[Source: This article was published in seroundtable.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Bridget Miller]

Google's John Mueller said it again, do not worry about words or keywords in the URLs. John responded to a recent question on Twitter saying "I wouldn't worry about keywords or words in a URL. In many cases, URLs aren't seen by users anyway."

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It references that video from Matt Cutts back in 2009 where it says keywords play a small role in rankings, but really small.

In 2017, John Mueller said keywords in URLs are overrated and that it is a small ranking factor back in 2016.

Forum discussion at Twitter.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published searchengineland.com By Ginny Marvin - Contributed by Member: Jeremy Frink

Here's what some marketers are saying about the move to include same meaning queries in exact match close variants.

Marketer reactions to the news that Google is yet again degrading the original intent (much less meaning) of exact match to include “same meaning” close variants is ranging from pessimism to ho-hum to optimism.

Expected impact on performance

“The impact of this will probably be most felt by accounts where exact match has historically been successful and where an exact match of a query made a difference in conversions — hence the reason you’d use exact in the first place,” said digital consultant and President of Netptune MoonJulie Friedman Bacchini.

Friedman Bacchini said the loss of control with exact match defeats the match type’s purpose. Many marketers use exact match to be explicit — exacting — in their targeting and expect a match type called “exact” to be just that.

Brad Geddes, the co-founder of ad testing platform AdAlysis and head of consultancy Certified Knowledge, said one problem with expanding the queries that can trigger an exact match keyword is that past changes have shown it can affect the overall performance of exact match. “The last change meant that our ‘variation matches’ had worse conversion rates than our exact match and that we lowered bids on most exact match terms. This change might just drive us from using it completely, or really hitting the negative keywords.”

Like Geddes, Andy Taylor, associate director of research at performance agency Merkle, also said they saw an increase in traffic assigned as exact match close variants with the last change, “and those close variants generally convert at a lower rate than true exact matches.”

Yet, others who participated in the test see the loosening of the reigns as a positive action.

One of the beta testers for this change was ExtraSpace Storage, a self-storage company in the U.S. with locations in more than 40 states. The company says it saw positive results from the test.

“The search queries were relevant to our industry and almost all of our primary KPIs saw an overall improvement,” said Steph Christensen, senior analyst for paid search at ExtraSpace.

Christensen said that during the test they did not do any keyword management, letting it run in a “normal environment to give it the best chance to provide the truest results.” She says they will continue to watch performance and make adjustments as needed after it’s fully rolled out by the end of October.

Advertisers as machine learning beneficiaries or guinea pigs

A big driver of these changes, of course, is machine learning. The machine learning/artificial intelligence race is on among Google and the other big tech companies.

Google says its machine learning is now good enough to determine when a query has the same intent as a keyword with a high enough rate of success that advertisers will see an overall performance lift.

Another way to look at the move, though, is that by opening up exact match to include same meaning queries, Google gets the benefit of having marketers train its algorithms by taking action on query reports.

Or as Geddes, put it: “Advertisers are basically paying the fee for Google to try and learn intent.”

Geddes’ point is that this change will help Google’s machine learning algorithms improve understanding of intent across millions of queries through advertiser actions and budgets.

“The fact that Google doesn’t understand user intent coupled with how poor their machine learning has been at times, means we might just move completely away from exact match,” says Geddes.

Of the example Google highlighted in its announcement, Geddes says, “If I search for Yosemite camping; I might want a blog article, stories, social media, or a campground. If I search for a campground — I want a campground.” (As an aside, from what I’ve found it appears Google doesn’t even monetize “Yosemite camping” or “Yosemite campground” results pages that it used as examples.)

Expected workflow changes

One big thing Google has emphasized is that these close variants changes allow advertisers to focus on things other than building out giant keyword lists to get their ads to show for relevant queries. Rather than doing a lot of upfront keyword research before launching, the idea is that the management will happen after the campaign runs and accumulates data. Marketers will add negatives and new keywords as appropriate. But this reframing of the management process and what amounts to a new definition of exact match has marketers thinking anew about all match types.

“The further un-exacting of exact match has me looking at phrase match again,” says Friedman Bacchini. “I definitely see it impacting use of negatives and time involved to review SQRs and apply negatives properly and exhaustively”.

Taylor agrees. “This change places more importance on regularly checking for negatives, but that has already been engrained in our management processes for years and won’t be anything new.”

Geddes said that advertisers might come up against negative keyword limits, which he has seen happen on occasion. Rather than relying heavily on adding negatives, he says they may consider only using phrase match going forward.

In addition to having ads trigger for queries that aren’t relevant or don’t convert well, there’s the matter of having the right ad trigger for a query when you have close variants in an account already.

Matt van Wagner, president and founder of search marketing firm Find Me Faster, says the agency will be monitoring the impact before assessing workflow adjustments, but is not anticipating performance lifts.

“We’ll watch search queries and how, or if, traffic shifts from other ad groups as well as CPC levels. We expect this to have neutral impact at best,” says van Wagner, “since we believe we have our keywords set to trigger on searches with other match types.”

Along those lines, Geddes says it will be critical to watch for duplicate queries triggering keywords across an account to make sure the right ad displays. It puts new focus on negative keyword strategies, says Geddes:

Google will show the most specific matching keyword within a campaign; but won’t do it across the account. So if I have both terms in my account as exact match (“Yosemite camping” and “Yosemite campground”), with one a much higher bid than the other, my higher bid keyword will usually show over my actual exact match word in a different campaign. That means that I now need to also copy my exact match keywords from one campaign and make them exact match negatives in another campaigns that is already using exact match just to control ad serving and bidding. I should never have to do that.

Measuring impact can be challenging

The effects of the change will take some time to unfold. Taylor says it took several months to see the impact of the last change to exact match close variants.

It’s difficult to calculate the incremental effect of these changes to close variants, in part says Taylor, because some close variant traffic comes from keywords – close variants or other match types — that are already elsewhere in the account.

“Google gives a nod to this in its recent announcement, saying that ‘Early tests show that advertisers using mostly exact match keywords see 3 percent more exact match clicks and conversions on average, with most coming from queries they aren’t reaching today,’” Taylor highlights with bolding added.

Another complicating factor, particularly for agencies, is that the effects of these changes don’t play out uniformly across accounts. Taylor shares an example:

An advertiser saw traffic on one of its key brand keywords shift to a different brand keyword several months after the close variants change last year.

“The normal reaction might be to use negatives to get that traffic back over to the correct keyword, but we were getting a better CPC and still getting the same traffic volume with the new variation,.

It didn’t make much sense, especially given Google’s continued assertion even in the current announcement that ‘Google Ads will still prefer to use keywords identical to the search query,’ but if the clicks are cheaper, the clicks are cheaper. This also speaks to how there’s not really a universal response to deploy for changes in close variants, aside from being mindful of what queries are coming in and how they’re performing.”

Looking ahead

Performance advertisers go where they get the best results.

“At the end of the day, the question is if poorer converting close variant queries might pull keyword performance down enough to force advertisers to pull back on bids and reduce overall investment,” said Taylor. “Generally speaking, giving sophisticated advertisers greater control to set the appropriate bids for each query (or any other segment) allows for more efficient allocation of spend, which should maximize overall investment in paid search.”

Geddes says their “priority is to make sure our Bing Ads budgets are maxed and that we’re not leaving anything on the table there. If our [Google] results get worse, we’ll also move some budgets to other places. But this might be one where we really have to do another account organization just to get around Google’s decisions.”

After the change has fully rolled out and they have enough data to act on, ExtraSpace’s Christensen said they will evaluate again. “Since we have such a large [account] build, when we do decide to make any changes we will have to show how we can do this at scale and maintain performance.”

Bacchini calls attention to the current misnomer of exact match and said Google should get rid of exact match altogether if it’s going to take away the original control of exact match. “It is particularly sneaky when you think of this move in terms of less sophisticated advertisers,” said Bacchini. “If they did not click on the ‘Learn More’ link below the formatting for entering in match types for keywords, how exactly would they know that Google Ads does not really mean exact?”

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published irishtechnews.ie By Sujain Thomas - Contributed by Member: Carol R. Venuti

Well, Google does not know you personally, so there is no reason to hate you. If you are writing and still not getting that first ranking on the page of the search engine, it means something is not right from your side.  First of all, let’s just get some ideas straight. How do you think search engine ranking is effective a web page? Being in the few lines of code will not always determine whether the page is capable enough to be placed on the first page of the search engine. Search engines are always on the lookout for signals to rank any page. So, it is easier for you to tweak an article and give those signals to search engines for enjoying a huge round of traffic.

Starting with the primary point:

To get that huge round of audience, you need to start with keyword research. It is one such topic which every blogger might have covered at least once. They need to work on that from the very first day of their blogging life. Every SEO blog or blogger might have used Google Keyword Planner for sure. You might have heard of it, because if you haven’t then you are missing out on a lot of things for your massive business growth.

More on Google Keyword Planner:

There are so many types of keyword research tools available in the market but Google Keyword Planner is at the top of the list. It is also one of the major keyword spy tool names you will come across recently. Google Keyword Planner is an official item from Google, offering you a traffic estimation of targeted keywords. It further helps users to find some of the related and relevant KWs for matching your niche. There are some important points you need to know about Google Keyword Planner before you can actually start using it.

  • For using this Google Keyword Planner tool, you need to register your name with Google and have an AdWords account. The tool is free of cost and you don’t have to spend a single penny on using this item. You have every right to create an AdWords tool using some simple steps and get to use it immediately.
  • If you want, you can clearly search for the current Google AdWords coupons, which will help you to create one free account for your own use. It will help you to use the Google Keyword Planner tool on an immediate count for sure.
  • The main target of this tool is towards AdWords advertisers. On the other hand, it is able to provide some amazing deals of information when it is time to find the right keyword for the blog and the relevant articles to your business.

Log online and get a clear idea on how the homepage of this tool from Google looks like. You just have to enter the target keyword in the given search bar and start your search results quite immediately.  Later, you can add filters if you want to.

Categorized in Online Research

Online research involves collecting information from the internet. It saves cost, is impactful and it offers ease of access. Online research is valuable for gathering information. Tools such as questionnaires, online surveys, polls and focus groups aid market research. You can conduct market research with little or no investment for e-commerce development.

Search Engine Optimization makes sure that your research is discoverable. If your research is highly ranked more people will find, read and cite your research.

Steps to improve the visibility of your research include:

  1. The title gives the reader a clear idea of what the research is about. The title is the first thing a reader sees. Make your research title relevant and consistent. Use a search engine friendly title. Make sure your title provides a solution.
  2. Keywords are key concepts in your research output. They index your article and make sure your research is found quickly. Use keywords that are relevant and common to your research field. Places to use relevant keywords include title, heading, description tags, abstract, graphics, main body text and file name of the document.
  3. Abstract convince readers to read an article. It aids return in a search.
  4. When others cite your research your visibility and reputation will increase. Citing your earlier works will also improve how search engines rank your research.
  5. External links from your research to blogs, personal webpage, and social networking sites will make your research more visible.
  6. The type of graphics you use affects your ranking. Use vectors such as .svg, .eps, .as and .ps. Vectors improve your research optimization.
  7. Make sure you are consistent with your name across all publications. Be distinguishable from others.
  8. Use social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to publicize your research. Inform everyone. Share your links everywhere.
  9. Make sure your research is on a platform indexed properly by search engines.

Online research is developing and can take place in email, chat rooms, instant messaging and web pages.  Online research is done for customer satisfaction, product testing, audience targeting and database mining.

Ethical dilemmas in online research include:

  1. How to get informed consent from the participants being researched?
  2. What constitutes privacy in online research?
  3. How can researchers prove the real identity of participants?
  4. When is covert observation justifiable?

Knowing how to choose resources when doing online research can help you avoid wasted time.

WAYS TO MAKE ONLINE RESEARCH EASY AND EFFECTIVE

  1. Ask: Know the resources recommended for your research from knowledgeable people. You can get information on valuable online journals or websites from an expert or knowledgeable people.
  2. Fact from fiction: Know the sites that are the best for your research topic. Make sure the websites you have chosen are valuable and up to date. Sites with .edu and .gov are usually safe. If you use a .org website make sure it is proper, reliable and credible. If you use a .com site; check if the site advertises, bias is a possibility.

Social media sites, blogs, and personal websites will give you personal opinions and not facts.

  1. Search Smartly: Use established search engines. Use specific terms. Try alternative searches. Use search operators or advanced search. Know the best sites.
  2. Focus: Do not be distracted when conducting an online research. Stay focused and away from social media sites.
  3. Cite Properly: Cite the source properly. Do not just copy and paste for plagiarism can affect your work.

When conducting research use legitimate and trustworthy resources. sites to help you find articles and journals that are reliable include:

  1. BioMedCentral
  2. Artcyclopedia
  3. FindArticles.com
  4. Digital History
  5. Infomine
  6. Internet Public Library
  7. Internet History Sourcebooks
  8. Librarians Internet Index
  9. Intute
  10. Library of Congress
  11. Project Gutenberg
  12. Perseus Digital Library
  13. Research Guide for Students.

No matter what you are researching the internet is a valuable tool. Use sites wisely and you will get all the information you need.

ONLINE RESEARCH METHODS

  1. Online focus group: This is for business to business service research, consumer research and political research. Pre-selected participants who represent specific interest are invited as part of the focus group.
  2. Online interview: This is done using computer-mediated communication (CMC) such as SMS or Email. Online interview is synchronous or asynchronous. In synchronous interviews, responses are received in real-time for example online chat interviews. In asynchronous interviews, responses are not in real-time such as email interviews. Online interviews use feedbacks about topics to get insight into the participants, attitudes, experiences or ideas.
  3. Online qualitative research: This includes blogs, communities and mobile diaries. It saves cost, time and is convenient. Respondents for online qualitative research can be gotten from surveys, databases or panels.
  4. Social network analysis: This has gained acceptance. With social network analysis researchers can measure the relationship between people, groups, organization, URLs and so on.

Other methods of online research include cyber-ethnography, online content analysis, and Web-based experiments.

TYPES OF ONLINE RESEARCH

  1. Customer satisfaction research: This occurs through phone calls or emails. Customers are asked to give feedback on their experience with a product, service or an organization.
  2. New product research: This is carried out by testing a new product with a group of selected individuals and immediately collecting feedback.
  3. Brand loyalty: This research seeks to find out what attracts customers to a brand. The research is to maintain or improve a brand.
  4. Employee satisfaction research: With this research, you can know what employees think about working for your organization. The moral of your organization can contribute to its productivity.

When conducting an online research give open-ended questions and show urgency but be tolerant.

Written by Junaid Ali Qureshi he is a digital marketing specialist who has helped several businesses gain traffic, outperform the competition and generate profitable leads. His current ventures include Progostech, Magentodevelopers.online.eLabelz, Smart Leads.ae, Progos Tech and eCig.

Categorized in Online Research

Source: This article was Published business.com By Katharine Paljug - Contributed by Member: Grace Irwin

Good content marketing, which makes use of long-tail keywords, can be key to making sure your small business ranks well on Google.

As the internet continues to change consumer behavior, more marketers are turning to content marketing to reach customers. But the rules for this new form of consumer outreach are different than those of traditional ads. Rather than creating a slogan or image to catch customers' attention, content marketing requires the careful use of long-tail keywords.

What are long-tail keywords?

Trying to figure out long-tail keywords can feel overwhelming, especially if you aren't a marketing professional. For instance, a simple Google search for the phrase returns more than 77 million results. At its core, long-tail keywords refer to a phrase or several words that indicate precisely what a user has typed into Google. If you tailor your SEO properly, you will rank high in the search results for the phrase that directly corresponds to what your customers are searching for online as it related to your business. 

For example, say your Atlanta-based company makes doodads that are only meant for use within restaurants and bars. Someone looking to buy those doodads might search for "where to find doodads for restaurants in Atlanta." And if you're positioned well in search results (because you've made effective use of that long-tail keyword phrase on your website), you may show up in the first- or second-page search results. 

To use long-tail keywords, you don't need to know everything about them. You just need to understand six things about the changing world of marketing, how long-tail keywords fit in that picture and where you can find them. The answer, generally speaking, is content marketing.

Content marketing has a low cost and high ROI.

Though you can still purchase ads online, one of the most cost-effective and valuable ways to reach customers is through content marketing. That involves creating online material, such as blog posts, website pages, videos or social media posts, that do not explicitly promote your brand. Instead, the messaging stimulates interest in your business and products by appealing to the needs and interests of your target customers. 

Content marketing is a form of inbound marketing, bringing consumers to you and gaining their trust and loyalty. It generates more than three times as many leads as traditional outbound marketing while costing about 62 percent less. 

However, blogging and other forms of content marketing aren't effective unless you make effective use of keywords, particularly long-tail keywords.

Long-tail keywords are essential to content marketing.

When creating online content, you want customers to be able to find it. The most common way that customers find content online is through search engines. The average business website receives more than three-quarters of its traffic from search, but that level of traffic is impossible without using keywords. 

When you incorporate relevant keywords in your content, you optimize your website for search, making it more likely that customers searching for the keywords you have used will find your business. This search engine optimization, or SEO, increases your web traffic and exposes new audiences to your brand. 

Just using keywords isn't enough. To create effective content that makes it to the top of a search engine results page, you need to use a specific type of keyword known as long-tail keywords.

Long-tail keywords attract customers who are ready to buy.

Long-tail keywords are phrases of three or more words, but their length isn't where the name comes from. Long tail describes the portion of the search-demand curve where these keywords live. 

In statistics, the long tail is the portion of a distribution graph that tapers off gradually rather than ending sharply. This tail usually has many small values and goes on for a long time. 

When it comes to online marketing, a small number of simple keywords are searched for very frequently, while keywords that fall into the long-tail are searched for more sporadically. For example, a simple keyword that is searched for hundreds of thousands of times would be "fitness." A long-tail keyword would be "dance fitness class in Boston." Because the tail is so long and there are so many of them, these keywords account for about 70 percent of all online searches, even though the individual keywords themselves are not searched as often. 

Long-tail keywords are not searched for as frequently as simple keywords like "hotel" or "socks," because they don't apply to everyone. They're what a customer plugs into a search engine when they know exactly what they want and need an online search to help them find it. These search terms communicate a consumer's intent – especially their intent to buy – rather than their general interest. 

This means that when you use the right long-tail keywords, you appeal directly to customers who are looking for what you are selling. You want to determine what your audience might be searching and then work those phrases into your content marketing.

Look for high search volume and low competition.

Because long-tail keywords are so niche, there is much less competition for them. If your long-tail keyword is "dance fitness class in Boston," you aren't competing for search traffic with every dance class out there or even every gym in Boston. You are only competing with Boston studios that offer dance fitness classes. That is a much smaller field. 

However, you still need enough people to search for your keywords for your investment in content marketing to be worthwhile. The best long-tail keywords are low in competition but higher in search volume. High volume in this context doesn't mean thousands of searches every day. But several dozens to a couple hundred searches shows that many of your potential customers are actively searching for that keyword.

There are many tools to help you find long-tail keywords.

The best way to find low-competition, high-volume long-tail keywords is with a keyword tool. These tools allow you to plug in a seed keyword related to your business or audience, and they will return relevant long-tail keywords. 

Keyword planners, such as Answer the Public and Keywords Everywhere, are free, though the number of keywords and the information they provide about them is limited. You can also plug seed keywords into a Google search and use the auto-complete and related search term features to find new long-tail keywords. 

Paid keyword research tools, such as LongTailPro or Ahrefs Keyword Explorer, return not only thousands of relevant long-tail keywords but also statistics on the number of monthly searches and the level of competition for those keywords. They also include tools for project planning, search filters, and additional traffic stats. However, these tools can be expensive, costing several hundred dollars to use. 

The type of tool you select depends on your budget and the scope of your content marketing, and the keywords that get you the best results depend on your business and your customers.

Long-tail keywords tell you what content to create.

If you know who your target customer is, you can use their interests and concerns as seed keywords to find related long-tail keywords. For example, if you know that your customers are interested in travel, you can search for those words to find related keyword such as "which travel insurance is best" or "tax deductible travel expenses." 

Once you have a list of these high-volume, low-competition keywords, they provide you with ideas for blog posts, social media, video content, web pages and more. You can create a series of blog posts comparing kinds of travel insurance. You can make an infographic about tax-deductible travel expenses. Rather than wondering what content to create, the long-tail keywords themselves can serve as your topics. 

Creating content around these relevant keywords automatically optimizes your web platforms for search. And since your initial seed keywords were based on what you know about your target customer, you are designing content that directly appeals to the people searching for a business like yours. Using long-tail keywords effectively works with search engines to bring customers directly to your website, rather than hoping that they see an ad and decide your business is worth visiting.

Categorized in Online Research

Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Contributed by Member: Corey Parker

Google’s John Mueller revealed that the search engine’s algorithms do not punish keyword stuffing too harshly.

In fact, keyword stuffing may be ignored altogether if the content is found to otherwise have value to searchers.

This information was provided on Twitter in response to users inquiring about keyword stuffing. More specifically, a user was concerned about a page ranking well in search results despite obvious signs of keyword repetition.

Prefacing his statement with the suggestion to focus on one’s own content rather than someone else’s, Mueller goes on to say that there are over 200 factors used to rank pages and “the nice part is that you don’t have to get them all perfect.”

When the excessive keyword repetition was further criticized by another user, Mueller said this practice shouldn’t result in a page being removed from search results, and “boring keyword stuffing” may be ignored altogether.

Official AdWords Campaign Templates
Select your industry. Download your campaign template. Custom built with exact match keywords and converting ad copy with high clickthrough rates.

“Yeah, but if we can ignore boring keyword stuffing (this was popular in the 90’s; search engines have a lot of practice here), there’s sometimes still enough value to be found elsewhere. I don’t know the page, but IMO keyword stuffing shouldn’t result in removal from the index.”

There are several takeaways from this exchange:

  • An SEO’s time is better spent improving their own content, rather than trying to figure out why other content is ranking higher.
  • Excessive keyword stuffing will not result in a page being removed from indexing.
  • Google may overlook keyword stuffing if the content has value otherwise.
  • Use of keywords is only one of over 200 ranking factors.

Overall, it’s probably not a good idea to overuse keywords because it arguably makes the content less enjoyable to read. However, keyword repetition will not hurt a piece of content when it comes to ranking in search results.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published forbes.com By Jayson DeMers - Contributed by Member: William A. Woods

Some search optimizers like to complain that “Google is always changing things.” In reality, that’s only a half-truth; Google is always coming out with new updates to improve its search results, but the fundamentals of SEO have remained the same for more than 15 years. Only some of those updates have truly “changed the game,” and for the most part, those updates are positive (even though they cause some major short-term headaches for optimizers).

Today, I’ll turn my attention to semantic search, a search engine improvement that came along in 2013 in the form of the Hummingbird update. At the time, it sent the SERPs into a somewhat chaotic frenzy of changes but introduced semantic search, which transformed SEO for the better—both for users and for marketers.

What Is Semantic Search?

I’ll start with a briefer on what semantic search actually is, in case you aren’t familiar. The so-called Hummingbird update came out back in 2013 and introduced a new way for Google to consider user-submitted queries. Up until that point, the search engine was built heavily on keyword interpretation; Google would look at specific sequences of words in a user’s query, then find matches for those keyword sequences in pages on the internet.

Search optimizers built their strategies around this tendency by targeting specific keyword sequences, and using them, verbatim, on as many pages as possible (while trying to seem relevant in accordance with Panda’s content requirements).

Hummingbird changed this. Now, instead of finding exact matches for keywords, Google looks at the language used by a searcher and analyzes the searcher’s intent. It then uses that intent to find the most relevant search results for that user’s intent. It’s a subtle distinction, but one that demanded a new approach to SEO; rather than focusing on specific, exact-match keywords, you had to start creating content that addressed a user’s needs, using more semantic phrases and synonyms for your primary targets.

Voice Search and Ongoing Improvements

Of course, since then, there’s been an explosion in voice search—driven by Google’s improved ability to recognize spoken words, its improved search results, and the increased need for voice searches with mobile devices. That, in turn, has fueled even more advances in semantic search sophistication.

One of the biggest advancements, an update called RankBrain, utilizes an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm to better understand the complex queries that everyday searchers use, and provide more helpful search results.

Why It's Better for Searchers

So why is this approach better for searchers?

  • Intuitiveness. Most of us have already taken for granted how intuitive searching is these days; if you ask a question, Google will have an answer for you—and probably an accurate one, even if your question doesn’t use the right terminology, isn’t spelled correctly, or dances around the main thing you’re trying to ask. A decade ago, effective search required you to carefully calculate which search terms to use, and even then, you might not find what you were looking for.
  • High-quality results. SERPs are now loaded with high-quality content related to your original query—and oftentimes, a direct answer to your question. Rich answers are growing in frequency, in part to meet the rising utility of semantic search, and it’s giving users faster, more relevant answers (which encourages even more search use on a daily basis).
  • Content encouragement. The nature of semantic search forces searches optimizers and webmasters to spend more time researching topics to write about and developing high-quality content that’s going to serve search users’ needs. That means there’s a bigger pool of content developers than ever before, and they’re working harder to churn out readable, practical, and in-demand content for public consumption.

Why It's Better for Optimizers

The benefits aren’t just for searchers, though—I’d argue there are just as many benefits for those of us in the SEO community (even if it was an annoying update to adjust to at first):

  • Less pressure on keywords. Keyword research has been one of the most important parts of the SEO process since search first became popular, and it’s still important to gauge the popularity of various search queries—but it isn’t as make-or-break as it used to be. You no longer have to ensure you have exact-match keywords at exactly the right ratio in exactly the right number of pages (an outdated concept known as keyword density); in many cases, merely writing about the general topic is incidentally enough to make your page relevant for your target.
  • Value Optimization. Search optimizers now get to spend more time optimizing their content for user value, rather than keyword targeting. Semantic search makes it harder to accurately predict and track how keywords are specifically searched for (and ranked for), so we can, instead, spend that effort on making things better for our core users.
  • Wiggle room. Semantic search considers synonyms and alternative wordings just as much as it considers exact match text, which means we have far more flexibility in our content. We might even end up optimizing for long-tail phrases we hadn’t considered before.

The SEO community is better off focusing on semantic search optimization, rather than keyword-specific optimization. It’s forcing content producers to produce better, more user-serving content, and relieving some of the pressure of keyword research (which at times is downright annoying).

Take this time to revisit your keyword selection and content strategies, and see if you can’t capitalize on these contextual queries even further within your content marketing strategy.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By R Oakes - Contributed by Member: Deborah Tannen

Ever wondered how the results of some popular keyword research tools stack up against the information Google Search Console provides? This article looks at comparing data from Google Search Console (GSC) search analytics against notable keyword research tools and what you can extract from Google.

As a bonus, you can get related searches and people also search data results from Google search results by using the code at the end of this article.

This article is not meant to be a scientific analysis, as it only includes data from seven websites. To be sure, we were gathering somewhat comprehensive data: we selected websites from the US and the UK plus different verticals.

Procedure

1. Started by defining industries with respect to various website verticals

We used SimilarWeb’s top categories to define the groupings and selected the following categories:

  • Arts and entertainment.
  • Autos and vehicles.
  • Business and industry.
  • Home and garden.
  • Recreation and hobbies.
  • Shopping.
  • Reference.

We pulled anonymized data from a sample of our websites and were able to obtain unseen data from search engine optimization specialists (SEOs) Aaron Dicks and Daniel Dzhenev. Since this initial exploratory analysis involved quantitative and qualitative components, we wanted to spend time understanding the process and nuance rather than making the concessions required in scaling up an analysis. We do think this analysis can lead to a rough methodology for in-house SEOs to make a more informed decision on which tool may better fit their respective vertical.

2. Acquired GSC data from websites in each niche

Data was acquired from Google Search Console by programming and using a Jupyter notebook.

Jupyter notebooks are an open-source web application that allows you to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations and narrative text to extract website-level data from the Search Analytics API daily, providing much greater granularity than is currently available in Google’s web interface.

3. Gathered ranking keywords of a single internal page for each website

Since home pages tend to gather many keywords that may or may not be topically relevant to the actual content of the page, we selected an established and performing internal page so the rankings are more likely to be relevant to the content of the page. This is also more realistic since users tend to do keyword research in the context of specific content ideas.

The image above is an example of the home page ranking for a variety of queries related to the business but not directly related to the content and intent of the page.

We removed brand terms and restricted the Google Search Console queries to first-page results.

Finally, we selected ahead term for each page. The phrase “head term” is generally used to denote a popular keyword with high search volume. We chose terms with relatively high search volume, though not the absolute highest search volume. Of the queries with the most impressions, we selected the one that best represented the page.

4. Did keyword research in various keyword tools and looked for the head term

We then used the head term selected in the previous step to perform keyword research in three major tools: Ahrefs, Moz, and SEMrush.

The “search suggestions” or “related searches” options were used, and all queries returned were kept, regardless of whether or not the tool specified a metric of how related the suggestions were to the head term.

Below we listed the number of results from each tool. In addition, we extracted the “people also search for” and “related searches” from Google searches for each head term (respective to country) and added the number of results to give a baseline of what Google gives for free.

**This result returned more than 5,000 results! It was truncated to 1,001, which is the max workable and sorted by descending volume.

We compiled the average number of keywords returned per tool:

5.  Processed the data

We then processed the queries for each source and website by using some language processing techniques to transform the words into their root forms (e.g., “running” to “run”), removed common words such as  “a,” “the” and “and,” expanded contractions and then sorted the words.

For example, this process would transform “SEO agencies in Raleigh” to “agency Raleigh SEO.”  This generally keeps the important words and puts them in order so that we can compare and remove similar queries.

We then created a percentage by dividing the number of unique terms by the total number of terms returned by the tool. This should tell us how much redundancy there are in the tools.

Unfortunately, it does not account for misspellings, which can also be problematic in keyword research tools because they add extra cruft (unnecessary, unwanted queries) to the results. Many years ago, it was possible to target common misspellings of terms on website pages. Today, search engines do a really good job of understanding what you typed, even if it’s misspelled.

In the table below, SEMrush had the highest percentage of unique queries in their search suggestions.

This is important because, if 1,000 keywords are only 70 percent unique, that means 300 keywords basically have no unique value for the task you are performing.

Next, we wanted to see how well the various tools found queries used to find these performing pages. We took the previously unique, normalized query phrases and looked at the percentage of GSC queries the tools had in their results.

In the chart below, note the average GSC coverage for each tool and that Moz is higher here, most likely because it returned 1,000 results for most head terms. All tools performed better than related queries scraped from Google (Use the code at the end of the article to do the same).

Getting into the vector space

After performing the previous analysis, we decided to convert the normalized query phrases into vector space to visually explore the variations in various tools.

Assigning to vector space uses something called pre-trained word vectors that are reduced in dimensionality (x and y coordinates) using a Python library called t-distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (TSNE). Don’t worry if you are unfamiliar with this; generally, word vectors are words converted into numbers in such a way that the numbers represent the inherent semantics of the keywords.

Converting the words to numbers helps us process, analyze and plot the words. When the semantic values are plotted on a coordinate plane, we get a clear understanding of how the various keywords are related. Points grouped together will be more semantically related, while points distant from one another will be less related.

Shopping

This is an example where Moz returns 1,000 results, yet the search volume and searcher keyword variations are very low.  This is likely caused by Moz semantically matching particular words instead of trying to match more to the meaning of the phrase. We asked Moz’s Russ Jones to better understand how Moz finds related phrases:

“Moz uses many different methods to find related terms. We use one algorithm that finds keywords with similar pages ranking for them, we use another ML algorithm that breaks up the phrase into constituent words and finds combinations of related words producing related phrases, etc. Each of these can be useful for different purposes, depending on whether you want very close or tangential topics. Are you looking to improve your rankings for a keyword or find sufficiently distinct keywords to write about that are still related? The results returned by Moz Explorer is our attempt to strike that balance.”

Moz does include a nice relevancy measure, as well as a filter for fine-tuning the keyword matches. For this analysis, we just used the default settings:

In the image below, the plot of the queries shows what is returned by each keyword vendor converted into the coordinate plane. The position and groupings impart some understanding of how keywords are related.

In this example, Moz (orange) produces a significant volume of various keywords, while other tools picked far fewer (Ahrefs in green) but more related to the initial topic:

Autos and vehicles

This is a fun one. You can see that Moz and Ahrefs had pretty good coverage of this high-volume term. Moz won by matching 34 percent of the actual terms from Google Search Console. Moz had double the number of results (almost by default) that Ahrefs had.

SEMrush lagged here with 35 queries for a topic with a broad amount of useful variety.

The larger gray points represent more “ground truth” queries from Google Search Console. Other colors are the various tools used. Gray points with no overlaid color are queries that various tools did not match.

Internet and telecom

This plot is interesting in that SEMrush jumped to nearly 5,000 results, from the 50-200 range in other results. You can also see (toward the bottom) that there were many terms outside of what this page tended to rank for or that were superfluous to what would be needed to understand user queries for a new page:

Most tools grouped somewhat close to the head term, while you can see that SEMrush (in purplish-pink) produced a large number of potentially more unrelated points, even though Google People Also Search were found in certain groupings.

General merchandise   

Here is an example of a keyword tool finding an interesting grouping of terms (groupings indicated by black circles) that the page currently doesn’t rank for. In reviewing the data, we found the grouping to the right makes sense for this page:

The two black circles help to visualize the ability to find groupings of related queries when plotting the text in this manner.

Analysis

Search engine optimization specialists with experience in keyword research know there is no one tool to rule them all.  Depending on the data you need, you may need to consult a few tools to get what you are after.

Below are my general impressions from each tool after reviewing, qualitatively:

  • The query data and numbers from our analysis of the uniqueness of results.
  • The likelihood of finding terms that real users use to find performing pages.

Moz     

Moz seems to have impressive numbers in terms of raw results, but we found that the overall quality and relevance of results was lacking in several cases.

Even when playing with the relevancy scores, it quickly went off on tangents, providing queries that were in no way related to my head term (see Moz suggestions for “Nacho Libre” in the image above).

With that said, Moz is very useful due to its comprehensive coverage, especially for SEOs working in smaller or newer verticals. In many cases, it is exceedingly difficult to find keywords for newer trending topics, so more keywords are definitely better here.

An average of 64 percent coverage for real user data from GSC for selected domains was very impressive  This also tells you that while Moz’s results can tend to go down rabbit holes, they tend to get a lot right as well. They have traded off a loss of fidelity for comprehensiveness.

Ahrefs

Ahrefs was my favorite in terms of quality due to their nice marriage of comprehensive results with the minimal amount of clearly unrelated queries.

It had the lowest number of average reported keyword results per vendor, but this is actually misleading due to the large outlier from SEMrush. Across the various searches, it tended to return a nice array of terms without a lot of clutter to wade through.

Most impressive to me was a specific type of niche grill that shared a name with a popular location. The results from Ahrefs stayed right on point, while SEMrush returned nothing, and Moz went off on tangents with many keywords related to the popular location.

A representative of Ahrefs clarified with me that their tool “search suggestions” uses data from Google Autosuggest.  They currently do not have a true recommendation engine the way Moz does. Using “Also ranks for” and “Having same terms” data from Ahrefs would put them more on par with the number of keywords returned by other tools.

 SEMrush   

SEMrush overall offered great quality, with 90 percent of the keywords being unique It was also on par with Ahrefs in terms of matching queries from GSC.

It was, however, the most inconsistent in terms of the number of results returned. It yielded 1,000+ keywords (actually 5,000) for Internet and Telecom > Telecommunications yet only covered 22 percent of the queries in GSC. For another result, it was the only one not to return related keywords. This is a very small dataset, so there is clearly an argument that these were anomalies.

Google: People Also Search For/Related Searches 

These results were extremely interesting because they tended to more closely match the types of searches users would make while in a particular buying state, as opposed to those specifically related to a particular phrase. 

For example, looking up “[term] shower curtains” returned “[term] toilet seats.”

These are unrelated from a semantic standpoint, but they are both relevant for someone redoing their bathroom, suggesting the similarities are based on user intent and not necessarily the keywords themselves.

Also, since data from “people also search” are tied to the individual results in Google search engine result pages (SERPs), it is hard to say whether the terms are related to the search query or operate more like site links, which are more relevant to the individual page.

Code used

When entered into the Javascript Console of Google Chrome on a Google search results page, the following will output the “People also search for” and “Related searches” data in the page, if they exist.

1    var data = {};
2    var out = [];
3    data.relatedsearches = [].map.call(document.querySelectorAll(".brs_col p"), e => ({ query: e.textContent }));
4    
5    data.peoplesearchfor = [].map.call(document.querySelectorAll(".rc > div:nth-child(3) > div > div > div:not([class])"), e => {
6    if (e && !e.className) {
7    return { query: e.textContent };
8     }
9     });
10   
11    for (d in data){
12
13    for (i in data[d]){
14    out.push(data[d][i]['query'])
15     }
16
17    }
18    console.log(out.join('\n'))

In addition, there is a Chrome add-on called Keywords Everywhere which will expose these terms in search results, as shown in several SERP screenshots throughout the article. 

Conclusion

Especially for in-house marketers, it is important to understand which tools tend to have data most aligned to your vertical. In this analysis, we showed some benefits and drawbacks of a few popular tools across a small sample of topics. We hoped to provide an approach that could form the underpinnings of your own analysis or for further improvement and to give SEOs a more practical way of choosing a research tool.

Keyword research tools are constantly evolving and adding newly found queries through the use of clickstream data and other data sources. The utility in these tools rests squarely on their ability to help us understand more succinctly how to better position our content to fit real user interest and not on the raw number of keywords returned. Don’t just use what has always been used. Test various tools and gauge their usefulness for yourself.

Categorized in Online Research

 Source: This article was published themarketingagents.com By Rich Brooks - Contributed by Member: Robert Hensonw

A keyword analysis (or keyword research) is the art and science of uncovering which keyword phrases your prospects are likely to use at Google or other search engines. 

Why is this important?

Because search engines are looking to return relevant results when someone performs a search. The closer the words on your web page, blog post or online video are to the search that was just performed, the more likely you are to rank higher for that search. 

Higher rankings mean more qualified traffic. In fact, a recent study showed that the number one result averaged a 36.4% click-through rate (CTR.) The second place result only managed 12.1% CTR, and the CTR declined with every subsequent result. 

Although using the right keywords isn’t the only reason why your page ranks well or poorly–the quality and quantity of inbound links is important, too–it’s one of the easiest variables for you to affect.

How do you perform a keyword analysis?

Keyword research is a three-step process:

  1. Brainstorm: Whether by yourself, with team members, or trusted customers and clients, you should start by brainstorming a list of your best keywords. These would be the words you think your ideal customer would use when searching for a product or service like yours, or phrases you’d like to rank well for. Anything from “Boston tax accountant” to “how do I write off a business expense?” I talk about using five perspectives to generate the best keyword phrases.
  2. Test: After you generate your keywords, you’ll want to determine if they actually will bring you enough traffic. Often, we’ve been in our industry for so long we use jargon that our prospects don’t use. Or, we are missing out on new, related phrases that could attract new customers. Using a tool like Google Adwords Keyword Tool will help you determine which words and phrases are most likely to attract the most qualified traffic. By entering your phrases into this free online tool, you can discover how much competition you would have from other sites to rank well for a phrase, as well as how many people are actually searching for that phrase. In addition, GAKT will provide a lot of related phrases that may perform better than your original list.
  3. Rewrite: Once you have your list of your best keywords, get to work putting them in strategic places on each page of your site, including the page title, any headers or subheaders, early and often in the body copy, as well as in the intrasite links from one page to another.

How do you know if it’s working?

Improved search engine visibility rarely happens overnight. Continually adding new, keyword rich content to your blog or website over time will improve your search engine ranking and attract more qualified traffic to your site. 

Two reports in Google Analytics can help determine if this is happening. The first can be found at Traffic Sources > Search Engine Optimization > Queries. This report shows your site’s average ranking for any keyword that “resulted in impressions, clicks, and click-throughs.” You can see if you’re moving up or down over time.

 The second report can be found at Traffic Sources > Search Engine Optimization > Landing Pages. This will show you how your individual pages are fairing from a search engine standpoint. 

Finally, take a look at your overall search traffic and the number of leads you’re generating from your website. If the number of leads you’re getting a month is increasing, your work is making a difference.

Categorized in Online Research

 Source: This article was published bloggingwizard.com By David Hartshorne - Contributed by Member: Carol R. Venuti

Mention the term Keyword Research Tools to any blogger, and they’ll most likely think of the Google Keyword Planner.

It has Google on the label, so it must be good, right?

Well, it’s worth checking and using for initial keyword research, but remember that the tool is, and always was, intended for Google Adwords campaigns.

So, while some of the data is useful, most is irrelevant.

And since Google made it even harder to get accurate data by introducing search volume ranges and grouping keywords with similar meaning, you should consider looking elsewhere.

In this post, we’re going to take a look at five other Keyword Research Tools. Some are lightweight and budget-friendly, while others are heavy-weight and more expensive. So wherever you are on your blogging journey, you’ll find a tool that suits you.

Before we look at the tools, let’s cover a few essentials:

The two methods of keyword research

The primary objective of keyword research is to find keywords that you can rank for in the SERPs; i.e. the Top 10 search results for your term. Why? Because if you’re in the Top 10 search results for your target keyword, then you’ve got more chance of getting the right traffic to your site.

There are two methods of keyword research used in the tools:

Traditional keyword research tools let you enter a ‘seed’ keyword, and then they return a load of keywords. From there you evaluate how difficult it will be to rank for each suggestion.

Competitor-based keyword research tools use reverse-engineering. They assess what keywords your competitors are already ranking for and evaluate if you could do better.

Each method has its benefits, and if possible, you should consider using both when researching your keywords.

Keyword difficulty rating explained

Most keyword research tools now include a keyword difficulty rating. The idea behind this metric is to let you spot low-competition keywords that you can out-rank.

The problem is that most vendors don’t always explain what their rating means in understandable terms. And each vendor calculates their keyword difficulty score differently.

As you check the five keyword research tools below, you’ll see that they returned different scores for our test keyword. We’ve included some notes along the way to help explain the scores.

5 powerful keyword research tools (Google Keyword Planner alternatives)

There’s been plenty written about how to use the GKP for keyword research. Most times it involves downloading data into a spreadsheet, and then sifting and sorting until you have some meaningful outcome.

But with these five keyword research tools, you can do all your searching and filtering inside the tool and then save or download your results as you wish.

Note: Each tool lets you search data from different countries, but to keep things consistent I’m using the google.com US data and the keyword: herbal remedies.

Without further ado, let’s get started.

Answer The Public

Answer The Public is a handy tool for those looking to get started without spending anything.

The idea behind the tool is to compliment the auto suggest results you see in Google and Bing with some relevant words.

Appending a search term with words like “for” or “with” gives a much richer starting point for content ideas.

Let’s take a look.

When you arrive on the homepage, you’re greeted by the Seeker. He’s a bald, white-bearded, impatient-looking bloke who’s waiting for you to enter your keyword idea and your location:

1a AnswerThePublic Seeker

When you enter your keyword, the Seeker returns with some content ideas, divided into three categories:

  • Questions – what, where, why, which, how.
  • Prepositions – with, to, for, like.
  • Alphabetical – a, b, c, etc.

For example, I entered “herbal remedies” and got these results – Questions (42), Prepositions (48), Alphabetical (101):

1b AnswerThePublic Results

You can download the complete results in a CSV file, using the button in the top-right corner. But if you scroll down the page, then you’ll see the results presented in two easier-to-read formats.

The first one is a one-page visualization of the results:

1c AnswerThePublic Question Visualisation

Or you can switch to Data to see the results listed in sections:

1d AnswerThePublic Preposition Data

Pros

  • Free tool
  • Excellent visualization of content ideas

Cons

  • No keyword difficulty score

Go To Answer The Public

Serpstat

Serpstat is an all-around SEO tool with some great features and affordable entry-level pricing.

The all-in-one platform started in 2013 as a Keyword Research Tool. Now it contains four more modules covering Competitor Analysis, Site Audit, Backlink Analysis and Rank Tracking.

Keyword research

When you enter your keyword into the search bar in Serpstat you’re presented with the Overview report:

2a Serpstat Keyword Research Overview

The Overview provides a taste of what’s contained in the four categories listed in the left-hand menu:

  • SEO Research – Includes Keyword Selection (matched keywords), Related Keywords (LSI keywords), Search Suggestions, Top Pages, and Competitors for the keyword.
  • PPC Research – Includes Keywords, Competitors, Ad Examples, and Ad Research reports.
  • Content Marketing – Shows Search Questions (interrogative questions like Ask The Public)
  • SERP Analysis – Shows you the Top 100 Google Results in organic and paid search for the keyword.

For this review, we’ll focus on the organic results from the SEO Research section.

  1.  Keyword Selection returns all the keywords related to your query.

2b Serpstat Keyword Selection

The key metric in this report is Keyword Difficulty. Serpstat grades your chances of your keyword getting in the Top 10 (Page 1) of Google as follows:

  • 0-20 – easy
  • 21-40 – medium
  • 41-60 – difficult
  • 61-100 – very difficult

So, in our example, herbal remedies is rated at 16.55, meaning it should be easy to rank in the Top 10.

Other metrics on this screen include:

  • Volume Google – The average monthly search volume for the keyword over the previous 12 months
  • Volume (last month) – The number of searches for the keyword over the past month
  • Results – The number of documents returned by the search engine for the query
  • Social domains – Social media domains that come up in search results for the keyword

The small icons to the right of the keyword show that the search results contain some rich answers like images, videos, maps, knowledge graphs, etc. For example, if you search for “herbal remedies” in Google you may see this in the results:

2c Serpstat Keyword Rich Image Results

Note:You may see something different due to personalization and a bunch of other factors.
  1.  Related Keywords returns a list of all keywords semantically related to your query.

2d Serpstat Keyword Related Keywords

Here you can see related keywords like herbal therapy and herb remedies. For each related keyword, Serpstat provides the average monthly search volume, plus some other PPC data.

  1.  Search Suggestions are the popular search queries that you see under the search bar as you start typing a query in Google.

2e Serpstat Keyword Search Suggestions

At the top of the screen, you can see the most popular words. When you click on one of these buttons, Serpstat does another search. For example, if you select the ‘anxiety’ button, Serpstat now searches for the keyword: herbal remedies anxiety.

To the right, there’s another option: Only Questions. The Only Questions filter will return the interrogative forms of search suggestions like what, where, how, etc.

2f Serpstat Keyword Search Questions Only

  1.  Top Pages gives a list of all pages ranking for at least one keyword related to your query.

2g Serpstat Keyword Top Pages

For each page, Serpstat provides the number of organic keywords. In the first line of our example, if you click on ‘101’ in the organic keywords column, you’re directed to the page analysis listing all the keywords:

2h Serpstat Keyword URL Analysis Position

This is a great way to see what keywords your competitors are ranking for.

As well as the organic keywords, Serpstat displays the number of social shares each page has received. So, like Buzzsumo, you’re able to get an idea of how popular a piece of content is.

  1.  Competitors is a list of the domains that are ranking for a large number of keywords related to your query.

2i Serpstat Keyword Competitors

So, as you might expect, you can see webmd.com at the top of our Competitors list as it’s a well-established medical site.

For each competitor’s page, Serpstat lists:

  • Common Keywords – The number of keywords related to the researched query.
  • All Keywords – The total number of the domain’s keywords
  • Visibility  – The domain visibility score

Serpstat also allows you to filter your queries and download your data.

Other Serpstat features

  • Competitor Analysis – Automatically identify and research your top competitors
  • Backlink Analysis – Monitor the backlinks of your and your competitors’ websites
  • Rank Tracking – Monitor your and your competitors’ webpage rankings
  • Site Audit – Perform an in-depth analysis of your web pages

Pricing

You can use Serpstat for free. The Freemium model allows you to research keywords and analyze competitors but is limited to 30 searches per month.

The Premium subscription plans start at $19 per month, but you can get an excellent discount by switching to the yearly subscriptions; e.g. 1-year (-20%),  3-year (-40%).

  • Prices start from $29/month or $182/year

Pros

  • Free starter plan
  • Affordable monthly subscription
  • Easy to navigate
  • Includes a keyword difficulty score
  • Provides additional insights in the SERPs like rich data and social shares

Cons

  • The Keyword Difficulty score is a new metric in Serpstat and seems slightly skewed compared to other tools.

Get Serpstat

KWFinder

KWFinder is part of the ‘juicy’ Mangools SEO suite, which also includes SERPWatcher, SERPChecker, and LinkMiner.

KWFinder is a keyword research tool to find you hundreds of long-tail keywords with high search volume and low SEO difficulty. It’s really easy to use, with a user-friendly interface, and most importantly, with metrics to provide an instant help to your SEO efforts.

Let’s get started.

Keyword research

When you log into your account you’ll see a simple search bar waiting for you to input your keyword:

3a KWFinder Search

There are three keyword research options:

  • Suggestions is the primary keyword research method that we’ll take a look at in a minute.

3b KWFinder Suggestions

  • Autocomplete uses the Google Suggest feature to prepend and append your keyword with different letters or words. For example, herbal remedieslooks like this:

3c KWFinder Autocomplete

  • Questions is similar to Autocomplete and will prepend the main seed keyword with question words. For example, with herbal remedies, you get questions like how much herbal medicine, what herbal remedies are good for anxiety,

3d KWFinder Questions

Metrics

The screenshots above are from the left-hand panel of the screen only. Here’s the full picture to give you an idea of the overall data in KWFinder:

3e KWFinder Metrics

Let’s look at the metrics in detail.

On the left panel, you can see the list of suggestions based on your main keyword. Next to each suggestion are the following metrics:

  • Trend – The trend of search in the last 12 months
  • Search – The average monthly search volume (exact match) in the last 12 months
  • CPC – The average cost per click of the listed keyword
  • PPC – The level of competition in PPC advertising (min = 0; max = 100)
  • DIFF – The SEO difficulty of a keyword, based on SEO stats from Moz (DA, PA, MR, MT) of the URLs on the first Google SERP (min = 0; max = 100)

On the upper-right panel, you can see an enlarged SEO difficulty score and a trend graph of search volumes during the last 12 months.

Underneath you can see the Google SERP statistics and other important metrics calculated by Moz.

  • Google SERP – These are the top results from Google search for your selected keyword
  • DA – Domain Authority predicts how well a website will rank on search engines
  • PA – Page Authority predicts how well a specific page will rank on search engines
  • MR – MozRank of the URL represents a link popularity score
  • MT – MozTrust of the URL measures trustworthiness of the link
  • Links – The number of external authority-passing links to the URL
  • FB – The number of Facebook shares for the URL
  • G+ – The number of Google+ shares for the URL
  • Rank – SEO competitiveness rank – the higher it is, the harder it is to compete. (min = 0; max = 100)
  •  Visits – The estimated visits per month on this SERP position

Note: You can get more detailed information about your competitors’ SEO metrics in the Google SERP using the SERPChecker Tool.

The Keyword Difficulty metric is the first one to check as it gives an early indication of whether you stand a chance to rank for your keyword. Here’s the full range of the KWFinder Difficulty Score:

3f KWFinder SEO Difficulty Range

In our example, herbal remedies is rated at 52, meaning it’s possible to rank on Page 1.

But it’s important to remember that keyword difficulty is not the only factor, and you should weigh up the other metrics too.

Other features in KWFinder

There are three other features inside KWFinder worth mentioning.

  1.  Keyword lists management

Lists allow you to keep and categorize the data you find from your keyword research. You can check each suggestion you want to keep and add it to a new or an existing list.

  1.  Import your own keywords

You can import your own lists of keywords into KWFinder in various ways:

  • Write the keywords as separate tags
  • Upload your TXT or CSV file
  • Drag-and-drop your file
  1.  Export your results

You can also export your keywords from either the “Suggestions” table or your keyword lists. You have the option to export to a CSV file (with or without metrics) or copy to the clipboard.

Other tools in the Mangools Suite

Mangools also includes three more SEO tools that integrate with KWFinder and are included in the price (see below).

SERPChecker is a Google SERP and SEO analysis tool. It includes a choice of 49+ SEO metrics and Social metrics. The tool lets you analyze the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors to help you rank higher.

SERPWatcher is a rank tracking tool, and like KWFinder, it’s easy to use. You can track keyword positions on a daily basis. If you head over to the demo page you can see app tracking some domains and keywords.

LinkMiner is a backlink analysis tool. Use this tool to discover which links are pointing to your website. Metrics are given for each link and you can see a snapshot preview of the website on the right hand side. Great for auditing backlink profiles and competitor research.

Pricing

The Mangools freemium model includes a limited free plan and a choice of monthly subscription plans. There’s also a healthy 50% discount when you opt for the annual subscription.

  • Prices start from $49/month or $349/year

Pros

  • Free starter plan
  • Affordable monthly subscription or discounted annual plans
  • Superb user interface
  • Includes a well-explained keyword difficulty score
  • Integrates well with other tools in the Mangools suite

Cons

  • If you need to gather a lot of data on a daily basis, the Agency plan is expensive compared to the Premium and Basic plans.

Get KWFinder*

SEMrush

SEMrush* is another great all-around SEO tool that supports both traditional keyword research and competitor-based research methods. SEMrush caused a stir in the market when it launched in 2008 as it was the first competitor-based SEO tool.

Lewis from Authority Hacker explains competitor-based research with this analogy:

Instead of looking for the needle in a haystack, it allowed you to find the right haystacks with the right needles.

Competitor research

Because SEMrush is primarily a competitor-based research tool, we can’t follow our example of entering our trial keyword herbal remedies. Instead, we have to flip things around and search our competitors to see what keywords they are ranking for.

For this example, I’m using healthline.com as our competitor.

Note: If you’re not sure who your competitors are then you can always enter your own domain first:

4a semrush organic competitors

And from there, you can click each domain to start checking their keywords.

When you enter your competition domain, SEMrush returns a load of data. For instance, this is just the top part of the Domain Overview screen:

4b semrush Domain Overview

Remember this is an all-around SEO tool, so we’ll ignore most of the information now and focus on the Organic Search Positions feature.

Here you can see that SEMrush has found 4,863,217 keywords that our competition domain (healthline.com) is ranking for:

4c semrush Organic Search Positions

SEMrush automatically sorts the results by Traffic% as these are the keywords that are likely to attract the most organic traffic. From here you can start to reverse-engineer your competitor’s best-performing keywords.

Here are the other metrics for each keyword:

  • Position – Where the URL currently ranks in the SERP, and their position from the previous update.
  • Volume – The estimated monthly traffic generated from these keywords (i.e. how many times people search for them).
  • KD – Keyword Difficulty – the higher the number, the harder it is to rank for these keywords.
  • CPC – The average Cost-Per-Click if someone advertised based on this keyword.
  • URL – The web page generating the traffic.
  • Traffic % – The average percentage of all traffic the website is getting from this keyword.
  • Costs % – The share of total traffic cost driven to the website from the keyword over the specific time frame.
  • Competitive Density of advertisers using the given term for their ads.
  • Results – Number of search results in the database.
  • Trend – The changes in interest for the given keyword over 12 months.
  • SERP – A snapshot of the SERP source where SEMrush found the result.
  • Last Update – The time when the given keyword was last updated in our database.

Filters

Using the filter, you can enter your keyword; e.g. herbal remedies, and narrow the search further:

4d semrush Organic Search Filter

Traditional research

If you don’t like the look of competitor-based research, then SEMrush also has a traditional research tool. This is how it works:

4e semrush Keyword Magic Works

Keyword Magic Tool

Start by entering your keyword into the Keyword Magic Tool search bar:

4f semrush Keyword Magic Tool

SEMrush returns the results.

In the top half of the screen is an overview of your ‘seed’ keyword:

4g semrush Keyword Magic Tool Top

Below, SEMrush gives you a massive list of related keywords that you can break into groups by topic:

4h semrush Keyword Magic Bottom

For example, you could pick ‘pain‘ from the left-hand panel and get results like herbal remedies for back pain.

You can filter these keywords by metrics like search volume, CPC, competitive density, and keyword difficulty to get your perfect list.

Keyword Analyzer

After filtering, you can send your more focused list to the Keyword Analyzer to refresh metrics on demand. In this example, I exported our pain group and refreshed the first keyword:

4i semrush Keyword Analyzer

From here you can identify metrics like Keyword Difficulty, Click Potential and, unsurprisingly, the Top Competitors that appear on each keyword’s results page.

Other SEMrush features

  • Advertising Research – Discover your competitors’ Adwords budget and keywords
  • Backlinks – Monitor the quantity and quality of backlinks to your domain
  • Video Advertising Research – Discover the top advertisers so you can create an effective ad campaign
  • Site Audit – Find and fix your On-Page issues and boost SEO-optimization

Pricing

The SEMrush free plan limits you to a handful of searches a day. If you know what you’re looking for you can find some excellent keywords, but the results are limited. The premium plans are expensive if you’re on a tight budget and more suited to experienced bloggers.

  • Prices start from $99/month or $999/year

Pros

  • Limited free plan
  • Combines traditional and competitor-based keyword research methods
  • Excellent competitor-based research tool

Cons

  • Cluttered user interface
  • The Keyword Magic Tool is in Beta phase and still catching up with other traditional research tools.

Ahrefs

Ahrefs* is an all-in-one SEO platform that supports both traditional and competitor-based keyword research. Its background lies in backlink analysis, but it now offers a full suite of SEO tools.

Keyword research

Ahrefs released a brand new version of their keyword research tool – Keywords Explorer 2.0 – in November 2016, and they claim it’s the best:

We knew that adding a few cool features here and there wouldn’t really make a difference. The only option was to start from scratch and take a shot at creating the very best keyword research tool in the industry.

You start by entering your seed keyword:

5a Ahrefs Keyword Explorer

At the top of the results screen is the Overview panel with common metrics like Keyword Difficulty and Search Volume, plus advanced metrics like Return rate, Clicks, and Clicks / Search:

5b Ahrefs Keyword Explorer Overview

Keyword Difficulty estimates how hard it would be to rank on the first page of search results for your given keyword, using the number of backlinks that current top search results have.

In our example, the rating is 37 and suggests, “You’ll need backlinks from ~49 websites to rank in top 10 for this keyword.” Ahrefs is built around the SEO value of backlinks, so it’s no surprise that their KD metric should include this.

Search Volume shows how many searches your target keyword gets per month in a given country (average for last 12 months). Ahrefs calculates this metric by processing large amounts of clickstream data.

Return Rate is a relative value that illustrates how often people search for this keyword again. It doesn’t show the exact number of “returns” and is only useful when comparing keywords with each other.

Clicks is the total number of clicks (organic and paid) on the search results that people perform per month while searching for that keyword. Some searches result in clicks on multiple results, while others might not lead to any clicks at all. As Tim Soulo puts it:

For example, people search a lot for “donald trump age”, but they don’t click on any results because they see the answer right away.

Clicks Per Search (or CPS) shows how many different search results people click on average after performing a search for this keyword.

In the next section, underneath the Overview panel, you get access to thousands of relevant keyword ideas:

5c Ahrefs Keyword Ideas

Ahrefs estimates the Traffic potential by looking at the organic search traffic of the current #1 ranking result for that keyword.

So, in our example, they estimate that if you’re in #1 position for the keyword herbal remedies, then you’d get 1000 visits out of the total 6000 searches per month.

Like we’ve seen with other tools the keyword suggestions are split into three groups:

  • Having same terms – Shows you all keywords that contain all of the terms of a target keyword in them (in any order).
  • Also rank for – Shows you all keywords that the Top10 ranking pages for your target keyword also rank for.
  • Search suggestions – Shows you all search queries suggested via “Autocomplete” when searching for your target keyword.

You need to click the View full report button to see the full extent of the keyword ideas. Here’s an example of the ‘Having same terms’ report:

5d Ahrefs Keyword Ideas Full

Along the top are the different filters you can use to narrow your selection. For example, only show keywords with a KD score from 0 to 40.

You may have noticed that some keyword ideas have a ‘Get Metrics’ button. This means Ahrefs has the data cached and you can access it instantly.

With such a huge database of keywords, you could be hanging around a while for all the results to load, so this option means you can access the data you want when you want. It takes a few seconds for the chosen keyword data to load.

One thing we’ve not seen yet is the SERP data for the keyword. If you press the SERP button of the keyword you want, you get a drop-down display of the current Top 10 results like this:

5e Ahrefs Keyword Serp

Competitor-based research

Ahrefs, like SEMrush, also offers you competitor-based keyword research via its Site Explorer Tool.

Here you can enter your competitor and find what keywords they are ranking for. Then you can find the low-competition keywords by using the filters.

5f Ahrefs Site Explorer Example

In this example, I’ve used the healthline.com domain and added the following filters:

  • Search Position 1-10
  • Search Volume greater than 500
  • Keyword Difficulty up to 40

Like we saw on the Keyword Explorer, you can expand each line to see the full SERP analysis.

Other Ahrefs features

  • Alerts – Get notified of new and lost backlinks, web mentions and rankings
  • Content Explorer – Discover the most popular content for any topic
  • Rank Tracker – Monitor your desktop and mobile rankings for any location
  • Backlink Checker – Analyze backlink profiles and discover link opportunities
  • Link Intersect – Find the sites linking to your competitors but not to you
  • Broken Link Checker – Keep your website free from dead links

Pricing

Ahrefs offers a 7 day trial for $7. The premium plans are expensive if you’re on a tight budget and more suited to experienced bloggers.

  • Prices start at $99/month or $990/year

Note: If you can’t justify using Ahrefs on a monthly basis, you could sign up for a month, do your KW research and cancel. That said, if you can justify the monthly pricing it’s well worth keeping because you’ll get access to the ongoing functionality such as rank tracking and web monitoring. It also means there’s no need to use any other tools to track rankings or monitor mentions on the web.

Pros

  • Limited free trial
  • Reliable keyword difficulty metric
  • Largest database of backlinks and keywords
  • Greater accuracy by processing large amounts of clickstream data
  • Combines traditional and competitor-based keyword research methods

Cons

  • It’s expensive, but they claim to be the best.

Final thoughts

Now you’ve seen each of the keyword research tools in action, you should have an idea of what each one can do.

Remember, at the beginning of this article I mentioned how each tool had different results? If you’ve been taking notes you’ll have spotted some variances in the results.

The bottom line is that each vendor gets its data from different sources and calculates its metrics differently. It’s difficult to compare like-for-like. Once you’ve decided on a tool, you’ll become more familiar with how its metrics are calculated.

Our verdict

Each of these keyword research tools is useful in its own right. You need to choose the best one for your circumstances. Here are our thoughts:

Answer The Public is more of a content generator or keyword suggestion tool. It’s a free tool that you can use to see what people are searching for, but there’s no keyword difficulty rating included. Use it to get broader topic ideas or seed keywords, rather than specific keywords.

If you’re an up-and-coming blogger and you have a small budget, then choose the KWFinder Tool. The user interface is superb, and the keyword data seems quite accurate.

If you’re a professional blogger, like Adam, then you’ll want to invest in the best premium tool – Ahrefs*. Yes, it’s pricey, but the volume and accuracy of the data mean you’ll get a solid return on your investment.

Categorized in Online Research
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