Need to find a job? These are the best job search engines on the web

If you're in the market for a new job, you'll want to check out this list of the best eight job search engines on the web. All of these job search tools offer unique features and can streamline your employment search efforts so your efforts are more productive. Each one is an incredibly useful tool that will help you localize your search, find interesting new positions that correlate to your experience and interests, and help you to find employment in a wide variety of genres. 

1- Monster.com

Monster Logo
Monster

Newly redesigned Monster.com is one of the oldest job search engines on the Web. While some of its usefulness has been diminished in recent years due to a lack of good filtering and too many posts by spammy recruiters, it's still an important site on which to conduct a job search. You can narrow your search by location, keywords, and employer; plus, Monster has plenty of job search extras: networking boards, job search alerts, and online resume posting.

Employers can also use Monster.com to find employees for a nominal fee, a useful tool for those looking to expand their hiring repertoire, find a new full-time or contract employee, or gather a pool of potential applicants for an upcoming position.  More »

Indeed logo
Indeed

Indeed.com is a very solid job search engine, with the ability to compile a resume and submit it onsite for employer searches of keywords, jobs, niches, and more. Indeed uncovers a wide variety of jobs and fields that you wouldn't normally find on most job search sites, and they do a good job of making their job search features as easy to use as possible. You can subscribe to job alerts via email; you can set these up for a certain keyword, geolocation, salary, and much more. 

In addition, Indeed makes it as simple as possible to keep track of jobs you've applied for; all you need to do is create a login (free) and every job you've applied for from within Indeed.com or that you've just expressed interest in will be saved to your profile. 

Daily and weekly alerts can be created with notifications going to your inbox; criteria include job title, location, salary requirements, and skill sets.  More »

USAJobs
USA Jobs

Think of USAjobs as your gateway into the huge world of US government jobs. Navigate to the USAjobs.gov home page, and you'll be able to narrow your search by keyword, job title, control number, agency skills, or location. One particularly interesting feature is the ability to search worldwide within any country that currently is advertising a vacancy. 

Just like many other job search engines on this list, you can create a user account (free) on USAjobs.gov, making the application process for government jobs extremely streamlined and easy.  More »

CareerBuilder Logo
Career Builder

CareerBuilder offers job searchers the ability to find a job, post a resume, create job alerts, get job advice and job resources, look up job fairs, and much more. This is a truly massive job search engine that offers a lot of good resources to the job searcher; I especially appreciate the list of job search communities. 

According to the CareerBuilder website, more than 24 million unique visitors a month visit CareerBuilder to find new jobs and obtain career advice, and offers job searches in over 60 different countries worldwide.  More »

5- Dice

DiceLogo
Dice

Dice.com is a job search engine dedicated to only finding technology jobs. It offers a targeted niche space for finding exactly the technology position you might be looking for.

One of the most appealing features that Dice offers is the ability to drill down to extremely specialized tech positions, giving job seekers the opportunity to find the niche tech jobs that are sometimes elusive on other job search engines.  More »

6- SimplyHired

SimplyHired Screenshot
Simply Hired

SimplyHired also offers a unique job search experience; the user trains the job search engine by rating jobs he or she is interested in. SimplyHired also gives you the ability to research salaries, add jobs to a job map, and view pretty detailed profiles of various companies.

If you're looking for a good job search engine that focuses on local job listings, SimplyHired can be a good choice. You can browse by town, by zip code, or by state to find the job that might be right for you.   More »

7- LinkedIn

linked in logo
LinkedIN

LinkedIn.com combines the best of two worlds: the ability to scour the Internet for jobs with its job search engine, and the opportunity to network with like-minded friends and individuals to deepen your job search.

LinkedIn's job postings are of the highest quality, and if you are connected to someone who already knows about that particular job, you've got a way in before you even hand in your resume.  More »

8- Craigslist

Craigslist logo
Craigslist

There are all sorts of interesting jobs on Craigslist. Just find your city, look under Jobs, then look under your job category. Non-profit, systems, government, writing, etc. jobs are all represented here.

You can also set up various RSS feeds that pertain to whatever job you might be looking for, in whatever location.

Caution: Craigslist this is a free marketplace and some of the jobs posted at on this site could be scams. Use caution and common sense when replying to job listings on Craigslist.  More »

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Categorized in Search Engine

You often know when you’ve just made a big mistake in your job application. You forget to attach your resume. You send the wrong version. You address your cover letter to Mr. Chris Allen—then realize there’s a strong chance Chris is a woman.

But other times, you have no idea—you may even think you’re doing everything right! In fact, there are a few common job search techniques that candidates employ over and over because they think they work well. In reality, though, these very same strategies might be standing in the way of you and that big interview.

To make sure you have the very best chances of inching closer to your dream job, here are four common blunders—and much more effective techniques to try instead.

1. Applying To As Many Jobs As You Can Possibly Find

People often think that the job search is a numbers game. The more resumes you send out, the more likely it’ll be that someone will call you back, right?

Mmm, not really. Because applying to hundreds of jobs means you’re probably not taking the time to truly research the company and position, tailor each application accordingly and reach out to current employees who might be able to give you insider information. (And if you are? I’m jealous of how many hours you must have in a day.)

Similarly, candidates sometimes believe that applying to multiple positions at the same company ups their chances of getting called back for one of them. In reality, though this sends one of three messages: That you’re not sure what you want, that you’re desperate and you’ll take anything or that you don’t have a solid grasp on what each job entails. In any case, not a good thing.

The Fix: Think Quality, Not Quantity

Instead of applying to every semi-relevant job within a 60-mile radius, start your search by compiling a short list of dream companies and learning everything you can about them. When they have openings that fit your skill set, take the time to carefully craft your application—adjusting your resume bullets to show exactly how your experience aligns, writing a custom cover letter and asking your new contacts if they have advice for standing out.

Yes, this approach takes more time and energy than submitting your same ol’ resume at over and over, but your chances of scoring an interview will be much, much higher.

2. Applying ASAP

OK, so you’ve narrowed down your list of companies and one of them just posted a role that’s exactly in line with your skill set. Awesome! So you crank out everything as fast as possible and hit “send”—wanting to be the first application the hiring manager sees. Not only will you show just how excited you are about the job, but maybe the team will love your application so much they won’t need to interview anyone else.

News flash: This rarely does you any favors.

The Fix: Give It A Day Or So

Nine times out of 10, I have to toss the applications I receive within the first hour of posting a position because they’re incomplete. When you’re focused on speed over everything else, it’s easy to miss the details—getting names right, including additional materials and so on. It’s better to give yourself a day or two to write, rewrite and edit your materials, make sure you’ve included everything necessary and have someone else look them over. (And, again, total bonus if you get advice from a current employee.) A stellar application will be better than a not-quite-there-but-prompt one, every time.

3. Sending Your Resume To People Unsolicited

Let’s go back to those people who work at your dream companies for a second. Meeting them and getting on their radar: Good. Asking for their advice on working there: Also good. Sending them your resume unsolicited with a note that says, “Here’s my resume—let me know if you know of anything I’d be a fit for!” Surprisingly, not always the best.

Sure, in some cases, you might get lucky, but typically only in the off chance that the company is hiring for a role that meets your exact qualifications. But this move can also be construed as you asking your nice new contact (who’s already been helpful in talking to you about the company) to do the hard work for you—reviewing your resume, checking to see if any open positions are a fit and forwarding along your information.

The Fix: Apply Normally, Then Let Your Contact Know

Yes, you can (and should) ask your contact for advice before you apply. And if, in the process, he or she offers to pass your resume or a recommendation along, that’s great. But never make this assumption. Take those tips you’ve learned and then do the hard work, just like any other candidate would do. Look at a company’s jobs page, find your dream role, then submit an application with all the required pieces.

4. Sending A Great Application For A Job You’re Not Qualified For (Fingers Crossed)

Don’t get me wrong: I think everyone should apply to roles that are just a little bit of a stretch. It’s good to have reach goals—plus, you might be more qualified than you think, and with preparation and a little bit of luck, you could land an interview.

But there’s a difference between applying for a slightly-out-of-reach job and one that you’ll never get. For example: an executive-level job when you’ve got three years of experience; heading up a department team of 10 when you’ve never managed anyone; applying for a product management role because you think it sounds cool, and hey—you’ll figure it out. I’ve seen people in all of these situations think that they can make up for a lack of experience with passion and an awesome application, but the majority of the time, hiring managers think otherwise.

The Fix: Focus On The Right Reach Jobs

Again, your time is much better spent applying to roles that line up nicely with your current skills and level of experience. Spend most of your efforts on roles for which you meet a good majority of the requirements, sprinkling in a few “reach” jobs here and there.

If you’re making a bit of a leap, read Muse writer Katie Douthwaite Wolf’s advice on making sure you stand out among more qualified candidates. Or, work with a coach on a job search strategy that’ll help you get noticed.

Finally, consider career expert Kari Reston’s approach: “Instead of directly applying for the role that’s posted, send a speculative application to the company. Acknowledge that the position that caught your eye is geared toward someone more senior, but explain your interest and say that you’d be interested in joining the team in another capacity.”

I know—these job search techniques are done with the best of intentions! But make sure you put yourself in the shoes of the hiring manager. But applying to too many jobs too quickly, shooting too high, or expecting others to do too much won’t have the results you’re looking for. Try these simple shifts and you’ll be much more likely to get in the door for that interview.

This article was originally published on The Daily Muse

Adrian Granzella Larssen is the editor-in-chief of The Daily Muse, the award-winning daily career advice publication that's helped millions of people find and succeed at their dream jobs.

Categorized in Search Techniques

(Kathryn Minshew.TechCrunch/Flickr) 
Kathryn Minshew, cofounder and CEO of the career advice and job listings site The Muse, hadn't been looking to hire a head of marketing in 2012.

Then she received a LinkedIn message from Elliot Bell that changed her mind. Bell was hired as the director of marketing a few months later. He worked at The Muse for four years.

Here's the full text of the LinkedIn message he sent Minshew. It's reprinted in "The New Rules of Work," the new book Minshew wrote with her cofounder and COO, Alex Cavoulacos.

Hi Kathryn,

While slightly out of place, I attended the Women 2.0 conference yesterday with EatDrinkJobs and had the chance to see you pitch. I was blown away by you, your team, and most of all, your company.

I spent six years at Seamless.com, working closely with amazing leaders like Jason Finger (who you know well). I see such amazing potential in your company, and I would love to be a part of it in any way. My primary focus in marketing, with a lot of experience marketing to the same corporations and users you seem to be attracting. I'd love to tell you more about how my skill set could help you all reach and exceed your current growth goals.

Congrats on all your current success. Again, I'd love to find a time to chat more about the company and tell you how I could help.

Best,

Elliott

In an interview with Business Insider, Minshew broke down exactly why Bell's message was so compelling:

  • He included something personal — that he'd seen her speak at a conference.
  • He said something nice about her — that she and her team blew him away.
  • He made it clear that he was excited to work with The Muse specifically, and not just any company.
  • He included two sentences about his background, which was just enough information for her to see whether he'd be a fit.
  • He mentioned the name of a mutual connection, so she could ask that connection about Bell.
  • He didn't make an ask that went overboard, like a 30-minute phone call tomorrow — a request Minshew has received.

In an article for The Muse, Bell wrote that the message took all of two minutes to write.

Cavoulacos told Business Insider about the rationale behind sending a cold email (or LinkedIn message):

"You are never going to get what you don't ask for. And what was the worst-case scenario here? Kathryn didn't see the email, didn't read the email, she wrote back and said, 'Sorry, no'? You're literally in the exact same position you were before."

Her observation echoes something Liz Wessel, a former Googler and current CEO of WayUp, has told Business Insider about cold emailing.

"Don't question yourself," Wessel said. "Worst case, they don't respond, and then who cares? Seriously, who cares? Cold email for sure."

Wessel asks all her employees at WayUp to cold email their idol, and she has tips on crafting the perfect cold email.

If you're struggling to muster up the courage to send a cold message, consider framing the approach differently in your head. As Minshew told Business Insider, "The person on the other end might be just as excited to find someone to work with."

published in finance.yahoo.com by Shana Lebowitz

Categorized in Social

Is your dwindling bank account impacting your health? The American Psychological Association (APA) released a survey showing that money stress impacts Americans' health nationwide. And, as it turns out, the wealthy are also stressed about money -- not just those in lower-income households.

You can eliminate some of that financial stress by earning extra income, even if you have a full-time job. Steve Chou of MyWifeQuitHerJob famously started two six-figure businesses while continuing to work at his day job.

Whether you’re looking for cash to launch your startup or make new investments with, or dig out from mounting debt, a few hundred to a few thousand dollars a month can change your life. Here’s how to get started.

1. Start a service business.

Launching a service business can be done without a large network, an online presence or much overhead. The easiest way to start is by telling people in your existing network what you’re offering and asking them to spread the word.

Noah Kagan from AppSumo nailed this concept. He decided to see if he could earn $1,000 in 24 hours, starting from scratch. He ended up founding a successful beef jerky subscription business that he gave to one of his students to run.

You can steal his concept, with a business like dinner catering, freelance writing or online marketing. Start by crafting a killer outreach email to get yourself up and running in just a few days.

2. Invest in real estate.

Becoming a landlord isn’t always practical for those who are employed full-time and already strapped for cash. But you can look at buying a condo or small property in another country as a vacation getaway instead. The price tag is typically cheaper, even when you hire a local property management group to manage renters while you’re away.

Commercial real estate can also be a lucrative way to invest and earn passive income, even without a large down payment. Get started with a site like Realty Mogul, and invest in commercial real estate for as little as $5,000. You'll get vetted deals and access to high-end listings you wouldn’t otherwise find.

3. Launch an online resource.

Share your expertise by launching an online ebook or course to help others while you earn passive income. My own ebook, 100 Days of Growth, ended up generating more income than my day job. It was a ton of up-front work, but once it was ready to go, it took minimal effort to maintain and to keep up with sales.

If writing ebooks isn’t your strong suit, launch a video course or bootcamp instead. I didn’t stop at books -- I also launched a content marketing bootcamp through ContentMarketer.io to help my clients master content-marketing abilities in 10 weeks.

4. Leverage the power of Amazon.

It’s always an admirable goal to launch your own online store and build a customer base, but you’re also talking about wearing many different hats. You need to research products, find a manufacturer, market your site and figure out how to fulfill orders. Don’t forget about customer service and refund requests.

Instead, you could sell a product and develop a presence directly on Amazon without the need to take on so many roles. Some sellers even have their products shipped directly to Amazon’s fulfillment center and never touch the product itself.

5. Join the sharing economy.

It’s not hard to nail down a few hundred to thousands of dollars a month by leveraging the sharing economy. But it’s not just about renting out your spare bedroom or basement on Airbnb. Rent out your car on Turo and bike to work or carpool instead. Rent out your camera equipment lying around your house on Cameralends, your snowboard or bike on Spinlister or your sailboat on Sailo.

And if you are going to rent on Airbnb, consider helping your revenue skyrocket by renting out your entire house instead, and using the opportunity to visit family or go on vacation.

6. Host an event.

You can make money hosting events without aiming for thousands of sign-ups, vendors and high-profile guest speakers. Instead, form a free MeetUp group on a topic you’re knowledgeable about, like growth hacking, and run free events.

After you secure a loyal following, charge for an event with a reputable guest speaker. Rent out a small, upscale conference room at a nearby hotel, and grow your new MeetUp by hosting exclusive, sought-after events that charge a premium for fantastic content.

7. Get paid to do what you’re already doing

Take inventory of what you're doing in your free time. People who love skydiving (like me!) can get certified to teach and do jumps on the weekend. You get to do what you love while earning extra money at the same time. Ask your local bar if you can help run its trivia night, or bartend a few nights a week while hanging out and getting to talk to interesting people.

Even if you’re not interested in doing much but relaxing and surfing online, you can earn money by testing websites and recording your opinion with a site like UserTesting.

So, get out there. Use your imagination to start a flow of extra income today.

Source : entrepreneur.com

Categorized in Others

A good part-time job that you can do from home and still make money? Sounds like a come-on from an Internet scammer. But such gigs do, in fact, exist.

When online telecommuting jobs resource FlexJobs surveyed almost 1,100 parents, it found high demand for part-time and home-based work. Good jobs that meet those requirements are hard to come by—and so appealing that they’ve been used for years as bait for work-from-home scams. (You can find a list of the most common ones here.)

With FlexJobs’ help, we identified eight legitimate options for people who want to work from home on a part-time or occasional basis. To determine pay ranges for each job, FlexJobs incorporated salary data from Payscale.com and Glassdoor.com.

The list that follows consists of established employers and legitimate open (or recently open) positions on FlexJobs, for a look at the best opportunities now in the part-time, work-from-home market. Of course, as with any job, applicants for these gigs should thoroughly vet any company before signing on.

person writing with pen on notebook
Jeremy Frechette—Getty Images

Writer

Hourly rate from Payscale: $10.17 - $57.49

Writers with specialized knowledge can use their expertise to write columns, blog, and perform other regular work. One company hiring such writers is About.com, which educates readers about more than 70,000 topics. In April 2016, About was hiring guides (writers with professional background or expertise in a subject) for celebrity gossip, dairy-free cooking, and Virginia Beach and Norfolk.

Another is GolfLink, which pays for articles about golf articles ($40 - 65+ per article).

Technical, grant, and curriculum writing, advertised on the education website Schmoop, calls for more experience and training. However, there’s also writing work out there for generalists with less experience and less specialized training.

editor
Getty Images—iStockphoto

Editor

Hourly rate from Payscale: $10.75 - $43.26

As with writing, editing jobs run the gamut from demanding specialized knowledge to simply needing general knowledge. Editing work may involve exclusively editorial editing, management of writers or content, copy editing, or proofreading -- or a combination of those. The language services company Cactus Communications is hiring editors for academic manuscripts, paying $1,200 monthly. Other recent part-time work-from-home editor listings include everything from technical editing and news editing to a social media editor responsible for managing social accounts and writing press releases.

tutor
Steve Debenport—Getty Images

Tutor

Hourly rate from Payscale: $9.69 - $40.32

Tutoring is another skill that people with specialized knowledge can parlay into part-time work. The option to do it online from home makes it much more convenient than traditional in-person tutoring. Online tutoring jobs can be found in SAT/ACT testing, English, nursing and calculus.

Companies hiring tutors include Kaplan (which offers up to $600 per tutoring assignment), Achieve Test Prep, and Rosetta Stone.

home bookkeeper
Steve Weinrebe—Getty Images

Bookkeeper

Hourly rate from Payscale: $11.05 - $24.49

Workers with accounting experience (and Quickbooks, and Microsoft Office products) can take it to the bank by helping clients or employers with payroll, accounts payable and receivable, monthly reporting, or closing at the end of the year.

Companies hiring bookkeepers include the specialized staffing services provider Robert Half, which is hiring a remote part-time bookkeeper for a telecommunications company paying $13.46 - $17 per hour. Another virtual employer in this category is the church accounting services provider MAG Bookkeeping, which was hiring a contracted remote part-time bookkeeper in April 2016.

research interviewer on phone
Amy Eckert—Getty Images

Research Interviewer

Hourly Rate from Payscale: $8.69 - $20.54

Here’s one of interest to people who like talking on the phone, and have a reliable phone connection and quiet workspace at home. Research interviewers help companies gauge customer experience and their interactions so they can improve their business.

Companies hiring research interviewers include industry giant Nielsen as well as Maritz CX, which starts customer experience employees at their state minimum wage, then offers a .50 cent increase after 30 days of perfect (from home) attendance, with more raises at review times (2 months/6months/1 year) -- and offers paid time off.

person on phone with headset
James Tutor—Getty Images/iStockphoto

Customer Service Representative

Hourly rate from Payscale: $9.31 - $17.89

Customer service workers may find themselves selling, providing tech support, tracking down answers or lost orders, and taking complaints or product orders, or a combination of those roles. To do so from home, they will need their best phone manners as well as good phone service and a headset, a quiet workspace, and computers that meet their employers’ processing and Internet requirements.

Companies hiring customer service representatives include the upscale cookware retailer Williams-Sonoma, which is hiring care center associates for all shifts and paying $10.75 per hour, the call center outsourcers Working SolutionsSitel and TeleTech.

data entry on computer
Robert Churchill—Alamy

Data Entry

Hourly rate from Payscale: $9.18 - $15.76

Speed, accuracy, typing skills, and a tolerance for what can be dull work are required for data entry positions. Data entry applicants must have a computer up to the employer’s specs as well.

Companies hiring for data entry positions include SportsDirect, which has an evenings and weekends gig inputting scores, as well as the tech startup Ibotta, and the healthcare diagnostic company Alere.

stylist showing clothes to client
Morsa Images—Getty Images

Stylist

Hourly rate from Glassdoor: $15.03 - $15.24

Fashionable folks can enjoy a little glamour and profit, while providing fashion advice and personal shopping services for people who go out a lot . It works via online platforms like Stitch FixRocksBox, and Bombfell, which is hiring a part-time men’s online stylist with a 30% employee discount.

Source : time.com

Categorized in Work from Home

Social media gaint Facebook is aiming to go head-to-head with LinkedIn. The world’s largest social network announced today that it has launched several new features on its Web site to make it easier for employers to get in contact with job seekers.

Businesses will be able to post openings for positions on their Facebook pages, while job seekers will be able to browse through openings thanks to a new Jobs bookmark.

"We're focused on building new ways to help make it easier for businesses to interact with the over 1 billion people visiting Pages every month," the company said in a statement. "Businesses and people already use Facebook to fill and find jobs, so we're rolling out new features that allow job posting and application directly on Facebook."

Reaching Out to Enterprise Clients

Facebook's argument is that employers and potential employees are using their site constantly, making it a natural platform for people looking for qualified candidates. That argument sounds particularly pointed with regard to competing social network LinkedIn, which is used almost exclusively when people are searching for work or to network in their industries.

In the last several months, Facebook has been making a renewed effort to appeal to enterprise customers with new features designed with them in mind. In October, the social network unveiled several updates to its Pages service geared toward helping businesses interact more effectively with the more than 1 billion visitors the site receives every month.

"Beginning today, businesses in the US and Canada will be able to post job openings, and their future employees will be able to easily find those posts on their Page or in the new jobs bookmark," the company said. "This new experience will help businesses find qualified people where they're already spending their time -- on Facebook and on mobile."

Simple Functionality

Employers will be able to create job posts through the admins of their Pages. They can then use the new feature to track applications and communicate directly with applicants. After posting jobs, the admins will be able to review applications and contact applicants on Facebook Messenger.

The process is similar for job applicants, the company said. Job posts may appear in their News Feeds, in the new bookmark for jobs and alongside other posts on business Pages. When they click on the Apply Now button, a form will open that is pre-populated with information from their profiles on Facebook. Applicants will also be able to edit their information before submitting it.

None of this functionality may seem all that revolutionary, or provide job seekers with anything they cannot already find on LinkedIn or other job searching sites. What may be the differentiator, however, is Facebook’s status as one of the most frequently visited Web sites in the world. The sheer number of eyeballs Facebook is able to regularly attract may be sufficient to give LinkedIn a run for its money.

Author : Jef Cozza

Source : http://www.newsfactor.com/news/Facebook-Adds-Job-Search-Features/story.xhtml?story_id=1000096XPDCC

Categorized in Social

Serious about landing your dream job this year? Or at least, landing a more fulfilling and higher paying job than the one you’re in now?

If you said, Yes, then let’s do it! My last article in Huffington Post,2017 Highest Paying Jobs, Best Companies and Fastest Growing Industries, has been helping many of you identify the best job role, companies and industries where you to work.

In this article, I’m focusing on where to find your dream job.

As you probably know, it can be daunting navigating through a bazillion career websites, job boards and niche communities touting the latest and greatest job openings. As a leading career coach, I even get overwhelmed! Never-the-less, every year I conduct loads of online research and capture the lessons learned and best practices from my clients to create a list of my favorite (and what, I believe, are some of the most effective and best) career apps and websites to help you find your dream job.

Where can you find your dream job?

1. Glassdoor - In my opinion, Glassdoor is the best place to start your job search. It has tons of new jobs added every day, and allows you to search by job title, key responsibilities, company or location. Plus, it provides employee reviews on company culture, senior leaders and salary information to give you a leg up on negotiating your salary. Simply sign up (it’s free!) and you have a bucket load of research and reference materials at your fingertips.Reviews.com said it best, “Glassdoor gives you both the info you need to find job opportunities and the context to see if it’s a good fit for you too.”

2. Indeed - The majority of my clients get hired off of Indeed. This is a Google-like search engine for jobs and one of the most efficient sites for surveying listings, since it aggregates information from job boards, news sites and company listings. An advanced search function provides a few more filters than Glassdoor, and allows you to drill down on a location, keyword and salary range. Indeed says it has 200 million unique visitors month and is available in 60 countries and 28 languages.

3. LinkedIn - Recruiters and hiring managers love this site. A 2015 Recruiter Nation report by Jobvite shows that 87% of recruiters are using LinkedIn (the most popular social media networking site for recruiters) to seek out job candidates. You can post a free profile so that recruiters can check you out. Another key advantage is that LinkedIn allows you to search for jobs and then shows those in your network who are currently working, or have worked, inside that organization. This makes it easier for you to find (and hopefully get) referrals which is the #1 way job candidates land a job!

Search job openings on LinkedIn by going to your home page and clicking the “jobs” tab towards the top of the page. You can search by job title, keyword, company, or use the advanced search to include additional criteria. Be sure to scroll down to view job openings and companies hiring, as well as those in your network who have worked inside those organizations. For more tips, I love this article by Pamela Vaughan,35 LinkedIn Tips for Professional Networking, Business and Marketing.

Niche job sites...

SmartRecruiters.com reports that 62-percent of jobs are posted on niche job boards. Do yourself a favor and invest some time researching theirBest 50 Niche Job Boards list. Be sure to bookmark those sites with jobs that most closely align to your skills, passions and career goals.

For example,The Ladders features executive and management jobs that pay $80,000 and above salaries. This site also has a nifty Resume Reviewer which can analyze your resume for key words, grammar and any missing information.

If you want to land a job in STEM (science, technology, engineering or math), then bookmark Dice. If you want to find jobs in journalism, P.R. or social media then try Media Bistro. If you’d like to work for a non-profit organization in the U.S. then bookmark Idealist. Or, if you’re a student or young professional, check outInternships for global organizations with paid internships.

Freelance gigs...

  • Want to earn some extra cash or have more freedom and flexibility in your career? You can become a freelancer or consultant by posting your skills and experience on these sites and then sit back and let the jobs come to you!
  • Accenture has been on Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list for the past 8 consecutive years as a Fortune Global 500 company that provides strategy, consulting, digital, technology and operations services. Check out Accenture Consulting and Forbes review Accenture’s Management Consulting Division.
  • Freelancer has posted almost 11 million freelancing jobs to date worth $3+ billion in 600 categories including website development, mobile apps, software architecture, internet marketing, and more.
  • UpWork says it posts 3 million part-time, short-term and freelance gigs annually worth $1 billion. For designers, creatives, programmers, developers, and a variety of other business services skills.
  • OnForce specializes in IT, OEM & POS support, as well as consume electronic installation and repairs.

Other sites that can put some cash in your pocket include: Uber, SnagaJob, TaskRabbit, and Postmates. These sites offer marketplaces for anyone wanting to get hired as a driver, mover, courier, cleaner and basic chore-doer.

Tip - the career apps and websites listed above are great resources to help you find your next job. I recommend creating a job search agent on those sites you like so that you’ll spend less time searching and more time receiving instant notifications of jobs that interest you.

In future articles, I’ll share my favorite resources and tips to help you land your dream job by getting more job leads, referrals and recommendations, as well as how to create a stellar resume and how to nail your job interviews. But for now, I hope this article helps you get one step closer to landing your dream job.

Author : Sherri Thomas

Source : http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sherri-thomas/2017-best-career-apps-web_b_14626898.html

Categorized in Science & Tech

We have jobs to pay the bills, typically. Some of us are fortunate enough to have jobs that allow for exploration and indulgence in certain passions or to push the boundaries of technology and innovation. But by and large, people go to work because they have to — their jobs earn them money, and with that money, they make a living.

As the modern economy churns and turns, some jobs simply become redundant or less valuable. That can happen for a number of reasons, ranging from automation to an influx of cheaper labor. When it does happen, though, wages drop as the labor market become saturated. When there are more people with similar skill sets as you, odds are there are people out there who are willing to do the same job for less pay.

That’s when you either take a pay cut or lose your job entirely. There are a lot of factors at play, but at the very core of it is a supply-demand dynamic.

As of right now, if you’re a software engineer, this is good news. If you’re in manufacturing? It’s not — and as you’ll see on the following pages, manufacturing specifically is a segment of the economy that is being hit very, very hard by globalization and automation.

Which jobs are experiencing negative wage growth, or at least a very bleak outlook going into 2017? Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, here are 10 you’ll either want to avoid or get out of as soon as possible.

1. Apparel manufacturing

If you’ve noticed that just about all of your clothing is made in Asia or Central America, there’s a reason for that: cheap labor. Apparel manufacturing in the United States is on a steep decline, with wages dropping too for those still in the industry. This is why clothing that is made in America tends to be much more expensive than other options.

2. Tobacco production

The BLS labels this as “tobacco manufacturing,” and it’s another area in the manufacturing and production sector that is seeing jobs disappear and wages go down. It probably has a lot to do with the fact that demand for tobacco is dropping significantly as smoking becomes less and less common.

3. Postal service

Jobs with the postal service aren’t what they used to be, and there are a number of reasons that USPS has been experiencing trouble for several years now. It’s been shedding jobs and funding, and it’s one area in which wages aren’t exactly on the up and up — if you were considering trying to get a job there.

4. Communication equipment manufacturing

This is a pretty broad category, but it’s essentially referring to things like phones, computers, tablets — really any type of device or gadget that we use to communicate. As most people know, almost all of these things are made in other countries to take advantage of cheaper labor costs, and to pass those savings on to American shoppers.

5. Publishing

The digital age has made it tough for traditional publishing companies to survive. Some are, but they’re not printing money like they used to. Jobs are scarcer, and they don’t pay nearly as much as they did in the glory days of publishing.

6. Textile production

“Textile production” is another incredibly vague category, but it’s another area in which we’re seeing jobs either replaced with cheaper foreign labor or automation.

7. A/V equipment manufacturing

Audio and video equipment, like communication equipment, is almost exclusivelly produced in foreign markets. Again, to take advantage of cheap labor. This includes things like your TV, cameras, stereos, etc.

8. Glass manufacturing

Here’s an industry you probably haven’t given much thought to — glass production. Glass is everywhere, but you don’t often think about who is producing it, or where. Well, it’s an industry that is seeing some serious contraction in the U.S., and because of that, the jobs within aren’t paying very well.

9. Paper production

You may not know much about the paper industry other than what you’ve learned from those Dunder Mifflinites on The Office, but as far as production of paper goes, it’s rough out there for workers. Paper mills are contracting, and workers are seeing wages stagnate.

10. Miscellaneous manufacturing

Our final installment is as broad as it gets. The BLS includes “miscellaneous manufacturing” among its “most rapidly declining wage and salary” list. That may or may not include many of the aforementioned industries, but includes many others as well. The point is manufacturing, a former backbone of the American economy, is on the outs. If you’re hoping to make big money, you’ll need to do it in another way.

Source: This article was published on cheatsheet.com by Sam Becker

Categorized in News & Politics

In a rapidly changing world economy, it’s a question that’s consistently at the top of everyone’s mind: what job skills do I need, and which will get me a job? Hunting for a job requires not only a specific set of strategies and techniques, but also a strong sense of confidence in your abilities. But it’s those abilities – which abilities, specifically – that hang up a lot of jobseekers.

We’ve dug into this very topic before, and provided some insight into which job skills will get you hired this year. As the economy is constantly shifting and evolving, and churning undercurrents of consumer behavior call for different types of workers creating and supplying different products and services, it can be really difficult to know what employers want. We’re here to be a compass of sorts, and outline a handful of skills that employers are really scouring the labor market for in 2017, which should give you a leg-up in your job search.

While there will always be a need (until the robot take-over, that is) for menial, low-wage work, if you’re truly looking to give your career a shot in the arm, you’re going to need to put in some time on the side. Investing in yourself by learning new skills can lead you to new, unanticipated opportunities, and ultimately put a lot more money in your pocket. If you want to get serious about improving your earnings potential, this is the place to start.

So, what are employers looking for, and what skills do you need to make yourself an attractive candidate? Read on to find out.

1. Social skills

Source: Thinkstock

As we covered a little while back, social skills are becoming increasingly important in more and more organizations. At one time, this set of skills was overlooked – even seen as a hindrance to productivity. But as time marches on, managers and team leaders are recognizing the importance of social skills, and how they can shape a workplace. The main reason? Human interaction is hard to automate, and almost impossible for a computer to mimic. As automation kicks in, and social connections become more scarce, they’ll naturally increase in value.

2. Industry-related programs

Source: Thinkstock

If you know what specific job or industry you’re gunning for, then you’re going to want to have a tool chest full of skills tailored for it. And in a world in which knowledge and software skills are as important as ever, figuring out which programs and skills you’ll need is paramount to getting hired. We put together a recent list of which programs are on employers’ wish lists for this year, so take a look and see which are relevant to your career track. Knowing these programs intimately will give you a big leg-up during the hiring process.

3. Development

Google software developers

These days, the word “developer” means so much more than someone who builds condos. And developers of all stripes are in high demand. In our case, we’re referring specifically to software and web developers, both of which possess skill sets that are highly sought-after by many big, flourishing companies. If this is a career track you’re interested in pursuing, go back to the previous item on our list, and figure out which software programs you need to be well-versed in to start getting successful interviews behind you.

4. Design

Software designer

In the same way that developers are a hot commodity, so are designers. Designers possibly come in more stripes than developers, as there are graphic designers, software designers, game designers – hell, even fashion companies and automotive manufacturers need designers. Needless to say, the world needs designers. If you want to get specific, the world needs web designers, and algorithm designers. These are skills that will not only land you a job, but likely a pretty high salary.

5. Information security

Information security sign

We don’t often go a week or so without hearing about some giant data breach, which typically puts the personal information for millions of people at risk. It’s happened to big corporations like Target, and it’s even happened to government agencies. Because data is so valuable – and because so many people are out there trying to steal it – information security is something that every organization is quickly trying to beef up. That means there’s a need for information security professionals, leaving an opportunity to learn the skills and get hired.

Author:  Sam Becker

Source:  http://www.cheatsheet.com/money-career/5-new-jobs-skills-employers-are-looking-for-in-2017.html/6

Categorized in Online Research

Welcome to this year’s list of the best job search websites for 2016.

If you are new to job search, you probably have questions- how much money should I ask for, what questions will I be asked in an interview, what is the best way to find a job today, and many others. 

This definitive list is carefully curated for accurate, contemporary information and guidance from job search experts. I’ve compiled these resources based on several criteria: First, I regularly reference these sites myself to share quality content on social media. Two, in my opinion, the author(s)/publisher show an understanding of modern job search trends and methodologies. And third, these sites consistently provide answers to popular job search questions. Technically there are even more than 43 sites listed!

All these resources are free because I don’t support companies that take advantage of job seekers. However, most do offer workshops, books, courses or paid services. I think most people can conduct a successful job search without paying a lot of money, but… savvy job seekers and careerists know when they need to invest in themselves.

You will find sites listed in alphabetical order under each category (or reverse order, depending on my mood!)

43 Best Job Search Websites 2016

Career Sherpa Best Job Search Website 2016

JOB SEARCH

Work Coach Cafe

This is the place to go for real stories and learn about job search topics like interviewing and you’ll workplace tips too!

US News & World Report’s On Careers

You’ll find many voices reporting and writing about job search and trends. including: Ask A Manager, Collegial Services, Vicki Salemi, Jobhuntercoach, Career Sherpa, Career Valet, Hallie Crawford, Robin Madell, Chrissy Scivicque and Peter Gudmundsson.

The Daily Muse

Great articles and information you’ll want for all aspects of your professional life! It covers career advice, job search, career paths, management, and more! There are even regular updates on cool companies you just may want to know about (because they are hiring)! You should also check out their free courses.

SmartBrief On Your Career

Sign up and receive content selected by the SmartBrief editors for help in all phases of managing your career. The regular newsletter is organized into sections: Getting Ahead, Making the Connections, The Landscape, Your Next Challenge (job search), The Water Cooler and SmartQuote. This link is to a sample of recent headlines, you can choose to subscribe here. (SmartBrief also has other industry summaries so I recommend you sign up for those relevant to your field!)

Levo League

This site contains content to help early careerists gain the advantage needed to succeed. “Levo arms you with the tools to develop your talent, build connections with peers, mentors, and jobs, and stay inspired day in and day out as you grow and develop.”

Job-Hunt.org

THE authoritative site for anyone in job search! It has everything you need for job search, at any stage of your career! You will find tons of great advice on all aspects of job search and career management. [Disclaimer: I am a job search navigation expert on this site]

Human Workplace

Liz Ryan is on your side, not HR’s. She provides honest, straight forward advice and insight to help empower you. You’ll easily recognize and remember her work because of the colorful artwork used in every article.

CAREEREALISM

The tagline says it all: “every job is temporary.” You will find relevant job search and career advice provided by “trusted career experts.”

Career Attraction

You’ll find job search advice and tips from carefully vetted experts on many topics from resume writing to personal branding.

SAMPLES & EXAMPLES

Looking for sample cover letters, resume samples, scripting on what to say? You’ll find it on these sites.

About Job Search by Alison Doyle

A rich resource with tons samples and examples.

Live Career Letter Examples

Easily and quickly customize your cover letter or any job search correspondence with these examples. There are also resume templates and articles, assessments and more!

Quintessential Careers

Quint Careers has so much more than sample cover letters. You’ll find articles on networking, interviewing and other job search trends. This is a go-to source for sample anything (cover letters, emails and resumes!)

INTERVIEWING

Ask The Headhunter Nick Corcodolis

Nick speaks from a recruiter’s perspective, answering job search questions most other recruiters won’t or don’t.

OVER 50 JOB SEARCH

If you are more seasoned (read older) job seeker, you need to understand the issues, biases and how you can spin your experience into a valuable asset!

AARP

Kerry Hannon is a AARP’s job expert and covers issues that the older job seeker has to know in order to compete. You’ll find all the issues you need to take into consideration while hunting down your next job as a more seasoned professional.

Career Pivot

Marc Miller’s focus is helping Boomers pivot into the next opportunity.

EARLY CAREER AND NEW COLLEGE GRAD

Savvy Intern

YouTern’s blog isn’t just for interns. The articles come from a variety of bloggers and apply to every job seeker! Always lots of great information!

THE HR AND RECRUITERS PERSPECTIVE

You must understand what HR and recruiters are thinking and how they are finding talent today. Learn what their issues and concerns are and get into their heads. Armed with this information, you’ll be a smarter seeker and position yourself as a better candidate for them to work with!

ERE.net

Is an online gathering place for recruiters and serves as a forum for recruiters to network, share best practices, and learn from each other. If you want to better understand the challenges and issues faced by human resources and recruiting industries, this is the place to start.

Social Talent

Hiring professionals use social media, internet searches and many other methods, to source candidates. As a job seeker, you’re gonna want to understand some of their secrets. Hey, some of these hacks will help you learn about companies and people too!

SOCIAL MEDIA FOR JOB SEARCH

Career Enlightenment

Joshua Waldman provides advice on how to use social media for your job search.

Career Sherpa

Shameless self plug. I write about new and existing social media tools to help you stay competitive in today’s job search!

Social-Hire (for candidates) 

Career & Interview Advice is where you’ll find new content published by writers and career pros. While there is a lot of information on this site, what I like is their “Our Top Picks For Candidates” which are hand-picked job search and professional networking articles from across the web.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a category all in itself! Every working professional MUST BE using LinkedIn. It isn’t just an online resume, it is a networking tool and resource you’ll want to get familiar with. Use their iOS or Android apps for your smart phone too!

LINKEDIN EXPERTS

Linked Into Business by Viveka von Rosen

Pretty much the authority on all things LinkedIn, Viveka knows her stuff!

PowerFormula by Wayne Breitbarth

When I have a question about LinkedIn, I can be pretty sure that if Viveka doesn’t have the answer, Wayne does.

SALARY RESEARCH

Besides talking to recruiters and people who do what you do, you can and should use these salary calculators to determine your value in the market place.

Specialty Job Boards

Searching the job boards is one of the least effective job search methods. Using specialty or niche job boards can be a better alternative. Depending on your industry or occupation, these may help you. Ask other people in your industry what niche job boards they use or recommend.

Dice

Dice is known as being a job board for technical candidates (IT, etc.) However, the news and advice on the site applies to many more types of job seekers as well. Typically, the tech scene is leading the way in recruiting trends, especially as we head into a more competitive hiring market. And, I think you’ll begin to see Dice leading the way with other forms of recruiting.

FlexJobs

Because finding flexible jobs is difficult, this site helps round up all levels of legitimate opportunities. If you are looking for a telecommuting, part-time, freelance, or flextime job- you need to know about this site. It has job search advice for people looking for these types of jobs too!

HigherEd Jobs

Search for jobs at colleges and universities with this niche job board.

Idealist

A listing of non-profit jobs, volunteer opportunities and internships.

LinkUp

Search for jobs directly on employer websites. LinkUp says they are “unlike job search boards and aggregators, we drive real job seekers directly to real jobs on real employers’ web sites. No hoaxes, scams or hurdles.”

USA Jobs

Looking for a government job? USA Jobs is the Federal Government’s official source for federal job listings across hundreds of federal agencies and organizations.

I don’t want to support your reliance and obsession with searching the job boards but if you must, here are ones you should

reference: Indeed.comSimplyHiredMonster.com and CareerBuilder are still good job boards. And don’t forget about CraigsList.

OTHER JOB SEARCH RESOURCES

CareerOneStop

Sponsored by the Department of Labor, this site has information on starting your search, finding a career match, information on re-training, and more.

GlassDoor

Use Glassdoor to research what employees are anonymously saying about companies, get salary information and learn what questions they’ve asked during interviews. Yes, they have job postings too!

Hidden Jobs site & app by Career Cloud

This site and app tracks company hiring announcements from newspapers, online media and company press releases. It’s one of a kind. Their instructions say follow the leads (ie. read the article) and google the company.

JibberJobber

A web-based tool to organize and manage your job search! It goes far beyond a standard spreadsheet. It helps keep track of and manage relationships, job postings, target companies and more!

JobScan

Do you want to know how your resume stacks up? Of course you do! This site will help you “optimize your resume keywords and get past resume screeners.” It compares your resume against the job posting you upload.

My Next Move

Research careers, assess your interests, and more. This is essentially a database sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor,Employment & Training Administration, and developed by the National Center for O*NET Development.

ONLINE VISIBILITY TOOLS

Get serious about your job search and long-term career success. You’ll need to be find-able online. These tools make it very easy to develop a “one page” summary of your experience and improve search results for your name!

About.me

Easily create a single webpage highlighting you. List your other social media profiles, create lists, join a community of people who value online visibility.

Branded.me

This freemium product converts information from your LinkedIn profile into a robust personal website.

BrandYourself

Use this tool to improve how your name ranks in search results and to improve your online visibility.

TOOLS & APPS

Job search apps come and go pretty quickly. I will cover newer apps on my site as they become popular.

Twitter List of Job Search Experts

Twitter has always been my favorite social network! Use it to read, learn and network! I’ve made it super simple for you to follow job search and career experts. You should try it!

Author : 

Source : http://careersherpa.net/43-best-job-search-websites-2016/

Categorized in Online Research
Page 1 of 2

airs logo

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.

Follow Us on Social Media

Book Your Seat for Webinar GET FREE REGISTRATION FOR MEMBERS ONLY      Register Now