These are, of course, the latest technology available to large metro centers.  Your own part of the world will offer speeds that vary with the technology and providers available in your area.

For Cellphone Users in City Limits

Modern cellphone connections should be 5 to 12 megabits-per-second (5 to 12 Mbps) if you have the 4th Generation LTE technology. 

For Desktop Users in City Limits

Modern high-speed cable connections to a home desktop should be 50 to 150 megabits-per-second (50 to 150 Mbps).

Also remember: these speeds are theoretical numbers.  In practice, most users will experience speeds that are slower than these theoretical values. Speeds vary with many factors.

Here are several ways you can test your internet connection speed and see your own performance.

1-Ookla Speed Test for Android

Ookla Android speed test
Ookla Android speed test. screenshot

Ookla is a respected American name that has offered speed testing services for years.  Their Ookla mobile app will perform upload and download speed tests with controlled data over a 30-second interval.  It will then provide you graphical results to show what speeds your mobile device is achieving on 4G, LTE, EDGE, 3G, and EVDO networks.

Important note:  many ISP's will offer to be the target Ookla server for you, so their results may be skewed to inflate their performance numbers.  After your first test, it is a good idea to go into Ookla settings and choose an independent server outside of your ISP's control when you run your second and third Android speed test.More »

Ookla speed test for iPhone/iOS
 Ookla speed test for iPhone/iOS. screenshot

In the same fashion as the Android version, Ookla for Apple will connect to a server from your iPhone, and send and receive data with a strict stopwatch to capture the results.  The results will show in stylish graphs, and you can choose to save your results online so you can share it with friends, or even your ISP.

When you use Ookla on your Apple, make sure to run it multiple times, and after the first test, using the Ookla settings to choose a target server that is not owned by your ISP; you are more likely to get unbiased results from a 3rd party server. More »

Bandwidthplace.com speed test
 Bandwidthplace.com speed test. screenshot

This is a good free speed test choice for residents of the USA, Canada, and the UK. The convenience of Bandwidthplace.com is that you need not install anything; just run their speed test in your Safari or Chrome or IE browser.

Bandwidth Place only has 19 servers around the world at this time, though, with most of its servers in the USA. Accordingly, if you are far away from the Bandwidth Place servers, your internet speed will appear quite slow. More »

DSLReports speed testDSLReports speed test. screenshot

 As an alternative to Ookla and Bandwidthplace, the tools at DSLReports offer some interesting additional features.  You can choose to test your bandwidth speed when it is encrypted (scrambled to prevent eavesdropping) or unencrypted. It also tests you against multiple servers simultaneously. More »

5-ZDNet Speed Test for Desktop

ZDNet speed testZDNet speed test. screenshot

 Another alternative to Ookla is ZDNet.  This fast test also offers international statistics on how other countries are faring for internet speeds. More »

6-Speedof.Me Speed Test for Desktop

Speedof.Me speed test
 Speedof.Me speed test. screenshot

Some network analysts claim that speed tests based on HTML5 technology are the most accurate mimic of how internet traffic really flows. The HTML 5 tool at Speedof.Me is one good option for testing your desktop or cell phone speed.  This browser-based tool is convenient for how it requires no install.

You don't get to choose the servers with Speedof.me, but you do get to pick what kind of data file you want to upload and download for the test. More »

7-Where Does Internet Sluggishness Come From?

Where does internet sluggishness come from?
 Where does internet sluggishness come from?. Buena Vista / Getty

Your performance is likely to fall short of the theoretical maximum on your ISP account.  This is because many variables come into play:

  1. Online traffic and congestion: if you are sharing a connection with many other users, and if those users are heavy gamers or downloaders, then you'll definitely experience a slowdown.
  2. Your location and distance from the server:  particularly try for those of you in rural settings, the more distance the signal travels, the more your data will hit bottlenecks across the many cable 'hops' to reach your device.
  3. Hardware: hundreds of pieces of hardware connect you to the Web, including your network connector, your router and model, many servers and many cables. Not to mention: a wireless connection has to compete with other signals in the air.
  4. Time of day:  just like the roads during rush hour, the cables of the Internet have peak times for traffic. This definitely contributes to your speed experience slowing down.
  5. Selective throttling:  some ISP's will actually analyze data, and purposely slow down specific types of data.  For example, many ISP's will purposely slow down your movie downloads, or even dial all your speeds down if you consume more than your monthly quota of data.
  6. Software running on your system:  you may unwittingly have some malware or some bandwidth-intensive application running that will rob your internet speed.
  7. The other people in your house or building:  if your teenage daughter is streaming music in the next room, or if your building neighbor below you is downloading 20GB of movies, then you'll likely experience sluggishness.

8-What to Do When Your Speed Doesn't Match What Your ISP Promises...

What if your internet speed is far below your ISP promises?
 What if your internet speed is far below your ISP promises?. Buena Vista / Getty

If the speed variance is within 20-35% of the promised speed, you may not have much recourse.  That's to say if your ISP promises you 100 Mbps and you can show them that you get 70 Mbps, the customer service people will probably just tell you politely that's you need to live with it.

On the other hand, if you paid for a 150 Mbps connection, and you are getting 44 Mbps, then you are well within reasonable to ask them to audit your connection.  If they mistakenly toggled you at a slower speed, then they should give you what you paid for, or credit you back fees.

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Paul Gil

Categorized in Science & Tech

DOES YOUR broadband feel like it’s a little slower than usual? Here’s how to easily check your speeds in real-time – direct from the Google homepage.

There is no shortage of websites offering to help test your broadband speeds.

Netflix has one to help users determine what video quality they can expect with their current broadband speeds, and of course, the always-reliable Speed-Test.net is often synonymous with this entire category of website.

But one of the quickest ways to run a broadband speed test is direct from the Google homepage.

Google has a built-in speed test that appears directly in the search results.

First things first, you’ll need to make sure you’re connected to the wired or wireless connection you want to test.

Then head on over to Google.co.uk to double check the internet connection is up-and-running.

When you’re ready, type the words “Speed Test” into the search box.

Obviously, this will load-up a list of Google search results, but at the top will be Google’s own offering.

To check your internet speed, click on Run Speed Test.

This loads a small web applet that shows the tests running in real-time, as Google checks your ping, download, and upload speeds.

When the test is finished, Google will display the results.

Google broadband speedtest

Google can now test your internet speed right from its homepage

You’ll also be able to check the server location that was used in the test, additional information about your network’s speed including what you should be able to do (stream 1080p video content), and a link to re-run the test.

Granted, it’s not revolutionary – and is very similar to other offerings.

But given Google will be most people’s port-of-call to start looking for a speed test online, this should significantly speed-up the process.

Source: This article was published express.co.uk By AARON BROWN

Categorized in Science & Tech

The CRTC promises high-speed connections to the rural areas lacking it, but their plan has holes

Going home for the holidays is always a welcome escape from school and the everyday hustle and bustle of life. However, ‘back home’ for me is the boonies, the sticks, the country. While the slower pace is nice, I always get a little more slow than I bargain for. Slow Internet, that is.

Sometimes, it’s slow enough to be deemed unusable. The idea of Internet in the bush is more of a symbol or an idea, a technological feat to strive for, than an actual service. With the United Nations declaring the Internet a basic human right in today’s technology-minded world, it’s astonishing that some rural areas still don’t even have basic access.

I’m not just a millennial with a socially acceptable addiction to being connected: the Internet is essential and crucial to functioning in our current society. So, it’s about time the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) decided to treat broadband Internet access as a “basic telecommunications service,” which means it’s finally time for them to give us in the countryside all the Internet.

They report that they hope to reduce the 18% of Canadian homes without adequate Internet to 10% in the next five years, and eradicate it entirely within the next 10 or 15. They’re also requiring service providers to put money into a fund — projected to grow to about $750 million worth — to facilitate these changes.

This may translate to increased prices on services to compensate. With no regulation on rates accompanying the new mandate, consumers are in a tight spot: if the CRTC makes service providers pay more money, those providers will take it straight from our pockets, and without proper policies in place, there’s no telling whether or not we’re going to be charged fairly.

The overall goal is to be able to offer high-speed Internet services to rural areas, with only the hope that they will be affordable. This isn’t good enough. This doesn’t equate to providing adequate Internet to all citizens, not when that access might itself be unfairly inaccessible for financial reasons. This lack of foresight demonstrates a real failure to provide the fundamental human right. What, exactly, is the CRTC doing?

The CRTC has come under fire for being stuck in the past and an obsolete regulator, but in spite of those flaws, it’s still the only credible Canadian regulator which is separate from government. While policing the Internet has always been frowned upon, financial regulation done in the interest of providing it for everyone at an affordable price would be in the best interests of Canadians.

The Internet has become key to meeting our most basic human needs. Newspaper classifieds have gone the way of the dodo. Finding a job, finding a place to live, and, not to mention, socializing is all done via a broadband connection. Even inmates have the right to access the web. Providing Internet service to all at a respectable speed is imperative, but not the final goal — it needs to be at a reasonable price, and we need to do more to ensure that.

Canada is ranked only 33rd in the world for Internet speed. If the CRTC is going to be relevant in our expanding technological society, it needs to work harder to protect the ‘public interest,’ even if the regulations and policies necessary to truly accomplish that are at the expense of the companies which provide Internet services.

Author: Kendra Nelson
Source: http://www.the-peak.ca/2017/01/stronger-internet-needs-to-come-with-stronger-policies

Categorized in Science & Tech

SpaceX has announced plans to launch over four thousand satellites into low-Earth orbit to provide the world with super-fast internet, according to a recent regulatory filing.

Earlier this week, Elon Musk's SpaceX company outlined plans to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to create global broadband network by launching 4,425 satellites into space. The first deployment will entail 800 satellites, intended only for connectivity in the US. The global remainder will be launched at a later date. Currently, some 1,400 satellites orbit the Earth, in varying stages of usefulness and repair.

"With deployment of the first 800 satellites, the system will be able to provide US and international broadband connectivity; when fully deployed, the system will add capacity and availability at the equator and poles for truly global coverage," SpaceX said.

The company has not announced a concrete date for its initial launch, but mentioned 2019 as a possibility.

SpaceX broadband satellites will weigh 386 kg each, and be about the size of a small car, making them smaller than existing telecommunications orbital platforms. They will also have a shallower orbit and are expected to have a service life of five to ten years.

"The SpaceX non-geostationary orbit (‘NGSO') satellite system (the ‘SpaceX System') consists of a constellation of 4,425 satellites (plus in-orbit spares) operating in 83 orbital planes (at altitudes ranging from 1,110 km to 1,325 km), as well as associated ground control facilities, gateway earth stations and end user earth stations," SpaceX wrote in its FCC filing.

The company detailed that the orbiting broadband network will reduce signal latency and dramatically improve bandwidth.

"Once fully optimized through the Final Deployment, the system will be able to provide high bandwidth (up to 1Gbps per user), low-latency broadband services for consumers and businesses in the US and globally," SpaceX wrote. "Subject to additional development work, SpaceX plans to design and manufacture its own satellites, gateway earth stations, and user terminals." Home internet customers would receive a "low-profile user terminal that is easy to mount and operate on walls or roofs."

If the ambitious SpaceX plan is realized, it would expand high-speed internet coverage globally, and greatly improve internet in rural areas that need it most.

Author:  Tech

Source:  https://sputniknews.com

Categorized in Science & Tech

The Internet is a necessity in the workplace, whether you work in a supermarket or in an office, there is a part of your job that will require an Internet connection. With companies becoming increasingly obsessed with ways to increase productivity, the most obvious way is to improve your connection speed.

If you count up the times you have waited for a page to load or a tutorial video to stop buffering, you’ll probably have spent hours if not days each year sat at your screen simply waiting.

In the following paragraphs we’ll cover what contributes to Internet speed and share some top tips on how you can speed yours up.

Internet speed is determined by a number of factors; some are completely out of your control, like where you live whilst others you do have control over.

Network structure

Perhaps the most important thing is the structure of your network. Whether you use a wired or wireless connection, if your system isn’t installed with bandwidth in mind you could be losing mountains of all-important speed. As a result, it is imperative that your business hires a structured cabling and wireless network professional to ensure that your network is in the best position possible to help you reach maximum Internet speed.

Clean your device

Have you ever wondered why the Internet on your laptop seems to move much quicker than on your PC, despite you being connected to the same network? Well a lot of this can be to do with your device rather than the network.

If you are trying to use multiple applications at once or your device is reaching its memory capacity, it will run much slower. As a knock on effect this means it will take longer for web pages to load.

Spend a few hours going through your computer and remove any unwanted applications. Don’t forget to perform regular virus scans as well because if your computer is infected it could make your Internet run at a snail-like pace. Here are a few more tips on how to clean your computer.

Check your browser

This is something that many people forget, but different browsers will have more of a strain on your computer and connection. For example, Internet Explorer is a popular browser but it does use a lot of resources, on the other hand you could find that using a more compact browser like Chrome will speed up your connection.

Download browser plug-ins

Most browsers now come with the ability to download plug-ins like dictionaries that allow you to hover over a word and instantly be presented with a definition.

There are many fantastic plug-ins that can help to improve your Internet speed. Popular ones include those which virtually disable ads from your surfing experience and with less flashing banners and pop-ups on your screen, you will have less elements to load and ultimately the content that matters should load much more quickly.

Most browsers now come with this ability built-in, like Safari will automatically disable all Flash elements unless you physically click on it and enable Flash.

Remove unwanted plug-ins

There are countless plug-ins that you can download so you’ll be forgiven for amassing a few over time. However, if you have plug-ins that you haven’t used in months, delete them. They’ll be running in the background and consuming bandwidth unnecessarily.

Close all unneeded tabs

Many webpages will now refresh automatically every few minutes, mainly news sites. So even if you aren’t looking at pages but have them open in tabs, they will be consuming bandwidth. If you are one of these people that likes to have unlimited tabs and browser windows open, think again if you are experiencing slow Internet speeds – closing them could have a huge difference.

Source : http://www.toptensocialmedia.com/social-media-technology-2/internet-reliance-improving-your-speed-at-work/

Categorized in Science & Tech

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