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Source: This article was Published in help123.sg - Contributed by Member: Dorothy Allen

The internet is full of websites that are fake or fraudulent, and we understand that it can be challenging to determine if a website is credible. Here are some tips you can use to find out if a website is legitimate:

1) Ensure that the contact information is valid

Credible websites provide updated and accurate contact information. Legitimate companies will always list ways you can get in touch with them. Always validate the contact information provided if you are unsure of its credibility.

2) Look out for spelling or grammatical mistakes

Spelling mistakes and grammatical inconsistencies in a website is an indication that the site may not be credible. Legitimate companies or website owners take effort to present information in a clear and error-free manner.

3) Double-check the web address to make sure it is the original

The website address bar contains vital information about where you are on the internet and how secure the page is. Paying attention to these details can minimize the risk of falling into a phishing scam or any other form of scams which hackers or cybercriminals have created to dupe web users.

Many fraudulent websites use domain names that reference well-known brands to trick unknowing users into providing sensitive personal information. It is good to always practice caution when visiting websites to make sure it is the official website you are visiting.

4) Ensure that the website is secure

Another piece of vital information that can be picked up from the website address bar is the website's connection security indicator. A secure website is indicated by the use of "HTTPS" instead of "HTTP", which means that the website's connection is secure and any information exchanged between you and the website is encrypted and safe.

5) Is the offer too good to be true?

Fraudulent and scam websites use low prices or deals that are too good to be true to lure internet users or shoppers to purchase fake, counterfeit, or even non-existent products. If you encounter a website which offers prices that sounds too good to be true, be suspicious about it. Always ensure that the website is legitimate before making any purchase!

Published in Internet Privacy

Source: This article was usa.kaspersky.com - Contributed by Member: Barbara Larson

Even though computers have become a constant feature of modern life, many people still don't realize the enormous risks that come from constant interaction with technology. 

Computer viruses are one of the oldest forms of malware — in other words, malicious software designed to do harm — but their ability to avoid detection and replicate themselves means that these programs will always be cause for worry. Understanding just what a virus can do to your computer is the first step to securing your system and protecting your family from attack.

A Computer Virus' Potential

The only real qualification for a piece of software to be labeled a "virus" is that the program has the ability to replicate itself onto other machines. This means that not all viruses pose a direct threat to your computer, but often even latent viruses will allow cyberthieves and hackers to install more damaging programs like worms and Trojans. 
Regardless of the intention of the computer virus, the program will take up some system resources while it runs. This slows down your system, even bringing your computer to an abrupt halt if the virus hogs enough resources or if there are many viruses running at the same time.

More often, the computer virus has some kind of malicious intent, either written into the virus itself or from the other pieces of malware that the virus installs. This software can take a number of harmful actions, like opening up a back door to the computer where hackers can take control of the system, or stealing confidential personal information like online banking credentials or credit card numbers. It could also direct your Web browser to unwanted, often pornographic, sites, or even lock the computer down and ask for a ransom to open it back up again. In the most severe cases, viruses can corrupt important computer files, rendering the system useless. Windows OS products are often targets of these types of vulnerabilities so be sure you're secure whether you are running the newest OS , XP, or Windows 8 - security is essential.

How to be a Savvy Computer-User

So with all the damage that a virus can do, you're sure to wonder how you can protect yourself and your family from these threats. The first step is the most obvious, and it all comes down to using your computer in a smart way. 
Ensure all your programs have the latest version of antivirus software installed. This is especially true for things like your operating system, security software and Web browser, but also holds true for just about any program that you frequently use. Viruses often take advantages of bugs or exploits in the code of these programs to propagate to new machines, and while the companies that make the programs are usually quick to fix the holes, those fixes only work if they have been downloaded to your computer. 


It's also important to avoid taking actions that could put your computer at risk. These include opening unsolicited email attachments, visiting unknown websites or downloading software from untrustworthy websites or peer-to-peer file transfer networks. To ensure that the entire family understands the risks, these procedures should be taught to everyone, and children should have their Internet use monitored to ensure they aren't visiting suspect websites or downloading random programs or files.

How to Install Virus Prevention and Detection Software

The next important step in protecting your computer and your family is to install trusted computer security software that can actively scan your system and provide virus protection. You should be warned, however, that not all security solutions are the same. 
Free antivirus software abounds on the Internet, but much of it isn't robust enough to offer complete protection or updated frequently enough to be of much use. Horrifyingly, some of this free software doesn't do anything at all and instead installs viruses, adware, spyware or Trojans when you try to download and install the program. 
If the price is a factor, the best option is to find a competitively priced Internet security solution that offers a free antivirus trial, so that you can see the software in action, and how your computer responds after being cleaned, before you make a purchasing decision. 
The hardest part about all of this is that while each day many threats are neutralized, more are then created in their place. This means that as long as there's an Internet, computer viruses will continue to be a problem. Ignoring the issue or thinking that it won't affect you is a sure way to get your computer compromised, and put your family's information or peace of mind at risk.

Published in Internet Privacy

Source: This article was published lawjournalnewsletters.com By JONATHAN BICK - Contributed by Member: Barbara Larson

Internet professional responsibility and client privacy difficulties are intimately associated with the services offered by lawyers. Electronic attorney services result in data gathering, information exchange, document transfers, enhanced communications and novel opportunities for marketing and promotion. These services, in turn, provide an array of complicated ethical issues that can present pitfalls for the uninitiated and unwary.

Since the Internet interpenetrates every aspect of the law, Internet activity can result in a grievance filed against attorneys for professional and ethical misconduct when such use results in communication failure, conflicts of interest, misrepresentation, fraud, dishonesty, missed deadlines or court appearances, advertising violations, improper billing, and funds misuse. While specific Internet privacy violation rules and regulations are rarely applied to attorney transactions, attorneys are regularly implicated in unfair and deceptive trade practices and industry-specific violations which are often interspersed with privacy violation facts.

Attorneys have a professional-responsibility duty to use the Internet, and it is that professional responsibility which results in difficulties for doing so. More specifically, the Model Rules of Professional Conduct Rule 1.1 (competence) paragraph 8 (maintenance) has been interpreted to require the use of the Internet, and Rules 7.1 – 7.5 (communications, advertising and soliciting) specifically charge attorneys with malfeasance for using the Internet improperly.

Internet professional conduct standards and model rules/commentary cross the full range of Internet-related concerns, including expert self-identification and specialty description; the correct way to structure Internet personal profiles; social media privacy settings; the importance and use of disclaimers; what constitutes “communication”; and the establishment of an attorney-client relationship. Additionally, ethics rules address “liking,” “friending” and “tagging” practices.

The application of codes of professional conduct is faced with a two-fold difficulty. First, what is the nature of the attorney Internet activity? Is the activity of publishing, broadcasting or telecommunications? Determining the nature of the attorney Internet activity is important because different privacy and ethic cannons apply. Additionally, the determination of the nature of the attorney activity allows practitioners to apply analogies. For example, guidance with respect to attorney Internet-advertising professional conduct is likely to be judged by the same standards as traditional attorney advertising.

The second difficulty is the location where activity occurs. Jurisdictions have enacted contrary laws and professional-responsibility duties.

Options for protecting client privacy and promoting professional responsibility include technical, business and legal options. Consider the following specific legal transactions.

A lawyer seeking to use the Internet to attract new clients across multiple jurisdictions frequently is confronted with inconsistent rules and regulations. A number of jurisdictions have taken the position that Internet communications are a form of advertising and thus subject to a particular state bar’s ethical restrictions. Such restrictions related to Internet content include banning testimonials; prohibitions on self-laudatory statements; disclaimers; and labeling the materials presented as advertising.

Other restrictions relate to content processing, such as requiring that advance copies of any advertising materials be submitted for review by designated bar entities prior to dissemination, and requiring that attorneys keep a copy of their website and any changes made to it for three years, along with a record of when and where the website was used. Still, other restrictions relate to distribution techniques, such as unsolicited commercial emailing (spam). Spam is considered by some states as overreaching, on the same grounds as ethical bans on in-person or telephone solicitation.

To overcome these difficulties and thus permit the responsible use of the Internet for attorney marketing, both technical and business solutions are available. The technical solution employs selectively serving advertisements to appropriate locations. For this solution, the software can be deployed to detect the origin of an Internet transaction. This software will serve up advertising based on the location of the recipient. Thus, attorneys can ameliorate or eliminate the difficulties associated with advertising and marketing restrictions without applying the most restrictive rule to every state.

Alternatively, a business solution may be used. Such a business solution would apply the most restrictive rules of each state to every Internet advertising and marketing communication.

Another legal difficulty associated with attorney Internet advertising and marketing is the unauthorized practice of law. All states have statutes or ethical rules that make it unlawful for persons to hold themselves out as attorneys or to provide legal services unless admitted and licensed to practice in that jurisdiction.

There are no reported decisions on this issue, but a handful of ethics opinions and court decisions take a restrictive view of unauthorized practice issues. For example, the court in Birbower, Montalbano, Condon & Frank v. Superior, 949 P.2d 1(1998), relied on unauthorized practice concerns in refusing to honor a fee agreement between a New York law firm and a California client for legal services provided in California, because the New York firm did not retain local counsel and its attorneys were not admitted in California.

The software can detect the origin of an Internet transaction. Thus, attorneys can ameliorate or eliminate the unauthorized practice of law by identifying the location of a potential client and only interacting with potential clients located in the state where an attorney is authorized to practice. Alternatively, an attorney could use a net nanny to prevent communications with potential clients located in the state where the attorney is not authorized to practice.

Preserving clients’ confidences is of critical importance in all aspects of an attorney’s practice. An attorney using the Internet to communicate with a client must consider the confidentiality of such communications. Using the Internet to communicate with clients on confidential matters raises a number of issues, including whether such communications: might violate the obligation to maintain client confidentiality; result in a waiver of the attorney-client privilege if intercepted by an unauthorized party; and create possible malpractice liability.

Both legal and technological solutions are available. First, memorializing informed consent is a legal solution.

Some recent ethics opinions suggest a need for caution. Iowa Opinion 96-1 states that before sending client-sensitive information over the Internet, a lawyer should either encrypt the information or obtain the client’s written acknowledgment of the risks of using this method of communication.

Substantial compliance may be a technological solution because the changing nature of Internet difficulties makes complete compliance unfeasible. Some attorneys have adopted internal measures to protect electronic client communications, including asking clients to consider alternative technologies; encrypting messages to increase security; obtaining written client authorization to use the Internet and acknowledgment of the possible risks in so doing, and exercising independent judgment about communications too sensitive to share using the Internet. While the use of such technology is not foolproof, if said use is demonstrably more significant than what is customary, judges and juries have found such efforts to be sufficient.

Finally, both legal and business options are available to surmount Internet-related client conflicts. Because of the business development potential of chat rooms, bulletin boards, and other electronic opportunities for client contact, many attorneys see the Internet as a powerful client development tool. What some fail to recognize, however, is that the very opportunity to attract new clients may be a source of unintended conflicts of interest.

Take, for example, one of the most common uses of Internet chat rooms: a request seeking advice from attorneys experienced in dealing with a particular legal problem. Attorneys have been known to prepare elaborate and highly detailed responses to such inquiries. Depending on the level and nature of the information received and the advice provided, however, attorneys may be dismayed to discover that they have inadvertently created an attorney-client relationship with the requesting party. At a minimum, given the anonymous nature of many such inquiries, they may face the embarrassment and potential client relations problem of taking a public position or providing advice contrary to the interests of an existing firm client.

An acceptable legal solution is the application of disclaimers and consents. Some operators of electronic bulletin boards and online discussion groups have tried to minimize the client conflict potential by providing disclaimers or including as part of the subscription agreement the acknowledgment that any participation in online discussions does not create an attorney-client relationship.

Alternatively, the use of limited answers would be a business solution. The Arizona State Bar recently cautioned that lawyers probably should not answer specific questions posed in chat rooms or newsgroups because of the inability to screen for potential conflicts with existing clients and the danger of disclosing confidential information.

Because the consequences of finding an attorney-client relationship are severe and may result in disqualification from representing other clients, the prudent lawyer should carefully scrutinize the nature and extent of any participation in online chat rooms and similar venues.

Published in Internet Ethics

Source: This article was published insights.speakwithageek.com - Contributed by Member: Deborah Tannen

What Is Micro-VPN?

Micro-VPNs are the smaller quantum of VPNs, at the level of an application or collection of applications. These are known as trusted applications; each of these trusted applications has a token that is authenticated before the tunnel is opened for the user utilizing a Micro VPN.

VPN And Security Concerns

In today's IT world, many workers often use their personal devices to get their work completed. This turns out to be a time-saving process for employees and company. Even though these devices help them, there are critical security concerns that arise with using your own device.

An old-style VPN approach is the most commonly used remote connectivity among organizations, to check emails and documents by an employee. The VPN tunnel that is established is device-wide, and once they are connected, any application on the personal device can navigate this tunnel, and get access to corporate resources. This means that if the employee’s device is infected with malware or malignant applications, these can potentially gain access to the tunnel. The above said security downside can be avoided, through the use of micro-VPNs, which are specific to an application instead of a device.

Security Advantages

The following are the certain advantages of using micro-VPN:

  • Takes virtual private network client from the device to the application and authenticates the user.
  • Provides access to specific corporate content without having to do a full-scale VPN on the device.
  • Acts as a security wrapper for the mobile device around an enterprise application by providing a token for successful VPN tunnel.
  • Administers mobile control policies on the application that connects to the corporate network.
  • The micro-VPN application and the corporate network can see one another; however, remaining of the device is not opened to/accessible by the client network. In addition, the user cannot access company resources from the non-enterprise application.

Citrix Solutions

Citrix XenMobile’ product, NetScaler Gateway, is based on the idea of micro-VPNs through logical VPN tunnels. NetScaler Gateway helps in creating different TCP sessions for different applications automatically.

Currently, micro-VPNs are one of the trustworthy solutions that can be deployed by the IT departments on employee’s devices to avoid exposure to unknown elements.

Find out today why you may need a VPN with help choosing the right VPN Provider.

Published in Internet Privacy

A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is one of the most effective and cheapest ways of protecting communications, as well as identity, on the internet. A VPN will effectively hide all the details of communications from being visible to anyone.

After connecting to the VPN, the only information visible to others is that a user is connected to a VPN server and nothing else. All other information, such as your IP address and sites you visited, is encrypted by the VPN’s security protocols. Not only this but VPNs also protect your data and communications.

VPNs are becoming increasingly popular. From the simplest to the most user-friendly and most functional, VPNs can save you from a world of troubles and help internet users to browse the internet without being tracked. It can also unlock many doors to give you access to geo-restricted content.

And that is exactly why I thought it’s high time to write about the best VPNs for complete internet security and privacy. So, without any further ado, here is a list of top 10 VPNs:

1. Ivacy

ivacy vpn

Ivacy gives you everything you want in a VPN and more - advanced data encryption for that added layer of online security and privacy, optimized servers for quicker download and buffer-free streaming!

With more than 200 optimized servers in 50+ countries, it gives you unrestricted access to geo-locked content anywhere in the world. It also boasts compatibility with a wide range of devices and operating systems and often gets cited as the best VPN, especially for Kodi by users across the globe.

It also has a whole arsenal of user-friendly features like internet kill switch, multi-login, split-tunneling and much more. At roughly half the price of any other industry-leading VPN for its recent 1+1 year plan, Ivacy isn’t just a good deal, it’s literally a steal!

2. Private Internet Access

IPVanish Logo

When concerned about your online security and privacy, IPVanish is often the first name that a lot of internet users around the world recall. Besides giving you foolproof security, this VPN also gives you unrestricted access to geo-restricted, region-locked or censored content anywhere in the world. It’s fast too, making streaming a positively buffer-free experience.

What ranks IPVanish as one of the leading VPNs in the world is its immaculate service and outstanding features which give you little (if at all) to complain about. Add the typical functional benefits with a ton of user-friendly features and you have your knight in shining armor prepared to protect you from all evil.

3. PureVPN

purevpn

This brand has established a strong and loyal clientele of customers by delivering outstanding service quality over the years. It gives advanced online protection and has a strict zero log policy on customer data.

It has nearly 800 servers that are spread across 141 countries and give you instant access to your favorite content from anywhere in the world with unlimited server-switching. It does not have a free trial but does offer a three-day VPN trial.

It is one of the few VPNs to actually have a browser plug-in for Chrome and Firefox. Although the service is impressive, it isn’t the first choice for people who want the best value for less money.

4. ExpressVPN

express VPN logo

ExpressVPN has a wide server spread with optimized servers located in more than 145 cities in 94 countries. This gives its users instant access to content from anywhere in the world.

Like many other industry-leading VPNs, Express is also known to provide unbreakable security with its advanced encryption protocols that make online threats like hacking and surveillance virtually impossible. Express is often cited as one of the leading VPNs for Netflix streaming. However, given that all leading VPN brands offer the same array of features for all subscription plans, Express may seem a bit on the higher side.

5. Private Internet Access

PIA VPN logo

A lot of internet users prefer Private Internet Access (PIA) because of its multi-gigabit VPN tunnel gateways. PIA is fast and reliable, offering impressive online security and privacy with equally impressive connection speed. So you get quick access to any content anywhere in the world at the click of a button.

It also happens to be one of the few VPNs that is modestly priced at below $40 ($39.95) for the yearly subscription plan.

6. NordVPN

NordVPN logo

Nord is a trusted name in cybersecurity and has been around for quite some time. With servers spread across the globe, Nord gives you instant access to your favorite content from all around the world. So accessing region-locked content is not something you should worry about if you have Nord VPN.

Often praised for its zero-logs policy, Nord is relatively cheap compared to other industry-leading VPNs like Express but its features and service are competitive, giving it an edge among many other brands.

7. VyprVPN

Vypr VPN

Besides boasting impressive speed as well as security, VyprVPN boasts an array of extra features that are packed into a highly intuitive and user-friendly app.

No matter which subscription plan you opt for, Vypr will give you the whole package with features like multi-login, unlimited server switching, and split tunneling. With more than 700 servers strategically spread across the globe, you don’t have to worry about accessing your favorite region-locked content ever again. However, Vypr does restrict certain security features on the basis of the subscription plan you opt for, which might or might not be a deal breaker, depending upon the mindset and the subscription plan in question.

8. TorGuard VPN

TorGuard VPN

Just like Tor Browser, TorGuard is a hack that gives you instant access to region-locked content anywhere in the world. However, since TorGuard is a VPN, it uses advanced encryption to protect your online privacy and identity.

With more than 3,000 servers spread across 55 countries, TorGuard really does make sure that you get instant access to content from around the world no matter where you do it from.

9. TunnelBear VPN

TunnelBear VPN

There’s little to worry about when you have an eight-foot-tall 500lb grizzly bear watching over you. TunnelBear has all the makings of a good VPN but perhaps it’s the cut-throat competition around it that has hindered its climb to the top.

It gives you foolproof online security and privacy with impressive connection and data transfer speeds. The subscriptions plans are moderately priced, keeping in mind the sensibilities of price-sensitive customers. All in all, TunnelBear is a good buy at the current price!

10. VPN Unlimited

vpn unlimited 

VPNUnlimited acts just like a DNS firewall, giving you total online security and privacy with lightning-fast unlimited access to region-locked content.

Although VPN Unlimited offers the same array of features and services as other brands operating in the industry such as multi-login and ISP-throttling, the price is a bit steep with the monthly subscription plan costing $8.99! So VPN Unlimited isn’t the “go to” brand of choice for many. However, for those who can afford the brand, VPN Unlimited is a safe bet.

Which VPN Is Right for You?

Your choice of VPN is going to come down to the features you need within your budget. That being said, you should now find it easier to determine which VPN best suits your purpose. Rest assured, each VPN listed above will meet and exceed your expectations and that is a fact.

If you are still wondering which VPN to get, visit this article which reviews VPN services based on the latest data, information, and customer reviews.

 Source: This article was published globalsign.com By Anas Baig

Published in Internet Privacy

What Are you trying to find out how to access the dark web and what is it?

Well, look no further, we have gone and done the research so we could show you step by step the best and safest way how to access the darknet.

We cover everything, from setting up Tor, how to choose a VPN, what not to do, finding the best sites to access, and extra steps to remain anonymous.

It is extremely easy to access the dark web and even easier to be detected on it if you don’t take precautions. If you are new to the darknet, this guide will help you on your way.

According to researchers, only 4% of the internet is visible to the general public.

Meaning that the remaining 96% of the internet is made up of “The Deep Web”.

Dark Web or DarkNet is a subset of the Deep Web where there are sites that sell drugs, hacking software, counterfeit money and more. We explain this further down the article if you are not up to speed.

If you are looking to access hidden marketplace’s or darknet websites (with a .onion domain) then dark web access is done using the TOR network with the TOR browser bundle. TOR is the most widely used dark web browser.

How To Access The Dark Web Guide

Step 1: Go and get yourself a good VPN (Virtual Private Network) here, use it ALL of the time, no matter if you are on TOR or not. This site here reviews the best VPN’s for use with TOR.

You should be taking your anonymity and security very seriously if you are visiting the Dark Net, especially if you are viewing any Darknet Markets.

Do not fool yourself and think that the ISP’s (Internet Service Providers) and Law Enforcement are not trying to track those who use Tor to access the Dark Web, they are, and they are good at it so don’t make it easy for them.

It should be brought to your attention that there was a recent Tor vulnerability which leaked your REAL IP address leading back to your real location. If you already have the Tor Browser then UPDATE it immediately. Vulnerabilities like these are happening more often to Tor.

VPN for Dark Web Access

By using the simple VPN app, your darknet activities will be hidden from your ISP and government agencies as all of your internet usages will be encrypted. No one will even know you are using TOR, let alone browsing for darknet markets.

What’s even better is that the VPN will give you a fake IP address, in another country if you like, so even if Tor is compromised then the trace just leads back to somewhere else that can’t be linked to you.

The other benefit of using a VPN is to prevent hackers stealing your identity and or personal files and photos from your computer.

You need to use a good VPN that keeps NO LOGS, fast performance, preferably accepts bitcoin as payment, has a kill switch for DNS leaks, and is compatible with TOR.

Then install your VPN, if you buy one of the better VPN’s then it is usually just a one-click install and one or two clicks to turn it on.

Step 2: You can’t access the deep web just using a common browser like Internet Explorer or Google Chrome. To get dark net access you will need to download the dark web browser called TOR browser bundle. Only get it from the official TOR website, never download it from anywhere else!

Now close all of your browsing windows and all apps connecting to the internet like Google Drive, Skype, OneDrive, iCloud etc.

Then open your VPN app and connect to another location other than where you are at, make sure to use the OpenVPN protocol as it is the most secure.

Open up your normal favorite browser and then download TOR

TOR Official Website: 

https://www.torproject.org/download/download.html

Tor Browser Download

Step 3: Install the TOR browser bundle on your PC or Mac. When the download is complete, double-click the downloaded file, choose the destination folder (the folder where you want to extract tor browser), and choose extract.

Step 4: Start TOR Browser. Open the folder where you extracted TOR browser and double-click “Start Tor Browser”. The TOR start page will open in a browser window (it’s actually a portable version of FireFox stripped down).

From here, you now have a good level of anonymity and security and you are able to gain access to .onion websites through your dark web browser.

tor-folder

Congratulations…

Next, you will want to visit a dark web site.

Now you have dark net access you should Click HERE to view the Darknet Market List so you can visit some of the best black market websites on the Deep Web.

silkroad
Silk Road ( Dark web screenshot )

If you do want to check out some dark net markets then you should follow the guide for that specific market as it will show you step by step what to do to sign up, browse etc.
If you are looking for the biggest list of hidden deep web links go here so you can find exactly what you are looking for. (some also call them dark web links). We have compiled one of the biggest lists of tested .onion sites on the darknet complete with a search function, website name, description, categories, site status and even a screenshot of the landing page so you can see if your site is online or dead.

Now we have shown you how to access the dark web we have some very important tips to share…

Bitcoin and Buying on the Dark Web:

If you are on the darknet to buy something, and most of us are, then you will need to use cryptocurrency to do so and Bitcoin is the most used cryptocurrency on the dark web.

Buying cryptocurrencies is another topic altogether, so we won’t go into it here but this site has made an easy to follow guide on buying bitcoin, but we will give you one GOLDEN tip on how to go under the radar and not have your crypto exchange account shut down and lose money.

NEVER send cryptocurrency directly from your exchange account (where you buy the coins) to a market or anywhere on the dark web, also never send coins directly from anywhere on the darknet to your exchange. They are onto this right away as they can tell where the coins came from and they WILL shut you down and you will be recorded in a list for sure.

You must send your coins from your exchange to a wallet (find out how to in the guides) then from the wallet to the dark web and vice-versa.

Bonus Security Steps For the Dark Net:
cyber-security

Step 5: DO NOT change the TOR browser window size unless you like living dangerously. The FEDS have programs that can match identities on random things such and match time online and other things with the browser window size, I shit you not. If you don’t change the size then it is the same as most other people.

Step 6: Please remember that TOR isn’t necessarily 100% anonymous, you should turn off JavaScript within the dark web browser settings to help.

tor-javascript-setting

Block Javascript in TOR Browser

Step 7: Disconnect your webcam or block the camera with some black tape. Hackers and governments have ways of getting into your computer and turning on the video and cameras.

You can have intimate images of you be used as blackmail or extortion, or even worse, used by the feds.

zuckerberg
Covered camera and mic?

Step 8: Disconnect your microphone or cover it with tape to muffle it good. The same goes for the microphone as the camera, the last thing you want is to be recorded saying incriminating things at home. It doesn’t even have to be while on the darknet. Even the Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg does it as he knows the dangers.

Step 9: NEVER use your real name, photos, email, or even password that you have used before on the dark web. This is the fastest way to be tracked. Use an anonymous email account and aliases that have nothing to do with you that you have never used before.

Step 10: If you are using TOR on the dark web for anything other than looking at cute pictures of kittens, you should think seriously about your privacy and security. Jolly Roger has put together a comprehensive guide on how to stay safe on the deep web, view the guide here.

If you have read through this how to access the darknet guide and thought to yourself WTF? Then you are probably new to this and need a bit of background and information to get you up to speed. Please remember to share this post so everyone that wants to have a look on the Dark Web can do so and do it safely.

What is the Clear Web?

Firstly, there is the Clear Web/Clear Net. This is the normal internet where you do everyday things like check Gmail, Facebook, and Twitter and buy things from Amazon etc. All websites and web pages that a search engine like Google can find are on the Clear Net.

What is the Deep Web?

Then we have the Deep Web. This is a subset of the internet that cannot be indexed (found) by search engines like Google. This includes all web pages that are behind membership logins, all company and organization web pages used internally and other data. The majority of the deep web does not have anything illegal on it.

deep-web-dark-web-differences

Deep Web and Dark Web

What is the Dark Web (also called darknet)?

Then we have the Dark Web. This is a subset of the Deep Web that contains all sorts of websites, both legal and illegal. The types of sites include black markets that sell things like drugs, counterfeit goods, and weapons, you also have hacking sites, X-rated sites, bitcoin tumbling, and even sites for hitmen. The variety of sites on the Dark Web is quite astonishing. For now, there is no dark web search engine that works as well as Google does for the clarinet.

 Source: This article was published darkwebnews.com By Tarquin

Published in Deep Web

Being online is part of daily life, with Wi-Fi hotspots, mobile internet, and broadband connections spanning almost all of Britain, US and other developed countries.

While this gives us an overwhelming amount of information at our fingertips, it also exposes surprisingly large amounts of our personal information to the rest of the online world.

Depending on the websites and services you use, all manner of data from your browsing habits through to your birthday, address and marital status can be harvested from your online presence.

Even if websites, connections and devices you use do their best to hide your personal information, there are still a myriad of risks to your online privacy; we’ve selected seven to watch out for over the next 12 months.

Browse the web for any amount of time and you’ll notice adverts following you from site to site that are filled with products you may have been looking at earlier. That’s because you're being tracked.

Website cookies have historically been used to track web browsing via a piece of data inserted into your browser, but other techniques such as MAC address and account tracking can be used to see what you’ve been doing on the web.

While some people might not mind this, preferring to have adverts served up to them that are relevant to their interests, some may find it an invasion of digital privacy.

In the European Union, websites have to notify visitors that they’re using cookies and have to be transparent with any other methods they are using to follow you online.

But as data becomes more important to companies, developers and advertisers, there’s a lot more tracking going on by default.

If you’re concerned about online tracking, it’s always worth delving into the privacy settings of various services, apps and web browsers to make sure they’re set to give you the level of privacy you want. Alternatively, there all anti-tracking tools and browser extensions to keep your activity under wraps.

Whereas tracking might follow you in real-time, a variety of internet companies and services can collect your browsing data and share your computer or router MAC address with third-party advertisers and companies.

With this data companies, you have no direct interaction with can build up a pretty good profile of your internet habits and web browsing.

And this now extends to mobile apps, which in order to offer you their services will ask for access to your phone number, contacts, and other deeper phone functions.

Services like Google Maps can also track your real-time and historic location by default, which can be great if you want to know where you may have stumbled off to after a heavy Friday night. But to others could be seen as always being stalked by faceless tech companies.

While this can be the price people need to accept for free apps and services, some the data they potentially surrender may be pretty invasive.

Websites and online services that don’t have the latest and most robust security can effectively leave the information they might hold on you and the data flowing between your computer and a web server, at risk from hackers.

For example, websites using the now-outdated HTTP web communication standard, rather than the more robust HTTPS, lack an encrypted connection between a computer or smartphone and the website it connects to. This means the data flowing between the two points can be monitored by other companies or potentially snooped on and stolen by hackers for more nefarious purposes.

Furthermore, if the servers that support a website or online service are hacked, then you could find that cybercriminals have access to some of your personal credentials, not just infringing upon your privacy but also paving the way for fraud and identity theft.

To avoid such problems, it’s worth trying to only use websites with encrypted connections and making sure you have up-to-date cybersecurity software.

And while you can’t prevent a web server from being hacked,  using tools like two-factor authentication and keeping an eye out for any legitimate warnings that alert you to potential breaches of your data will help keep your personal information safer.

Smart TVs, fridges, thermostats, and speakers might seem like futuristic tech, but they can pose a threat to privacy.

A lack of security standards around the Internet of Things, the collective name given to connected and smart devices, means some devices might not have encrypted connections to the servers that power their smart features or may be vulnerable to simple hacking techniques, making them ripe targets for cybercriminals.

Or alternatively, devices such as smart speakers could end up listening to you all the time, rather than just respond to an activation phrase, which, whether deliberately or not, would be a massive breach of privacy.

More regulations and standards are being created to ensure smart home devices are kept secure and the data they collect and use is done so in a fashion that does not infringe upon a user’s personal privacy. But for the time being, if you value your privacy, it’s worth selecting smart home tech that has strong security and is transparent on how the gadgets collect data.

With all the things we can do on smartphones these days, it can be easy to plough through mobile data allowances pretty quickly, which makes logging onto public Wi-Fi hotspots very tempting.

But the problem is they often have weak or no form of security or encryption, meaning that hackers can snoop on the data going between your device, the hotspot and the web.

Some hotspots have a web portal that requires you to part with your email or login via Facebook or Twitter, meaning you have to part with some of your personal details, potentially opening you up to email spam, or force you to provide permission for the Wi-Fi service to have access to your social media posts.

It's worth being vigilant with the data you have to part to get a taste of free public Wi-Fi and identify if a provider will track your activity and use your details for intrusive marketing purposes.

More privacy-conscious people should consider using a virtual private network (VPN) which encrypts your web traffic and can hide your machine’s MAC address, making it difficult for others to snoop on your activity when out and about.

Some governments carry out online surveillance and don’t really allow their citizens to web browse privately. In the UK, the Investigatory Powers Act allows government authorities to legally spy on the browsing and internet use of British citizens.

As such, the government can directly breach your online privacy if they suspect you may be involved in criminal activity, though they need to apply for a warrant to do so, which should mean the average person isn’t being spied on by MI5.

However, the Investigatory Powers Act forces internet service companies to collect metadata on their customers and hold it for twelve months, which with a warrant can be collected in bulk by a government authority and used to combat terrorism or stop organized crime.

This means data relating to your personal internet use could get sifted through as part of a law enforcement task force even if you’re no way related to an investigation, which can be seen as pretty intrusive to your privacy.

Again, the use of a VPN or a proxy server can help boost your online privacy by hiding your IP address from the prying eyes of government agents and the police.

An open Facebook profile is arguably a stalker’s dream, with all manner of personal details, from current city of residence to phone numbers and photos available to browse and swipe.

And on Twitter, many users regularly post pictures with their location tagged, all of which allows for people to know their whereabouts with relative accuracy, as well as let savvy burglars know you’re not at home.

Privacy settings have been boosted on various social media sites to limit personal data to only friends or select contacts.

But there’s still the problem of your Facebook friends or Instagram followers, with fewer privacy settings,  tagging you in pictures they have of you and your escapades, potentially exposing some of your personal activities, location, and information to their friends who maybe strangers to you.

While the use of social networking sites at their very core is the antithesis of privacy, the use of them can be more intrusive that you’d perhaps first realize.

So for people wanting to keep their profiles low-key, it's worth taking time to go through the privacy options menu of such sites, and be aware of what you’re posting and how some updates can contain a lot more personal information than you’d think.]

Thanks to living in an ever-more connected world we have a lot more useful services and information but a mouse click or tap on a phone away; the downside is it exposes some of our personal data, habits, and life to a wider world.

But before you yank out the router and delete your Netflix account, there are techniques and approaches you can use to keep yourself away from prying eyes and fraudsters.

From tweaking web browser extensions and settings to using VPNs and anonymous search engines; plenty of tools can help you enjoy the fruit of the internet without sacrificing your online privacy.

Protect your privacy with KeepSolid VPN (70% off lifetime offer)

Source: This article was published pocket-lint.com

Published in Internet Privacy

Cyber-crime has become one of the greatest threats to businesses, government institutions, and individuals, as hackers are constantly finding new targets and advanced tools to break through cyber defenses. As technology improves, new vulnerabilities are discovered and new obstacles challenge security professionals.

The past year was followed by a number of high-impact cyber-attacks. Namely, a number of devastating, high-impact cyber-attacks like rumors that the US election was hacked, marked 2017. Apart from the rumors regarding the hacked US election, there were ransomware attacks all over the world, and of course, the Equifax breach.

Unfortunately, as challenging as it is today, cyber-security threats will likely get worse in the future, as attacks get more sophisticated. As the years pass, the global security threat outlook keeps on developing. In order to fight this threat, all business entities must understand and learn how to cope with these global cyber threats.

In 2018, these cyber threats are expected to grow at a constant rate, as more complex challenges continue to surface, and cyber criminals keep coming up with new ways of attacking secure IT systems. The following are some of the biggest internet security threats that can impact the operations of IT-powered organizations in the year 2018.

Ransomware

Over the past 12 months, we saw a huge number of ransomware attacks. Ransomware is, in fact, a relatively simple form of malware that breaches defenses and locks down computer files using strong encryption. Then, hackers demand money in exchange for digital keys, needed to unlock the data. Quite often, especially if the encrypted data hasn’t been backed up, victims pay. This has made ransomware popular with criminal hackers, who have recently started demanding payment in cryptocurrencies which are extremely hard to trace.

Google, Amazon, IBM and other big cloud operators, have hired the best digital security that will protect them from such attacks. However, smaller companies can’t afford such thing, which makes them more vulnerable. For a small-scale local business, even a single tiny breach could lead to a big payday for the hackers involved. To prevent your computer from getting hijacked, avoid clicking on unknown links, keep security software up to date, and backup everything on an external hard drive.

Attacks on Cryptocurrencies

According to the latest research, currently there are 1324 cryptocurrencies in total, and this number is expected to increase. The rapid increase in the value of some cryptocurrencies has pushed thieves into massive criminal activities against virtual currency scheme. As more people mine cryptocurrencies on their computers, cybercriminals will organize more attacks designed to steal crypto coins from users, using malware to steal funds from victims’ computers or to deploy hidden mining tools on machines.

Threats to IoT (Internet of Things)

As the value of real-time data collection advances, day-by-day, individuals and business entities are increasingly making use of IoT devices. But, unlike our traditional devices, the IoT devices pose a significant challenge and a sense of less control, simply because they are not the best protected entities, and are susceptible to hacking. That’s why protecting them is so important and will continue to do so in 2018. Millions of connected devices have little or no defense against hackers who want to gain control of them and use them to enter into a network or access valuable data. The number of cyber-attacks powered by compromised IoT devices has become a great concern of the IT security industry, which is why IoT vendors are already putting more time and effort into securing their devices.

Source: This article was published alleywatch.com By VIVENNE CARDENASS

Published in Internet Privacy

Young people are far more likely to have a positive experience surfing the internet than a negative one.

That’s according to new research released to coincide with Safer Internet Day, which is being celebrated around the world today.

However, young people’s digital lives are increasingly a double-edged sword, with the research revealing that while 89 percent felt happy as a result of their internet use in the past seven days, more than half reported having felt sad (56%) or angry (52%).

Safer Internet Day has been established to make the internet a more secure environment – which this year’s campaign focusing on children and young people.

So here are five things you should do to ensure your children’s lives online are as protected as they are offline.

Update your privacy settings

Facebook’s default setting made be as safe as you think (Getty)

Many social media sites have the default privacy setting as ‘public’, meaning that anyone who searches your name can see everything you’ve recently been up to.

Setting a Twitter account to ‘private’ and changing your Facebook profile to ‘friends only’ only takes a few minutes but ensures you’re not leaving a traceable digital footprint.

Facebook also has an option to remove your profile from search engines like Google, which means the only way someone can view your account is if you add them as a friend yourself. You can control your Facebook privacy settings by clicking here or also by going to ‘Privacy Checkup’ on your page.

Social media websites also update and change their settings all the time, making it tricky to keep track of what’s visible to whom at any one point.

If you want to edit these settings in one go, use a product like Trend Micro Security, which provides a privacy scan of social networks like Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and LinkedIn at once.

Install anti-virus software and firewalls

Most new laptops or computers come with a year’s trial of anti-virus software installed, but if not then it’s definitely worth investing in one. Anti-virus software prevents malicious data from accessing your private information on your accounts, ranging from your email address to passwords or bank details. The best anti-virus software available in 2018 can be found here. If the expensive software isn’t an option, check out the best free protection here.

Many people used to think that Apple products were immune from malicious attacks due to the way they were built and the ever-changing hardware programmed into them. However, according to a report from Malwarebytes in August last year, there was a 230 percent increase in Mac malware in 2017.

Installing anti-virus software is an easy way to prevent malware. (Getty)

Chris Hoffman, of How-To-Geek.com, highlights the hidden dangers of new viruses infecting popular websites. He urges everyone to install some form of virus protection software because even familiar websites can easily become compromised.

‘Your computer could be infected just from you visiting a website,” he says. “Even if you only visit websites you trust the website itself could be compromised – something that happens with alarming frequency these days.’ Downloading anti-virus software will prevent your browser from opening the webpage if it notices a problem.

Only use secure wi-fi connections

If you’re waiting around at the airport or in a shopping center, it can be tempting to join the nearby free Wi-Fi connection to kill some time. But while many of these connections are secure and trustworthy, not all of them are.

The Norton Security 2016 Wi-Fi Risk Report found that 22% of respondents have accessed bank or financial information while using public Wi-Fi, and 58% of people have logged into a personal email account. Logging into a public, unsecured Wi-Fi connection puts all of this information at risk and makes it far easier to be shared with everyone nearby who are also connected.

But if you must use public Wi-Fi, download a VPN to use alongside. A VPN (Virtual Private Network) scrambles the data from your phone or laptop before it receives the data on the other end that you’re trying to access. Some VPNs will charge you to download the software, but there are free versions available like ‘Betternet’ on the App store, which requires you to watch a quick advert but will connect you securely for free.

Use difficult and varied passwords

In 2016, nearly 17% of people safeguarded their accounts with the password ‘123456.’ Others that made the top 10 most common list included ‘password’ and ‘qwertyuiop’. Data breaches are becoming more and more common globally – an estimated 10 million passwords were made public last year – but can be avoided to an extent by using a strong password. A combination of upper and lower case letters with numbers and special symbols is the best bet to keep your data private.

Ensure that you use different passwords for different accounts, and keep them above at least six characters long. Password managers like Keeper, which come installed on some laptops, are great for creating a personalized, fully scrambled password automatically.

Widespread data breaches of big companies can often result in passwords being shared with hackers. The best result is that you lose access to one of your accounts. At worst, if you use the same password for everything, you could find yourself a victim of identity fraud.

Think twice before clicking on email links or attachments

The rise of Internet banking has made it more and more common to receive financial communication via email. Things like requesting an appointment or a reminder that your credit card will expire soon may be harmless, but may also just have likely been sent by a third-party pretending to be the bank.

Clicking on the name of the email sender will often show the full email address. Rather than just ‘Barclays Bank’, it may reveal a random email address – a giveaway sign that the account it has come from is entirely unconnected to your bank. Many bank-related scams target customers in this way, pretending to get you to log into your account for something minimal, but actually re-directing you to an entirely alien website.

Many banking scams have obvious giveaways like a lack of personal greeting. (Information Security HeadQuarters)

Look for spelling errors, links that don’t work or impersonal greetings (like the Dear customer, instead of Dear ‘Your Name’) as the first port of call. If you’re not sure whether or not an email is legitimate, try sending a reply. If it’s a fraudulent account then there’s a chance the email might bounce – a big hint that it’s not an authentic request. The safest way to check is to get in contact with the bank or organization and ask if they’ve emailed you before anything else.

The UK Safer Internet Centre is led by three charities – Childnet, the South West Grid for Learning and the Internet Watch Foundation and aims to create a better online experience for all.

The theme this year is ‘Create, Connect and Share Respect: a better internet starts with you’.

Source: This article was published uk.news.yahoo.com By Georgie Darling

Published in Internet Privacy

Cybercrime is everywhere, and the least you can do is read up about it. You might think Internet and email scams only affect those who are not tech savvy or do not keep up with the daily news, but that is not true. From IT professionals to teachers, to journalists, people from all fragments of society and professional fronts have fallen for these immaculately planned online fraudsBusiness Compromise ScamsPharming, etc, which might confuse anybody. And the notion of risk-taking obviously does not work in this context. With the advent of social network and the wide usage of emailing, these scams acquired quite a foothold.

Common Online, Internet & Email scams

Here are the 10 Internet and email scams you should look out for:

Nigerian Scam

Possibly the most talked about scams, these operate mostly through the mail and messaging services. People usually receive mails from a fake Nigerian individual, who claims to be from a very wealthy family and is looking for somebody to donate her money. Usually, these scams are fronts for black money or identity theft. The user is promised a huge amount of money if he or she would share his details, and a surprising number of people fall for it. They will also ask the unwitting user to sign a number of legal forms, which are actually pretty effective in taking money out of your account.

International Lottery Scam

The lottery scam is perhaps the oldest and most obvious scams in the history of Internet fraud, and yet people are duped by it. Basically, a mail reaches your server from an unknown lottery company, and it looks official and almost real. But there are obviously some red flags which expert can point out. Usually, when this happens, the mail will not address you by your name or your personal details. They promise to transfer millions of dollars into your personal account, if you give them your bank details, and then, of course, they drain the money out of your account. Millions of people around the world have lost a massive amount of their earnings through this scam. Sometimes, the emails take the name of a famous lottery company, which might be a global name, and with high-end techniques, conmen have better means of faking their credentials, so you should always be on the lookout.

Travel scams

This kind of fraud is pretty relevant even today, as people who are on these websites or get the fraudulent emails are not at all expecting to get swindled. People see huge discounts or really low rates on some travel packages and fall for it. They will also ask for your private details, and you will need to pay some money. Usually, these are quick scams and won’t drain your account, but you will never see the money you spent or get any tickets. Whenever you receive such a mail or spot something suspicious on a website, it is best to double-check.

Credit Card Scams

These frauds are also hugely common.Usually, you will get a mail from your an operator who claims to be your bank. They will tell you your credit/debit card has been canceled, or you are facing some breach in your account and thus, need to act fast. Most people, in a state of panic, give out their credit card details, One Time Passwords, and even their pin numbers. It is very important to remember that your bank would never ask you for this kind of sensitive information over mail or phone, and be careful.

Job Scams

These kinds of frauds prey upon those who are vulnerable. Most people are looking for jobs update their personal details, like mail ids and names on employment search portals. Anybody can access those details and contact the user. You will get a mail, asking for your resume, educational details, and other credentials. They will promise you an interview and possibly ask for a token amount of money, which would be reverted back to you upon hiring or at a later time. These scams are usually fronts for identity thefts and money swindling.

Digital payment scams

These are the easiest and the most dangerous frauds there is, and everybody should take note since people are so tech-reliant right now. Millions of people use digital wallets or online payment portals like PayPal or Venmo. Users often get an alert on their mail about how their account has been hacked, or an amount of money has been taken out of their account. Usually, people panic, and it never occurs to them that they are being duped by a third party.

Online ad scams

These are similar to the employment scam routine, just a little more creative. When you post an item for sale on a portal or post an ad to buy a specific item, in websites like eBay or Craigslist, or any other platform, fraudulent people can access those details and get back to you. They’ll tell you they have what you are looking for, and might even share pictures with you, but these offers usually come with a payment-first policy, and after you pay them,  you don’t hear back from them.

Investment scams

These frauds are like a short-term Ponzi scheme. You might get alerts or emails offering you ‘double your money on a month’ plans or any other such scams. Some fake portals even have provisions for your verification, where they ask you for a token amount of money, and hence dupe you.

Disaster relief or rescue scams

Whenever you get a mail asking you to donate money to a charity or a rescue operation, never respond to them. Most people obviously fall for these as they want to support a cause, but as there is no way to verify these scams, and people usually donate a substantial amount of money to disaster relief, this is a very dangerous fraud.

Ask for help scams

These frauds are more personal in nature, and you might get a mail with very specific details about a certain person, stuck in a situation in a random country, from where he/she cannot get back home and will ask for your money. People often get blindsided by the personal nature of these emails, but it is very important to remember that these are usually chain emails, and ask people to send over financial help.

Online scams are a huge risk as you can encounter them anywhere, and the smartest of people get affected by it, as they never see it coming. Whenever you encounter anything on a new portal or website, it is always best to verify their credentials before you send in your money or personal details.

Be aware, Stay safe!

 Source: This article was published thewindowsclub.com

Published in Internet Privacy
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