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New rules that give the FCC more power to regulate the internet were upheld by a court Tuesday, marking a victory for the Obama administration over the major telecom companies. 
The rules, known in the industry as net neutrality, were put into effect a year ago by the Federal Communication Commission. They prohibit internet providers, such as Verizon (VZTech30),Comcast (CMCSA) and AT&T (TTech30), from charging for so-called fast lanes that could be used by content companies that use a great deal of bandwidth, such as Netflix (NFLXTech30),Google (GOOG) and Facebook (FBTech30).

"After a decade of debate and legal battles, today's ruling affirms the FCC's ability to enforce the strongest possible internet protections -- both on fixed and mobile networks -- that will ensure the internet remains open, now and in the future," said FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.

 

But the telecoms indicated this isn't the end of the legal battle.

"We have always expected this issue to be decided by the Supreme Court, and we look forward to participating in that appeal," said David McAtee, AT&T general counsel.

The FCC passed the rules in early 2015 on a party line vote, with three Democrats commissioners voting in favor and two Republican commissioners voting no.

"I continue to believe that these regulations are unlawful," said Ajit Pai, one of Rebublicans. "The FCC's regulations are unnecessary and counterproductive."

The Court of Appeals in Washington D.C. split 2-1 in its decision upholding the rule. The majority decision agreed with the FCC's stance that, without the rules, there would be "a threat to internet openness...that would ultimately inhibit the speed and extent of future broadband deployment."

But in his dissent, Judge Stephen Williams worried that the rules will make it harder for new or relatively small firms to compete. He worried that it will lead to a "incurable monopoly" in which broadband service will be dominated by today's large, established players.

Source  : http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/14/technology/net-neutrality-fcc-court-of-appeal/index.html

Categorized in Science & Tech

 

The tech titan wants to change the future of healthcare. But first, it needs to come up with a useful product.

 

Glucose-monitoring contact lenses for diabetics, wrist computers that read diagnostic nanoparticles injected in the blood stream, implantable devices that modify electrical signals that pass along nerves, medication robots, human augmentation, human brain simulation -- the list goes on.

That's not an inventory of improbable CGI effects from the latest sci-fi movie, it's a list of initiatives being tackled by Alphabet's (NASDAQ:GOOG)(NASDAQ:GOOGL) Google Life Sciences research unit, recently rebranded Verily.

For those who appreciate The Motley Fool's affection for William Shakespeare, "verily" is Shakespearean-era word that means "truly," or "confidently." As in: "I verily believe that sweater is the ugliest one I have ever seen."

Confidence certainly exemplifies Google. Verily was hatched from Google X, the company's secretive lab for oft-nutty projects, such as space elevators, teleportation, and hoverboards. Google X also launched Google Glass, which was undoubtedly a super-cool device, but wasn't received well by its intended market, to put it mildly.

With that kind of background, what are the chances Verily will unleash something that will change healthcare? Are good things about to flow? Or -- courtesy of the Bard of Avon -- is Verily merely a tale full of sound and fury, signifying nothing? Let's look at Verily's current financial situation and then check out the prospect of a marketable product that could move Google's needle.

A pound of flesh, but no blood


Like the moneylender in the Merchant of Venice, Verily demands a pound of flesh from its parent each quarter. Alphabet, Google's newfangled conglomerate, doesn't break out the performance of subsidiaries, but last quarter's earnings report offered a view into costs and output.

Verily is a subsidiary lumped under Other Bets with Google's broadband business and smart home company. Revenue from Other Bets doubled to $185 million from $74 million in the year-earlier period, and rose 11% sequentially. Costs also increased: Operating losses widened to $859 million from $660 million a year ago and moved up 7% from the previous quarter.

Despite the costs incurred, it's certainly not bleeding its parent dry. After all, Google has an almost endless supporting budget, and if any of Verily's projects pan out, what's being expended now will look like pocket change.

In addition, while some Verily ventures may seem frankly nuts, they might have actual potential. A recent joint venture with U.K. drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE:GSK) will use implants that create electrical pulses to help the body heal itself. The collaborators have agreed to spend up to $716 million over seven years, with GSK holding 55% of the joint venture and Verily 45%. It's a new field, called bioelectronic medicine. Despite the quasi-scientific sound of this endeavor, early studies reported in peer-reviewed journals have shown positive results in treating rheumatoid arthritis.

SanofiAbbVie, and Biogen have also teamed up with Verily over the past few years. Big pharma hopes to tap into Google's data analysis tools, as well as license Verily's miniaturized medical devices (after they are developed), to tackle various disease targets. In a slightly different kind of venture, Johnson & Johnson has inked a deal with Verily to develop medical robots.

The less you speak of your greatness, the more shall I think of it

None of these ventures have led to a useful product yet. Meanwhile, Verily has been skewered by multiple scientists for not critically assessing the actual potential behind its various moonshots. "One needs to balance how much these toys are used mostly for marketing and giving a sense of a company really working on something impressive -- the brave new world -- or if we're talking about something that will have clear and immediate clinical impact. The latter is very hard to imagine," said Dr. John Ioannidis, a professor of disease prevention at Stanford University, commenting on Verily's projects.

In the blink of an eye

In light of that, what about one of Verily's oldest initiatives? Looking back to 2012, the life sciences unit was originally developed to create "smart" contact lenses whose super-cool images were appearing all over the internet a scant two years ago. Designed to measure blood glucose levels, the lenses featured sensors and chips the size of flecks of glitter and a wireless antenna thinner than a human hair.

On the face of it, a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) lens seems to meet Ioannidis' criteria of having a "clear clinical impact." Better yet: it has an investable thesis. Verily and its big pharma partner Novartis (NYSE:NVS) are aiming straight at the $10 billion diabetes monitoring market. With this kind of market, the project was clearly capable of becoming a needle-moving revenue generator.

Look a little deeper, though, and the view is cloudier.

DexCom(NASDAQ:DXCM) Executive VP Steve Pacelli pointed out, "Lots of companies have tried and failed noninvasively to sense glucose in tears. You can measure glucose in tears, but the concentration is a lot lower, there's going to be huge time lag issues; the consistency of measurement is going to be a challenge."

There's a bigger problem. Both Dexcom and Medtronic(NYSE:MDT) have continuous glucose monitors on the market, but both face a major hurdle. The FDA does not consider continuous glucose monitoring -- from any device -- accurate enough to prescribe insulin dosing by itself. While CGM devices are being used, their market is very limited, since they are only allowed to be used as supplemental devices.

Google's CGM lens will face the same FDA hurdle -- assuming this product comes out of the lab.

The long and short of it

Apple, Microsoft, Intel -- virtually all the tech titans, in fact -- are now pursuing major initiatives in healthcare. A confluence of factors, such as digitization of records, machine intelligence, genetic engineering, and rapid advances in medical equipment, have made the field ripe for disruption from data-enabled, mobile-based, and miniaturized devices.

Even more enticing are the opportunities to massively grow revenue. The tech giants are billion-dollar companies, but healthcare spending is approaching $3 trillion annually in the U.S. alone. Looking globally, the World Health Organization estimates the annual expenditure at $6.5 trillion.

Bottom line: Despite the big carrot enticing it, Google has yet to come up with anything that can lay claim to changing healthcare. Although Alphabet could be a potentially interesting addition to your healthcare portfolio, it should be added with the understanding that there are many other pure-play companies with a much clearer path and investing thesis than Verily.

Still, let's allow Shakespeare to have the final word. While the bard makes an unlikely investment guru, he had plenty of useful things to say that have lasted through centuries, including: "Though this be madness, yet there is method to it."

In other words, it may be that hidden within Google's craziness lies the seed of something that could still astonish us. And no matter what, we can be sure of one thing: The ultimate search engine will keep grabbing headlines with its latest moonshots. After all, we're talking about Google.

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Source : http://www.fool.com/investing/2016/09/03/how-google-plans-to-reinvent-healthcare.aspx

 

Categorized in Search Engine

Google is always expanding and improving its search capabilities. From controlling the privacy of your searches to hearing what you're saying, the search engine's innovations are designed to help you find exactly what you need.

Of course, not everything you Google is going to be serious. There are searches you can perform purely for enjoyment. You can see some popular ones by clicking here! There are three new searches you can do that fall into this category.

From any desktop or mobile browser, Google "tic tac toe" or "tic-tac-toe." The results page will generate a playable tic-tac-toe board. You can challenge your friends or try to beat the computer. The game is set to medium difficulty by default.

The fun doesn’t stop there. Searching for "solitaire" returns a solitaire game with two degrees of difficulty. After you win, you can share your score on social media if you want. And make sure you check out this awesome download for 1,000 free solitaire games!

Finally, the old see-and-say is digitized in this last search. Searching "animal noises" will generate an interactive section where you can hear the sounds made by different animals. You can also Google one of these 20 specific animals to hear its call: ape, dog, cat, zebra, lion, moose, owl, pig, cow, duck, elephant, horse, raccoon, bowhead whale, humpback whale, wolf, rooster, sheep, tiger and a turkey.

Source : http://www.komando.com/tips/371494/3-amazing-new-google-search-functions/2

Categorized in Search Engine

According to legislation adopted by the European Union, Google is not considered to be a search engine. It took the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union two years of negotiations and legislative process to come up with this decision. The decision will also declare that Bing, Yahoo and DuckDuckGo are not search engines either. Here are the details of the story, with credit to ERDi who first reported on it.

Why is Google not a Search Engine?

According to the EU’s agreed upon definitions, a search engine searches all websites, which Google does not. Google does not search and/or index the dark web (Tor), nor does it search pages which it is directed not to by a site’s robots.txt file.

The fact that Google complies with Right to Be Forgotten requests, and removes content such as revenge porn, also disqualifies it as a search engine by the EU’s definition.

So What is a Search Engine?

There is currently no search engine in existence today which matches the definition laid out by the EU’s Directive on Network and Information Security.

“Online search engine’ is a digital service that allows users to perform searches of in principle all websites or a geographical subset thereof, websites in a particular language on the basis of a query on any subject in the form of a keyword, phrase or other input; and returns links in which information related to the requested content can be found.“

The key phrase “of in principle all websites” is technically what disqualifies all search engines as we know them today from being search engines by the EU’s definition. Perhaps one day EU will get its wish, but for now search engines are what they are, and they’re a far cry from what EU believes they should be.

 

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-not-search-engine/160901/

Categorized in Search Engine

When people think of search engines, the first name that comes to mind is often Google. It’s one of the most enduring brand names, and it has even worked its way into mainstream vernacular, and today many people substitute the phrase “searched online” for “Googled”. According to comScore, Inc., Google and its affiliated websites comprise 67.6% of the search engine market share in the United States, and, according to Netmarketshare 66.44% worldwide.

Though prominent, Google is not the only search engine available. There are innumerable others that provide various interfaces, search algorithms, and other unique features. Many even base their search algorithms around specific philosophies, ones that often attract brand-new audiences.

In descending order, the remaining most popular search engine companies in the United States, by market share after Google, are Microsoft (18.7%), Yahoo (10.0%), Ask Network (2.4%), and AOL (1.3%), according to ComScore report.

Likewise, according to December 2014 data, the remaining most popular search engines worldwide by market share are Baidu (11.15%), Bing (10.29%), Yahoo! (9.31%), and AOL (0.53%).

The exact data is highly variable based on who’s reporting it, and it varies even further on a month-to-month basis. But generally speaking, the ranking order does not vary much.

This list does not necessarily include the 12 most used or well-known search engines after Google; instead, it includes search engines that differ from one another in terms of history, philosophy, content, targeted audiences, and other variables. With that in mind, lets take a look at 12 of the most underrated search engines.

Bing

Based on comScore’s data, the next most powerful player in the search engine industry is Microsoft and its search engine, Bing.

Key differences between the two engines, according to the New York Times, lie in backdrop, search tools, and the amount of information offered on the immediate search page. Bing sports striking, engaging home pages, a display tool when searching for airline flights, aggregate restaurant rating badges, and more. One popular feature is its “linkfromdomain:” search term. This term allows users to see the most frequently used outgoing link from a given site. This can provide easy access to research pages or recommended sites from a trusted source.

Another operator, contains:FILETYPE, allows users to search by file type. Researchers and students with specific softwares may search specifically for PDFs, Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, different photo types, and more universal file types on a whim. This helps to rule out unnecessary documents.

bing filetype operator

Bing’s clean interface particularly excels when searching for videos. The video searches don’t integrate well with text searches on Google. On Bing, the listed videos fit neatly side-by-side in an interface that best accommodates them. This helps to cut down on the amount of time a user would spend scrolling.

Bing hasn’t been shy in comparing itself to Google, either. It has even launched a website titled “Bing It On which directly compares its search results to those of Google.

Yahoo

Another powerful competitor in the search engine market is the long-enduring Yahoo. For many, Yahoo is much more than a search engine; it’s an online Swiss Army knife.

In addition to its search engine, the Yahoo Web portal offers easy access to its news aggregator, games center, retail options, travel guide, horoscope, and other varied features. Yahoo Finance is a popular aggregate for some of the best financial news available, combining information from CNN Money, The Street, and more.

Another extraordinarily well-used feature of Yahoo is Yahoo Answers, which is a forum that allows people to phrase questions in ways the traditional search engines have difficulty handling. Other users can view questions and use their background knowledge and tailor their answers in a personalized manner.

Other popular aspects of Yahoo include easy photo sharing (facilitated by Yahoo’s purchase of Flickr), local news through Yahoo Local, and myriad entertainment options. By having all these convenient features in one place, users rarely have to venture elsewhere if they don’t want to.

Yandex

Founded in Russia in 1997, Yandex has quickly risen to become the country’s premier search engine. Since 2010, it has gone worldwide and become a popular resource for those looking for easy-to-use search pages between different languages. Its translation and cross-lingual search options are featured prominently on its homepage, and it accommodates English, Russian, German, French, and smaller Eastern European languages. This allows bilingual searchers or students working on language projects to more easily find whatever it is they’re looking for.

yandex search engine

Ask

The search engine formerly known as “Ask Jeeves” was easily one of Google’s greatest competitors during the early days of the World Wide Web. Though not the hot commodity it once was, it remains popular for its accommodation of natural, colloquial language. After a user poses a question, it provides possible answers and a large list of other pertinent questions.

Ask’s historic accommodation of vernacular has, in essence, found a spiritual successor through voice commands and searches on mobile devices. Thanks to Apple’s Siri (which relies on Bing) and the Google app, there’s less stigma over voice commands, and they’re becoming more popular. With Siri, users are directly able to bypass using their other apps or search engines by just asking their phone a question.

Though Ask may have popularized the use of dialectal searches, it unfortunately is not as well-integrated with the programs that now champion them.

Dogpile

For those unsure of which search engine to use, many default to Dogpile — the engine that aggregates from pretty much everyone else.

Like Ask, Dogpile is another site with early online history and considerable brand loyalty. Search results (from Google, Yahoo, Yandex, and more) are set upon a focused interface of white and varying shades of blue. Many prefer Dogpile for its chic design, comprehensive answers, and a template that doesn’t prove too distracting or cluttered.

dogpile search engine

Its listed features include: Category Links, Yellow Pages, White Pages, Statistics Bar, Search Finder, Preferences, Spelling Correction, About Results, and Favorite Fetches. A user’s Dogpile experience is easily personalized to a user’s liking.

Yippy

Many Internet users are unfamiliar with the Deep Web. According to CNN, the Deep Web encompasses everything traditional search engines having trouble finding. Pages in the Deep Web may be relatively unconnected to other parts of the Internet or housed on private networks.

yippy search engine

Search engine Yippy (formerly Clusty) searches the Web using other search engines, but it provides results in the form of “clouds” instead of traditional search methods. This makes it more likely to find pages that would be otherwise buried or nearly impossible to find using search engines like Google or Yahoo. Though Yippy doesn’t have the ability to scour the every corner of the Deep Web (no search engine does), it is much more capable and efficient at finding pages for users with more obscure and niche tastes.

Duck Duck Go

With a name based on the popular kids’ game Duck Duck Goose, Duck Duck Go is a website that many find as approachable, user-friendly, and engaging as the game.

Duck Duck Go’s first priority is protecting user privacy. Many adults of all ages find themselves concerned over identity theft and hacking; these issues regularly appear on both local and national news. This search engine doesn’t reach into your history, email, or social media workings to drum up relevant information. Two totally different people can search the same term and get identical results.

The search engine also maintains a handy infinite scroll option (no need to click to other pages), reduced advertising spam, and prompts to help clarify a question.

EntireWeb

First launched back in 2000, EntireWeb is a search engine that requires pages to submit their websites to it for free. This results in a much less crowded search space and guarantees those who submit are less likely to be drowned out by other competition. Queries can be submitted for regular Web search, image search, or real-time search.

Blekko

Created just a few years ago in 2010, blekko (with a stylized lowercase “b”) is the search engine clearly inspired by Twitter. While Twitter (and now other social media sites) has “hashtags,” blekko has “slashtags.” When searching something in its database, blekko provides users with a series of related key words with which to narrow their search.

For instance, searching “celebrity news” on blekko turns up the slashtags for Top Results, Gossip, Magazine, and Latest. Blekko’s interface, which combines minimalist squares and a varied color palette, is considered very user-friendly.

blekko search engine results page example

Goodsearch

Recent years have seen an uptick in people’s interest in engaging technology in an ethical manner. As corporations such as Google and Microsoft continue to grow steadily more powerful, people have been better scrutinizing where their money and attention go.

Goodsearch is a search engine for the charitable. Fueled by Yahoo, Goodsearch allows users to pick a cause of their choice; this can be a nonprofit organization or school. Upon selecting their target, Goodsearch will begin donating 50% of its revenue from that user to their cause. To date, Goodsearch has donated well over $11 million to a variety of sources. According to Goodsearch, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) has received more than $50,000, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has received more than $18,000 from the website.

goodsearch search engine donation exa,mple

In recent years, Goodsearch has earned the attention of many celebrities, including Zooey Deschanel, Jessica Biel, and Montel Williams.

GigaBlast

Another search engine boasting enormous social and trust capital is GigaBlast. Founded in 2000, GigaBlast is, according to its LinkedIn page, the “leading clean-energy search engine.” An impressive 90% of its energy usage comes from harnessed wind energy, and the company maintains fewer than 10 employees.

Though it’s physically small, its power is big. GigaBlast indexes well over 10 billion pages of content. As environmental issues become more prominent in public consciousness, people are more likely to turn to sites like GigaBlast.

Baidu

Though a relative unknown in the United States, Chinese search engine Baidu is a juggernaut on the international scene. It’s the top search engine in China (with 62% of search engine market share in 2013), and it is the second most popular search engine in the world.

“China’s Google,” as it is nicknamed, has been steadily growing since its incorporation in 2000, and it has recently begun courting English-speaking developers. Its features include searchable webpages, audio files, and images, a collaborative encyclopedia, and a bustling discussion forum. Thanks to its savvy smartphone integration, it has leapt past its immediate competitor, Qihoo 360, which now has only 21% of the Chinese search engine market share.

baidu-and-google

If Baidu manages to continue its domestic success abroad, it might not be long before it does become a household name in the United States.

In Conclusion

Once-popular search engines like AOL.com and InfoSeek have either died out or are now sock-puppeted by their former competitors. InfoSeek attempted to charge for searches, failed, adjusted by depending on gaudy banner advertisements, became a generic “portal,” and was finally salvaged by Google. As AOL declined after its merger with Time Warner, so did its search engine. Now it is also part of Google.

Search engines in the preceding list still thrive because they capitalize upon some distinct corner of the market. For some, that market involves corporate social responsibility (Goodsearch, GigaBlast), social trends (Blekko), privacy concerns (Duck Duck Go), or utility (Yippy, Dogpile). Giants like Google, Bing, and Yahoo largely dominate the general market, so the others have had to specialize to survive.

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/going-beyond-google-comprehensive-list-search-engines/123880/

Categorized in Search Engine

Tips about a new Google search command have been circulating around the Reddit community r/Google today, where users have discovered that searching for “**” (without quotation marks) pulls up a list websites for physically nearby businesses.

This command has been confirmed to work on both mobile and desktop for searchers residing in the United States and Europe. I can personally confirm that the command also works in Canada.

When using the command myself, Google pulled up websites for all manner of local businesses. Everything from tourist attractions, to news agencies, to car dealerships, to restaurants, and more were included in the set of search I was presented with.

Of course, results will vary depending on where you live and what’s popular in your local area. In order to determine which location to surface results from, Google needs to be able to access location information from either GPS or your internet address. As one user put it, Google needs to be able to think you’re at least “somewhere”. The command does not work within proxies or on a virtual server.

It’s also worth noting that when using this command, suggestions within the “Searches related to…” section at the bottom of search results are populated with names of local businesses — rather than suggesting other search terms that begin with “**”.

While not a perfect substitute for using the smart location-based search features in Google Maps, this command could be useful for discovering local businesses you didn’t know about.

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/hidden-google-command-search-list-local-business-websites/171470/

Categorized in Search Engine

Google search is hands down the most popular search engine on the internet. The engine was launched on September 15, 1997. Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) is currently the leading search engine worldwide with a market share of 61.9 percent in July. Last month, Google boasted a total 9.9 billion searches.

Even though Google is the biggest search engine in the world, not everybody exploits its full potential. Some tricks will allow users to optimize the results. Here are a few tricks to use Google like a pro.

Quotation Marks: Using quotation marks is pretty useful to find specific quotes. Google will find the exact phrase you typed between the quotes without changing the order or adding more words.

Using Filetype. To find a specific document, or information in a particular format, Filetype is a lifesaver. To use this trick you only need to type ‘Filetype:’ followed by the format. i.e Car Filetype:ppt. File types include ‘.pdf’ for PDF files, ‘.wav.’ and ‘.mp3’ for sounds recorded in specific formats, ‘.ppt for Powerpoint presentations’.

Minus sign. Sometimes some unwanted information will keep popping up on searches. The minus sign will exclude the word typed just after it. The only exception is words that use a hyphen.

Weather and Forecast. Google is the easiest way to find weather information online. Type ‘weather’ followed by the name of a city. Google will give you details on the location’s weather before the first search result.

Flight Status. Simply typing the airline name and its airplane name will show the flight information, status and an estimated time of arrival.

Calculator and Tip Calculator. Google built a calculator and a tip calculator on its engine. Instead of using a calculator you can type your expression in the search bar and it will give you the answer. As for the tip calculator, just type tip calculator in the search bar and it will display a calculator with an adjustable bill, tip %, and the number of people splitting the bill.

Timer. Google also features a built-in timer. Just enter the amount of time followed by the word ‘Timer’ and Google will display a timer.

Sunrise and Sunset. Simply typing the words sunrise or sunset followed by a location will display the estimated time of sunrise or sunset in the area.

Game Scores. To find out the result during a matchday of any sport just type the name of the team in the search bar. The engine will display the result of the team’s match as the first result.

Source : http://theusbport.com/10-tip-and-tricks-for-google-searching-like-a-boss/14712

Categorized in Research Methods

Well it’s been a big week for search, I think we can all agree.

If you’re a regular Google user (65% of you globally) then you’ll have noticed some changes, both good and bad.

I won’t debate the merits of these improvements, we’ve done that already here: Google kills Right Hand Side Ads and here: Google launches Accelerated Mobile Pages, but there’s a definite feeling of vexation that appears to be coming to a head.

Deep breath…

As the paid search space increases in ‘top-heaviness’, as organic results get pushed further off the first SERP, as the Knowledge Graph scrapes more and more publisher content and continues to make it pointless to click through to a website, and as our longstanding feelings of unfairness over Google’s monopoly and tax balance become more acute, now more than ever we feel there should be another, viable search engine alternative.

There was a point not that long ago when you could easily divide people between those that used Google, Yahoo, Ask Jeeves and AltaVista. Now it’s got to the point where if you’re not using Google, you’re not really using the internet properly.

Right now though maybe we should be paying more attention to the alternatives. Maybe our daily lives and, for some of us, careers shouldn’t need to balance on the fickle algorithm changes of the world’s most valuable company.

Let’s see what else is out there in the non-Google world. It’s not that scary, I promise. Although you may want to bring a coat.

Please note: this is an update of an article published on SEW in May 2014, we felt like it needed sprucing up especially many of the listed engines (Blekko, Topsy) are no longer with us.

Bing

Microsoft’s search engine is the second most popular search engine in the world, with 15.8% of the search market.

Bing homepage

 

But why should you use Bing? Lifehacker has some great articles where they try to convince themselves as much as anyone else why Bing is a serious contender to Google. Plus points include:

  • Bing’s video search is significantly better than Google’s, giving you a grid of large thumbnails that you can click on to play or preview if you hover over them.
  • Bing often gives twice as many autocomplete suggestions than Google does.
  • Bing can predict when airfares are about to go up or down if you’re searching for flights.
  • Bing also has a feature where if you type linkfromdomain:[site name] it will highlight the best ranked outgoing links from that site, helping you figure out which other sites your chosen site links to the most.

Also note that Bing powers Yahoo’s search engine.

DuckDuckGo

The key feature of DuckDuckGo is that it doesn’t retain its users’ data, so it won’t track you or manipulate results based on your behaviour. So if you’re particularly spooked by Google’s all-seeing, all-knowing eye, this might be the one for you.

DuckDuckGo homepage

There’s lots more info on DuckDuckGo’s performance here.

Quora

As Google gets better and better at answering more complicated questions, it will never be able to match the personal touch available with Quora.

quora

Ask any question and its erudite community will offer their replies. Or you can choose from any similar queries previously asked.

Dogpile

Dogpile may look like a search engine you cobbled together with clip-art, but that’s rather the point as it pulls in and ‘curates’ results from various different engines including Google, Yandex and Yahoo, but removes all the ads.

Dogpile Web Search

Vimeo

Of course if you’re going to give up Google, then you’ll also have to give up YouTube, which can be a terrifying prospect. But there is an alternative. And a pretty good one at that… Vimeo.. The professional’s choice of video-sharing site, which has lots of HD video and no ads.

otis the cat reviews in videos on Vimeo

 

Yandex

This is a Russian portal, offering many similar products and services as Google, and it’s the dominant search engine in Russia.

As you can see it offers results in a nice logical format, replete with favicons so you can clearly see the various channels for your branded queries.

search engine watch on Yandex

Boardreader

If you want to get into the nitty-gritty of a subject with a variety of different points of view away from the major publications, Boardreader surfaces results purely from forums, message boards and, of course, Reddit.

Boardreader Forum Search Engine

Boardreader Forum Search Engine

WolframAlpha

WolframAlpha is a ‘computational knowledge engine’, or super clever nerd to you and me. Ask it to calculate any data or ask it about any fact and it will give you the answer. Plus it does this awesome ‘computing’ thing while it thinks about your answer (which can take a short while.)

what really killed the dinosaurs Wolfram Alpha

It’s not always successful, you have to practice how to get the best from it. But at least it’s aware of the terrible 90s television show The Dinosaurs.

IxQuick

Another search engine that puts its users’ privacy at the forefront. With IxQuick none of your details are stored and no cookies are used. A user can set preferences, but they will be deleted after 90 days of inactivity.

Ixquick Search Engine

Ask.com

Oh look… Ask Jeeves is still around. Also he’s no longer a Wodehousian butler, but a computer generated bank manager. Weird.

Ask Jeeves

It’s still a slightly mediocre search engine pretending to be a question and answer site, but the ‘Popular Q&A’ results found on the right hand side are very handy if Jeeves himself can’t satisfy your query. And what a good use of the right-hand side space, huh Google.

SlideShare

SlideShare is a really handy place to source information from presentations, slide decks, webinars and whatever else you may have missed from not attending a conference.

 

You’ll also be surprised what information you can find there.

hamburgers on SlideShare

Addict-o-matic

“Inhale the web” with the friendly looking hoover guy by creating your own topic page, which you can bookmark and see results from a huge number of channels in that one page (including Google, Bing News, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr).

Addictomatic Inhale the Web

 

Creative Commons Search

CC Search is particularly handy if you need to find copyright free images for your website (as discussed in this post on image optimisation for SEO). Just type your query in then click on your chosen site you want to search.

CC Search

Giphy

Because really, when it comes down to it, we could imagine a worse dystopian future than one in which we all communicate entirely in Gifs.

GIPHY homepage

 

Source : https://searchenginewatch.com/2016/02/25/say-goodbye-to-google-14-alternative-search-engines/

Categorized in Search Engine

The search function was designed with experts from Harvard and the Mayo Clinic.

An agonising headache that just won’t go away – but at what point should the feeling sorry for yourself give way to genuine concern?

In the past, that would’ve been a question exclusively directed at your GP.

But, increasingly people are turning to the internet in their quest for an answer to their health fears.

Google’s symptom search function allows people to ask about symptoms, and collates a list of related conditions, possible information and suggests when it is important to visit a doctor

Indeed, search engine giant, Google estimates one per cent of the millions of searches performed each day, are symptom related.

And whereas once upon a Google search, you would’ve been inundated with a deluge of links to health forums, blogs, NHS Choices pages and other potentially alarming information, the new reality is changing the face of the internet diagnosis.

Now the new Google symptom checker, designed in conjunction with experts from the prestigious Harvard Medical School and Mayo Clinic, aims to make navigating health content online a less daunting ordeal.

The tool allows people to ask about symptoms, such as a “headache on one side”.

And the result is a list of related conditions, for example headache, migraine, tension headache, cluster headache, sinusitis and the common cold.

Source : https://www.thesun.co.uk/living/1677380/symptom-checker-diagnoses-whats-wrong-gives-treatment-advice-and-tells-you-when-its-serious-enough-to-see-a-doctor/

Categorized in Search Engine

The European Commission is working on a plan to give news publishers greater rights over content appearing on search engines such as Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google, which is an Action Alerts PLUS holding.

Speaking to journalists in Brussels Friday, EC spokesman Christian Wigand said the proposal is due out in the second half of September, part of a broader effort to forge a so-called Digital Single Market in the 28-country European Union.

But Wigand downplayed media reports of plans to give European news publishers the right to charge Internet platforms for showing snippets of their articles.

In particular he said the aim is to recognize the role of publishers as investors in content "and give them a stronger position when negotiating with other market players. This is absolutely not about an EU levy on search engines."

He added that the overall objective "is to make sure that Europeans can access a wide and diverse legal offer of content, and therefore [to] strengthen cultural diversity, while ensuring that authors and other rights holders are better and more fairly protected."

At least one expert thinks the plan may not necessarily hurt big players like Google and its YouTube video-sharing site, but rather smaller players seeking to establish viable alternatives.

"These little guys are the ones that content owners will have no qualms about charging for access to their content," said Matthew Jones, a London-based partner with EIP Europe law firm, via e-mail.

"They are the ones that will not be able to afford to implement technology that will allow them to filter out content that is protected by copyright," he said. "As such, these smaller players may find themselves priced out of the market."

Source : https://www.thestreet.com/story/13686465/1/copyright-reform-to-give-news-outlets-more-say-over-search-engine-content.html

Categorized in Internet Privacy

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