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(Sponsored Content) When your system is connected to a network, you cannot always guarantee the integrity of the person at the far end of a network connection. If your system is connected to the Internet, ethics go out the window altogether. You have to assume that the person at the far end is a bad guy, then proceed from there. With this tip, we’ll outline an approach to this problem that may help you to focus in on how to deal with the bad guys wherever they may be.

Internet bad guys generally fall into two categories, sneaks and bullies. The bullies you can probably identify easiest, they are the ones who go after your system with active attacks. They will try to break into your system, trying just about everything in the book. On our test IBM i server in the office recently, we had a bully come by who tried to log on using over 700 different user profiles in a period of five minutes. Each logon attempt was met by our SafeNet/i exit point software and tossed out right at the point of entry with a security warning message to our security officer for each try. The user profiles were all different and all “typical” of what you might expect to see in just about any shop in the country. When bullies come after you, they do it with brute force. They can try to spoof your system, guess your passwords, deny others from using your system by keeping it overly busy dealing with their break-in attempt, and much more.

 

The sneaks are a lot more passive. Sneaks will sit back and monitor network traffic to your system and try to uncover secret information that will then give them what they need to gain access to your system “normally.” Sneaks are very hard to identify and the have insidious tools at their disposal to get the information they want. This can even include Trojan horses that gather the information for them. Since sneaks are so hard to identify, you should plan your security strategy assuming that someone is always watching your system.

To guard your system against both sneaks and bullies, you need to think about how to layer your system defenses to guard against anything and anyone. If your system is connected to the Internet, you must assume that a sneak or a bully is going to attempt to gain access and plan accordingly. The best defense is always a good offense and you should consider the various layers of your system and have a plan to deal with intruders at every level. This layered approach will help you develop a good defense. The layers you should give consideration to include:

  • System security – including your system level use of user profiles and regularly rotated passwords. For most IBM i shops, this will be your last line of defense, so plan it well. Consider using longer passwords or pass phases that are now supported by the IBM i OS.
  • Network security – this commonly involves implementation of a firewall between your network and the Internet but can also include services available from your ISP. On the IBM i there are also things that can be done at the IBM i OS server level via exit programs that can address network security issues.
  • Application security – your applications should be designed to integrate with your security policies. Application software can easily be misused and abused and your applications should be designed with this in mind, especially those applications that are open to network and Internet users.
  • Transmission security – when you use an uncontrolled network like the Internet, your data will be open to anyone while it is in transit from one place to another. To protect your data, you need to consider encryption techniques and the use of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) on your IBM i along with encryption. Encryption should be required for all 5250 terminal connections.

In your plan for network and Internet security, you need to have a plan for each of these layers of control in order to safeguard your system. And, even then, a bully or a sneak might still get past you, so watch out.

[Source: This article was published in itjungle.com By Rich Loeber - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Identity theft is such a growing problem that it’s become almost routine—Marriott, MyFitness Pal, LinkedIn, Zynga, and even Equifax (of all places) have had high-profile online data breaches in recent years, affecting hundreds of millions of people. To help combat this problem, Experian and other companies are marketing “dark web scans” to prevent data breaches. But what is a dark web scan, and do you need it?

The dark web, explained 

The dark web is a large, hidden network of websites not indexed or found on typical search engines. It’s also a hub of illegal activity, including the buying and selling of stolen financial and personal information. If your information ends up on dark web sites after a data breach, an identity thief could use that data to open credit cards, take out loans, or withdraw money from your bank account.

How dark web scans work 

A dark scan will scan the dark web to see if medical identification info, bank account numbers, and Social Security numbers are being shared. If you get positive results, the dark scan service will suggest that you change your passwords, use stronger ones, or put a credit freeze on your credit profiles with the three major bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion). A negative search result doesn’t necessarily mean you haven’t had a data breach, of course, as there’s no way for any company to search the entirety of the dark web.

Many of these services offer you a free scan, but that only covers certain information like phone numbers, passwords, and Social Security numbers. If you want to set up alerts, or search for other information like bank account numbers, passports, or your driver’s license, or have access to credit reports (which are already free) these services will typically charge a monthly fee (Experian offers this service for $9.99 per month after a 30-day free trial).

Is a dark web scan worth paying for?

In an interview for NBC News’ Better, Neal O’Farrell, executive director of the Identify Theft Council, called dark web scanning “a smoke and mirrors deal” that doesn’t “go to the cause of the problem, which is vigilance, awareness, taking care of your own personal information, freezing your credit.”

[Source: This article was published in twocents.lifehacker.com By Mike Winters - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

The new standard, called Global Privacy Control, will let you activate a browser setting to keep your data from being sold.

A group of tech companies, publishers, and activist groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla, and DuckDuckGo are backing a new standard to let internet users set their privacy settings for the entire web.

“Before today, if you want to exercise your privacy rights, you have to go from website to website and change all your settings,” says Gabriel Weinberg, CEO of DuckDuckGo, the privacy-focused search engine.

That new standard, called Global Privacy Control, lets users set a single setting in their browsers or through browser extensions telling each website that they visit not to sell or share their data. It’s already backed by some publishers including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and the Financial Times, as well as companies including Automattic, which operates blogging platforms wordpress.com and Tumblr.

 

Advocates believe that under a provision of the California Consumer Privacy Act, activating the setting should send a legally binding request that website operators not sell their data. The setting may also be enforceable under Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation, and the backers of the standard are planning to communicate with European privacy regulators about the details of how that would work, says Peter Dolanjski, director of product at DuckDuckGo. At the moment, the official specification of the standard specifies that it’s in an experimental stage and “currently not intended to convey legally binding requests,” but that’s expected to change as legal authorities and industry groups have time to react to the standard and put it into place across the web, Dolanjski says.

“It’s going to take a little bit of time for them to make the modifications and all that,” he says.

If it becomes widely accepted and helps prevent website operators and companies from building cross-site profiles of their users, the new standard could help bring an element of privacy back to the web, advocates say. Global Privacy Control could not only help internet users avoid ads that seem to follow them across the web but also potentially limit some of the other negative aspects of today’s internet experience, from filter bubbles and misinformation to discrimination based on people’s behavior and perceived demographics, says Weinberg.

“It’s all traced back to the same behavioral data profiles,” he says.

While the exact details may vary based on future regulations, the standard was designed to allow some sharing of data with service providers such as analytics companies that track web visits for individual sites—but not for building aggregate profiles of how people behave across sites. Those profiles are used by search engines, social media companies, and ad networks to discern people’s interests and demographics and target them with marketing accordingly. While that can result in people seeing more relevant ads on the internet, it’s also been a way for propagandists and fraudsters to find people they believe are vulnerable to receiving particular types of misinformation, from misleading election information to work-from-home scams.

The new setting can be activated through the configuration menu of DuckDuckGo’s browser extensions and is expected to be present in future versions of Mozilla’s Firefox browser as well as other browsers and privacy-focused extensions. Users wanting to test if the setting is activated can visit the Global Privacy Control website, which has a banner indicating whether the setting is enabled.

The concept is similar to Do Not Track, a similar feature introduced in web browsers about a decade ago but never widely observed by website operators. The difference, Weinberg says, is that Do Not Track never really had any legal teeth behind it, while Global Privacy Control is expected to be backed by California authorities under the state privacy law. It’s unclear whether people still using Do Not Track in their browsers would have the same result. Companies could argue that the setting, which some browsers turned on by default and which predates the California law, wasn’t necessarily turned on with the intention of giving notice not to sell data under the law, he says.

Even if that law only covers California residents, the builders of the standard hope that as more jurisdictions put such rules into place, website operators will choose to observe Global Privacy Control user intentions even in the potentially shrinking number of places where they’re not legally bound to do so.

“We hope that this is just a stepping stone to federal legislation,” says Weinberg.

[Source: This article was published in fastcompany.com By Steven Melendez - Uploaded by the Association Member: Wushe Zhiyang]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

 These days everyone is spending more time online. Whether working from home or spending nearly every working hour in front of a computer screen, the internet has become an indispensable part of our social and professional lives.

Hackers, scammers, and cybercriminals lurk everywhere. They are the dark web denizens, who spy, pose, steal identities through a variety of tech-savvy and old fashioned flim-flam subterfuge, and endanger everyone’s online safety.

So, staying safe online is a three-pronged approach: 1) threat awareness, 2) shoring up defenses, and 3) staying off the threat radar by using a VPN from this page https://surfshark.com/servers/uk

Threat Awareness

Today’s online threats range from simple social engineering—email phishing, etc.-- to sophisticated backdoor attacks—Zero-day attacks, bots, Trojans, etc. In the leapfrog battle between cyber criminals and the professional defenders who provide online security that users need, the average user can become part of that defense.

Shoring up you online defenses

Here are 10 steps you can take to stay safe online:

1. Beware of browser-based social engineering

In browser social engineering, the victim clicks on a legitimate appearing web link. The link triggers a download through vulnerabilities in browser plug-in weaknesses inherent in programs like Java and Flash.

So, surfing the web can be hazardous to your privacy and security. Malicious websites can contain so-called drive-by downloads requiring absolutely no interaction other than visiting the infected page. The page will contain an exploit kit, which is prewritten code designed to search for software vulnerabilities and inject malware into the victim's computer.

2. Only visit HTTPS secured websites

Look for the little padlock icon in the top left corner next to the URL on the web browser address line. It signifies that the connection between the user and the website is encrypted. While it does not guarantee absolute safety, the HTTPS is the best option to maximize online privacy.

The best advice is to limit browsing as much as possible on unsecured sites, and never do online transactions on those unsecured pages.

3. Always log out of websites after use.

Log out of social media accounts, email clients, and online banking accounts when finished. Closing the browser window without logging off keeps the user signed in until the connection times out, which provides a window of opportunity to a potential hacker.

4. Keep social media accounts private

A public Instagram account allows anyone with an internet connection and knowledge of the user’s handle to find that user for online stalking. Loading a Facebook account with detailed personal information with stories, photos, and information on friends and families is the bait that phishing scammers and spam ad targeters rely on to invade the user’s privacy.

5. Don’t become a socially engineered “phish.”

Social Engineering is an especially popular way to deliver malware. It relies on human curiosity and emotions and tries to trick the user into downloading intrusive malware or visiting a compromised website that hosts drive-by attacks.

 

A socially engineered email message, for example, can contain scare tactics like "Your bank account has been compromised! Please change your password immediately" Clicking on the email link takes the user to a fake sign-in page. The user is tricked into entering authentic user and password information.

There are variations on the phishing theme, which include:

  • Spear phishing based on the hacker's knowledge of the victim or organization. The attacks are focused on knowledge gained about the victim from public or social media. They have an air of authenticity because fraud perpetrators customize their attack emails with the person's name, position, organization, and other information.
  • Whaling, which is a type of spear phishing that targets CEOs (i.e., “big fish”). The top official compromises login credentials, which begins phase 2 of the scam. In phase 2 the attacker impersonates the boss and uses the CEO’s email to authorize fraudulent financial transactions, for example.
  • Pharming, which is the targeting of an authentic web site and changing its IP address to redirect users to a malicious website. This can occur even if the victim enters the authentic alphabetical name of the website.

6. Install the latest antivirus software and antispyware technology.

 

Commercial grade antivirus software is the first line of defense against hidden malware. State-of-the-art antivirus software performs on-demand malware scans, and immediately scans a file or website when the user opens or enters it. Also, reputable antivirus software will block malicious web links, provide basic phishing protection and perform periodic system vulnerability scans.

7. Use the computer operating system’s built-in protection.

Both Windows 10 and MacOSX have file encryption and automatic firewall features. Some features are installed by default; others must be activated. Encrypting the computer’s hard drive will protect everything stored on a computer. If a laptop is lost or stolen, the files cannot be read. Also, a firewall is an essential connection protector and monitors all traffic entering the network.

 

8. Avoid public Wi-Fi networks, the major source of Man-in-the-Middle (MITM) attacks.

During an MITM attack a hacker gets between or eavesdrops on two parties. Each party believes they are talking only to each other. So, the MITM attacker could take over a conversation and trick the victim into disclosing personal identification or security credentials.

MITM attackers employ a variety of strategies which allow them to:

  • detect and access unsecured networks
  • send victims to fake websites through spoofing a DNS address
  • hijack session cookies which have unsecured login information to help them steal a victim’s email account.
  • detect online activity through “sniffing” software and quickly launch a MITM attack
  • employ a cleverly spoofed web application to fool the user into disclosing login credentials.

 

The best protection against MITM attacks is to never connect to a public Wi-Fi server. However using a VPN will protect the user’s privacy when using a public Wi-Fi is the only option.

9. Use strong passwords.

Passwords are the padlocks that can slow or even defeat unauthorized entry to online accounts. As a general rule, the longer a password is, the harder it is to crack. Longer passwords are more resistant to brute-force password cracking. That is where hackers use software to guess every possible combination of letters and numbers to hack a user's password.

While complexity--a variety of characters--in passwords might seem to provide more security than simple but longer ones, the opposite is true. Take the seemingly complex password "kqwbc932," for example. A brute-force attack would be able to crack it in about 11 minutes. However, a simple pass phrase like "i own 2 CATS and 1 dog" would be secure virtually forever.

The best password advice, then, is to compose an easy to remember, but unusual sentence. Use the first letters of the words in the sentence with punctuation as the password. For example, "My dad's favorite program in 1970 was “All in the Family" would become "Mydadsfpw1970wAitF."

Also, when available, use both a traditional password accompanied by some other follow-up authentication that an intruder cannot access or use. This could be anything from receiving a secure smartphone or email text with a single-use additional access code, or by answering a personal question.

As an additional safeguard, use a ridiculous answer to a personal authentication question. Example: "Q: What is the name of the city in which you were married? A: Lower Slobovia."

Then there are some common sense password hygiene practices, which include:

  • Never write the password and tape it in plain sight or other obvious places, like beneath the computer keyboard.
  • Use a different password for access to every site and every device.
  • Use the browser password manager or password management software to store multiple passwords. Password management software can generate random, impossible-to-hack passwords for quick and convenient access.

10. Back up everything.

No one is completely immune from downloading a virus or falling for a clever ransomware ruse. Hackers exploit weak points, and those weak points are usually people, who want to be helpful and cooperative. So, when the breach occurs, the best insurance for restoring everything to normal and quickly is a reliable system backup.

The backup can either be offsite or local. The key is to isolate the backup method and storage from the main system, because malware will frequently look for backup devices and go after them as well.

Use a VPN as the third element of online security

A virtual private network directs all internet connectivity through a secure and encrypted tunnel. Internet service providers and other snoopers wanting to detect the user’s online activity see only meaningless, encrypted garble when VPN is in use.

Benefits of the VPNs encrypted connection include:

Masking of the user’s IP address and login location

Defeating man-in-the-middle attacks (see Step 8 above) on public Wi-Fi locations

Accessing blocked content and net censorship in certain countries through logging into remote VPN servers

Summary and Takeaways

Staying safe online requires a knowledge of the threat, employing the proper defenses, and using the encrypted browsing of a VPN. Today’s threats involve social engineering and traps online through poisoned websites.

Shoring up online defense means safe browsing using only HTTPS secured websites, logging off sites when finished, and keeping media accounts private. Also, be aware of the types of phishing traps that rely on inside information as well as social engineering that relies on a person’s natural desire to cooperate and be helpful.

Then there are measures that can protect the user’s equipment from online hazards. Install the best anti-virus software and use the computer operating system’s built-in safeguards.

Avoid unprotected public Wi-Fi networks and use strong password strategies. Finally, remember to back up everything, and do it off site or isolated from the main system.

[Source: This article was published in greenocktelegraph.co.uk  - Uploaded by the Association Member: Joshua Simon]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Everywhere you look, it seems some company is either spying on their users or failing to protect their users' data. Protecting yourself might seem like a hopeless task, but these top privacy apps can really make a difference.

It's easy to feel that personal privacy is a dead issue. Once you go online, your every action is exposed, either through data lost in a breach or misuse by advertisers and online merchants. But don't give up hope. You don't have to go totally off-grid to retain or regain control of your privacy. Smart people around the world have come up with a variety of programs to attack the problem from different directions—creating apps that range from VPNs to email providers that don't spy on you or share your data. You may have to lay out a little cash, but the alternative is using free services that pay themselves by monetizing your private data.

The Email Nightmare, Part 1

Like the internet itself, email was invented by optimists and academics who never dreamed that anyone would misuse it. Read someone else's mail? How rude! Fill up inboxes with unwanted junk mail? They had no idea what was coming.

One type of privacy app aims to protect the content of your email conversations from snooping and tampering. Preveil, Private-Mail, ProtonMail, and StartMail let you lock down your communications using a technique called public-key cryptography. All but Preveil use a protocol called PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) to generate a pair of keys, one public, one private. To send me a secure message, you encrypt it with my public key, and I decrypt it with my private key. Simple!  

Using Preveil is even simpler, though. A high-tech system involving what they call wrapped keys means you never deal with a key, public or private. It does also mean you can't connect with users of other PGP-based services, but few consumers know how to set that up.

This public key technology also lets me send you a message that's digitally signed, guaranteeing it came from me, with no tampering. I simply encrypt the message with my private key. The fact that you can decrypt it using my public key means it's totally legit. ProtonMail and StartMail automate the key exchange process with other users of the same service, while Private-Mail requires that you perform the exchange yourself. With any of these, you can exchange secure messages with anybody who provides a public key.

Of course, not everyone has embraced public key cryptography for their email. With StartMail and ProtonMail, you can send encrypted messages to non-users, though you don't get the same level of open-source security. The service encrypts the message using a simple password, and you transmit the password via some avenue other than email, perhaps a secure messaging app.

Virtru offers email encryption for free, but only if you use Gmail, and only in Chrome. Like Preveil, it handles key management internally, though it doesn't use public-key cryptography. You send an encrypted message and the recipient clicks a button to read it, without either of you entering a password.

The Email Nightmare, Part 2

With the contents of your email conversations encrypted, no hacker can sniff out just what you're saying. However, your email address itself is exposed any time you send a message, buy a product online, or sign up for any kind of internet-based service. That might not sound problematic, but your email address is typically your user ID for many sites. A hacker who finds your email and guesses your weak password now owns the account. And, of course, having your email address floating promiscuously around the web just invites spam.

But how can you communicate without giving a merchant or service your email? The solution lies in a simple technology called a Disposable Email Address, or DEA. The DEA service provides and manages these addresses, ensuring that mail sent to them lands in your inbox, and that your replies seem to come from the DEA. If you're done dealing with a particular merchant, or if one of your DEAs starts receiving spam, you just destroy it.

Burner Mail, Abine Blur, and ManyMe are among the services offering DEA management. ManyMe is unusual in a couple of ways. First, it's free, which is uncommon. Second, unlike most such services it doesn't make you register a new FlyBy email (as it calls them) before using it. Say someone at a cocktail party asks for your email. You can make up a FlyBy address on the spot, without giving your actual email away.

Abine Blur takes the concept of masking your actual identity online to the next level. Besides masking your email address, it offers masked credit card numbers, different for each transaction. You load the masked card with exactly the amount of the transaction, so a sleazy merchant can't overcharge you or use the card again. It even lets you chat on the phone without giving your actual number.

It's worth noting that Private-Mail and StartMail also offer a modicum of DEA management. StartMail lets you manage up to 10 permanent DEAs, and an unlimited number of DEAs set to expire within two weeks or less. Private-Mail offers five alternate email identities, without full DEA management.

Throw the Trackers Off the Scent

As they say, if you're not paying, then you are the product. You can surf the internet endlessly without paying a fee to visit specific sites, but those sites still work hard to monetize your visits. Advertising trackers plant cookies on your system, taking note when a tracker from an ad on a different website encounters that same cookie. Through this and other tracking methods, they form a profile of your online activity, a profile that others are willing to pay for.

Some years ago, the Internet's Powers That Be, recognizing that many users prefer not to be tracked, ginned up a simple Do Not Track message to be sent by the browser. This DNT system never became a standard, but all the top browsers adopted it anyway. It had no effect, because websites were and are free to ignore the header.

In place of the ineffectual DNT header, many security companies started devising active systems to identify and block ad trackers and other trackers. You'll find this feature as a bonus in many security suites and some privacy-specific products. Abine Blur, Ghostery Midnight, and ShieldApps Cyber Privacy Suite offer active DNT. Unlike most such implementations, Midnight deters tracker requests in any internet-aware application.

The trackers, in turn, invented a different technique for identifying individuals across different websites, relying on the ridiculous amount of information supplied to each site by your browser. This ranges from your IP address and browser version down to minutiae like the fonts installed on your system. There's so much information that trackers can create a fingerprint that's almost sure to identify you, and only you.

So, what can you do? Make a liar out of your browser, that's what. TrackOff mixes up the data sent from your browser so it's different for each website. Cyber Privacy Suite also scrambles your fingerprint. Important info still reaches the site, but not in a consistent way that could be fingerprinted. Steganos Privacy Suite once included a component to foil fingerprinting, but the latest edition has dropped that feature, along with its active Do Not Track component.

Using a Virtual Private Network, or VPN, disguises your IP address but leaves plenty of data unchanged for the fingerprinters. Even so, keeping your internet traffic encrypted and having your IP address hidden are valuable ways to protect your privacy. In addition to their other privacy components, Ghostery Midnight and Cyber Privacy Suite include VPN protection.

Passwords Protect Privacy

Passwords are terrible, but we don't yet have a universal replacement. For security, you must use a different non-guessable strong password for every secure site. The only way anybody can accomplish that feat is by relying on a password manager. Unless you use a different strong password for every website, a data breach on one site could expose dozens of your other accounts.

In a perfect world, you already have an effective password manager in place, and you've taken the opportunity to fix any weak or duplicate passwords. On the chance you aren't already equipped, some privacy products have taken to including password management as a bonus feature. Abine Blur, for one, offers a complete, if basic, password manager. It even rates your passwords, giving extra credit for those logins that also use a masked email address.

You can get Steganos Password Manager as a separate program or as part of Steganos Privacy Suite. Either way, it's not a standout. You're probably better off with a top-notch free password manager. Cyber Privacy Suite seeks passwords stored insecurely in your browsers and moves them to encrypted storage, but doesn't do any password management beyond that protective step.

Icloak Stik is a tiny, bootable USB device that provides you with an entire private operating system; more about that below. Within that private OS, it offers the One Ring password manager built into the Tor Browser. That's important, because your existing password manager won't work in the Icloak environment.

Many Other Modes

Just as your private data can be exposed in many ways, software companies find a variety of ways to protect it. One unusual service comes from Abine DeleteMe. Rather than create disposable email addresses, this service attempts to clean up your existing email and other personal data. It searches dozens of websites that legally aggregate public information. Wherever it finds you, it sends an opt-out request to remove your data. This process can't be fully automated, so DeleteMe is relatively expensive.

Icloak Stik takes privacy to an extreme. You plug this tiny USB device into any PC, Mac, or Linux box and reboot. The Linux-based operating system that comes up resides entirely on the USB device. If you don't need to copy any files to the device, you can pocket it after booting up. And you can hide your IP address by going online with the Tor Browser. Once you shut down the host device, all traces of your session vanish.

If a malefactor steals your laptop or otherwise gains access to your PC, your private data could still be safe, provided you've encrypted it. We've covered numerous products solely devoted to encrypting files, folders, or whole drives. Some privacy products broaden their protection by including encryption. Steganos Privacy Suite, for example, includes the Steganos Safe encryption tool, also available as a standalone product.

Private-Mail goes beyond the usual features of encrypted email by giving you an online area to store encrypted files. You can encrypt files using PGP or using a simple password, and you can even share your encrypted files with others.

With Preveil, storing essential files in your encrypted cloud is a snap. You just treat that cloud like any other folder. Sharing with other Preveil users is also easy. 

Virtru doesn't offer cloud storage, but it gives you unusual control over your messages and attachments. You can set messages to expire, disable secure forwarding, and add a watermark to some kinds of attachments. You can also convert attachments into a protected form that only the recipient can view, just like a Virtru message.

Protect the Protectors

When you set up an encrypted email system or a disposable email address manager, your account password is a potential weakness. If you use an easily-guessed password, or if a stranger shoulder-surfs your login, you could lose control of your privacy protection. That's where two-factor authentication comes in.

The concept is simple. With two-factor authentication, logging requires at least two of the following: something you know (such as a password); something you have (such as an authentication app); or something you are (such as a fingerprint). Quite a few of the privacy tools examined here offer a two-factor option, specifically Abine Blur, Burner Mail, Private-Mail, StartMail, and Steganos Privacy Suite.

All these products rely on Google Authenticator or another Time-based One-Time Password generator. To get started, you use your authenticator mobile app to snap a QR code provided by the privacy program. Enter the code generated by the app and you're done. Now, your password alone doesn't grant access to the privacy program. A password thief won't be able to enter the code from your authenticator app, and hence won't get in.

Preveil also provides a degree of two-factor authentication by the very nature of its encryption. Connecting to your encrypted mail is easy and automatic provided that you have access both to the email account and to a trusted device. An evildoer who cracks your email account still won't gain access to your encrypted mail and files. And if you lose a trusted device, you can cancel your trust.

As for Virtru, it doesn't require a password and doesn't offer two-factor authentication. You prove your identity by logging into your Gmail account. That being the case, you'd do well to protect that Gmail account using two-factor authentication.

These aren't the only programs for protecting your privacy, and this isn't an exhaustive list of privacy-cloaking techniques. However, all these programs do their best to keep you safe from advertisers, spies, and creeps online.

Abine Blur

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Your subscription to Abine Blur Premium brings a veritable smorgasbord of privacy-enhancing features and services. Its masked emails feature automates the process of using a different disposable email address for every transaction. If one of those masked emails starts getting spam, you can just delete it, and you know which merchant sold you out.

What's the use in masking your email when you're giving the merchant something even more sensitive—your credit card number? Blur masks card numbers, too, and each masked card only has enough value to pay the particular transaction. No shady merchant can charge you extra, or fake another transaction on your card.

You can have all the masked emails you want, but masked cards require a small payment, because Abine expends resources processing the payment. Masked phone numbers are still more limited; you get just one. But when you use that masked phone number, you can be sure your contact won't benefit by selling it to robocallers or text spammers.

 

It's a small step from tracking your disposable email addresses to tracking your logins for all those websites. Blur includes a complete, if basic, password manager. Most password managers praise you for using a different password at each website; Blur gives you extra credit if you also use a masked email address for each.

Blur securely syncs your password and payment data across all your PCs, Macs, and mobile devices. Its browser extensions offer full access to program features and include an active Do Not Track component that foils advertisers and other trackers. On top of all that, Blur spells out how it handles your data in clear, simple detail. It's a cornucopia of privacy protection.

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PreVeil

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Preveil lets you exchange encrypted email without having to switch to a special, new email account. You just keep using your existing email with Gmail, Outlook, Apple Mail, or the Mail apps built into Android and iOS. Using it with another email client requires a little work, but it's possible. You don't have to memorize or exchange passwords. The combination of access to your email account and use of a trusted device authenticates you.

With almost any encryption system, losing your master key or password means you lose access to your files. Some even make you accept a disclaimer to that effect. Preveil offers an unusual system from the deep reaches of crypto technology. Called Shamir's Secret Sharing, it lets you set up a pool of fellow Preveil users who can help you regain a lost key. They don't get any access to your key, but several of them working together can rebuild it for you.

Preveil brings top-tier enterprise-grade encryption technology to the consumer, yet presents it in a user-friendly way. This free solution is our Editors' Choice for email encryption.

PreVeil Review

ProtonMail

Visit Site at ProtonMail
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You use ProtonMail the same way you'd use any web-based email service. The difference is that email conversations with other ProtonMail users are automatically protected using public key encryption. The same is true for any correspondent whose public key you've imported. You can also send encrypted mail to outsiders using a simpler form of encryption.

If you don't need more than 150 messages per day and 500MB of storage for email, you can use ProtonMail for free. Even a paid subscription isn't expensive, at $5 per month or $48 per year. The paid edition gets you 1,000 messages per day, along with the ability to create up to four protected email addresses, full tech support, and 5GB of email storage. This is a simple, solid email encryption solution.

ProtonMail Review

TrackOFF Basic

TrackOFF Basic

Advertisers really care what you do online. The better they can profile you, the more they can target ads. A nice juicy personal profile is also a commodity they can sell. With the proliferation of active Do Not Track systems, some trackers have switched to a technique called browser fingerprinting. And TrackOFF Basic stands square in their way, ensuring that your browser does its job without painting a target on your back.

Every time you visit a website, your browser sends a ton of information. It has to send your IP address, to receive the requested pages. But it also sends the browser version, OS details, even the fonts installed on your PC. Nominally, this information helps the website fine-tune your browsing experience. But there's so much data spewing from the browser that trackers can easily create a unique fingerprint, and thereby recognize you when you visit a different site.

TrackOFF doesn't suppress the info coming from your browser, as that could cause problems with some sites. It just mixes things up a little, presenting a slightly different fingerprint to each website. It does cost $34.95 per year, but that's fine for some tracking-sensitive souls.

TrackOFF Basic Review

Virtru Email Protection for Gmail

Virtru

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Like Preveil, Virtru is a consumer product that takes advantage of technology developed for the corporate world. Also like Preveil, it's free, and doesn't require that you change your email address. However, it only works with Gmail accounts, and only if you access them using Chrome.

Corporations can set up in-house handling of encryption keys. With the consumer edition, Virtru takes on that role. You never enter a password or share a key. By logging in to your Gmail account, you get full access to your encrypted email. If that seems unsafe in any way, consider enabling two-factor authentication for Gmail itself.

Virtru offers unusual control over your encrypted email messages. You can set them to expire after a fixed time, and change that time (or revoke access) even after sending the message. You can control the recipient's ability to forward secure messages. And you can watermark certain attachment types, to prove they came from you.

Yes, only those who access their Gmail on Chrome can make use of this tool. But the pools of Gmail users and of Chrome users are large enough to guaranteed quite a few potential users.

Virtru Email Protection for Gmail Review

Abine DeleteMe

129.00 20% Discount on any DeleteMe subscription with code PCMAG at DeleteMe
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Some DEA services require you to create a new, pristine email account to receive the mail from your disposable addresses, while others feed directly into your existing inbox. The latter approach is more convenient, but it comes with a problem. Your email address, along with other personal information, is already scattered across the interwebs. Completely wiping that information from the web is impossible, but Abine DeleteMe does everything that is possible to minimize your exposure.

DeleteMe scans websites for dozens of information aggregating websites. These sites legally collect public information and make it easy to find. They also legally must remove your info if you so request. DeleteMe automates the opt-out process as much as possible. However, automation isn't possible in some cases, so Abine retains a staff of human operators to handle those. Every six months, you get a report of what DeleteMe found, and what was removed.

Unlike automated opt-out algorithms, those human operators must be paid. That's why DeleteMe costs more than most privacy services, $129 per year. You can often find discounts, or deals to add a family member.

Read More...

[Source: This article was published in pcmag.com By Neil J. Rubenking - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

The words “privacy” and “internet” are sort of an oxymoron because it’s incredibly hard to be truly safe and anonymous on the internet. ISPs, browsers, and websites are constantly monitoring everything people do online and collecting their data. Cybercriminals should also be a major concern to everyone as they’re always looking for new victims to target.

That said, unless someone’s a person of interest to government organizations or crime syndicates, they can achieve a robust level of online privacy. Check out these 5 ways to safely and privately browse the internet.

Why is More Privacy a Good Thing?

Browsing the internet and using apps generally means giving up a lot of personal data. That’s because governments, ISPs, browsers, websites, and apps are constantly monitoring what people are doing. With websites, for instance, this is done via cookies and trackers.

People have always been generally aware that their data is being gathered by companies, usually for either service improvement or ad purposes. But recently, it’s become apparent that companies and app developers are privy to people’s personal lives to an alarming degree.

Many people might reiterate that “nothing to hide” mantra for why they freely give away all this information. Explaining why that statement is heedlessly naive may well fill a whole book, so here are two short but powerful reasons instead:

– Online security has become directly linked to physical security. Nevermind the people potentially spying over a webcam or smart home camera. Stalking and swatting are two other real-life consequences. Jameson Lopp can certainly attest to that after being swatted and threatened numerous times by an anonymous attacker.

– The copious amounts of data breaches occurring every year is a testament to the fact that companies cannot be trusted with everyone’s personal data. The information they collect is extremely valuable to criminals, and they will go to great lengths to get it.

How to Stay Safe and Private While Browsing the Internet

1. Use a VPN

VPNs are constantly being mentioned these days, but what is a VPN, and how does it actually work?

Virtual private networks provide a way to have a private connection over a public network. The technology utilizes what’s called an encryption tunnel to make data hard to get and unreadable. It also sends the connection through a VPN server which replaces a device’s IP address and changes its owner’s location.

This all means that a person gains both privacy and security while browsing with a VPN turned on. Just keep in mind that this does not protect against malware and a compromised computer or device will still send unfiltered information to attackers.

2. Go Incognito

Browsing in private or incognito mode provides a modicum of privacy by preventing the browser from saving that session’s browsing history. Chrome has also recently added a feature that automatically blocks third-party cookies in incognito mode – but not all trackers. Making this great when combined with other privacy and security steps.

3. Don’t Log Into Anything

Naturally, this advice cannot be applied to everyday browsing as logging into an email or other accounts is sometimes necessary. This is especially true during work hours. There are times when logging in isn’t necessary, however.

 

Following privacy measures, like using a VPN, is canceled out when someone logs into their accounts, instantly identifying them. VPNs will keep the connection secure from outside threats like SSL-stripping, and incognito still means browsing history won’t be saved. 

4. Avoid Too Many Extensions

Extensions can be convenient and incredibly helpful, but they can also be a siphon for browsing data and personal information. It’s not that the extensions themselves are necessarily dangerous – though some are malware in disguise. Instead, it’s that they can be weak links in a browser’s security infrastructure. 

Extension developers don’t always keep up with security updates for their products, and some get abandoned entirely. Cybercriminals take advantage of those weaknesses to infiltrate people’s browsing sessions through their extensions.

This doesn’t mean they should be avoided altogether, as that’s not always possible. Do take care by properly vetting and managing extensions to ensure they remain safe to use.

5. Try a Privacy Browser

Privacy browsers are becoming more and more popular thanks to their focus on the user’s need for protection rather than their corporate greed. Browsers like Tor, DuckDuckGo, and Brave, block all trackers and don’t collect browsing history. Each privacy browser has its own list of beneficial features but the Tor browser warrants a special mention.

Tor utilizes a network of servers to anonymize a person’s browsing session. It sends their network requests through a series of “nodes” which replace a device’s IP address. Keep in mind, however, unlike a VPN, Tor does not anonymize any other online events, like apps, nor does it encrypt the connection.

Final Thoughts

It’s not fair that these are the lengths needed to ensure online privacy and security. Things are looking up, regulation-wise, but the reality is that privacy declines as technology improves. Already there have been major issues regarding the IoT and home smart devices being abused to spy on people.

[Source: This article was published in thebuzzpaper.com By Devashish Pandey - Uploaded by the Association Member: Clara Johnson] 

Categorized in Internet Privacy

A recent research paper has reaffirmed that our internet history can be reliably used to identify us. The research was conducted by Sarah Bird, Ilana Segall, and Martin Lopatka from Mozilla and is titled: Replication: Why We Still Can’t Browse in Peace:On the Uniqueness and Reidentifiability of Web Browsing Histories. The paper was released at the Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security and is a continuation of a 2012 paper which highlighted the same reidentifiability problem.

Just your internet history can be used to reidentify you on the internet

Using data from 52,000 consenting Firefox users, the researchers were able to identify 48,919 distinct browsing profiles which had 99% uniqueness.

This is especially concerning because internet history is routinely sold by your internet service provider (ISP) and mobile data provider to third party advertising and marketing firms which are demonstrably able to tie a list of sites back to an individual they already have a profile on – even if the ISP claims to be “anonymizing” the data being sold. This is legally sanctioned activity ever since 2017 when Congress voted to get rid of broadband privacy and allow the monetization of this type of data collection.

This type of “history based profiling” is undoubtedly being used to build ad profiles on internet users around the world. Previous studies have shown that an IP address usually stays static for about a month – which the researchers noted “is more than enough time to build reidentifiable browsing profiles.”

It isn’t just our ISPs and mobile data providers that are siphoning up browsing history and using it for fingerprinting purposes, though. The authors noted in the abstract:

“[…] we observe numerous third parties pervasive enough to gather web histories sufficient to leverage browsing history as an identifier.”

These third parties include obvious players with a lot of insight into internet traffic such as Facebook and Google. All hope is not lost, though. In their user-facing recommendations section, the researchers commented:

“Until the state of the web has improved, the onus of ensuring privacy often falls on the user.”

Reidentification is a provable, real problem on the internet that internet users need to prepare for. It’s unfortunate that the internet infrastructure isn’t set up to respect privacy, and it’s unclear if it ever will be.

[Source: This article was published in privateinternetaccess.com By Caleb Chen - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jasper Solander]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

 Threat intelligence firm KELA shared a list of more than 900 Pulse Secure VPN enterprise server usernames and passwords with ZDNet, which a hacker had posted on the dark web in plain text.

The usernames and passwords, as well as IP addresses, from more than 900 Pulse Secure Virtual Private Network enterprise servers were posted in plain text on the dark web by a Russian-speaking hacker, first reported by ZDNet.com, which obtained the list with help from threat intelligence firm KELA. 

The list contained Pulse Secure VPN server firmware version, SSH server keys, all local users and password hashes, administrator account details, previous VPN logins with cleartext credentials, and session cookies.  

The authenticity of the list was verified by multiple cybersecurity sources. Further, the list was published on a forum frequented by popular ransomware threat actors, such as REvil and NetWalker. 

 

The leak was first discovered by researchers from Bank Security, which observed that the VPN servers listed by the hacker were operating with the firmware version that contained the CVE-2019-11510 vulnerability patched by Pulse Secure in early 2019. 

The Department of Homeland Security and other security researchers have repeatedly urged organizations to patch this critical vulnerability, as hackers continued to target the flawThose targeted attacks continued through January 2020. 

And in April, DHS warned that hackers were using stolen credentials to crack into enterprise networks through the Pulse Secure VPN, even if the vulnerability was patched. 

To find vulnerable VPNs, it appears that the hacker who compiled the list scanned the internet IPv4 address between June 24 and July 8, 2020 and leveraged the known vulnerability to access servers. Then, the threat actor gathered the server details and credentials, collecting the data into a central repository. 

Reviewing the list, it appears that 677 companies failed to patch the Pulse Secure VPN vulnerability. 

VPNs are one of the most common, secure methods used to remotely connect to the network. But as remote connections and telehealth use expanded amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the threat landscape has become much more complex. 

Pulse Secure CMO Scott Gordon told HealthITSecurity.com in March, that in healthcare, providers need to be employing endpoint protection and modern VPN solutions “where you’re encrypting communication session between the device and the data between the practitioner’s devices and application.” 

Since you are now expanding VPN use to more sets of employees contracts and affiliates you should for sure that the VPN software is up to date and current to eliminate the potential VPN vulnerabilities,” Gordon said, at the time. “They’ve essentially broadened the attack surface. Every end user accessing information and resources are now part of their attack surface, and they want to do everything they can now that they've added greater accessibility.” 

To Laurence Pitt, Global Security Strategy Director, Juniper Networks, its unacceptable that organizations failed to patch the vulnerability more than a year after a fix was provided, which allowed for cleartext data dump to occur. 

Further, security researchers have repeatedly provided proof-of-concept data that showed just what could occur if the enterprise left the vulnerability exposed.   

“The lesson learned here? Patch, patch, patch,” Pitt said in an emailed statement. “The data published lists only 900 servers. What we do not know is how many more have not been released – or, which of these could be sensitive servers that are now being poked and prodded in planning for a bigger attack.  

If you are running an older version of code on a service as critical as the VPN is today, then find the latest version and get that upgrade planned, he added.

Healthcare organizations should review insights recently provided by the National Security Agency to better understand the risk and best practice methods to secure VPNs, telework, and other remote sites.

[Source: This article was published in healthitsecurity.com By Jessica Davis - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jeremy Frink]

Categorized in Deep Web

Privacy on the internet is very important for many users, to achieve this they resort to TOR or a VPN. ButWhich is better? What are the advantages of using one or the other? In today’s article we are going to see in detail all the advantages and disadvantages that both have.

If we talk about internet privacy, generally the common people do not pay much attention to it. They have all their data in their Google accounts, they log in anywhere, their social networks are not configured to protect their privacy.

We could be giving examples all day. But what can happen if I expose my data in this way? The simple answer? Anything.

From attacks by cybercriminals, to the surveillance of different government agencies, limitation of access to websites, etc. Anything can happen, since information is one of the most powerful tools you can give to a company or individual.

When we surf the internet in a normal way, so to speak, we are never doing it anonymously. Even the incognito mode of the most popular browsers is not an effective method to achieve this.

It is precisely by this method that many users decide use a VPN or browse through Tor. The two systems are very good for browsing the internet anonymously, although their differences are notorious and we will mention them below.

Main advantages of using a VPN network

Explaining the operation of a VPN network is quite simple: it adds a private network to our connection. In short, the VPN network takes our connection, takes care encrypt it and then send it to the destination server.

The way it works is too simple, at least in a basic way. Instead of directly entering a website, we first go through an intermediate server and then enter the destination site through this intermediate server.

Using a VPN network is highly recommended for those who connect to the internet from public WiFi networks. Also, one of the great advantages it has is that you can camouflage your real location.

Let’s pretend you are in Argentina, but the VPN server works in the United States. All the websites you access will believe that you are precisely in the United States. Which comes in handy to bypass any kind of content blocking on the internet.

 

Main advantages of using Tor

The idea of ​​Tor is to keep the user anonymous at all times when browsing the internet. To get it, our information passes between a large number of nodes before we can see the website. In this way, it is not possible to determine our location and our connection information such as IP.

Although, it is a reliable system that improves our privacy on the internet. In reality, browsing completely anonymously is not possible and neither is it in Tor. Since, in the final node the data is decrypted to be able to access the site in question. Yes we are exposed although it is much more complicated for them to find out something about us. Tor takes care of that.

When we use Tor, we are much more secure than when using any common browser. But you must bear in mind that it is not an infallible system. Although we will be much safer when visiting websites with secure connections (HTTPS) than in sites that do not have encryption activated.

A very important extra that you should always keep in mind is that: if the website is not secure, that is, it is not encrypted (HTTPS), do not enter any kind of information to it. By this we mean login information, email, bank accounts, credit cards, etc.

Tor vs VPN Which one should you use?

The first thing you should know is that most quality VPNs are paid. In the case of Tor, this is totally free and we will not have to pay absolutely anything at any time.

Another thing to keep in mind is that VPN services do store user data for obvious reasons. Anonymity is lost this way, especially if they had to face the law.

In the case of Tor this does not happen, the only problem with the latter is that the browsing speed is not exactly the bestregardless of the speed of your connection.

The bottom line is pretty simple: If you are an average user who is concerned about how companies use your private data, then it is best to use a VPN network. This will be faster than Tor which will allow us to consume multimedia content without any kind of problem.

In the case of Tor, it is used for those people who need a lot of anonymity on the internet. It is something quite common that we see in people who have to face governments. Like the case of different journalists in Venezuela, to give an example.

The differences between Tor and a VPN network are quite clear. Each one is used for something slightly different, the two promise anonymity. But you must bear in mind that long-term and total anonymity on the internet does not exist.

[Source: This article was published in explica.co - Uploaded by the Association Member: Anthony Frank] 

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Introduction to dark web fraud

Dark web fraud constitutes a global information security problem. The widespread availability of how-to guides providing instructions on how to commit such fraud exacerbates the problem even further.

Before examining these how-to guides in detail, we need to explain the meaning of “dark web.” The web includes two main layers: the surface web, which consists of any content indexed by search engines, and the deep web, which comprises all content that is not indexed by search engines. Content in the deep web can be hidden behind paywalls, firewalls and other types of protection.

The dark web constitutes a small portion of the deep web and appeared as a result of the development by the United States of software known as Tor. It allowed internet users to encrypt their location and information they sent and received. This, in turn, ensured their anonymity and privacy. The dark web is often used by criminals for various malicious purposes, such as sales of guns, drugs and other illegal materials. It is estimated that the content available on the dark web constitutes less than 0.005% of the content available on the surface web.

Large volumes of content exchanged through the dark web include how-to guides. According to a Terbium Labs study that covers three major dark web exchanges, 49% of the data sold through those exchanges consists of how-to guides. 

In this article, we will examine the types of how-to guides sold through the dark web. Afterwards, we will discuss their reliability. Finally, we will provide concluding remarks.

Typology of how-to guides

How-to guides can, depending on their purpose, be divided into five categories: account takeover, phishing, doxing, cashing out and synthetic identity fraud. 

1. Account takeover

The term “account takeover” refers to a situation where a fraudster gets unauthorized access to a genuine customer’s account, such as online banking accounts, email accounts and accounts providing access to subscription services. Once the fraudster gets access to a customer account, he or she may use it for various purposes, including but not limited to purchasing goods or services, acquiring more sensitive information which can be used to blackmail the victim and spreading malware to the contacts of the victim.

How-to guides may include detailed instructions on how to use software for automatic detection of vulnerabilities in corporate computer systems. It is believed that such software was used to conduct the British Airways cyberattacks, which enabled hackers to access tens of thousands of frequent-flyer accounts.

2. Phishing

How-to guides may also teach criminals how to conduct phishing attacks. Research conducted by Cyren revealed that 5,335 new phishing how-to guides were made available in 2019 alone. The same research indicated that 87% of the phishing how-to guides included at least one evasive technique, such as content injection, HTML character encoding, and the inclusion of URLs in attachments.Let’s look at those a little more closely. Content injection refers to changing the content of a page on a legitimate website in such a way as to redirect users of that website to a phishing page. HTML character encoding means the inclusion of phishing code in a webpage in such a way as to prevent security crawlers from detecting keywords associated with phishing (e.g., “credit card” and “password”). The inclusion of URLs in attachments is a technique allowing fraudsters to hide links to phishing websites in files.

 

3. Doxing

Doxing is the practice of finding out sensitive information about an individual or organization and making it publicly available with the aim to harass, shame or extort the victim. Doxing how-to guides contain instructions on how to find sensitive information, how to post it in such a way as to prevent the removal of the information and how to obtain monetary gain through extortion.

4. Cashing out

Cashing-out how-to guides contain instructions on how to cash out voucher codes, bank accounts, credit cards, gift cards and other payment methods. In some cases, such guides may provide links to e-commerce websites that can accept stolen financial data purchased through the dark web. In other cases, they describe the steps one needs to take to clone payment instruments, such as debit and credit cards.

5. Synthetic identity fraud

To commit a synthetic identity fraud, one needs to combine stolen information from unsuspecting individuals and combine it with false information, such as dates of births, addresses and names. The resulting synthetic identities are less likely to be detected because of the lack of a clearly identified victim.A report from the US Federal Reserve indicates that synthetic identity theft constitutes the fastest growing type of identity fraud. In 2016 alone, the losses caused by this type of fraud exceeded USD 6 billion. Many how-to guides contain detailed descriptions of methods used to combine actual and fake data in such a way as to mislead the relevant financial institutions into believing that the synthetic identities are genuine.

The reliability of the how-to guides

How-to guides are highly unreliable. In many cases, they provide no useful information and the buyer cannot demand his or her money back. In this regard, Tyler Carbone, a CEO at Terbium Labs, noted: “Ironically, many fraud guides are themselves fraudulent. Bad actors create fake guides, and try to make a profit selling them before buyers catch on.” Of course, this is not surprising as people who teach others on how to commit fraud should not be expected to be honest and ethical. 

Some how-to guides may even include malware to be used by their buyers to commit fraud. Quite often, such malware may actually infect the computers of the buyers. Thus, the buyers who pay for purchasing how-to guides may actually pay for infecting their own computers.

According to the researchers of Terbium Labs, about 11% of all how-to guides are fraudulent. Although the remaining 89% how-to guides contain genuine information about how to commit fraud, many of them contain obsolete data (more than a decade old) or duplicated data (e.g., publicly available data repackaged by the hackers as their own).

Irrespective of the reliability of how-to guides, these materials may provide people with weak computer skills with the opportunity to conduct serious cyberattacks. This is not only because they often contain detailed and simple instructions, but also because they may include ready-made malware that can be used during the attacks and databases of stolen sensitive information which can facilitate fraudulent operations. The average price of stolen sensitive information on the dark web is about $8.50, but one can find such information even at the price of $1.

Concluding remarks regarding how-to guides

How-to guides have the potential to increase the number of global cyberattacks because they reduce the financial and competence requirements required for conducting such attacks. Anyone who can pay about $4 for a how-to guide or about $16 for a collection of how-to guides under a single listing is now able to engage in account takeovers, phishing, doxing, fraudulent cashing-out, synthetic identity fraud and other malicious activities. 

This means that how-to guides can be regarded not only as an information security problem but also as a social problem because their use can lead to the paralysis of the functioning of various social organizations such as governments, hospitals and companies.

[Source: This article was published in resources.infosecinstitute.com By Daniel Dimov - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne]

Categorized in Deep Web
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