how to restore deleted text messages on an iphone l

We’ve already talked about how to delete your text messages, so now we’re going to look at how to recover deleted text messages on your iPhone. That’s right, text messages don’t really get deleted when you delete them, unless you reset your iPhone to its factory settings — an action designed to erase everything on your device, not just texts.

If you’re passing your iPhone on to someone else, or selling it, then performing a factory reset is the safest way to rid your device of its precious data. If you’ve deleted some texts by mistake and want to recover them, there are ways you can do this. Let’s take a look at a few examples.

Restoring texts from an iCloud Backup

Restoring an iCloud backup is probably the easiest way to recover deleted text messages on your iPhone. Provided that you have iCloud Backup turned on, and your iPhone has been doing its scheduled backups, then your deleted texts should be backed up to iCloud. The service backs up messages sent via iMessage, SMS, and MMS, though it does require the SIM card that was in use when you made the backup.

  1. Go to Settings > iCloud > Backup.
  2. Make sure iCloud Backup is turned on.
  3. After that, you will have to erase your iPhone by going into Settings > General > Reset.
  4. Choose Erase All Content and Settings.
  5. Once done, you’ll be asked if you want to restore your iPhone from an iCloud Backup.
  6. Choose Restore from iCloud Backup.

Once your backup is restored, you should be able to access any texts that were on your phone when you first made the backup.

Restoring texts from an iTunes Backup

prevent from syncing itunes iphone ios

prevent from syncing itunes iphone ios

If you’re in the habit of doing backups through iTunes, then you should have a number of backups to choose from. However, this requires a bit of digging in the iTunes preferences before you plug your iPhone into your computer.

  1. In iTunes, go to Edit > Preferences > Devices.
  2. Make sure Prevent iPods, iPhones, and iPads from syncing automatically is checked.
  3. Click OK.

If you sync your iPhone with iTunes, you can permanently delete messages so they can’t be recovered. Once you’ve prevented your iPhone from automatically syncing, however, there are two ways to restore your iPhone from an iTunes backup.

  1. After you reset your iPhone to its factory settings, you can either Restore from iTunes Backup or plug your iPhone into your computer and open iTunes.
  2. Select your iPhone in the top menu, and in the Summary section, click Restore Backup.
  3. If asked to update your device, select Download only.

Restoring text with a third-party app

There are many apps that will allow you to retrieve text messages from your iPhone, most of which work in the same way. You plug your iPhone into your computer, open a program, and follow a set of on-screen steps. From texts to call history, these apps will let you recover things you thought were lost forever. Below are a few of our favorites.

The best

iMobie Phone Rescue ($60+)

Phone Rescue will allow you to recover a number of files, including messages. What sets this program apart, however, is that it allows you to recover data from your iCloud account, in addition to your iTunes and device backups. The app also has a number of repair tools, which let you recover your device when it crashes or experiences errors.

Download now from:

iMobie

The rest

Wondershare Dr.Fone ($70+)

This recovery tool is compatible with the latest iOS devices, and you can install the program on both MacOS and Windows-based machines. The software will allow you to quickly recover text messages, as well as photos, videos, and even data from third-party apps like WhatsApp.

Download now from:

Wondershare

Tenorshare Ultdata ($50+)

Like other recovery apps, this app will let you recover both messages and media. It also allows you to recover your iPhone when it’s stuck in recovery mode, or when it fails to install the latest iOS update.

Source : yahoo.com 

Categorized in Others

You pull out your phone with just enough time to pop open the camera and frame the perfect photo before it’s too late. Time is always of the essence when you’re shooting real-life scenes and another second or two would have been too late. Your iPhone focuses, you snap the shutter button and boom… the dreaded “not enough storage” message pops up on your screen just as your subject vanishes. That’s right, your iPhone was already full of photos and videos, and you didn’t have enough storage to save another one.

It’s happened to us all at one point or another, but one simple device will help make sure it never happens again. Check out the SanDisk iXpand Flash Drive, which works with any iPhone or iPad that has a Lightning connector, and could be the best purchase you make this year.

The iXpand flash drive features a Lightning plug on one end and a standard USB plug on the other. Using a free companion app, you can save all the photos and videos on your iPhone to the drive. Then you can keep them there or connect to your Mac or Windows PC and save them on your hard drive.

Some product highlights:

  • Free up space on your iPhone by moving photos and videos to your iXpand flash
  • Automatically back up photos and videos from your camera
  • Automatically back up your contacts
  • Watch popular video on your iPhone or iPad
  • Designed with a flexible connector to fit through most iPhone cases
  • High-speed USB 3.0 transfer to and from your computer
  • Secure file storage across your computer, iPhone and iPad
  • Videos automatically saved to the drive if captured from within the iXpand Drive app

The 32GB model is linked here and is on sale for $40, but there are also 64GB and 128GB models linked on the product page if you need more storage.

SanDisk iXpand Flash Drive 32GB for iPhone and iPad, Black/Silver, (SDIX30C-032G-GN6NN): $39.95

Source : yahoo.com

Categorized in How to

Apple is slated to release a new iPhone this year, and one premium model will reportedly feature a curved screen, news reports said. These curved displays seem to be all the rage, with companies designing the screens for everything from smartphones to televisions. But what, if anything, do you gain from the curve?

Plenty of others phone makers have released curved screens, but Samsung was the first with the release of the concave Samsung Galaxy Round in 2013. Since then firms have experimented with various different kinds of curves, but when Samsung introduced the convex dual-curved sides to its flagship Galaxy S6 in 2015 it set the zeitgeist and most phone makers have since toed the line.

Rumors about Apple's curved iPhone were reported by The Wall Street Journal. Citing unnamed sources familiar with the matter, the Journal reported that Apple would be releasing a high-end version of its 10th-anniversary iPhone, alongside the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus; this version will have a curved screen and be priced at around $1,000. [10 Technologies That Will Transform Your Life]

And Apple is hardly the only company investing in this display technology. Samsung was the first to release a smartphone with a curved display, the concave Samsung Galaxy Round, in 2013. Since then, other companies have experimented with different kinds of curves, but in 2015, when Samsung introduced the convex, dual-curved sides to its flagship Galaxy S6, the company seemed to ignite a new trend.

Tellingly, The Korea Herald also reported that Samsung could end up supplying Apple with the curved screens. This is because Apple currently uses liquid crystal display (LCD) technology in its iPhones, and creating curved screens is practical only with organic LED (OLED) displays.

These displays, which are also used in TVs, rely on a thin film of organic compound — that is, a compound that contains carbon — which emits light in response to an electric current. LCDs, on the other hand, require backlighting to shine light through the liquid crystals.

Early work

Samsung pioneered OLED technology in the early 2000s, and has built up a market-leading position in the development of the small OLED displays used in smartphones, said Karl Leo, director of the Integrated Center for Applied Physics and Photonic Materials at the Technical University Dresden in Germany.

"Samsung took a high risk to develop the production processes," Leo told Live Science. "Initially, for a couple of years, Samsung had the market to itself, and since obviously Apple and Samsung are competitors, Apple clearly had a problem with the need to establish independent manufacturing facilities that have enough capacity for the very large number of displays it needs."

While mass-producing OLEDs is complicated, the benefits are considerable, and several other companies are now producing the screen on a large scale, Leo said. OLED displays can have higher contrasts — blacker blacks and brighter whites — than LCD displays, he said. And unlike with LCDs, looking at an OLED screen from narrow angles does not distort the color or contrast, he added.

Most importantly, OLEDs emit light themselves and so don't need backlighting, and this allows for much thinner displays, Leo said. In addition, the films of organic compounds are soft, making it possible to create a curved screen, he said.

But why would you want a curved screen? The curved edges of the Samsung Galaxy S6, which introduced the de facto standard for curved smartphone screens, featured various new functions. These included shortcuts and information that can be seen at a quick glance on the long, curved edges of the device.

But Samsung said the main goal was to tackle "FoMo," or fear of missing out, reported The Daily Telegraph. The phone allows users to assign a color for up to five contacts, and the screen lights up in that color if they call. When the screen is face down, users can still see the curved edges, so it's possible to tell if a friend is calling even if users are in a situation where it would be rude to check their phone.

Design vs. function

However, design choices are the main reason behind the new trend for curved screens, not functionality, said Leo, who owns a Galaxy S7 Edge himself.

"It's a desire [of] manufactures to distinguish themselves, but in my opinion this has its limits," he said. [11 Odd and Intriguing Smart Home Technologies]

I must frankly say a curved screen is a minor step," He said that the ultimate promise of OLED technology is flexible screens that can be bent and twisted without damaging them and even screens so supple they can be rolled up like a towel.

There are considerable challenges to overcome before reaching that promise though, he said. Creating highly flexible displays will require a flexible substrate (the layer on which the OLEDs are applied) rather than the glass substrate that is typically used today, he said.

OLEDs also need to be protected from humidity and oxygen; otherwise, the pixels get damaged and stop working, Leo said. With a glass substrate, this is not too difficult, but if phone manufacturers switch to a flexible plastic substrate, it is much more challenging to keep oxygen and humidity levels low enough, he added.

It's not just the OLEDs that need to be flexible, though. The transistor backplane — the layer of  components responsible for electronically switching each pixel on and off — will need to be flexible as well, Leo said. He said that flexible organic transistors could solve this problem, but these materials are still a ways away from being commercially available, which means truly flexible displays aren't likely to appear anytime soon, according to Leo.

But unlike curved phone screens, when flexible displays do arrive, they will be cause for real excitement Leo said. For example, he says one could imagine a phone display that could be rolled up tight enough that it could fit inside a pen. When you want to use the phone display you simply unfurl it from the pen and then it rolls back up once you're done.

"Wouldn't that be lovely?" he said.

Or at home, imagine if your television is actually rolled up like a window shade, and if you want to use it, you pull it down, watch TV, and then simply zip it up again.

"So, for flexible displays, there are many beautiful applications," Leo said. "You can put them anywhere. You can put them in garments, so flexibility would be really a breakthrough for many applications."

Source : livescience.com

Categorized in News & Politics

While viruses and malware are most often synonymous with Windows PCs or, to a lesser extent, Android-powered smartphones, it is possible, technically speaking, that Apple’s iOS-powered devices can contract certain bugs as well. Although iOS is one of the most secure and heavily-encrypted mobile operating systems on the market today, unfortunately, over the course of time they can begin exhibiting signs that something under-the-hood just isn’t right.

Although the actual likelihood of your iPhone or iPad’s failure to ‘just play nice’ likely isn’t due to a virus or malware, it’s still important to know that you can always check and take the appropriate steps to ensure everything is in proper order.

How to Find out if Your iPhone or iPad Device Has a Virus or Malware

In technical terms, a ‘virus’, as it pertains to computing, is a string of malicious code that is able to insert itself into a specific app. Viruses could potentially wreak havoc on that app, or on different parts of the iOS UI, if left unabated. iOS apps, however, being as secure and highly-regulated as they are, go through a rigorous screening process by Apple before they are uploaded to the App Store for users to download and enjoy.

As we’ve seen in the past, though, even some iOS apps — remember the Chinese ‘app’, YiSpector? — have fallen into the wrong hands, and sought to sabotage the sanctity of iPhones and iPads all around the world. So while it’s extraordinarily unlikely that an app downloaded from the App Store will come loaded with malicious code, one can never be too sure.

That said, here are a few questions to ask yourself when trying to determine whether or not an infected app is wreaking havoc on your device:

Have you Jailbroken it?

And, if so, have you installed any apps from unofficial or questionable sources? If the answer to both of these questions is YES, your device may have been infected by malware — an entire app that was created with the sole intent of infecting and overtaking your device — and you should uninstall any unofficial apps from your device immediately.

Does your iOS device start acting up when you’re using a specific app?

If so, the issue may be isolated within that app, itself, and isn’t as far-reaching as the iOS system. Odd behaviors exhibited by compromised apps may include, but are not limited to, redirecting you to an unknown web page in Safari, or even opening the App Store without your permission.

Does your iPhone or iPad act up all of the time?

Also worth noting is if the issue you’re experiencing appears to persist regardless of which apps are being used, then there’s a much greater chance that your device may be acting up in light of an underlying hardware problem — and you should therefore take it in to be analyzed at your nearest Apple Store’s ‘Genius Bar’.

How Can iOS and Certain Apps Even Be Hacked?

Fortunately, iOS is an extremely secure mobile operating system; and so the likelihood of being infected, even though it can happen, is nevertheless slim to none. Moreover, even despite recent revelations that the CIA can hack our iPhones and iPads, the iOS system, itself, is just about impossible to compromise — even by the savviest hackers out there.

Yet since hackers can’t do that, they tend to rely on cracking the myriad of developer kits that are out in the wild — used most often by well-meaning app developers who just want to make our lives easier. In this fashion, hackers can sometimes gain access to specific apps, from which they acquire the ability to either send you spam, redirect you to an unknown or unauthorized website, or even download other apps without your permission.

How to Fix iOS Hacking Issues

Update – If you believe the problem you’re having is isolated to a single app, the first step you’d want to take is to verify if your device is running the most current version of the app — and if it’s not, to download the update, accordingly.

Delete Troublesome Apps – Should the issue persist thereafter, you might want to consider deleting the app, altogether, and see if you can get by without it for a while. If your device starts acting smoothly again, then it’s pretty clear that the app you deleted was the issue all along, right? In this instance, you may want to try getting by without the app. Or, if you’d rather try to work it out, you can always reach out to the developers, as well, and see if they’re aware of the issue.

Clear Website Data – What might also be helpful, if you’re having problems with Safari redirecting you to an unauthorized page, is if you go in and manually clear all website and search history data. This will allow you to start from a clean slate, essentially, and will clear the cache of all previously visited webpages — whether you visited them intentionally, or, *gasp*, if they visited you. To do this, navigate to:

  1. Settings.
  2. Safari.
  3. Select Clear History and Website Data.
  4. Tap to confirm on the subsequent pop-up menu.

Reboot Your Device – Alternatively, you can try physically rebooting the device to see if that regulates things. To do this, hold down on the power/sleep-wake button and the device’s Home button at the same time. Keep holding both until you see the screen go black — and then keep holding until the device boots back up again and you see the Apple logo. (This process may take as long as 45 seconds, depending on your model, so just be aware of that and don’t let go of those two buttons until you see the Apple logo flash on the screen.) Learn More: How to Reboot an iPhone 7

Last Resort: Hard Reset – If neither of these tips solve the problem, you may want to try performing a hard reset of your device. This will essentially delete everything — including data, apps, and files. You can always back-up your device and reinstall your lost data from a previously saved back-up; however, if you think you’ve been infected by malware, you might be better served by starting from a clean slate and manually rebuilding.

  1. This process may take a while, so be sure you’re both connected to Wi-Fi and plugged into a power outlet before getting started.
  2. Open Settings.
  3. Tap General.
  4. Tap Reset.
  5. Tap Erase All Content & Settings.
  6. Then follow the steps as they appear on screen.

Also important to ensure is that you update to the latest versions of iOS, when they become available. But be cautious when updating to the next version of iOS 10.3, since Cupertino will be switching over to a brand-new file management system!

Source : idropnews.com

Categorized in How to

While viruses and malware are most often synonymous with Windows PCs or, to a lesser extent, Android-powered smartphones, it is possible, technically speaking, that Apple’s iOS-powered devices can contract certain bugs as well. Although iOS is one of the most secure and heavily-encrypted mobile operating systems on the market today, unfortunately, over the course of time they can begin exhibiting signs that something under-the-hood just isn’t right.

Although the actual likelihood of your iPhone or iPad’s failure to ‘just play nice’ likely isn’t due to a virus or malware, it’s still important to know that you can always check and take the appropriate steps to ensure everything is in proper order.

How to Find out if Your iPhone or iPad Device Has a Virus or Malware

In technical terms, a ‘virus’, as it pertains to computing, is a string of malicious code that is able to insert itself into a specific app. Viruses could potentially wreak havoc on that app, or on different parts of the iOS UI, if left unabated. iOS apps, however, being as secure and highly-regulated as they are, go through a rigorous screening process by Apple before they are uploaded to the App Store for users to download and enjoy.

As we’ve seen in the past, though, even some iOS apps — remember the Chinese ‘app’, YiSpector? — have fallen into the wrong hands, and sought to sabotage the sanctity of iPhones and iPads all around the world. So while it’s extraordinarily unlikely that an app downloaded from the App Store will come loaded with malicious code, one can never be too sure.

That said, here are a few questions to ask yourself when trying to determine whether or not an infected app is wreaking havoc on your device:

Have you Jailbroken it?

And, if so, have you installed any apps from unofficial or questionable sources? If the answer to both of these questions is YES, your device may have been infected by malware — an entire app that was created with the sole intent of infecting and overtaking your device — and you should uninstall any unofficial apps from your device immediately.

Does your iOS device start acting up when you’re using a specific app?

If so, the issue may be isolated within that app, itself, and isn’t as far-reaching as the iOS system. Odd behaviors exhibited by compromised apps may include, but are not limited to, redirecting you to an unknown web page in Safari, or even opening the App Store without your permission.

Does your iPhone or iPad act up all of the time?

Also worth noting is if the issue you’re experiencing appears to persist regardless of which apps are being used, then there’s a much greater chance that your device may be acting up in light of an underlying hardware problem — and you should therefore take it in to be analyzed at your nearest Apple Store’s ‘Genius Bar’.

How Can iOS and Certain Apps Even Be Hacked?

Fortunately, iOS is an extremely secure mobile operating system; and so the likelihood of being infected, even though it can happen, is nevertheless slim to none. Moreover, even despite recent revelations that the CIA can hack our iPhones and iPads, the iOS system, itself, is just about impossible to compromise — even by the savviest hackers out there.

Yet since hackers can’t do that, they tend to rely on cracking the myriad of developer kits that are out in the wild — used most often by well-meaning app developers who just want to make our lives easier. In this fashion, hackers can sometimes gain access to specific apps, from which they acquire the ability to either send you spam, redirect you to an unknown or unauthorized website, or even download other apps without your permission.

How to Fix iOS Hacking Issues

Update – If you believe the problem you’re having is isolated to a single app, the first step you’d want to take is to verify if your device is running the most current version of the app — and if it’s not, to download the update, accordingly.

Delete Troublesome Apps – Should the issue persist thereafter, you might want to consider deleting the app, altogether, and see if you can get by without it for a while. If your device starts acting smoothly again, then it’s pretty clear that the app you deleted was the issue all along, right? In this instance, you may want to try getting by without the app. Or, if you’d rather try to work it out, you can always reach out to the developers, as well, and see if they’re aware of the issue.

Clear Website Data – What might also be helpful, if you’re having problems with Safari redirecting you to an unauthorized page, is if you go in and manually clear all website and search history data. This will allow you to start from a clean slate, essentially, and will clear the cache of all previously visited webpages — whether you visited them intentionally, or, *gasp*, if they visited you. To do this, navigate to:

  1. Settings.
  2. Safari.
  3. Select Clear History and Website Data.
  4. Tap to confirm on the subsequent pop-up menu.

Reboot Your Device – Alternatively, you can try physically rebooting the device to see if that regulates things. To do this, hold down on the power/sleep-wake button and the device’s Home button at the same time. Keep holding both until you see the screen go black — and then keep holding until the device boots back up again and you see the Apple logo. (This process may take as long as 45 seconds, depending on your model, so just be aware of that and don’t let go of those two buttons until you see the Apple logo flash on the screen.) Learn More: How to Reboot an iPhone 7

Last Resort: Hard Reset – If neither of these tips solve the problem, you may want to try performing a hard reset of your device. This will essentially delete everything — including data, apps, and files. You can always back-up your device and reinstall your lost data from a previously saved back-up; however, if you think you’ve been infected by malware, you might be better served by starting from a clean slate and manually rebuilding.

  1. This process may take a while, so be sure you’re both connected to Wi-Fi and plugged into a power outlet before getting started.
  2. Open Settings.
  3. Tap General.
  4. Tap Reset.
  5. Tap Erase All Content & Settings.
  6. Then follow the steps as they appear on screen.

Also important to ensure is that you update to the latest versions of iOS, when they become available. But be cautious when updating to the next version of iOS 10.3, since Cupertino will be switching over to a brand-new file management system!

Source : idropnews.com

Categorized in How to

When you’re forking over a fortune for the latest iPhone, the last thing you’re probably thinking about is paying even more for “what if” scenarios. But cracking your iPhone screen is bound to happen. Trust me: Happy hour drinks and uneven pavement do not mix.

But how much should it really cost to fix a cracked iPhone screen? In a perfect world, nothing.

In this world: Damaged iPhones have cost Americans $10.7 billion since 2007, according to a study done in 2014 by SquareTrade, which is — full disclosure — a company that provides warranties for iPhones and iPads.

Outside of warranty, repairing your cracked iPhone screen will typically cost $129 to $149 if you get it fixed by Apple.

Don’t have an emergency fund you could use to pay that $100+ fee? You should!

Just like with health or home insurance, it is much better to be financially prepared when disaster strikes. Think of it as a “peace of mind” payment; even if you never end up using it, you can rest easy to know that you’re covered.

The case for AppleCare+

Whether it’s for a plane ticket or a new sound system, you’ve probably been asked, “would you like to purchase insurance with that?”

With your iPhone, get that insurance, or else you might be asking “new phone, who dis?” earlier than you might like.

I’ve cracked my iPhone screen probably eight times in my life, and almost every twentysomething I know has shattered their screen at least once. I didn’t splurge for AppleCare+, and I’ve felt all types of #regrets.

I’ve gotten my screen replaced for $120 and up, and constantly question the quality of the replacement screens, as they seem to be crack even when gingerly dropped. After reaching out to my social network about where they get their screens replaced, most people touted AppleCare+ as the best screen saviors.

“If you’re willing to pay more upfront at purchase, I’d go with AppleCare+,” says Luke Villapaz, who has used it in the past. “It’s a great option if you’re catastrophically clumsy with your phone. … not so great if you’re the type that straight up loses their phone often.”

crackedphone

While every iPhone comes with one year of hardware repair coverage as part of its limited warranty, AppleCare+ from Apple extends that coverage for two years and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage, with a service fee of $29 for screen damage or $99 for any other damage.

This is definitely a deal worth taking advantage of if you know you’ll be dropping your phone at least once in the next three years. And TBH, you probably will.

Currently, AppleCare+ can be bought for iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus for $129 when you purchase your new iPhone. It can also be bought within 60 days of your iPhone purchase.

Don’t forget; if you’re dropping a lot of cash on a new smartphone, make sure to really maximize your money by using a cash back credit card.

Protect what you have

Of course, it’s always smartest to protect your screen to prevent it from cracking in the first place!

Personally, I use Tech Armor’s Ballistic Glass Screen Protector. You can get one for as low as $6, and they really do a great job at preventing scratches and small cracks. ZAGG Invisible Shield screen protectors also come highly recommended. For an iPhone 7, prices start at $14.99 and go up to $49.99.

“Once you buy one they’ll replace them for free you just have to pay shipping. I’ve probably gotten 10 from them,” says Tori Sellers, an avid ZAGG user. “You just have to send the cracked one back to them in an envelope they provide that already has postage.”

Source : bankrate.com

Categorized in Others

Apple rolled out the new iOS 10.3 update Monday — and if you took the plunge and upgraded to the new OS, you might have noticed your iPhone is running a bit more quickly and smoothly than it did before.

That alone shouldn't be a big surprise. New software should make your phone hum, and this update in particular includes a fancy new modern file system that has played a part in freeing up more storage space on devices than the previous OS.

But that's not the only reason your iPhone now has some extra pep, according to Apple engineer Renaud Lienhart. He took to Twitter to reveal one of the undocumented tweaks to the OS.

iOS 10.3 feels “snappier” because many animations were slightly tweaked & shortened, for the better.
— Renaud Lienhart (@NotoriousBUGS) March 28, 2017

The animations he's talking about come when you open, close or switch between apps, as BGR notes. This doesn't mean the apps will be running faster when you use them — it has to do more with improved responsiveness, which I noticed right away while switching between open apps on the new OS. It's a small change, but it makes multitasking on the iPhone even more seamless than before.

You should update your device to iOS 10.3 for more than just the speed boost, too. It's always a good call to keep your phone's OS current, since updates usually fix issues and bugs, like the Safari ransom bug that 10.3 knocked out.

That, and you'll finally be able to track down pesky AirPods when they get lost and avoid dropping a $69 fee (not nice) for a replacement.

Author: Brett Williams
Source : Mashable Tech
 
Categorized in Others

WHEN YOU LOSE the key to your bike lock you borrow bolt cutters. When your door is jammed you look up a locksmith. And when you need targeted surveillance of a smartphone, you call your cyberarms dealer. Naturally! For bad actors and nation states, sometimes all it takes to access someone’s private text messages, browsing history, calls, emails, calendar, location, contacts, and apps, is a big enough check. Although maybe not as big as you’d think.

Researchers from the mobile security firm Lookout and Google’s Android security team revealed evidence this weekof a type of mobile spyware for Android that masquerades as a normal app download, while secretly gaining root access to a device to do broad surveillance on the user over time. Lookout, working with Citizen Lab, a human rights and global security research group, discovered a similar malicious product for iOS last year. Called Pegasus, the malware appeared to originate from the Israeli spy technology company NSO Group. Since NSO Group also advertises the product for Android, Lookout got to work trying to find proof that it exists. It didn’t take long.

“We knew we’d find it,” says Mike Murray, the vice president of security intelligence at Lookout. “It was just a question of when and where in the data. It’s important to understand the pervasiveness of this. This stuff is being used by all sorts of nation-state advanced attackers around the world for whatever their aims are. And their aims are more broad than we necessarily think about.”

That isn’t cause for you specifically to worry. Google checked data from the Verify Apps software security scanner it has on 1.4 billion devices around the world and found possible downloads of Pegasus for Android (also called Chrysaor) on fewer than 40 devices total, in countries including Israel, Georgia, Mexico, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United Arab Emirates. Google says it notified all of those users about the potential danger and blocked the malware. A few dozen devices is a very small population, but the software provides virtually complete access and control on a device. This isn’t some credit card theft or prescription drug scam. It’s complete ownership of data about a person’s entire digital life.

Reports indicate that it costs a few hundred thousand dollars to get up and running with this type of NSO Group tool, and then costs tens of thousands of dollars for each target a customer wants to use the product on. Think of it like a licensing fee. The cost is relatively small, especially in the context of the types of coffers that comprise NSO’s clientele, but high enough that you probably wouldn’t install it on every phone out there. Murray says that the cost of using the iOS and Android tools is comparable, from what he has seen.

The malicious app download was never available in the Google Play Store, and was probably distributed to targets using links in specially crafted text messages, as was the case with the iOS version. Pegasus for iOS exploited a series of rare and valuable zero day (previously unknown and therefore unpatched) bugs in iOS to gain full access. In the case of the Android version, though, the malware exploits a known rooting method called Framaroot.

Since it’s open source, Android can be infinitely altered and adjusted, but this can make it difficult to distribute security updates widely, since not all patches and protections become available for all “forks” (independent versions) of the operating system. As a result, it is easier to use old vulnerabilities to target Android users, because a portion of the population will generally still be vulnerable to a given attack months or years after a patch comes out. And even if a potential victim downloads Pegasus for Android on a device that has all the most recent security updates, the spyware can still work if the user mistakenly grants approval through Android’s permissions system.

The malware is also difficult to detect. It has self-destruct mechanisms built in to wipe it off devices, and can even block certain patches and scans that could nullify it. But Lookout knew the types of things that characterized the NSO Group’s Pegasus tool on iOS, and was able to look for evidence of the Android version in anonymous data it has collected from more than 100 million of its customers’ devices. “With the iOS version [of Pegasus] we started to learn about how NSO builds software and how they do their job. We noticed common standards in the way they write code, common infrastructure that they’ve used,” says Murray. “So we found a bunch of initial candidates [in our data] that looked very promising, some of which were incredibly promising and actually turned out to be the real thing.”

Google says it has disabled the malicious application on infected devices, and has updated its Verify Apps service to protect the overall Android population. Some samples of Pegasus for Android date back to 2014, though, so it seems likely that NSO Group and other cyberarms dealers have developed even more sophisticated techniques since then.

“I don’t think this is the end to this story,” Murray says. “They’re evolving. I think the next round is going to be even more interesting.”

Source : wired.com

Categorized in Others

In light of the latest news that President Trump has overturned the FCC Internet privacy rules, discussions for and against virtual private networks (VPNs) have resurfaced. One of the biggest complaints with the repeal is that internet service providers are now legally allowed to sell your browsing data, if they’d like. While some ISPs have said that they won’t sell your browsing history for now, that doesn’t bar them from doing so in the future.

Proponents of VPNs believe that by utilizing such a service, you can obfuscate your browsing history so that your ISP won’t be able to build a “catalog” of your browsing habits. Opponents to VPNs dutifully note that by using a VPN service all you’re doing is migrating your browsing history from one ISP’s eyes to another. Browsing history data collection aside, benefits still exist by using VPNs, especially on your iPhone or iPad.

Why should I use a VPN on iOS?

Many iPhone and iPad users have come to believe that iOS as a whole is an incredibly secure platform. That may be true to an extent, but vulnerabilities still exist. More obviously, these vulnerabilities may not exist in iOS themselves but rather third-party apps that implement poor code.

A few months back we reported on how both Experian and myFICO mobile contained security vulnerabilities that potentially leaked user data onto connected networks. Simply put: launching your Experian app on iOS on an unsecured network meant your user credentials could be pulled maliciously. Once pulled, attackers could pull up all your personal and credit data linked to Experian.

In cases where third-party apps are insecure, using a VPN can add an additional layer for obfuscation. Instead of an attacker easily seeing your credentials, your credentials are now being passed through another network entirely.

Which VPN should I use on iOS?

This age-old question continues to be one of the more difficult aspects of VPN discussions. There are literally hundreds of VPN providers out there, but deciphering which to choose is one the most difficult challenges.

To begin, our first recommendation is do not use a free VPN service provider. Maintaining VPN data servers cost real money, so any company willing to offer free VPN servers to its users means it’s most likely selling that user data. Worse still, that “free” VPN provider may even not be actually securing your data but rather sending it out in the open.

The second recommendation is to not start with the App Store. Normally the iOS App Store is a great location to dive in and discover applications to solve problems you may have, but you should be extra careful here. In the case of VPN applications, you want to find one that hs been thoroughly vetted. Sites like That One Privacy Site have set out to build detailed comparisons against as many VPN providers as possible. Keeping in line with the President’s FCC ruling, looking for a VPN provider that doesn’t keep logs on data usage is a great start.

After that, we’d recommend testing out a few different VPNs for a few weeks. Different VPN providers have different experiences with data speeds depending on where their servers are located. In my personal testing, NordVPN has been fantastic for me and served as a companion when I traveled to South America last year. From our readers, we’ve received recommendations on CloakPrivate Internet Access, and Hide My Ass. By trying multiple different providers, you can learn which ones will offer a better overall experience for you.

Note: All four of the listed VPN providers above have well-built, and easy to understand iOS applications that directly integrate into iOS’ own VPN settings. 

What’s next for VPNs and iOS?

Discussions around VPNs will continue to occur so long as security is in the forefront of user’s minds. Until Apple rolls out its own VPN similar to Google, users will have to rely on their own intuitions on which to pick from.

For a list of VPN providers currently offering discounts, check out our 9to5Toys’ Specials page. Remember to cross-check providers with other resources to make sure it fits your personal criteria.

Do you have a personal VPN that you use on iOS that you love? Have any doubts you want answered? Let us know in the comments below!

Categorized in How to

Apple has issued an emergency patch to fix a vulnerability that left iOS devices at risk of being attacked via WiFi.

Just days after the release of iOS 10.3, Apple has pushed out an update for iOS 10.3.1 in order to fix a significant security issue that made iOS devices vulnerable to attacks sent via Wi-Fi.

The emergency patch addresses a vulnerability that would allow an attacker within range of an at-risk device to exploit a flaw in the operating system that would allow for arbitrary code execution that could attack the Wi-Fi chip in the device.

The issue appears to be the residual effect of a similar vulnerability that was supposedly patched with iOS 10.3. That version of the exploit allowed an attacker to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges, meaning it could affect the entire operating system.

The vulnerability patched by the update to iOS 10.3.1 affected devices with a Wi-Fi chip. That includes the iPhone 5 and later, iPad 4th generation and later and iPod touch 6th generation and later.

In a support documentation for the update, Apple credited Google Project Zero —Google’s team of security researchers—for spotting the issue.

The patch to iOS 10.3.1 also fixes an apparent issue that kept old iOS devices from downloading iOS 10.3 as an over-the-air update. 32-bit devices including the iPhone 5, 5C and fourth-generation iPad were affected, but will now be able to download the update normally.

How To Update To iOS 10.3.1

iOS 10.3.1 can be downloaded directly to your iOS device if you are connected to a Wi-Fi connection. This can be done by going to the Settings app, tapping “General” and tapping “Software Update.” An option to download and install should appear.

However, given the primary issue iOS 10.3.1 fixes has to do with potential security threats for iOS devices connected to Wi-Fi, you may choose to install the update via iTunes. Make sure your iTunes is up to date, then connect your iOS device to your computer via USB.

In iTunes, select your device’s icon from the upper left bar. Click on the Summary tab and click “check for update.” Click “Download” and iTunes will begin downloading the update. A guide of on-screen prompts will lead you through the process to complete the update.

Source : Yahoo.com
 
Categorized in Others

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