real world as it is, or as it should be, and does not exist to reflect the internet as it is.

Google was recently caught in a controversy over an assumed return to the Chinese market with a custom China-only search engine that censors internet content in the same way that domestic sites are required to by the Chinese government. Hundreds of Google employees signed a letter in protest.

Google wants to “return” to the Chinese market. The Chinese government would not allow Google to operate a search engine accessible to Chinese citizens that accurately reflected what’s actually on the internet.

The examples go on and on.

What governments tend to have in common is that in political circles, it’s very difficult to find people advocating for the index-to-the-internet conception of what a search engine should be.

Why the search-engine-as-index idea is dead

Google’s self-stated mission is to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

Nebulous, yes. But for the purposes of this column, it’s telling that Google says that its mission is to organize, not the internet’s information, but the “world’s.”

The reality is that people search Google Search and other search engines because they want information about the world, not because they want information about what the internet collectively “thinks.”

And, in any event, the point is growing moot.

What the internet “thinks” is increasingly being gamed and manipulated by propagandists, bots, fake news, trolls, conspiracy theorists, and hackers.

Accurately reflecting all this manipulated information in search engines is valuable only to the manipulators.

Also: With each passing day, more information “searching” is happening via virtual assistants such as Google Assistant, Siri, Cortana, and Alexa.

In other words, virtual assistants are becoming the new search engines.

With augmented reality glasses and other highly mobile sources of information, search engines such as Google will have to increasingly become arbiters of what’s true, or supposed to be true, because the public will increasingly demand a single answer for its questions.

That’s why the old initiatives for your company’s presence on the internet — SEO, marketing, social media strategy and all the rest — have new urgency.

With each passing day, search engines exist less to index the internet and more to decide for us all what’s “true” and what’s “not true.”

It’s time to redouble your efforts to make sure that what Google thinks is true about your company really is true.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published gizmodo.com By Brent Rose - Contributed by Member: Deborah Tannen

So, Chrome is ten years old. Officially in the double-digits. Soon it’ll be getting wispy chin-hairs and its voice will be cracking. That said, Google’s browser has accomplished a lot in the ten years that it’s been around. It went from a latecomer in the Browser Wars, with just a 1-percent market share early on launch, and now it’s the most-used browser in the world, with around 60-percent market share. We thought we’d take a look back at the few of the ways it became so dominant.

The Omnibox.png

1. The Omnibox

Children, you will not believe it, but once in web browsers, there was a field for entering the web address and a very different field for the search! Can you believe that? What a bunch of dirty animals we were then. However, when Chrome launched in 2008, it really tried to emphasize a "clean, simple, and efficient interface," and one of the options was to combine the URL box and the search box into one. Suddenly, users could enter a web address or simply switch off the search terms in the same place. It has saved a lot of clicks from the start and has only been improved by additional auto-complete capabilities. It's even able to answer questions and solve math problems before pressing Enter. "The Omnibox handles more than just URLs," Google said in its comic announcement to the world. "It also offers suggestions for search queries, top pages you've visited before, pages you've not visited yet but are popular, and more … you'll have a full-text search of your history You will not have to bookmark this page for digital cameras, just enter "digital camera" and quickly come back to it. "Ten years later, and it's amazing how much I still rely on these features, It's worth noting that all of this information went back to Google by default, but you could use other search engines (Yahoo, Ask, etc.) if you wanted.

2. Incognito mode

Google did not invent the concept of private (or more private) surfing. Apple's Safari actually had a privacy mode before Chrome, but that just shows what a good name can do. Incognito mode has become one of the Q tips of … well, there's a reason why some people still refer to it as a "porn mode". However, it can be used for much more, including checking out websites and profiles through the eyes of an anonymous third party or getting around the paywalls of news organizations.

3rd speed

You may forget that the biggest initial benefit of Chrome was not just that it was fast, but also that stupid fast, Thanks to very intelligent programming, Google claimed that Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine could work ten times faster than Safari or Firefox, and approximately 56 times faster than Microsoft's IE7 (then the dominant browser). This kind of speed paved the way for better in-browser applications like email, calendars and spreadsheets, which of course Google would do

Speed.jpg

4. Each tab is a separate process

This is one of those situations that you take away. Chrome has taken the revolutionary approach of making every open tab its own process. This meant that if a website had a berth code that would simply crash one tab and the other 19 open tabs would stay quiet and function normally. As a result, fewer browsers were completely reset, and as long as your computer had sufficient RAM, each tab was much less prone to delays than other browsers at the time. The other side of this coin is that Chrome can make a metric shit sound out of your computer's memory, especially if you tend to have many tabs open at the same time as I am. In the last few years, much has been done in favor of Google to minimize the amount of background tabs that can impact your system and battery life, but there are still many rivers crossing at this front. Other browsers, such as For example, Opera now has this approach, "Every tab is a process," but most are based on the open source Chromium architecture.

5. Make the web less annoying

It's easy to say how much the web sucks today, but the truth is that it used to suck a lot worse. How do you remember videos that automatically hunted stupidities into your eardrum for 30 seconds before you even found out which tab they came from? Chrome has set it up to mute these videos by default for an entire domain. Or how about extremely annoying popup and banner ads? Maybe fake play buttons that have taken you to a sketchy website? Google gave the sites 30 days to settle for a set of web standards. If it did not, Chrome automatically blocked the offensive content. In this way, 60 percent market share can choose to use their influence to get people to change their evil ways.

os.jpg

6. It is the first browser to become an operating system

What is the claim to fame? This small web browser became the basis for a whole operating system. Firefox, IE, Safari, Opera … none of them can claim the same. It is not an insignificant operating system either. Chrome OS runs Chromebooks, which account for approximately 60 percent of all mobile devices shipped to K-12 schools in the United States (as of Q4 2017). This will be a first computer experience for many of these children at a very formative time in their lives. Whether this will pay off for Google, remains to be seen.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published phys.org By Marc Saltzman - Contributed by Member: Issac Avila

Whether you already own one or have thought about it, you probably know Google Home ($129) is one of those popular voice-activated personal assistants for the home.

After saying the wake words "OK, Google" (or "Hey Google"), ask a question or give a command, and you'll hear a human-like female voice respond from its clear speaker—whether you want to hear a specific song, set a timer for the oven, or control your smart devices in your home (such as a Wi-Fi-enabled thermostat).

But you already know all this, you say?

The following is a handful of lesser-known Google Home features, including a few tips and tricks, and hidden Easter Eggs.

Google Home can help you remember where you left things. Say something like "Ok Google, remember my passport is in the top drawer." When you need it in the future, ask "OK Google, where's my passport?" and it will tell you where it is, and what date you asked it to remind you.

Funny sounds. Want to entertain the kids? Google Home can play you recordings of animal noises and vehicle sounds. For example, ask what a horse or train sounds like. Google will sing for you, too! Simply say "Hey Google, sing a song" or "OK Google, serenade me," and you'll hear the assistant belt out a ditty. Ask it to do it again and it'll likely be a different tune. You can also ask it to drop a beat if you want to rap on top: say "OK Google, beatbox."

Play that song. Speaking of music, Google Home will find a song for you—even if you don't know the title. For example, say "Ok Google, play that song that says 'passionate from miles away'" and it will play Drake's Passionfruit. Your personal assistant can also be an instrument tuner; if you have a guitar on your lap, say "Hey Google, start an instrument tuner" and it will ask what musical note you want to hear.

Get flight prices ASAP. Say something like "OK Google, how much does it cost to fly from Los Angeles to New York today, returning Monday?" and you'll hear the lowest roundtrip cost. It can keep track of the cheapest flights for those dates and even email you a summary to your Gmail account.

Play games with Google Home. Say "OK Google, Mad Libs" ("the world's greatest word game") or "Hey Google, play Lucky Trivia." Expect more games to be added over time.

Personalize. You might've heard Google Home can detect different voices in your home. Therefore, if you ask how long it'll take to get to the office this morning, you'll hear a different response than if your partner asks the same question.

Shortcuts. Did you know you can create custom shortcuts for long phrases you commonly ask? For example, instead of "Hey Google, turn off all the lights in the house," you can say something like "OK Google, good night." To create a shortcut, open the Google Home app on your smartphone, enter Settings, and you'll see "Shortcuts" under "More" settings.

Google Home helps with homework. You can ask math questions ("OK Google, what's the square root of 729?"), get history help ("OK Google, who founded the United States?") or learn geography facts ("OK Google, what's the capital of India?"). You can even ask how to spell something, such as "OK Google, how do you spell 'emancipation'?" Try something trickier like "OK Google, what's 'quantum theory'?" or "Ok Google, search for monkey facts."

Weather forecasts. You likely know you can ask for weather information, but you can also for multi-day forecasts, too, in any city. For example, say "OK Google, "what will the weather be like over the next 5 days in Kingston, Jamaica?"

Voice volume. You can adjust Google Home's volume by swiping your finger on top of the unit, but you can also use your voice to change volume. Say something like "OK Google, volume at 50%," if you're not near the speaker.

Random. Google Home has a Magic 8-ball, of sorts. Say "OK Google, Crystal Ball" and ask a yes or no question.

Get organized. Google Home lets you access your calendar by simply asking for info like "OK Google, what meetings do I have today?" But you can also add events to your calendar using Google Home, too, such as asking "Ok Google, add dinner with Kellie tomorrow at 8 PM to my calendar."

My day. When you wake up, say "OK Google, tell me about my day," and you'll hear the date and time, weather, calendar events, and news. You can also change where you get your news from by opening the Google Home app and selecting desired sources.

Jetsons skills. If you own a Roomba, you can now initiate the vacuum cleaner using your voice. After you pair your Roomba with Google Home, say "Ok Google, ask Roomba to start cleaning." The future is here!

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published irishtechnews.ie By Sujain Thomas - Contributed by Member: Carol R. Venuti

Well, Google does not know you personally, so there is no reason to hate you. If you are writing and still not getting that first ranking on the page of the search engine, it means something is not right from your side.  First of all, let’s just get some ideas straight. How do you think search engine ranking is effective a web page? Being in the few lines of code will not always determine whether the page is capable enough to be placed on the first page of the search engine. Search engines are always on the lookout for signals to rank any page. So, it is easier for you to tweak an article and give those signals to search engines for enjoying a huge round of traffic.

Starting with the primary point:

To get that huge round of audience, you need to start with keyword research. It is one such topic which every blogger might have covered at least once. They need to work on that from the very first day of their blogging life. Every SEO blog or blogger might have used Google Keyword Planner for sure. You might have heard of it, because if you haven’t then you are missing out on a lot of things for your massive business growth.

More on Google Keyword Planner:

There are so many types of keyword research tools available in the market but Google Keyword Planner is at the top of the list. It is also one of the major keyword spy tool names you will come across recently. Google Keyword Planner is an official item from Google, offering you a traffic estimation of targeted keywords. It further helps users to find some of the related and relevant KWs for matching your niche. There are some important points you need to know about Google Keyword Planner before you can actually start using it.

  • For using this Google Keyword Planner tool, you need to register your name with Google and have an AdWords account. The tool is free of cost and you don’t have to spend a single penny on using this item. You have every right to create an AdWords tool using some simple steps and get to use it immediately.
  • If you want, you can clearly search for the current Google AdWords coupons, which will help you to create one free account for your own use. It will help you to use the Google Keyword Planner tool on an immediate count for sure.
  • The main target of this tool is towards AdWords advertisers. On the other hand, it is able to provide some amazing deals of information when it is time to find the right keyword for the blog and the relevant articles to your business.

Log online and get a clear idea on how the homepage of this tool from Google looks like. You just have to enter the target keyword in the given search bar and start your search results quite immediately.  Later, you can add filters if you want to.

Categorized in Online Research

Source: This article was Published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: Rebecca Jenkins

Remember the early days of "not provided"? Well, Google Search Console has begun removing some query data for "privacy" reasons.

Google has quietly posted that they are now removing query data from the Google Search Console reports that they identify as “anonymous queries.” Google said, “an anonymous query is a query submitted only a few users.” Google added that they “omit these queries from results to protect user privacy.”

Google said the amount of queries removed depend on the site, Google said: “some sites will have very few unique queries; other sites will have a large proportion of anonymous queries.”

Google wrote on the page:

Chart totals no longer include anonymous* (rare) queries when you apply a query filter. Previously, the chart totals included all anonymous queries when a “Queries not containing:” filter was applied. Because of this, you might see a drop in clicks and impressions when adding a filter that excludes specific queries. We believe that omitting anonymous queries from all query-filtered results is more consistent.

Back in 2011, Google removed query data from their reports when they began moving Google search results to HTTPS. When Google made this move, it was about protecting user’s privacy to disallow people from sniffing Google’s searches. But Google told webmasters that they will be able to get all this data securely in Google Search Console. Now, with this change, Google is now also removing some query data from Google Search Console as well.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published hackercombat.com By Julia Sowells - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

When we have to search for something on the Internet, our mind by default goes to Google or Bing. Obviously, our mind is tuned that way, and we get the results we seek. But how often do we consider that the information we are really looking for might be available on the deep web?

The major search engine keeps meticulous details of our movement on the Internet. Well, if you don’t want Google to know about your online searches and activities, it is best to keep anonymity.

Now, what about those huge databases of content lying in the repository of ‘Invisible Web’ popularly known as the ‘Deep Web’ where the general crawlers are not able to reach? How do you get them?

Deep web content is believed to be about 500 times bigger than normal search content, and it mostly goes unnoticed by regular search engines. When you look at the typical search engine, it performs a generic search. For example, there are huge personal profiles, and records of people related documents on static websites, and this high-quality content is invisible to the search engines.

Why is a Deep Web search not available from Google?

The primary reason Google doesn’t provide deep web content is that this content doesn’t index in the regular search engines. Hence, these search engines will not show results, or crawl to a document or file which is unindexed by the world wide web. The content lies behind the HTML forms. Regular search engines crawl, and the searches are derived from interconnected servers.

Interconnected servers mean you are regularly interacting with the source, but when it comes to the dark web this does not happen. Everything is behind the veil and stays hidden internally on the Tor network; which ensures security and privacy.

Only 4 percent of Internet content is visible to the general public, and the other 96 percent is hidden behind the deep web.

Now, the reason Google is not picking up these data, or why deep web content does not get indexed is not a hidden secret. It is mainly that these businesses are either illegal or bad for the society at large. The content can be of things like porn, drugs, weapons, military information, hacking tools, etc.

Robots Exclusion

The robot.txt that we normally use is to tell the website which of the files it should record and register that is to be indexed.

Now we have a terminology called ‘robots Exclusion files’. Web administrators will tweak the setup in a way that certain pages will not show up for indexing, and will remain hidden when the crawlers search.

Let’s look at some of the crawlers that go deep into the internet.

List of Best Deep Web Search Engines of 2017
  • Pipl
  • MyLife
  • Yippy 
  • SurfWax 
  • Wayback machine 
  • Google Scholar 
  • DuckDuckGo 
  • Fazzle 
  • Not Evil 
  • Start Page

Pipl

This is one of the search engines that will help you dig deep and get the results which may be missing on Google and Bing. Pipl robots interact with searchable databases and extract facts, contact details and other relevant information from personal profiles, member directories, scientific publications, court records and numerous other deep-web sources.

Pipl

Pipl works by extracting files as it communicates with the searchable database. It attempts to get information pertaining to search queries from personal profiles and member directories, which can be highly sensitive. Pipl has the ability to deeply penetrate and get the information the user seeks. They use advanced ranking algorithms and language analysis to get you the results closest to your keyword.

MyLife

Mylife engine can get you the details of a person, viz-a-viz personal data, and profiles, age, occupation, residence, contact details etc. It also includes pictures and other relevant histories of the person latest trip and other surveys if conducted. What’s more, you can rate individuals based on the profile and information.

mylife

Almost everyone above 18-years-old in the United States has a profile on the Internet, so one can expect more than 200 million profiles with rich data on Mylife searches.

Yippy

Yippy in fact a Metasearch Engine (it gets its outcomes by utilizing other web indexes), I’ve included Yippy here as it has a place with an entryway of devices a web client might be occupied with, for example, such as email, games, videos and so on.

Yippy

The best thing about Yippy is that they don’t store information of the users like Google does. It is a Metasearch Engine, and it is dependent on other web indexes to show its results.

Yippy may not be a good search engine for people who are used to Google because this engine searches the web differently. If you search “marijuana,” for example, it will bring up results that will read ‘the effects of marijuana,” rather than a Wikipedia page and news stories. So it’s a pretty useful website that can be good for people who want their wards to know what is really required and not the other way round.

SurfWax

SurfWax is a subscription-based search engine. It has a bunch of features apart from contemporary search habits. According to the website, the name SurfWax arose because “On waves, surf wax helps surfers grip their surfboard; for Web surfing, SurfWax helps you get the best grip on information — providing the ‘best use’ of relevant search results.” SurfWax is able to integrate relevant search based with key finding elements for an effective search result.

SurfWax

Wayback machine

This engine gives you enormous access to the URL information. It is the front-end of the Internet Archive of open web pages. Internet Archive allows the public to post their digital documents, which can be downloaded to its data cluster. The majority of the data is collected by the web crawlers of Wayback machines automatically. The primary intention of this is to preserve public web information.

Wayback Machine

Google Scholar

Another Google search engine, but quite different from its prime engine, Google Scholar scans for a wide range of academic literature. The search results draw from university repositories, online journals, and other related web sources.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar helps researchers find sources that exist on the internet. You can customize your search results to a particular field of interest, region, or institution, for example, ‘psychology, Harvard University.’ This will give you access to relevant documents.

DuckDuckGo

Unlike Google, this search engine does not track your activities, which is the first good thing about it. This has a clean UI and it is simple and yes, it has the ability to deep search the internet.

DuckDuckGo

Having said that you can customize the searches, and even enhance them according to the results and satisfaction. The search engines believe in quality and not quantity. The emphasis is on the best results. It does this from over 500 independent sources, including Google, Yahoo, Bing, and all the other popular search engines.

Fazzle

Accessible in English, French, and Dutch, this is a meta web index engine. It is designed to get quick results. The query items include Images, Documents, Video, Audio, and Shopping, Whitepaper and more.

Fazzle

Fazzle list most of the items that may look like promotion, and like to know meta web indexes available, this search engine does not cover supported a connection in searches. So it looks like the first search results on any keyword could likely be a promotion. Nevertheless, among all the Deep Web Fazzle stands apart when it comes to giving you the best pick on searches.

Not Evil

The not for profit ‘not Evil’ search engines entirely survives on contribution, and it seems to be getting a fair share of support. Highly reliable in the search results, this SE has a functionality that is highly competitive in the TOR network.

Not Evil

There is no advertising or tracking, and due to the thoughtful and continuously updated algorithms of search, it is easy to find the necessary goods, content or information. Using not Evil, you can save a lot of time and keep total anonymity.

This search engine was formerly known as TorSearch.

Start Page

Startpage was made available in the year 2009. This name was chosen to make it easier for people to spell and remember.

Startpage.com and Ixquick.com are both the same and run by one company. It is a private search engine and offers the same level of protection.

Start Page

This is one of the best search engines when it comes to concealing privacy. Unlike popular search engines, Startpage.com does not record your IP and keeps your search history a secret.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published seroundtable.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: James Gill

Google announced that they will now begin automatically verifying some users in Google Search Console, which will open up access to Google Search Console to countless (I don't even know the figure, hundreds of thousands, millions?) of webmasters, site owners and more. In short, if you are a verified owner of a Google Analytics property, Google will automatically verify you for that same website in the Search Console.

This is very big news, probably not for most of you, since you all are on top of making sure the right people have access to Google Search Console. But this is very big news, in general, to get more people to access to Google Search Console. As I said at Search Engine Land "those with Google Search Console access will get emails and notifications of issues in their inboxes. These messages can include manual actions, hacks, WordPress and other CMS upgrade alerts, as well as other notifications - all aimed at helping you keep your website healthy, indexed and ranking." Yea, I quoted myself - sue me. But it is important, this opens up super important notifications and reports to many people who had no idea this tool existed.

Everyone knows about Google Analytics, it is a given. But Google Search Console - not so much. I know many SEOs who have been telling Google to auto-verify people this way and Google has finally done it. You no longer need to manually go and verify your site in Search Console, Google will do it automatically if you are the site owner in Google Analytics!

This is what it looks like when you get notified of being automatically verified. Sergei Ivanov posted on Twitter some screenshots.

This is the notification telling the site owner they are now verified because of the collaboration with Google Analytics:

Here is the notification in Google Search Console of this:

 

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published ifsecglobal.com By John Mason - Contributed by Member: Grace Irwin

Google voice search makes finding what you need even easier.

Just say “OK Google,” tell your phone or tablet what you want to find, and you’ll get results. Or use the microphone icon in your browser.

There’s even an official Chrome extension that combines voice search with Google Docs dictation, so you can type a document without touching a keyboard.

It’s really cool technology, but like most convenient tech, there are some tradeoffs.

In this case, the biggest trade-off is privacy. Voice search comes with some “features” that you might not be aware of, and privacy enthusiasts find those features a bit worrying. (Fortunately, you can mitigate them with a few clicks if you know where to look; we’ll get to that in a moment.)

First, let’s talk about how Google voice search is changing human-computer interaction.

Google Voice Search: The future of search

For years, Google has been making it easier to find the information you want on the internet. Extremely refined algorithms, sophisticated tracking and scoring, and integration with a variety of other services all remove barriers to getting great search results.

Voice search is an extension of that. If you can’t – or just don’t want to – type your query, all you need to do is speak it and Google will take a look. You can use it to search other search engines (like DuckDuckGo, which is much more privacy-focused), Wikipedia, YouTube, Wolfram Alpha, and a wide variety of other sites.

Google Assistant, a more powerful companion to simple voice search, will help you find photos, send text messages, keep your shopping list, and even order products.

It’s clear that Google is betting heavily on voice technology, and that it’s working. A 2018 survey by Stone Temple found that 16% of people prefer to use voice search over any other method.

And 60% used voice search at least some of the time. Users also took advantage of voice tech for sending texts, making calls, getting directions, and setting reminders.

Google stores every voice command that you’ve ever given your device

Why do so many prefer voice-enabled apps? Mostly because it saves time. Over 60% said that they use voice because it’s fast. But the fact that it’s accurate, doesn’t require typing, and results in an audio answer were mentioned, too.

The past few years have seen increased usage of voice search and other voice-enabled technologies, and it’s unlikely to slow down any time soon. Google is leading the way in making it easier for users to interact with their devices using their voice.

But this convenience has a cost that many people aren’t aware of: privacy.

Why privacy advocates are wary of Google Voice Search

Most people using Google’s voice products without much thought. They say “OK Google,” or hold down the home button on their device, and start talking. When they’re done with the search, they forget about it.

But Google doesn’t.

It stores every voice command that you’ve ever given your device, plus a few seconds of audio before you gave the command. Which means that Google is always listening through your phone. They might not be saving everything you say near the device, but they’re always listening.

And much of it is saved. In fact, you can see how much. Head to myactivity.google.com and you’ll see the data that Google has stored. If you’ve used voice search recently, you should be able to find a record of it and even listen to the stored audio.

It’s a little unnerving, hearing the things you said to your phone played back to you from your computer

It’s a little unnerving, hearing the things you said to your phone played back to you from your computer, and knowing that it’s coming from Google’s servers.

And, of course, we all know what Google does with your information that’s stored on its servers: analyzes it and uses it to serve you ads. That, combined with the fact that your phone is always listening and ready to record audio, has privacy enthusiasts worried.

What you can do to protect your privacy from Google Voice Search

The most obvious thing you can do to mitigate the privacy concerns of using Google voice search is to simply not use it. If you turn Google Assistant off, it won’t be listening, and it won’t be recording anything.

To turn it off, open Google Assistant, then tap the blue icon in the upper-right corner. Hit the three dots in the upper-right corner of the resulting screen and select Settings. Tap the name of your device, and move the slider for Google Assistant to the off position.

Of course, that means you won’t be able to use the full power voice search. And that’s inconvenient. But if you’re concerned about privacy, it might be worth it.

Especially because Google’s voice search capabilities may not work very well when you’re using a VPN. And using a high-quality, secure VPN is one of the most important things you can do to keep your mobile data safe.

If you want to keep using voice search, you can tell Google to stop recording and storing what you say. You can do this by going to myactivity.google.com, selecting Activity Controls from the sidebar menu, and scrolling down to Voice & Audio Activity. Click the slider to pause it.

This will prevent the storage of your voice searches and activity. That means Google won’t be using it to target ads . . . but it also means that it won’t be as good at recognizing your voice, have as much data for learning speech recognition, or learn things that might help it solve your problems.

But it’s a step in the right direction for privacy.

Weigh the options

Unfortunately, keeping your data secure means not getting as many benefits from Google’s voice-recognition technologies as you might otherwise. So you’ll have to weigh the pros and cons of privacy versus the convenience of Google voice search and similar services.

In an age when privacy is increasingly threatened, it’s easy to assume that all of your data will end up in Google’s hands anyway. But if you put up a bit of a fight, you just might be able to maintain a bit of control over your data.

Categorized in How to

Source: This article was Published technode.com By TIANYU FANG - Contributed by Member: Corey Parker

Since Google Search’s exit from China in 2010, homegrown tech giant Baidu has absorbed most of the Chinese search engine market, dominating over 70% of its market share. With rumors that Google is making a return and a state media commentary welcoming its re-entry, Baidu’s CEO Robin Li appears confident about defeating its past rival again; “If Google decides to return to China, we will fight and beat them again,” Li said in a WeChat post.

Many – including the 86% of participants in an internet poll who indicated their preference for Google over Baidu – would encourage Li to reconsider his statement. Even when the two search engines are subject to the same level of control, one could propose a handful of reasons to choose Google Search over Baidu: the Chinese tech giant’s innumerable copyright infringements, blatant disregard for user privacy, and equivocal ethical standards have constantly put it on the spotlight of public outcry.

Be that as it may, it is likely that Google will not beat Baidu in the search engine sector if it returns. Prior to Google’s exit in 2010, Baidu had a significantly larger market share than did its American rival. In China, user acquisition follows a different set of rules than the US, making the turf war between Google and Baidu not a competition between product qualities, but localized marketing strategies.

Long before $99 Xiaomi smartphones became ubiquitous nationwide, China’s internet industry heavily relied upon internet cafés, where many Chinese consumers from lower-tier cities first accessed the internet. The company paid internet café franchises to switch the default homepage of their browsers to Baidu, whereby increasing its visibilities and successfully reached China’s new internet users, as Quartz’s Josh Horwitz concluded.

What accompanied this marketing strategy was the success of Hao123.com, an online listings portal owned by Baidu with a search bar that redirects users to Baidu’s search results. While Google subsequently launched a similar service known as 265.com, Hao123.com’s expansion was way more “aggressive” – it was constantly accused of unauthorized hijackings of browser homepages, and many considered it malware. In fact, if one entered “Hao123” into Baidu’s search bar, “how to remove hao123” would appear in the dropdown list.

Google did not follow Baidu’s path to success for two reasons. First, the company had made little effort building its visibility in less developed regions. At the time when Baidu had built a sizable sales team of four thousand marketers, Google’s China branch had only a few hundred employees, primarily operated through third-party partnerships, and did not even build its own marketing team.

The second was the significant discrepancy between Baidu’s ethical standards and Google’s. The latter is known for its Code of Conduct – the noble motto “don’t be evil” being the most often quoted line – which heavily influenced the corporation’s decision-making. In 2008, the scene in China would be better characterized as “when Baidu went low, Google went high.” As China’s internet industry was back then largely ruled by the law of the jungle, Baidu chose to acquire users by taking advantage of gray areas in China’s legal system, such as offering illegal mp3 downloads.

Eight years later, many of these principles still hold true: as a significant part of its penetration strategy, Baidu expends more than 10% of its yearly revenue on mobile carriers and smartphone manufacturers, which in turn pre-install Baidu’s mobile apps on brand-new Android phones. An inattentive user intending to load one Baidu tool on a Windows laptop but forgets to unselect a hidden box in the corner may end up having five Baidu apps installed and default browser changed.

Baidu has seen its fair share of backlashes, but Chinese users have always had other alternatives, such as the Tencent-backed Sogou, the runner-up in China’s search engine market and a version of Bing has been operating in China for years. There is little chance that Google’s return will change the established scene in China’s search engine sector, although Google might have a better shot in more technically specialized areas: artificial intelligence, news aggregation, autonomous driving, and of course, advertising.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published voip.review By RUGILE BERTULE - Contributed by Member: James Gill

According to a recent report from The Intercept, Google is planning to relaunch its search engine in China, meeting all the Chinese government’s censorship requirements.

Back in 2010, the Internet giant withdrew its services from China due to strict censorship. Now Google is clawing its way back into the world’s largest Internet market, with a censored version of their search engine under the codename “Dragonfly”. The first platform to be developed is an Android app that is expected to be finalized in the upcoming six to nine months, claims The Intercept.

The appeal of 750 million Internet users would be quite tempting to anyone, yet this news about Google has been met with some negativity and may be considered as showing support for the totalitarian regime in China. “This has very serious implications not just for China, but for all of us, for freedom of information and Internet freedom. It will set a terrible precedent for many other companies who are still trying to do business in China while maintaining the principles of not succumbing to China’s censorship. The biggest search engine in the world obeying the censorship in China is a victory for the Chinese government – it sends a signal that nobody will bother to challenge the censorship anymore,” said Patrick Poon, a researcher for Amnesty International in his comment to The Intercept.

This renewed drive by Google is said to be initiated by Sundar Pichai, who started his position as CEO of the company in 2015. In 2016, Sundar openly expressed his intentions to return to the Chinese market, and recently the company rolled out their Files Go app and Guess the Sketch game for the WeChat application in China. Despite the lack of official announcement regarding this subject from Google, it is clear that the tech titan is on the way to expand its horizons in the massive Chinese market.

Categorized in Search Engine

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