The web is teeming with images, and a lot of them are not what they seem. Reverse image search makes it easier to spot the fake images, and the fake people who are using someone else's profile photos.

Reverse image search involves choosing an image and using a search engine to find the same image on other web sites. It's a feature I use almost every day, and I'm confident that more people would do it if they knew what they were missing.

Reverse image search is both simple and free, thanks to services such as TinEye - which pioneered the field - and Google Image Search. Both offer browser extensions so all you have to do is right-click any online image and choose reverse image search from the drop-down menu. There are several other services, including meta-services like Image Raider, which will "search by image on Google, Bing, and Yandex" with up to 20 images at a time. However, Google and TinEye cover most people's needs most of the time.

So why would you use reverse image search? Reasons vary, but usually it's either to authenticate an image, by finding its source, or track its use across the web.

Tracking image use

If you have a website, publish brochures or press releases, or post copyright photographs online, you can assume that your images are going to be re-used. Reverse image search tells you where and when. After that, you can decide whether a re-use is legal and appropriate, and whether or not to take action.

Searching for publicity and advertising images will show you how much traction your press release or blog post got, and you may well find coverage that text searches have missed - perhaps in foreign languages.

You may also find your images re-used in contexts you're not happy about, such as illustrating stories about a rival company's products. If so, you can make sure they are correctly captioned and credited. Just remember that you can't complain about images that you don't actually own.

You may find some websites using your bandwidth by linking to the image on your web site rather than theirs. In that case, I've seen people replace the original photo with a less appropriate one that has the same filename.

You may also find copyright photos that you did not license for re-use. If so, you can get them taken down, or send them an invoice.

Either way, reverse image search surfaces a lot of valuable information that you couldn't easily find in any other way.

Authenticating images

When you see an image in your email or on the web, you don't really know how old it is, or where it originated. Reverse image search helps you to find out.

For example, suppose you are thinking about publishing a picture online or in print. Are you sure the supplier owns it? Is it genuine or has it been doctored? How old is it? How often has it been used before? How much is it really worth?

There are many thousands of cases where a quick reverse image search has, or would have, avoided major mistakes. Sometimes an image is claimed to show a particular event, but it was actually taken earlier, at a different event. This happens quite a lot with tweeted images and sometimes even with news stories. It might be a simple mistake by a picture agency, or it might be an attempt at deception.

Who is in the picture? In some cases, I've found, it's not the person it's said to show. Sometimes picture agencies get their captions wrong, and sometimes there are several different people with the same name. Checking the same image on several web pages usually solves both problems.

Has the image been doctored? Reverse image searches usually bring up numerous images that appear to look the same, but on closer examination, they're different. Sometimes a face may have been swapped, or something may have been removed from or added to the picture. Don't think this doesn't happen: whole websites are devoted to doctoring images, often for humorous or political reasons.

Sometimes pictures have been flipped (laterally reversed): it's an option worth trying when reverse image searches you don't find the matching images you'd expect. In the pre-web era, I once took flak for publishing a flipped photo of a famous guitarist. Dozens of fans spotted what I hadn't: that he appeared to be playing his guitar the wrong way round.

For these and similar reasons, reverse image searching is now a critical skill for mainstream publications, especially news organisations. And now you can do it in a couple of seconds, it makes sense for less critical uses, too.

Authenticating people

I also do reverse image searches on profile photos on social networking sites such as LinkedIn and Twitter. It's naive to assume everybody is who they claim to be. What appears to be an attractive young woman making friends with colleagues on LinkedIn might be a hacker fishing for information.

Surprisingly often, I find would-be contacts have stolen their profile photo from another Facebook or PhotoBucket user, or I find the same photos are being used to advertise escort services. Scammers often use photos of long-forgotten film actors and writers as well.

One day, reverse image search could save you from being scammed or conned.

If that's not a good reason to use it, I don't know what is.

Note: I'll explain the pros and cons of using Google and TinEye in my next post, Reverse image searching made easy...

http://www.zdnet.com/article/heres-why-you-and-your-business-should-use-reverse-image-search/

Categorized in Search Engine

A picture posted to Imgur Saturday reveals Google’s search engine autocompletes the query “Muslim Dad” with some brutal phrases.

When a user types in “Muslim dad,” the first autocomplete is tame, pulling up searches for “muslim dad dnc.” This refers to the speech a Muslim father gave at the Democratic National Convention in honor of his solider son who died.

The rest of the autocompletes are “muslim dad kills daughters,” “muslim dad kills his daughter,” “muslim dad runs over daughter” and “muslim dad christian mother.”

When a user types in “muslim father,” the auto completes are a little different. The first result is again “muslim father dnc.”

The remaining autocompletes are “muslim father kills daughter,” “muslim father kills gay son,” “muslim fathers and daughters,” “muslim father christian mother.”

http://dailycaller.com/2016/07/31/when-you-type-muslim-dad-in-google-some-pretty-brutal-autocomplete-results-pop-up/

Categorized in Search Engine

On Friday, Google security team announced that they finished implementing HSTS support for all the company's products running on the google.com domain.

The move comes after months of testing to make sure the feature covered all the services, including APIs, not just the main Web interfaces.

HSTS stands for HTTP Strict Transport Security and is a Web security protocol supported by all of today's browsers and Web servers.

HSTS protects HTTPS against several SSL attacks

The technology allows webmasters to protect their service and their users against HTTPS downgrades, man-in-the-middle attacks, and cookie hijacking for HTTPS connections.

The protocol prevents users from going back to an HTTP connection when accessing Google over HTTPS, and forcibly redirects them to HTTPS connections when possible.

The technology is widely regarded as the best way to protect HTTPS connections against the most common attacks on SSL but has not been widely adopted.

95% of HTTPS websites still don't use HSTS

A study from Netcraft conducted last March showed that 95% of all servers running HTTPS either fail to set up HSTS or come with configuration errors. As such, Google's team has spent a great amount of time testing.

"Ordinarily, implementing HSTS is a relatively basic process," Google's Jay Brown, Sr. Technical Program Manager, explained on Friday. "However, due to Google's particular complexities, we needed to do some extra prep work that most other domains wouldn't have needed to do. For example, we had to address mixed content, bad HREFs, redirects to HTTP, and other issues like updating legacy services which could cause problems for users as they try to access our core domain."

During HSTS tests, Brown says that the team managed to break Google's famous Santa Tracker last December. The problem was fixed, but this only comes to show the wide spectrum of products the engineers had to ensure were working properly after HSTS deployment.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/google-adds-hsts-support-to-google-com-search-engine-506816.shtml

Categorized in Search Engine

TinEye and Google Image Search are both good for doing reverse image searches, and the two websites are different enough to be complementary. But there are other options including browser extensions and smartphone apps....

There are lots of reasons for using reverse image search - see my earlier post, Here's why you and your business should use reverse image search - and quite a few ways to do it. The main ones are the TinEye and Google Image Search websites, both of which are free. Depending on your location, needs and personal preferences, you might also want to try Baidu, Yandex, Bing Image Match, Image Raider or some other service.

But if you're new to reverse image searching, I suggest you start with TinEye and Google. I use both, because they are different enough to complement one another. TinEye has better features. Google Image Search generally has a bigger, fresher database, though it doesn't find all the images that TinEye knows about.

Basically, TineEye has the smart guys while Google has the web crawlers.

TinEye wins mainly on sorting features. You can order TinEye's results by newest first or oldest first, by size, by the best match, or by the most changed. I'm often trying to find the oldest version posted, to authenticate a particular photograph.

TinEye's results often show a variety of closely related images, because some versions have been edited or adapted. Sometimes you find your searched-for picture is a small part of a larger image, which is very useful: you can switch to searching for the whole thing. TinEye is also good at finding versions of images that haven't had logos added, which is another step closer to the original.

The main drawback with TinEye is that some of the search results are a couple of years old, and when you follow the link, either the image or the page or even the whole website has disappeared. In such cases, I use the TinEye result to run a Google Image search.

Google Image Search finds web pages rather than images. If you're doing a reverse image search, it's usually more useful to look for the link that says "Find other sizes of this image" and click on "All sizes".

By default, Google displays the most exact matches in descending order of size, and the links to the sources are hidden until you click an image. You can try to make it work more like TinEye by selecting "Visually similar" from the drop-down menu, but this includes images that have nothing at all to do with the original. For most purposes, this is a waste of time.

Worse, Google can't sort images by date. As with text searches, you get options such as "Past week" and "Custom range", but these are tedious to use, and don't seem very reliable.

However, Google does some very good things that TinEye doesn't. The key features are search by type (Face, Photo, Line drawing etc) and search by usage rights. It's very useful to be able to search for images that are "labelled for reuse with modification" or "labelled for non-commercial reuse" or whatever. Handled with care, this could be a money-saver.

With a bit of experiment, some combination of TinEye and Google Image Search should meet most of your needs. If not, there are other options.

I generally use the browser extensions for TinEye and Google. These perform a reverse image search when you right-click an online image and select "search [service] with this image" or something similar. This is quicker than uploading an image from a hard drive or pasting in a web link, though you can do those things too.

Browser extensions include Google's Search by Image for Google (Chrome, Firefox), TinEye Reverse Image Search (Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, Internet Explorer), and Bing Image Match (Chrome). Third-party options include Google Reverse Image Search (Firefox, not written by Google), Search Image by Bing (Firefox, not written by Microsoft) and Who stole my pictures? (Firefox). You may be able to find more. I haven't tried all of them.

Apple iPhone users can do reverse image searches with apps such as Veracity and Microsoft's official Bing app. There's also a Search By Image app for Android. Of course, you can also use Google Image Search in the Chrome browser on a smartphone. Press and hold the image, and when the box appears, touch "Search Google for this image".

Finally, there's a useful image search engine for Reddit, called Karma Decay. If you use Reddit, you will know that some amusing images are reposted on a regular basis. Karma Decay finds them all.

This is more useful than it sounds. Redditors comment on most of these images, and their comments often include links to sources and sometimes explanations. If you are, like me, trying to authenticate images, these links and comments can save quite a lot of work.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/reverse-image-searching-made-easy/

Categorized in Search Engine

HOLLYWOOD studio Warner Brothers has gone after reddit and Google in its latest attempt to crackdown on the illegal piracy of its films.

A particular subreddit on the popular forum-based website dedicated to online streaming sources of films was the target of the Warner Brothers legal action.

The studio sent a letter to the search engine giant asking for the company to remove results for the BestOfStreamingVideo subreddit from Google searches. However Google declined to heed the request.

According to the takedown notice, Warner Brothers filed 24 complaints of copyright violation with Google with the offending subreddit named as an allegedly infringing URL on one of the claims because it linked to a pirated copy of the film Interstellar.

The subreddit has 46,000 subscribers but moderators didn’t seem too concerned about the complaint.
Speculation by piracy website Torrent Freak suggested the reason Google knocked back the request to remove the subreddit from searches was because it was too broad. Another reason posited by the website was because Google may think the responsibility for such action lies with reddit.

It is unclear if a similar takedown notice was issued to the social media site but it would likely be met with similar resistance.

“The sub was made as a way for our users to share streaming video, and as Reddit is a platform for free speech it is out of our control as to what our users post,” one reddit moderator said.

Warner Brothers request to remove reddit forum from search results 

Source: http://www.news.com.au

Categorized in Others

Google Search gets a new feature where users will get an alert every time their name is mentioned or appears on the Internet. The feature is called ‘Stay in the Loop,’ through which the search engine giant will notify users on their registered Gmail IDs as to where their names mentioned.

The new feature works as long as a user is logged into his official Google account. Also, they’ve to give Google access to save their Web and App activity which can be enabled via the Activity Controls menu.

“Save your search activity on apps and in browsers to make searches faster and get customized experiences in Search, Maps, Now, and other Google products,” says the Activity Controls page.

How does it work?

To activate the feature, users need to make sure they’re logged into their Google account and have granted Google access to track their Web and App activity. This can be done via the Activity Controls Menu.

Once they’ve granted Google the required access, the Stay in the loop widget shows up at the bottom of the first page of search results. Clicking on the widget takes users to a Google Alert form that already has your username in quotation marks. Once you’ve adjusted the Settings, just click on Create alert, and you’re good to go.

From here on, users can set Google Alerts for their name references. Users can also choose from a number of suggestions to get alerts for such as music, politics, sports and automobiles. Moreover, users can also adjust settings such as email frequency, source types, languages, and region.

Google announced the feature last month in a blog post, though it had not yet been released. Now the search engine giant has officially made the feature live. Along with the ‘Stay in the Loop’ feature, Google has also rolled out several improvements and other features for My Account off-late. The company released the ‘Find your phone’ feature to help users locate their smartphones in case they’re lost or stolen. It also rolled out a new feature where users can access My Account through voice commands.

That being said, several reports suggest that the feature is now live in India. However, I still don’t see the new Stay in the Loop widget that is supposed to appear at the bottom of the first page of search results, even after granting Google access to my Web and App activity via the Activity Controls menu.

Did any of our readers get to see the new Stay in the Loop feature? Do let us know in the comments section below.

http://www.pc-tablet.co.in/google-search-notify-users-metioned-web/38836/

Categorized in Search Engine

Google’s original mobile testing tool came out in 2014, and two years in the land of technology might as well be a lifetime. It was about time they came out with an update, and I’m happy to say it was worth the wait. According to Google, “people are five times more likely to leave a mobile site that isn’t mobile-friendly,” and “nearly half of all visitors will leave a mobile site if the pages don’t load within 3 seconds.” In other, more blatant words, it’s imperative that business owners optimize their sites for mobile.

Read below to find out how to use the newest version of Google’s mobile testing tool and make sure your website is meeting the needs of your mobile customers.

How to Get the New Google Mobile Testing Tool

First things first: you can access the tool from Google’s Search Console’s mobile usability report. Either way, once you’ve arrived at the tool, it’s as simple as entering your website’s URL into the search box, clicking “test now”, and waiting for the results. The home screen will look something like this:

google1

Then, once you enter a URL, your results page will look something like this:

google2

How to Interpret the Google Mobile Testing Tool Results

So now you know how to access the tool (it’s pretty self-explanatory and easy to use, thanks to Google!). Next, you need to know what those results mean. A test is worthless if you can’t use the results to make positive improvements.

In terms of the screenshot above, Google makes it pretty clear that the site is mobile friendly. The big green 99/100 rating for mobile friendliness is a pretty big giveaway. If you’re not looking for an in-depth analysis of your site, this might be just enough information to make you happy and send you on your way. However, you’d be missing out on some of the tool’s (not-so-hidden) features that could help improve your mobile site even more.

You’ll notice in the shot above that next to the mobile friendliness rating are ratings for mobile and desktop speed. Although Express scored high in the overall rating, they didn’t fare so well when it came to speed. This is just one example of the added information you get with the newest version of this tool.

If this was my site and my ratings, the first thing I’d work on fixing would be the speed of my site on both mobile and desktop.

One of the big differences between the old version of the tool and the updated version is that you now have access to this added information; in the past, all the tool said was whether or not your site was mobile friendly. Now, users have much more detailed information in the form of a 0-100-scale rating that discusses mobile friendliness, but also mobile and desktop speed.

Additional Features of the Google Mobile Testing Tool

Besides the new rating scale and the fact that you can get all three scores on one screen, Google has made another big change; they give you the option to have a comprehensive report sent to you that you can share with your team. If you click that button, a screen will appear that looks something like this:

google3

Google is nice enough to give you some mobile tips in an easy-to-read, easy-to-understand format even before receiving your free report (which they promise will arrive within 24 hours). Here is a report that I had sent to me for amandadisilvestro.com:

Screen Shot 2016-07-24 at 4.46.11 PM

 

mobile tool

You can see that in the area where I scored poorly (mobile speed), Google tells me exactly what needs to be fixed. They even provide links that lead to technical support in case the team needs help fixing the problem. They’re pretty much taking the guesswork out of the whole thing, so truly optimizing a mobile site has never been this painless.

Possible Critiques of the Google Mobile Testing Tool

I do think it is interesting, and worth noting, that while there is a ton of information out there about how the tool works and how to use it, there isn’t a lot of information that explains the algorithm the tool uses in order to determine the three different ratings. All I was really able to determine was that it looks at things like CSS, HTML, scripts, and images and then evaluates how quickly (or slowly) it takes for your website to load.

So how do they determine where your site falls on the rating scale? Perhaps by how long it takes for your site to load past the 3-second mark, which they claim is the attention span people have for waiting on mobile sites. (Ironically enough, it takes longer than three seconds for Google’s site to complete its test.)

I became even more skeptical after coming across this article by Search Engine Watch. They did some more extensive tests and found that their site, along with Forbes, and many other sites, all received “poor” ratings for both mobile and desktop speed. In fact, the only site they could find that received good scores in all three categories was Google. When I did the test myself, I received the same results, as you can see below:

Screen Shot 2016-07-24 at 4.50.21 PM

I hate to be a skeptic and go around touting a conspiracy theory, but what’s up with that Google? Are all the other mobile sites out there really inferior to yours, or are you just trying to drum up business for your new tool?

Regardless of the critiques or potential fishy-ness happening, the tool is easy to use and is something I would recommend. After all, it’s free, and if you truly don’t believe what you see, then you don’t have to make any changes. If nothing else, it gets you thinking.

What do you think of Google’s new tool? Was your site able to score a “good” in more than one category? Comment in the section below and let us know what you think.

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/dont-miss-use-googles-new-mobile-testing-tool/168899/

Categorized in Search Engine

Search giant Google has added a new feature on its Google Search where users would be notified with an alert every time their name is noted or seems on the Internet. The feature is said to be “Stay in the Loop” from which the users would get their names appeared on their Gmail IDs by the Google.

The new feature runs as long as a user stays connected with their official Google account. Also, they have to offer Google access to store their Web and App activity which can be activated through the Activity Controls menu.

The Activity Controls menu said, “Save your search activity on apps and in browsers to make searches faster and get customized experiences in Search, Maps, Now, and other Google products.”

To enable this feature, users have to make sure that they are logged into their registered Gmail account and have given all permission to Google to track their Web and App activity. This can be activated through the Activity Controls menu.

Once they have given all needed access to Google, the Stay in the loop widget adds at the bottom of the first page of the search results. Tapping on the widget moves users to a Google Alert form that already consist of username in quotation marks. Once they have managed the Settings, just tap on Create alert, and the user would be all set to get the alert.

From here on, users can adjust Google Alerts for their name references. Users can also have access to select from a number of suggestions to obtain alerts for like politics, music, sports, and automobiles. In addition to this, they can also manage settings like source types, languages, frequency, and region.

Google declared the feature in the previous month in a blog post, though it had not yet been updated. Now the search engine has officially brought the feature live to the users. Along with this feature, Google has also unveiled several changes and other features for My Account off-late. The company launched the ‘Find your Phone’ feature to allow users locate their smart devices in cases they are stolen or lost. It also brought a new feature where subscribers can use My Account through voice commands.

According to several reports, the feature is now made live in India too. But, The ‘Stay in the Loop’ doesn’t seem to locate at the bottom of the first page of search results yet, even after giving Google access to my Web and App activity through the Activity Controls menu.

http://tecake.in/news/tech/google-search-acquires-new-feature-stay-loop-notify-users-whenever-appeared-web-21403.html

Categorized in Search Engine

During the Google I/O on March 18, 2016, Google is expected to reveal its plan to access the Google Play Store from the chromebook. (Photo : YouTube/ CNET)

Google is finally rolling out the much needed Google Play Family Library feature that would allow families to share their paid apps, TV shows and movies inside their home for free.
Apple already has a Family Sharing feature for their iTunes app and content for several years now and the search engine giant has just recently unveiled a feature for their own Google Play Store. Members of a family can now share their content with each other without having to pay for it again or to give away their account details.

Google Play Family Library allows users to pay with their own credit card or from the main account provided they have access, The Verge has learned. It can work for up to six different accounts and across multiple devices as well.

The search engine giant is rolling out the new Google Play Family Library feature in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Mexico, Japan, Italy, Ireland, Germany, France, Canada, Brazil and Australia. Users inside the Family Library can also choose whether they would like to share a content with a specific account or not.

For instance, an adult themed movie could be shared with other adults in the family but not with the kids' account. Parents inside the Google Play Family Library will also have the option to approve first the purchases of their children, Forbes reported.

It could then give parents the much needed control over app purchases as kids can sometimes buy as much as thousands of dollars even without the consent of adults. It was a glaring problem as parents often just gave their tablets and smartphones to their children without locking their account purchase capabilities first.

Apps and content that have been bought with the Google Play Family Library will be allowed to be used or consumed in other Android and ChromeOS devices. It can even allow the content to be used in other iPhones and iPads provided that a Google account is used.

Google is now rolling out the new Google Paly Family Library feature across the said countries and regions. It is unclear whether the search engine giant will still release the feature into more areas in the future.

http://en.yibada.com/articles/145968/20160728/google-play-family-library-feature-sharing-paid-apps-content-finally.htm

Categorized in Search Engine

Google, the world's leading search engine, has been unfairly subpoenaed by the Department of Justice, as part of a lawsuit to which it is not a party.

Federal prosecutors have asked Google, Microsoft, Yahoo and AOL to turn over logs showing search terms entered by search engine users, and a list of websites indexed by the portals' search engines.

Google has refused the Department of Justice's demand for this data, which the government wants for an upcoming lawsuit concerning the 1998 Child Online Protection Act. Two years ago the US Supreme Court issued an injunction preventing enforcement of the Act. The DoJ wants that injunction reversed; the ACLU has filed suit to prevent any such reversal. The trial date is set for June 12th,2006.

Federal prosecutors are not asking for any specific information that concerns privacy advocates, or for any personal or private information about Google's users, but Google asks why it should share its data, and how it became a party to this lawsuit in the first place. In this writer's opinion, Federal prosecutors are clearly overreaching in subpoenaing Google for this information.

The defendant in the COPA case - - the government - - would like to use the million website addresses to simulate the World Wide Web to test the effectiveness of some of the filtering programs it is developing. Leaving aside Google's motives in refusing to deliver this information, the question is, should governments defend their cases by using their might to lean on third party businesses and private entities? And if companies do not comply with such requests, should governments invoke their subpoena powers?

Territorial Rights Management (TRM) and Digital Rights Management (DRM) are some of the technologies that, when coupled with encryption, security, user authentication and credit card validation, could most certainly address the concerns set forth in the COPA law and the reasons for the Court's injunction against its execution.

Similarly, given a little time, technological innovators could invent solutions that do not undermine the First and Fifth Amendments: another reason for courts to keep this law from being enforced until the industry can provide technological tools based on TRM and user authentication that will help parents protect their children from problematic websites and content. Such issues are explored in ABI Research's study Conditional Access & Digital Rights Management, which forms part of the Digital Media Distribution and Management Research Service.

http://www.hometoys.com/article/2016/07/raspberry-pi-and-matlab-based-3d-scanner/8541

Categorized in Search Engine

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