Apple’s 2017 iPhone lineup is poised to be the company’s most interesting and ambitious yet. By the time September rolls around, it’s widely believed Apple will release three brand new iPhone models: an iPhone 7s, an iPhone 7s Plus, and last but not least, the highly anticipated iPhone 8.

While the iPhone 7s and 7s Plus will sport the same form factor as the iPhone 7, the iPhone 8 will introduce a completely new design, complete with an advanced edge-to-edge 5.8-inch OLED display that will essentially take up the entire front end of the device. In fact, reports from the rumor mill suggest that the bezels surrounding the iPhone 8 display will only be about 4mm all around, a tidbit seemingly confirmed by our exclusive look at an iPhone 8 dummy model earlier this week.

With June right around the corner and the finalized iPhone 8 design likely locked down at this point, there’s a good chance that the number of leaked iPhone 8 moldings and schematics will rise significantly in the weeks and months ahead of the iPhone 8 release. To this point, Slashleaks today points us to a new series of photos — originally sourced via Weibo — which show us three different iPhone molds corresponding to the three new iPhone models Apple will release later this year.

While the photo above doesn’t shed a whole lot of new light on Apple’s 2017 iPhone lineup, it does suggest that the iPhone 8 may be slightly taller than the iPhone 7s. While previous reports claimed that the iPhone 8 will pack a display the size of an iPhone 7 Plus into the form factor of an iPhone 7, the iPhone 8 may actually be slightly larger if we assume that the molds above were all aligned uniformly.

Another point worth noting is that the camera module on the iPhone 8 is oriented vertically, a design which echoes a number of leaked schematics and designs we’ve seen over the past few months. It’s widely believed that the vertical orientation of the iPhone 8’s camera module has to do with the rumored augmented reality features Apple is planning to show off later this year.

With the iPhone 8 design said to feature one giant piece of glass, it’s widely believed that Apple will incorporate the Touch ID sensor into the display itself. Though some previous leaks have featured a cut-out for a Touch ID sensor on the back, it’s believed that the final iPhone 8 design will be far more elegant and user-friendly.

Now as for when we can expect to see the iPhone 8 finally hit store shelves, the good news is that we won’t have to wait longer than usual. Despite an onslaught of rumors claiming that the iPhone 8 release date might be pushed back by 4-8 weeks, more recent reports from credible sources indicate that the iPhone 8 release, like most other iPhone releases, will go down in September.

Price wise, it’s no surprise that Apple plans to charge a premium for the iPhone 8, with the entry-level 128GB model said to retail for $1000 and the more storage-friendly 256GB model said to retail for $1,099.

Source: This article was published BGR.com By Yoni Heisler

Categorized in Others

Commentary: A darts player says his hand was speared with glass after his Apple device blew up, according to a report.

He swiped right. And then boom.

That's the story told by Brit Lee Hayes of his unfortunate encounter with his iPhone 7.

He told the Sun that he'd only had it for three days and was answering a call when it allegedly just blew up on him.

"It was on the bench in the kitchen and I heard it ringing. As soon as I touched the screen to answer it the phone just exploded," he reportedly said.

His description of a loud bang and a sizzling noise is consistent with many reports of phones spontaneously combusting.

Apple didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Hayes, 42, of Southport, England, reportedly told the Sun that he had many small shards of glass embedded in his hand and that the phone had left burn marks on the kitchen bench where it had been sitting.

Hayes is a semi-professional darts player who calls himself "The Scorpion." He told the Sun his injuries have prevented him from competing and he's thinking of suing Apple.

It's appears that Hayes, himself, has been involved in legal issues before. As the Southport OTS News reported, a Lee "The Scorpion" Hayes was convicted last year of perverting the course of justice. Hayes didn't respond to two requests for comment.

 

When phones explode, blame often lies with the batteries -- as was the case with Samsung's now infamous Galaxy Note 7. In that case, one customer sued Samsung because he alleged that the phone exploded in his pants.

It doesn't seem to matter which brand it might be or even the age of the phone. Phones are electronic devices and they can go wrong.

Hayes told the Sun he considers himself relatively lucky.

"It was a nasty injury -- my hand was bleeding quite heavily -- but it could have been so much worse. I could have lost my hand," he said.

Technically Incorrect: Bringing you a fresh and irreverent take on tech.

Solving for XX: The industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about "women in tech."

Source : This article was published cnet.com By Chris Matyszczyk

Categorized in Others

Last week we showed you one of the first real world speed test videos to pit the new Galaxy S8 against the reigning speed champion, Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus. Unfortunately, we also explained why it was one of the worst speed test videos we had ever seen. None of these YouTube speed test videos are scientific, of course, but some tests are far more controlled than others. In this particular test, the narrator just tapped a bunch of apps and tried to eyeball which one opened faster each time.

We were still waiting for some of the more experienced YouTube gadget vloggers to share their speed test results, and now we have a much better test to share. And to be quite frank, the results are shocking.

Each year when new flagship Android phones are released, tech fans scratch their heads as they fail to best Apple’s iPhones. On paper, iPhones have much less impressive specs, and yet Apple always manages to deliver the smoothest possible user experience time and time again.

This year, Samsung’s new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ completely crush Apple’s iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus in terms of multi-core benchmark tests, though they still lagged behind Apple in single-core tests. In theory, that should mean Samsung’s new phones might be slower than iPhones at simple tasks, but the new Galaxy S8 phones should be clear leaders when it comes to heavy lifting like launching games and rendering 4K video. According to the results of a new real world speed test from YouTuber EverythingApplePro, that’s not the case at all.

The speed test video below shows the Galaxy S8 pitted against the iPhone 7 Plus in a number of different ways. While the competition is close at times, it’s not close at all in the long run. The most interesting parts of the video show that Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus is much faster than the Galaxy S8 when it comes to things like rendering 4K video and launching graphics-heavy games. Anyone who had seen earlier multi-core benchmark tests would certainly have expected the opposite to be the case.

Source : Yahoo.com

Categorized in Others

 

Slower than expected sales may have Apple reducing iPhone production.

Traditionally, new iPhones sell pretty well in their first few months -- often outperforming the previous model's sales during the same quarter. That might not be the case with Apple's latest handset: according to Nikkei, sluggish sales are forcing the company to cut back production of iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus devices. Based on data received from suppliers, Nikkei expects Apple to slow stock production by about 10 percent.

Apple saw an early sign of this reported slowdown in March, when its Q2 earnings showed that while iPhone 6S upgrades were outpacing the previous year, they still weren't up to snuff with sales from users who upgraded to the iPhone 6 is 2014. It's too early to say if the iPhone 7's slower sales are enough to make it the company's first device not to outsell the previous model, but we'll know soon enough: Apple's next quarterly earnings are set to drop sometime at the end of next month.

Author: Sean Buckley
Source: https://www.engadget.com/2016/12/30/the-iphone-7-may-not-be-selling-as-well-as-apple-hoped

Categorized in Science & Tech

To me, deciding on my 'Smartphone of the Year' is a curious challenge. The choice can't simply be 'the best phone' because everyone has a slightly different criteria for what makes the best phone. If I were to think about it empirically and go for the phone that fits the majority of people's criteria I wouldn't have the best phone, I would have 'the average phone of the year' that upsets the least number of people.

For a smartphone to pick up my personal award it needs to say something about itself, about the manufacturer behind it, and it needs to reflect the smartphone industry over the last twelve months.

So, with just a little bit of scene-setting and discussion about the phones I'm placing in third and second place, let's find out my smartphone of 2016.

Third Place: Jolla C, by Jolla

I've known that the Jolla C would be in the running for a long time for the award, because for the middle six months of the year it was the perfect use of 'proof by negation' of what the smartphone industry required from a smartphone in 2016.

The Jolla C hardware might look a touch underpowered, although it has been built to a very low price of around 170 Euros. With a SnapDragon 212 System on chip, 2 GB of RAM, 16 GB of storage and a 2500 mAh battery, the real strength is in the software. It runs a 'clean' version of Sailfish OS which flies even on these apparently low specifications.

Around one thousand handsets were released (as 'developer editions') and offered over the summer months - a short run that was almost instantly snapped up by the faithful. It made some waves online, but no more. Here was a small company, making the hardware, putting on the software, and distributing the machine. Sailfish OS is compact, designed for a 'buttonless' smartphone relying solely on touchscreen input, with genuine multitasking on top of a robust Linux-based OS. It's robustness was proved on this low-priced Nexus-like device.

Author: Ewan Spence
Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/ewanspence/2016/12/31/iphone-7-plus-galaxy-s7-edge-jolla-smartphone-of-the-year/#182255f6d1ff

Categorized in Science & Tech

The iPhone 7 may be taking all the headlines, but there is another current model which offers an equally compelling (and far more budget friendly) alternative: the iPhone SE. So what are the differences given the huge gap in their respective price tags? The answers may surprise you, so let’s take a look…

Note: if you do decide to upgrade to the iPhone 7, my detailed iPhone 7 vs iPhone 7 Plus review will help you choose between Apple AAPL +0.52%’s two premium models

Choosing between the iPhone 7 (left) vs iPhone SE (right) is not as simple as you might thing. Image credit: Apple

Design & Size

Apple shocked a lot of people by keeping the iPhone 6 design largely unchanged for a third generation with the iPhone 7, but it was equally surprising to see the iPhone SE launch earlier this year using the old iPhone 5/5S chassis first introduced in 2012. That said it gives users two very different options:

  • iPhone SE - 123.8 x 58.6 x 7.6 mm (4.87 x 2.31 x 0.30 in), 113g (3.99 oz)
  • iPhone 7 - 138.3 x 67.1 x 7.1 mm (5.44 x 2.64 x 0.28 in) and 138 g (4.87 oz)

Yes, the iPhone SE is significantly more compact than the iPhone 7 and this is primarily due to the differences in the two models’ screen sizes (more next). Interestingly it also means the iPhone SE largely stands alone as an oasis in a desert of massive phones and it is super easy to use one handed - especially due to its flat, angular grippy edges.

The flat edges of the iPhone SE (top) make it easier to hold in hand. Image credit: Gordon Kelly


The flat edges of the iPhone SE (top) make it easier to hold in hand. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

By contrast the iPhone 7, while still relatively small by today’s phone standards, is more hazardous due to its curved edges and slippery finish. But it does come with a hidden bonus: dual stereo external speakers. This is a clever addition with Apple amplifying the earpiece to make it work as a second speaker. It’s not as powerful as dual front firing speakers, but it’s the easily the best external audio an iPhone has ever had.

Then again the iPhone SE retains one potentially major advantage over its more expensive stablemate: it retains the 3.5mm headphone jack which the iPhone 7 controversially removed. Looking for an upside? Apple claims the iPhone 7 is water resistant as a result (it’ll survive up to 30 minutes under water), though that doesn’t explain how the likes of Samsung kept the headphone jack while giving their phones similar water resistance.

Both the iPhone 7 (pictured) and iPhone 7 Plus are certified to withstand full submersion in water. Image credit: Gordon Kelly


Both the iPhone 7 (pictured) and iPhone 7 Plus are certified to withstand full submersion in water. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

Displays

Of course what makes the iPhone SE so much smaller than the iPhone 7 is its display:

  • iPhone SE - 4-inch LED-backlit IPS LCD, 1136 x 640 pixels (326 ppi pixel density), 60.8% screen-to-body ratio
  • iPhone 7 - 4.7-inch LED-backlit IPS LCD, 1334 x 750 pixels (326 ppi), 65.6% screen-to-body ratio. 3D Touch

And yet this is arguably also the iPhone 7’s greatest advantage. Despite having identical pixel densities, the iPhone 7 has a much brighter display than the iPhone SE and its support for what Apple dubs ‘Wide Color’ (the DCI-P3 color space) means it is far more colour accurate as well. In fact it’s the most colour accurate smartphone display in the world.

Both iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus displays are bright, vivid and very color accurate pushing LCD to its limits. Image credit: Gordon Kelly


Both iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus displays are bright, vivid and very color accurate pushing LCD to its limits. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

The iPhone 7 also carries forward support for 3D Touch from the iPhone 6S and which Apple surprisingly excluded from the iPhone SE (most likely to keep the price down). 3D Touch is a pressure sensitive technology which detects different strengths of press on the screen to create a raft of ‘peek and pop’ shortcuts (such as previewing emails or web links without opening them and creating app shortcuts like selfie and slo mo video modes on the camera icon).

Examples of 3D Touch in iOS. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

Examples of 3D Touch in iOS. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

3D Touch splits opinion with some users finding it indispensable and others ignoring it to the extent they forget it is there (making what is and isn’t 3D Touch enabled a guessing game would help greatly). So its importance to you will be a crucial factor in which phone to choose.

Performance

The iPhone 7 is the fastest phone currently available, but before you reach for your wallet know this: the iPhone SE is also a flying machine. This is because it uses the same components as the still speedy iPhone 6S yet combines them with a less demanding, lower resolution display:

  • iPhone SE and iPhone 6S - Apple A9, CPU: Dual-core 1.84 GHz Twister, GPU: PowerVR GT7600 (six-core graphics), 2GB RAM
  • iPhone 7 - Apple A10 Fusion: Quad Core CPU, Six Core GPU, 2GB RAM

Of course the iPhone 7 does have an advantage. Apple says the iPhone 7’s CPU and GPU deliver 40% and 50% performance boosts respectively. This will be well worth the extra money to power users and serious mobile gamers, but for everyone else you’ll be happy to know both phones race along and neither is likely to be troubled for anything iOS apps will throw at them for several years.

The A10 Fusion chipset makes the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus Apple's fastest ever iPhones and the fastest smartphones currently available. Image credit: Apple


The A10 Fusion chipset makes the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus Apple's fastest ever iPhones and the fastest smartphones currently available. Image credit: Apple

There are other differences. The iPhone 7 has a 450Mbit 4G compatible modem whereas the iPhone SE oddly uses the older iPhone 6 150Mbit part, though this is unlikely to be a problem unless you live in an area with extremely fast 4G.

Similarly the iPhone SE uses the iPhone 6’s first generation Touch ID fingerprint sensor while the iPhone 7 keeps the second generation Touch ID sensor from the iPhone 6S. Does this matter? Not really, the iPhone 7 is that little bit quicker at fingerprint recognition but both are extremely fast and very accurate.

Cameras

The camera is perhaps the biggest factor in determining smartphone updates these days, so should you pick the iPhone 7 for its heavily marketed camera advancements? You might be surprised learn that the answer is: not necessarily.

Apple promises game changing cameras in the iPhone 7 and (in particular) the dual camera iPhone 7 Plus, but do they deliver? Image credit: Gordon Kelly


Apple promises game changing cameras in the iPhone 7 and (in particular) the dual camera iPhone 7 Plus, but do they deliver? Image credit: Gordon Kell

  • iPhone SE – Rear: 12 megapixel sensor, f2.2 aperture, Focus Pixels, EIS, dual-LED flash, 4K video recording. Front: 1.2MP Front Camera, f2.4 aperture, 720p video recording
  • iPhone 7 - Rear: 12 megapixel wide angle sensor, f/1.8 aperture, Focus Pixels, Optical Image Stabilisation, quad-LED (dual tone) flash, 4K video recording. Front: 7MP sensor, f/2.2 aperture, 1080p recording

As you’ll spot, the real differentiator here is actually the front facing camera since the iPhone SE disappointingly retains the substandard front camera from the iPhone 6. That’s a real shame. The iPhone 7 front camera isn’t class leading, but it is far superior.

iPhone 6S (left) and iPhone SE (right) produce identical results. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

iPhone 6S (left) and iPhone SE (right) produce identical results. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

That aside both phones’ main rear shooters produce very similar results because the iPhone 7 isn’t quite as revolutionary as Apple would like you to believe. Low light photography is where the biggest advancements lie thanks to a combination of a higher aperture (f/1.8 vs f/2.2) and the addition of optical image stabilisation (OIS) which allows for longer exposures.

Despite this the iPhone 7 is still comfortably behind the Galaxy S7 and, most significantly, Google’s new Pixel and Pixel XL in the photographic stakes and the iPhone SE remains an excellent shooter. So only camera aficionados wedded to the iOS platform need to make this the deciding factor.

Right now the Google Pixel is clearly the best smartphone camera with the Galaxy S7 second and the iPhone 7 in third place. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

Right now the Google Pixel is clearly the best smartphone camera with the Galaxy S7 second and the iPhone 7 in third place. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

Battery Life And Charging

And it is perhaps here that the iPhone SE delivers the biggest surprise of them all because, despite a smaller capacity (1642 mAh vs 1960 mAh), it offers considerably better battery life than the iPhone 7.

The reason for this is its smaller, lower resolution display. Displays still consume most battery power while the iPhone SE also needs to drive less pixels to power it. Consequently even Apple’s official specifications pageadmits you’ll get an extra hour on the iPhone SE when surfing the web using 4G and up to 10 hours additional music playback.

Personally I find the differences to be even greater than this.

The iPhone 7 lacks a headphone jack (unlike most rivals) meaning you can charge it and use wired headphones at the same time. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

The iPhone 7 lacks a headphone jack (unlike most rivals) meaning you can charge it and use wired headphones at the same time. Image credit: Gordon Kelly

The iPhone SE will comfortably get me through a day whereas the iPhone 7 nearly always requires charging by mid to late afternoon. Given neither phone supports fast charging out the box (you’ll need to buy an iPad charger separately for a moderate improvement), this makes ‘splash and dash’ charging less effective and the importance of the iPhone SE’s greater staying power all the more useful.

Storage And Price

Easily the best thing about the iPhone SE and perhaps its greatest differentiator is price, but the iPhone 7 does come with bigger storage options:

  • iPhone SE - 16GB ($399), 64GB ($499)
  • iPhone 7 - 32GB ($649), 128GB ($749), 256GB ($849)

With 16GB all but useless given the iPhone SE’s advanced camera and 4K video, the 64GB option is the clear sweet spot and since this is $150 less and twice the storage of the entry level 32GB iPhone 7 it becomes a very tempting budget friendly option. Especially for those who want to retain the 3.5mm headphone jack.

As for the iPhone 7, the $749 128GB option is the clear standout for most customers. Note most buyers outside the US will find prices higher than this, in particular the UK and India where Apple increased prices dramatically this year.

iPhone SE vs iPhone 7 Plus (proportional size difference). My tip is to buy one of these phones and skip the iPhone 7. Image credit: Apple

iPhone SE vs iPhone 7 Plus (proportional size difference). My tip is to buy one of these phones and skip the iPhone 7. Image credit: Apple

Bottom Line

Aside from the disappointing front camera, the iPhone SE is almost a perfect budget iPhone. It’s compact, fast, long lasting and takes great photos. By contrast the iPhone 7 is more divisive with its omitted headphone jack and relatively modest camera upgrade.

Consequently my recommendation is simple: go small (iPhone SE) or - if you have the money to spend - go big for the iPhone 7 Plus which has a superior display, clever dual rear camera and vastly better battery life that easily justifies its additional $100 outlay at each storage capacity.

For me the iPhone 7 is a phone caught in no man’s land. Easily outclassed by its bigger brother at the high end and not offering anywhere near the bang for your buck of the iPhone SE.

Author : Gordon Kelly

Source : http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2016/11/05/iphone-7-vs-iphone-se-whats-the-difference/#cebd40d1a8bd

Categorized in Social

Everything you need to know about iPhone 7, iPhone 6s, iPhone SE, and more!

iPhone is a pocket camera, computer, and yes — communicator — all in one. It's Apple's most successful product and one of the most successful products of all time. Introduced by Steve Jobs in 2007, Apple has sold over a billion of them to date. Current models include iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus, with enhanced cameras, water-proofing, virtual home buttons, and improved battery life. Last year's iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus are still on the market, available at a slight discount. And iPhone SE, which packs most of the features of iPhone 6s into the smaller, iPhone 5s package.

Best iPhone: 128 GB matte black iPhone 7

Categorized in Science & Tech

Many of our readers who switched from Android to iPhone came from the super-popular Samsung Galaxy line of phones. So, why did they switch?

When I first asked why peoples switched from Android phones for iPhones, I figured man who replied would come from having a Samsung. Samsung is popular and there are so many on the market, that the numbers just felt like they would be there. Also, given the recall on Galaxy Note 7, many people were scrambling to find replacement phones — and some of those would have to go iPhone 7.

There are other reasons too, of course. Apple has proven they can deliver iPhone software and security updates to everyone in the world, all at the same time, which is increasingly important to people. Apple also continues to focus on lifelike photography, which is what some people prefer. It's also never been easier to make the switch.

But what are the reasons that have mattered most to you?

Kendall Seabury:

Came from an explosive note 7 and I'm using a temporary 6s plus and I have a 7 plus backordered.

What made me switch was consistentsy. Apple owns the hardware and the software. Since they can do that they can perfect it. I work at a place that gets spotty wifi and terrible cell coverage. On the note 7 I'd finish a 8.5 hour shift with 20% battery. On the iPhone I leave work and I have 60% or maybe even more.

I also have an iPad so continuity is amazing. It's now making me consider a MacBook Pro.

cctpitts01:

Went from the 6s Plus to the Note7 and as you already know the issue with the battery forced me to make move and seeing that the Note7 was the only device I wanted that ran Android I went and ordered (2) 256GB iPhone 7+ because even before the issues with the battery started they were already behind with the updates and it rubbed me the wrong way that Verizon altered the Note7 and had removed features that are present on the the ATT, Sprint and T-Mobile variants. I'm done with Verizon altering devices on Android and glad they can't tinker with the iPhone.

beenzy:

I switched from a Note 7. I've always wanted to give iOS a shot, so I got an iPhone 7 and a first gen Apple watch for the price of my Note 7 refund. It's been a few weeks now, and I'm enjoying the iOS experience so far. I like the smaller former factor, and I think the watch/phone integration is much better.

Aaron Moore:

This whole Note 7 fiasco really turned me off of Samsung. I went to a Iphone 7 Plus when I finally returned my second Note 7. Iphone has always had a superior OS, it's the lack of customization and other features that Androids allow that has kept me from buying an Iphone in the past few year. I am liking the speed and the battery life on the new 7 plus, and the low light camera is superior to the Note 7.

City00:

If I was going to stick with Android, it was either going to be a Google imagined phone, or I was going to get the Note 7. Well since the Note 7 became a non-factor, and, IMO, the Pixel phones are hideous, and overpriced for stock Android, I got an iPhone 7+ instead.

Devhux:

I switched from the Note 7 to an iPhone 6S Plus once the first recall happened. It took a bit of negotiating with my carrier as I had received an extra credit for trading in a previous Samsung device to get the Note.

I've had several issues with Android devices in the past and felt that I needed a change. A month in, and so far I'm very happy with my decision.

Xented:

I had an Note 7, Pixel C, and Huawei Watch. Sold on Ebay as soon as the explosive stuff with the note 7 happened.

I now have an iPhone 6S Plus (waiting on my preorder 7 Plus) , iPad Pro (9.7), and Apple Watch. The explosion incident with android was just the tipping point for me. Android is great, but so is iOS. With iOS and iPhones i know i have a quality piece of hardware that i don't have to worry about. They all work together seamlessly and I don't have to worry about support.

Pluka471:

I switched from a Note 5 and 7 to an iPhone 7 plus for a couple of reasons.

  1. OS and security updates
  2. Better and more predictable battery life. No more mystery battery drains that leave me with an almost dead phone.
  3. More polished OS and Apps with important features that work better. (granted Android is more flexible and customizable, but I believe it comes at the expense of polish).
  4. Better support from Apple. A broken screen on a Note 5 costs $250 and takes weeks to turnaround, iPhone is $129 and takes hours (many Apple stores in my area).

I hope that Google's Pixel phone matures in a couple of iterations to equalize these issues - I'm an Android fan, but for now, iPhones are more stable - even if a little restrictive and boring.

It wasn't just the Galaxy Note, though. The Galaxy S line also had people switching to iPhone.

djrakowski:

Security updates. My Galaxy S7 edge and my wife's Galaxy S7 (both on T-Mobile) didn't receive September security updates until the 1st or 2nd week of October.

ThaiBoy02:

I've been with Android since the OG Droid days. I finally decided to give the iPhone a try as I was sick and tired of hearing people say how great iOS was in general and wanted to see for myself what the deal was. I was rocking a Samsung Galaxy S6 (non edge) and was completely over the horrible battery life and late software updates so I decided to buy a iPhone 6s outright and give iOS a go. The switch was a little rough at first as I never used an iOS device before that. I have to say its nice to actually get software updates when its actually released and Google still has no answer for iMessage... Anyways I ended up recently purchasing the iPhone 7 Plus over the Pixel XL. My main reason for going with the 7 Plus is Apple supports their devices for a longer period of time.

Steve H Gotha:

I went from a Galaxy S7 Edge to 7 Plus primarily because of the water resistance, ever since I lost a phone having to jump into a pool to save my daughter I require water resistance for my phone. I can honestly say I truly appreciate both iOS and Android but as my wife and daughter have iOS devices it makes it easier for us to share stuff, and my daughter loves that she can FaceTime me now.

Bob McClenahan:

I switched back to iOS (iPhone 7 Plus) after about six months with a Galaxy S7. The camera was horrible, and I really missed iOS Messages.

 

 

ronin_cse:

I switched from a Galaxy S7 Edge. Wasn't really for any of the above mentioned reasons, I just ended up getting too annoyed by lots of little things on Android that aren't really on iOS and I didn't really need any of the pros that Android offers vs iOS.

Things like better battery life, better updates, better response, less lag, less bugs, better apps, etc...

Why did you switch to iPhone?

I find all of these answers, and the many more I received, really interesting. Now that I've seen the wide array of responses, however, it makes me want to find out even more.

So, if you switched from your Samsung Galaxy phone for an iPhone, I'd love to know why. Was it one specific reason, like the camera or privacy? Or was it a combination of reasons, from hardware to software, quality to feature set? If you haven't switched yet but are considering it, is it because of the changes made to iOS 10 or iPhone 7?

Source : http://www.imore.com/

Auhtor : RENE RITCHIE

Categorized in Science & Tech

The rumor mill surrounding the Galaxy S8 is in full production mode at the moment, with anonymous sources from all corners of the web revealing potential features and design elements long before Samsung is ready to reveal the phone in earnest. The latest comes from Fone Arena, which reports that the S8 will follow the iPhone 7’s lead in the speaker department.

The iPhone 7 was the first iPhone to feature stereo speakers, and it’s an addition that has been roundly praised by reviewers and users alike. Now, Samsung will reportedly follow suit, adding stereo speakers to the S8, along with special branding to draw more attention to the feature.

One of the HTC One’s marquee features was its stereo speaker setup that the company branded BoomSound. The report suggests that Samsung has something similar in mind for the speakers on the new S8.

Curiously, the report also suggests that the S8 could draw upon Samsung’s recent $8 billion purchase of Harman to give its new stereo smartphone some added flair. However, this is something that was already shot down by Harman’s own CEO, Dinesh Paliwal, just a couple of weeks ago. At the time, Paliwal suggests that the timeline to integrate any Harman technology into the S8 was simply too short, and that Samsung’s smartphones would have to wait until 2018 before they could benefit from the acquisition.

“Since we are globally number one in audio technology, we plan to create new opportunities by applying the audio technologies into Samsung’s smartphones and home appliances. We may adopt Harman’s luxury audio technology into Galaxy S series possibly in 2018,” Paliwal said.

Source : http://bgr.com

Auhtor : 

Categorized in Social

Each year when Apple introduces a new iPhone, critics and users hold their breaths for a major breakthrough to be included in the new model. With the iPhone 7, there's no major breakthrough, but there are two fairly big changes—one good, one maybe not so good.

 

The positive major change introduced with the phone is the new dual-camera system available on the iPhone 7 Plus.

 

With two 12-megapixel cameras, a telephoto lens, and the ability to capture DSLR-quality depth of field effects, the 7 Plus' camera is a big step forward and could lay the ground work for even more advanced features later (think 3D). On the downside, the features don't ship out of the box; they'll be delivered via software later.

 

The negative change is the removal of the traditional headphone jack. The iPhone 7 will now include only a Lightning port for connecting wired headphones. Apple put the removal in terms of "courage," and it certainly fits with the company's other controversial-at-the-time feature removals (DVD, Ethernet, floppy discs), but whether the included adapter dongle is enough to satisfy users remains to be seen.

 

The most notable changes introduced with the iPhone 7 include:

  • Removal of the headphone jack—Bound to be the most controversial iPhone change in years, the iPhone 7 removes the traditional headphone jack entirely. Instead, users are expected to use headphones that connect to the phone's Lightning port or AirPods, a new set of wireless headphones introduced by Apple at the same time. 
  • The dual-camera system on the iPhone 7 Plus—The camera system on the iPhone 7 Plus is a major upgrade. It includes two 12-megapixel cameras on the back of the device, with the second camera offering a telephoto lens. This enables new image effects using depth of field (the foreground of the image in focus, the back blurred), live previews of depth of field effects, and up to 10x zoom. The camera flash also includes four bulbs (up from 2) for better color accuracy.
  • Higher top-end Storage—The highest capacity storage on the iPhone 7 is now 256 GB, up from 128 GB in the iPhone 6S. 
  • Better color fidelity in screen—Both Phone 7 models have technology built into their screens that allows them to display a greater range of colors, delivering better-looking images. This technology was introduced previously on the iPad Pro.
  • New color options—In addition to silver, gold, and rose gold, the iPhone 7 offers two new color choices: Black and a high-polish "Jet Black." Jet Black is only available in the 128 GB and 256 GB models.

 

 


 

 

 

iPhone 7 Hardware Features

 

In addition to the changes noted above, new elements of the iPhone 7 also include:

  • The new A10 Fusion processor 
  • W1 wireless audio chip to support AirPods and new wireless Beats headphones
  • Redesigned, solid state Home button with new force feedback engine
  • Improved user-facing camera
  • 25% brighter screen
  • The ability to edit and add effects to Live Photos
  • Improved battery life
  • IP67 water and dust resistance
  • Support for Felica NFC standard used in Japan.

 

Screen

  • iPhone 7: 4.7 inches, at 1334 x 750 pixels
  • iPhone 7 Plus: 5.5 inches, at 1920 x 1080 pixels

 

Cameras

  • iPhone 7
  • Back camera: 12 megapixel, digital zoom up 5x
  • User-facing camera: 7 megapixel

iPhone 7 Plus
Back camera: Two 12-megapixel cameras, one with telephoto lens, optical zoom to 2x, digital zoom to 10x
User-facing camera: 7 megapixel

 

Panoramic photos: up to 63 megapixel
Video: 4K HD at 30 frames/second; 1080p at 120 frames/second slo-mo; 720p at 240 frames/second super slow-mo

 

Battery Life
iPhone 7

  • 14 hours talk
  • 14 hours Internet use (Wi-Fi)/12 hours 4G LTE
  • 30 hours audio
  • 13 hours video
  • 10 days standby

 

iPhone 7 Plus

  • 21 hours talk
  • 15 hours Internet use (Wi-Fi)/13 hours 4G LTE
  • 40 hours audio
  • 14 hours video
  • 16 days standby

 

Sensors

  • Accelerometer
  • Gyroscope
  • Barometer
  • Touch ID
  • Ambient light sensor
  • Proximity sensor
  • 3D Touch
  • Taptic Engine for feedback

 

iPhone 7 & 7 Plus Software Features

  • The improved camera features of the iPhone 7 Plus don't ship with it. Instead, they'll be delivered as a free software update later in 2016

  • Editable Live Photos

  • iOS 10 support

  • Support for all existing iPhone features like FaceTime, Siri, GPS, AirPlay, App Store, Apple Pay, etc.

 

Colors

  • Silver
  • Gold
  • Rose Gold
  • Black
  • Jet Black

 

US Phone Carriers

  • AT&T
  • Sprint
  • T-Mobile
  • Verizon

 

Size and Weight 

  • iPhone 7: 4.87 ounces
  • iPhone 7 Plus: 6.63 ounces
  • iPhone 7: 5.44 x 2.64 x 0.28 inches
  • iPhone 7 Plus: 6.23 x 3.07 x 0.29 inches

 

Capacity and Price

  • iPhone 7
  • 32 GB - US$649
  • 128 GB - $749
  • 256 GB - $849
  • iPhone 7 Plus
  • 32 GB - $769
  • 128 GB - $869
  • 256 GB - $969

 

Availability

  • The iPhone 7 and 7 Plus go on sale Sept. 16, 2016. Customers can pre-order them starting on Sept. 9, 2016.

 

Previous Models

When Apple releases new iPhones, it also keeps previous models around to sell at lower prices. With the introduction of the iPhone 7, Apple's line up of other iPhone models is now:

  • The iPhone 6S & 6S Plus will be available in 32 GB and 128 GB models for $549 and $649, and $649 and $749, respectively
  • The iPhone SE remains in its current 16 GB and 64 GB configurations and at its current pricing
  • The iPhone 6 & 6 Plus will be discontinued.

 

Author:  Sam Costello

Source:  https://www.lifewire.com

 

 

 

 

Categorized in Internet Privacy
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