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 Source: This article was Published cmswire.com By Kaya Ismail - Contributed by Member: Linda Manly

Following LinkedIn’s launched back in 2002, the platform became known as the place to be for recruiters and job seekers alike. It was (and still is), the place to house your digital resume for the world to see. Today, however, LinkedIn has flourished into a full-fledged social network for professionals from all walks of life. It’s a place to find jobs, headhunt, network, and share industry knowledge. As of January 2018, LinkedIn had over 250 million active users, of which 40 percent use the social media platform on a daily basis. But more interestingly, LinkedIn has proven to be ideal for finding new B2B leads, with B2B marketers stating that 80 percent of their leads have come from LinkedIn.

Renee Smith, the technical marketer at Los Angeles-based Salted Stone, couldn’t recommend LinkedIn enough when we asked her about B2B marketing. “LinkedIn is built for B2B marketers. [LinkedIn is] comprised entirely of professionals aligning themselves directly with their business,” she said.

What is LinkedIn Advanced Search?

LinkedIn advanced search is a faceted search feature that can help you narrow down your search criteria in a number of different ways. You can search for people or companies, filter your results by industry, past companies, connection degrees, schools, regions, occupations, and more.

In this article, we’ll show how to use LinkedIn advanced search to find new B2B leads. To demonstrate, I’ll be targeting New York-based CEOs in the IT industry.  

1. Access LinkedIn Advanced Search

To get started with LinkedIn Advanced Search, simply click on the LinkedIn search bar.

Now, choose from either “People,” “Jobs” or “Posts.” If you’re hunting for B2B leads, you’ll want to click “People”. You’ll then be presented with a new navigation bar with additional options. From this interface, you can filter your search by location, connections, and current company.

However, clicking the “All Filters” button will send you into LinkedIn Advanced Search mode, with even more options.

2. Apply the Relevant Filters

You should now be looking at all the filters LinkedIn Advanced Search has to offer.

Because I’m looking for CEOs in New York working in the IT industry, I can start by filling in the fields like so:

  • “Title” field with “CEO”
  • “Location” field with “New York”
  • “Industry” field with “Information Technology and Services” (Note, industries are already configured, you just need to check the right box).

Once all the relevant filters have been selected, you can then click on “Apply.”  

3. Review Search Results

You will now be shown a search results page showing you all the LinkedIn members who match your search criteria. As you can see, I’ve found a long list of LinkedIn users who are New York-based, CEOs and working in the IT industry.

Exactly how you approach each lead is your call. You could send them a message or connect with them before engaging via direct messages or by commenting on their content.

Engage Prospective Leads, Don't Pitch Them

LinkedIn’s advanced search function is a truly underestimated tool for marketing and sales professionals. But to get the most out of each connection you make, Monica Wolyniec, marketing, and communications manager at New York City-based Boomset, Inc. recommended taking a softer approach to LinkedIn leads. “Don't connect [just] to pitch. Engage, connect, and converse in order to add value to your prospect's pain points,” she advised.

Create and Share Industry Content

Dhaval Doshi, the founder, and director of Mumbai, India-based Smarthome NX, concurred. He urged marketers and professionals to leverage content marketing on LinkedIn in order to woo B2B leads. “Document your journey as a professional or entrepreneur and publish as many videos [or articles] as possible to build authority.

Categorized in How to

Do you use hashtags for marketing campaigns on Twitter?

Looking for hashtag tools to help improve your use of hashtags?

In this article, you’ll find seven hashtag tools for researching and reporting on Twitter hashtags.

Why Is Researching Twitter Hashtags Important?

Twitter users often follow hashtags that pertain to their interests, so social media marketers can use targeted hashtags to improve their reach among users with specific interests. However, with only 280 characters in which to squeeze both your message and hashtags, you need to choose the hashtags you target carefully.

When you set aside time to research what hashtags are the most popular with your customer personas, you’re better able to target users who reflect your ideal audience. Luckily, several tools available can help you identify and track the best hashtags for your industry.

Each tool has its own strengths. However, generally speaking, a research tool can help you monitor hashtags, improve influencer outreach, discover demographic and geographic information, and gauge sentiment. With the right toolbox, you can simplify social marketing on Twitter.

#1: Discover Hashtag Popularity With RiteTag

RiteTag helps you find new hashtags and track your current hashtags. In addition to showing important hashtag data, this tool helps you find the best possible hashtags for your text and images. With the handy Chrome extension, you can highlight text or right-click an image (as shown below) and instantly get hashtag suggestions for it.

RiteTag hashtag suggestions

The RiteTag hashtag search feature organizes results so you can see at a glance which related hashtags will help your tweet visibility now or over time. The results also indicate which related hashtags are less popular.

RiteTag hashtag search results

For $49 per year, you can use RiteTag for up to 1,000 queries a month for both images and text. Other plans are available if you’re looking for help crafting, publishing, or enhancing posts; these plans range from $7.50 to $15 per month.

#2: Purchase In-Depth Hashtag Reports With ExportTweet

With ExportTweet, you can track hashtags, keywords, and accounts. This tool also helps you find top tweets, related hashtags, influencer data, device source, geographic location, and more. The free tool (accessed via the Try Now button) gives information on the last 100 tweets, but the paid searches offer unlimited tracking time and unlimited report downloads.

ExportTweet hashtag search results

With the pay-as-you-go pricing options, ExportTweet is a great option for new hashtag trackers or those who want to focus on only a few hashtags. You can purchase reports for both real-time hashtag tracking (25,000+ tweets) and hashtag historical data(2,000+ tweets), which include CSV spreadsheets of top related hashtags and all images, videos, and URLs. Real-time reports start at $19.99, and historical data reports start at $16.99.

#3: Reveal Top Hashtags and Influencers With Hashtagify

If you’re not sure where to start with your hashtags and prefer a more visual interface, check out the Hashtagify search tool. Like other search tools, it helps you find relevant hashtags. In addition to data about a hashtag’s popularity over time, you can see which influencers use the hashtag and get details about the hashtag’s reach in different languages and geographic areas.

Hashtagify hashtag search results

The search tool is free to use. You can purchase a Hashtagify plan starting at $9 per month to add hashtag trackers, two months of data storage, full access to the top ranking hashtags, and a bookmark feature to save any favorite hashtags.

#4: Get Day-Of Hashtag Data With Tweet Archivist

Tweet Archivist is another free search tool for hashtags. Other search tools give you a range of several days, but with Tweet Archivist, you get real-time data from the day of your search with the number of tweets and impressions for the day, as shown in this result for the #socialmedia hashtag:

Tweet Archivist hashtag search results

With the free report, you’ll see the top associated words, top URLs associated with the hashtag, the source of the top tweets, top languages used, user mentions, associated hashtags, and an influencer index.

Tweet Archivist hashtag search results

For $14.99 per month, you gain the ability to download data and receive three archives that are updated every hour. If you don’t want a recurring monthly payment plan, other pricing options are also available.

#5: Discover Local Trending Hashtags With Trendsmap

For a local business, Trendsmap is an amazing tool for finding trending hashtags in your area. This tool will reveal the most popular trending topics on Twitter based on geographic data. Yes, you can use Twitter itself for this, but you get only a few trending topics compared to the many you’ll see via Trendsmap.

This tool will show local trending hashtags, users, and words. For example, here you see trending words, hashtags, and users in the Houston area during an uncharacteristic ice storm:

Trendsmap hashtag search results

Trendsmap has a free search feature and pricing options that start at $25 per month. The free search feature provides only real-time hashtag data, whereas the paid plans offer longer historical data.

With the free search, you’ll have to find your location and zoom in to see the top hashtags, users, and words. With the paid plan, you can narrow your search by your physical location, city, or region and customize whether you see hashtags, users, or words.

#6: Track Campaign Hashtags With Socialert

Socialert is a budget-friendly tool, making it perfect for individual users or small businesses. You can do a free search before the tool asks you to upgrade to a paid plan. The free search will analyze 300 tweets over a 7-day period to give you a snapshot of relevant data. You’ll see the hashtag reach and impression rate along with geographic data and overall sentiment.

If you upgrade to a paid plan, you can get in-depth analytics, historical data, search filters, and influencer tracking. The paid plans start at $9.95 per month for two campaigns, and you can upgrade your plan as required to track more campaigns. Here you see a report on the hashtag #smm:

Socialert hashtag search results

#7: Follow Hashtags in Real Time With Keyhole

Keyhole has a free search function for surface-level analytics. Enter a hashtag you want to research. In the results, you’ll see data that’s useful for quickly gathering general information on a hashtag. Get real-time data on the number of posts, users, impressions, reach, demographics, sentiment, and top sources.

For instance, here you see a section of Keyhole results for a search on the hashtag #marketing:

Keyhole hashtag search results

For additional features, upgrade to one of the paid plans.

Conclusion

With Facebook’s new algorithm change, you may need to focus more on your Twitter marketing. Hashtag usage is incredibly important for Twitter, and many tools can help you track hashtags for Twitter optimization. However, some tools may be more useful to you than others.

Every social media campaign has its own strategy, so the level of data you need for each will vary. The free search functions will help you gather initial data, but you might want to dig deeper in other cases.

What do you think? Have you used any of these hashtag tracking resources? What tools have you found most useful? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

 Source: This article was published socialmediaexaminer.com By Lindsay

Categorized in Online Research

Will advertisers someday be able to buy recommendations?

It’s one thing to build a useful voice skill or app, but quite another for consumers to actually find it. That’s because people need to know a particular skill or app exists before they can use it, and today’s voice discovery tools are about as basic as a Yahoo search circa 1995.

Amazon publishes a directory of its 25,000 voice skills, as well as a bare-bones Skill Finder app, but consumers using those databases still need to know what they’re looking for. Brands looking to rise above the noise will need to figure out how to market and promote their voice skills if they hope to attract more than a handful of users.

“This is not an ‘if you build it they will come’ world,” said Greg Hedges, vp of emerging experiences at Rain, a digital consultancy that created an Alexa skill for Campbell’s, among others. “You really do have to enact the same kind of owned-earned-paid approach as you would elsewhere to generate awareness. And you have to give people a reason to return.”

To invoke a skill, you need to first enable it and call it by name: “Alexa, ask Campbell’s Kitchen to tell me how to make chicken soup.” If you were to simply ask, “Alexa, tell me how to make chicken soup,” however, the device would default to the Allrecipes skill. (An Amazon representative declined to explain why Alexa recommends that particular skill, saying only that “in limited scenarios, Alexa will respond to certain questions by suggesting skills that may be helpful.”)

So far, brands have been unable to lay claim to generic phrases on Alexa. But that hasn’t stopped Amazon from reserving some of them for its own products. For example, if you say, “Alexa, help me with my chores,” it will automatically enable and launch The Tick’s Housework Hero skill, which offers no actual help but plenty of hearty encouragement from actor Peter Serafinowicz, star of The Tick on Amazon Prime.

A bigger issue is voice commerce. Some Alexa skills can add products to an Amazon shopping list. Ask the Good Housekeeping skill how to remove a grass stain, for instance, and it will ask if you want to add bleach, detergent and stain remover to your list, without specifying a particular brand. Will brands one day be able to buy that recommendation? Amazon isn’t saying.

V-commerce is about to get a huge boost, thanks to Walmart and Google. Earlier this month, the retail colossus launched voice ordering on Google Home for more than 2 million products, as part of a bigger partnership with the Mountain View, Calif.-based tech giant. Meanwhile, Google also announced the $49 Google Home Mini, which will compete head-on with Amazon’s Echo Dot.


To search with love

Brands will need to lean more heavily on search to surface both their voice skills and their products. But when it comes to voice search, the rules are a bit different, cautioned Alex Lirtsman, chief strategist for digital agency Ready Set Rocket.

Rather than optimizing for the top keywords, brands will need to focus on more complex natural language queries, Lirtsman explained. Just as people have learned to use multiple keywords to get more specific results from online searches, they tend to ask more detailed questions with voice.

“Instead of saying, ‘Where’s a storage facility near me?’ they’ll say, ‘What’s the cheapest storage facility within a 10-minute drive?’” Lirtsman said. “There’s an expectation they’ll get pricing and other data. I don’t think a lot of brands have thought through all of these scenarios.”

Voice search also tends to be much more location-centric, Lirtsman added. Brands that lack a physical presence will be at a disadvantage.

And unlike the early days of internet search in the ’90s, the window of opportunity for voice is much narrower. On desktop and mobile, brands are usually happy to land on the first one or two pages of Google search results. But people are unlikely to listen to more than the first two or three search results on a device like an Amazon Echo or Google Home.

That puts even more pressure on brands to be at the top of the results list—assuming there is one, noted Gartner research director Charles Golvin. “For a lot of these searches, there’s just an answer,” he said. “And if you’re not the answer, you’re screwed, right?”

Pay to play?

This puts companies like Amazon and Google—and, eventually, Apple and Microsoft—in position to demand top dollar for placing a brand’s skill at the top of its directory or making it the first result in a voice search.

“It’s analogous to buying spots in the app store for a particular category,” said Golvin. “If someone is searching for word games, you can pay Apple to be the first result.”

Amazon declined to comment on whether it planned to monetize voice searches in the future, while a spokesperson for Google provided the following statement: “Similar to what we’ve done with other products, our initial goal is to provide users with a great Assistant experience. While we don’t have any plans to share right now, we’re looking at ways to create a business model that will also provide that great user experience.”

But some brands, fearing that they will be disintermediated in the same way that they were in the early days of Facebook, are concerned about big companies like Google and Amazon having such a powerful position in the voice assistance market, noted Susan Etlinger, industry analyst for Altimeter Group.

“In 2007, brands were asking, ‘If we create a Facebook page, and Facebook gets all the data, what is that going to look like 10 years from now?’” she said. “And now we know what that looks like. But at the same time, there’s undeniable value in it. So it’s a really tough decision.”

Source: This article was published adweek.com By Dan Tynan

Categorized in Search Engine

Big changes are coming to Facebook Live. The social network will let broadcasts run for up to four hours – or even continuously in some cases. Plus, you can now hide reactions and comments, view livestreams in full-screen, and restrict who sees your broadcast.

Here’s a quick roundup of all the changes coming to Facebook Live that marketers need to know.

1. 4 Hour Live Streams

Since Facebook Live launched, livestreams have been limited to 90 minutes. Now Facebook is more than doubling that.

Yes, broadcasters are now restricted to a mere four hours for users when broadcasting via the Facebook app or using the Live API.

2. Hide Reactions & Comments

Don’t want to see comments and reactions while you’re broadcasting or watching? Facebook will now let you hide both in a video-only mode.

All you have to do is swipe right to hide comments and reactions. Swipe left to bring them back.

In theory, this will help reduce distractions and help keep viewers focused on the broadcast.

3. Full-Screen Live

One significant change that is more geared toward viewers than broadcasters is that viewers can now watch broadcasts in full-screen mode, rather than as a square we’ve become used to over the past several months.

Although Android users will have to wait for full-screen mode until summer, iOS users can enjoy this new feature right away. Full-screen will work with both landscape and portrait viewing when fully rolled out.

4. Continuous Live

Want to go live indefinitely on Facebook? Now you can.

Continuous live video was actually added a couple months ago, but this one slipped under the radar of many marketers. “Some great use cases for continuous live include live feeds of aquariums, museums, and zoos,” according to Facebook.

The catch with continuous live? Your followers won’t receive a notification that you’re live. Also, once you end broadcasting, it’s gone forever. Your followers have to literally watch it when it’s live – there’s no rewinding or reliving it.

5. Geogating

Want only men to watch your livestream? Or people who are located in certain places?

New audience restrictions, what Facebook calls “geogating,” were added to the Live API at the same time as continuous streaming. Now you can target or exclude people by:

Location – country, state, city, or ZIP code.
Age – you can specify a minimum and maximum age.
Gender

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/facebook-live-update/169111/

Ads now appear in Local Finder results, plus ads display differently in Google Maps.

Google has made changes this week to local search results and Google Maps that will impact retailers and service providers with physical locations.

 

Ads in Local Finder results

Local SEO specialist Brian Barwig was among those who have noticed the ads appearing in the Local Finder results — reached after clicking “More places” from a local three-pack in the main Google search results.

map

The addition of the ads (more than one ad can display) in the Local Finder results means retailers and service providers that aren’t featured in the local three-pack have a new way of getting to the top of the results if users click through to see more listings. (It also means another haven for organic listings has been infiltrated with advertising.)

The ads in the Local Finder rely on AdWords location extensions just like Google Maps, which started featuring ads that used location extensions when Google updated Maps in 2013. Unlike the results in Maps, however, advertisers featured in Local Finder results do not get a pin on the map results.

A Google spokesperson didn’t offer further details other than to say, We’re always testing out new formats for local businesses, but don’t have any additional details to share for now.”

Google Maps is no longer considered a Search Partner

Google has also announced changes to how ads display in Google Maps. Soon, Google will onlyshow ads that include location extensions in Maps; regular text ads will not be featured. The other big change is that Google Maps is no longer considered part of Search Partners. Google has alerted advertisers, and Maps has been removed from the list of Google sites included in Search Partners in the AdWords help pages.

This change in Maps’ status means:

1. Advertisers that use location extensions but had opted out of Search Partners will now be able to have their ads shown in Maps and may see an increase in impressions and clicks as their ads start showing there.

2. Advertisers that don’t use location extensions but were opted into Search Partners could see a drop in impressions and clicks with ads no longer showing in Maps.

The move to include Maps as part of Google search inventory will mean more advertisers will be included in Maps ad auctions. The emphasis on location extensions is in line with Google’s increasing reliance on structured data and feeds, as retailers participating in Google Shopping can attest.

 Source: http://searchengineland.com/google-ads-local-finder-results-maps-not-search-partner-247779

Categorized in Search Engine

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