The Sunday Times just dropped its highly anticipated Sunday Times Rich List, which ranks the wealthiest people in Britain, as well as the rest of the world.Data from the list shows that it is actually entrepreneurs and self-made business people who dominate the top spots — not just mainly those with inherited wealth.While, of course, there are families that keep passing their companies and wealth down in the family, such as the owners of Koch Industries, Walmart, and even the L'Oreal cosmetics empire, there are an increasing amount of self-made billionaires from across the globe. Most of these self-made people are in the tech industry, such as China's Jack Ma of Alibaba and Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook.Check out who are the wealthiest people on earth:

33. Alain & Gerard Wertheimer: Net worth — £18.9 billion ($24.5 billion). The brothers (pictured here with the Queen), own and control the House of Chanel perfume company.

33. Alain & Gerard Wertheimer: Net worth — £18.9 billion ($24.5 billion). The brothers (pictured here with the Queen), own and control the House of Chanel perfume company.
Getty

32. Samuel and Donald Newhouse: Net worth — £19.9 billion ($25. 8 billion). The brothers are heirs to Advance Publications, a multimillion-dollar publishing and broadcasting empire which includes The New Yorker and Vogue.

32. Samuel and Donald Newhouse: Net worth — £19.9 billion ($25. 8 billion). The brothers are heirs to Advance Publications, a multimillion-dollar publishing and broadcasting empire which includes The New Yorker and Vogue.
President of Advance Publications Donald Newhouse, Newscaster Paula Zahn and Katherine Newhouse Mele.Getty

31. Ma Huateng (Pony Ma): Net worth — £20.1 billion ($26.09 billion). The Chinese internet entrepreneur is the founder, president, CEO and executive board member of Tencent. Tencent is a holding company for subsidiaries that provide everything from online advertising, media, entertainment, and payment systems.

31. Ma Huateng (Pony Ma): Net worth — £20.1 billion ($26.09 billion). The Chinese internet entrepreneur is the founder, president, CEO and executive board member of Tencent. Tencent is a holding company for subsidiaries that provide everything from online advertising, media, entertainment, and payment systems.
Tencent Chairman & Chief Executive Officer Pony Ma attends a news conference announcing the company's results in Hong Kong March 18, 2015REUTERS/Bobby Yip

T=28. George Soros: Net worth — £20.7 billion ($26.87 billion). Soros is one of the world's most famous and successful investors. However he started from humble beginnings where he worked as a railway porter and waiter to put himself through his university education at the London School of Economics.

T=28. George Soros: Net worth — £20.7 billion ($26.87 billion). Soros is one of the world's most famous and successful investors. However he started from humble beginnings where he worked as a railway porter and waiter to put himself through his university education at the London School of Economics.
Georges Soros, Chairman of Soros Fund Management in 2016.Reuters

T=28. Phil Knight: Net worth — £20.7 billion ($26.87 billion). Knight is the co-founder and chairman emeritus of one of the world's largest and most recognisable sports brands, Nike.

T=28. Phil Knight: Net worth — £20.7 billion ($26.87 billion). Knight is the co-founder and chairman emeritus of one of the world's largest and most recognisable sports brands, Nike.
Christian Petersen/Getty Images

T=28. Maria Franca Fissolo: Net worth — £20.7 billion ($26.87 billion). The Italian billionaire is the owner of Europe's second largest confectionery company Ferrero. She is a widow of Michele Ferrero.

T=28. Maria Franca Fissolo: Net worth — £20.7 billion ($26.87 billion). The Italian billionaire is the owner of Europe's second largest confectionery company Ferrero. She is a widow of Michele Ferrero.
Maria Franca Fissolo.YouTube/Gazzetta D'Alba

27. Mukesh Ambani: Net worth — £21.8 billion ($28.29 billion). Ambani, pictured on the right of former UK chancellor George Osborne, is the chairman, managing director and largest shareholder of a Fortune Global 500 company Reliance Industries Limited (RIL).

26. Axel Dumas: Net worth — £22.2 billion ($28.8 billion). He is the CEO of major fashion house Hermès. He is the sixth-generation member of the family to lead it after his family founded it in 1837.

26. Axel Dumas: Net worth — £22.2 billion ($28.8 billion). He is the CEO of major fashion house Hermès. He is the sixth-generation member of the family to lead it after his family founded it in 1837.
Vittorio Zunino Celotto / Getty

25. The Henkel family: Net worth — £22.5 billion ($28.88 billion). The German chemical and consumer goods company was founded in 1876 by Fritz Henkel. Christoph Henkel inherited a £1 billion stake in the group in 1999 shortly after his father Konrad's death in 1999.

25. The Henkel family: Net worth — £22.5 billion ($28.88 billion). The German chemical and consumer goods company was founded in 1876 by Fritz Henkel. Christoph Henkel inherited a £1 billion stake in the group in 1999 shortly after his father Konrad's death in 1999.
Reuters / Ina Fassbender

24. Steve Ballmer: Net worth — £23.6 billion ($30.63 billion). He was the former CEO of Microsoft from January 2000 to February 2014 and is the current owner of the basketball team, the Los Angeles Clippers.

24. Steve Ballmer: Net worth — £23.6 billion ($30.63 billion). He was the former CEO of Microsoft from January 2000 to February 2014 and is the current owner of the basketball team, the Los Angeles Clippers.
REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

23. Jorge Paulo Lemann: Net worth — £23.9 billion ($31 billion). Pictured on the left, Lemann is the richest person in Brazil and made his fortune as a corporate takeover legend.

23. Jorge Paulo Lemann: Net worth — £23.9 billion ($31 billion). Pictured on the left, Lemann is the richest person in Brazil and made his fortune as a corporate takeover legend.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

22. Sheldon Adelson: Net worth — £24.6 billion ($31.93 billion). He is the founder and CEO of gambling giant Las Vegas Sands Corp and is a major Republican party donor.

22. Sheldon Adelson: Net worth — £24.6 billion ($31.93 billion). He is the founder and CEO of gambling giant Las Vegas Sands Corp and is a major Republican party donor.
Kin Cheung/AP

21. Li Ka-shing: Net worth — £25.4 billion ($32.97 billion). He is one of Asia's richest men after being one of the first big investors in Facebook while also acquiring British telecom company O2, which he purchased in 2015 for $15 billion.

21. Li Ka-shing: Net worth — £25.4 billion ($32.97 billion). He is one of Asia's richest men after being one of the first big investors in Facebook while also acquiring  British telecom company O2, which he purchased in 2015 for $15 billion.
Stanford University, Flickr

20. Wang Jianlin: Net worth — £25.7 billion ($33.36 billion). He is the founder of China's largest real estate developer Dalian Wanda Group and also owns a 20% stake in Spanish football club Atlético Madrid.

20. Wang Jianlin: Net worth — £25.7 billion ($33.36 billion). He is the founder of  China's largest real estate developer Dalian Wanda Group and also owns a 20% stake in Spanish football club Atlético Madrid.
Damir Sogolj / Reuters

19. Jack Ma: Net worth — £26.7 billion ($26.7 billion). The Chinese tech billionaire is the founder and executive chairman of e-commerce giant Alibaba Group.

19. Jack Ma: Net worth — £26.7 billion ($26.7 billion). The Chinese tech billionaire is the founder and executive chairman of e-commerce giant Alibaba Group.
Jack Ma, Executive Chairman of Alibaba REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

18. Ingvar Kamprad and family: Net worth — £28 billion ($36.34 billion). The Swedish business magnate has been at the helm of IKEA, one of the world's largest furniture stores and most beloved brands, for more than 70 years.

17. Karl & Theo Albrecht Jr & Beate Heister and family: Net worth — £30.5 billion ($39.59 billion). Germany's Karl Albrecht founded the discount supermarket chain Aldi with his brother Theo.

17. Karl & Theo Albrecht Jr & Beate Heister and family: Net worth — £30.5 billion ($39.59 billion). Germany's Karl Albrecht founded the discount supermarket chain Aldi with his brother Theo.
In this July 30, 2002 file photo a man carries two plastic bags in front of an ALDI market in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. AP Photo /Martin Meissner, file

16. Stefan Quandt & Susanne Klatten: Net worth — £30.8 billion ($39.98 billion). He is the son of the late Herbert and Johanna Quandt, and owns 25.6% of BMW while his sister claims a 20.8%.

16. Stefan Quandt & Susanne Klatten: Net worth — £30.8 billion ($39.98 billion). He is the son of the late Herbert and Johanna Quandt, and owns 25.6% of BMW while his sister claims a 20.8%.
Stefan Quandt in 1999.Reuters

15. Liliane Bettencourt: Net worth — £31.8 billion ($41.28 billion). She is the heiress to the L'Oreal cosmetics fortune and the company's largest shareholder.

15. Liliane Bettencourt: Net worth — £31.8 billion ($41.28 billion). She is the heiress to the L'Oreal cosmetics fortune and the company's largest shareholder.
REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

14. Sergey Brin: Net worth: £33.4 billion ($43.35 billion). The Russian American computer scientist co-founded tech giant Google with Larry Page.

13. Larry Page: Net worth — £34.2 billion. Page beats his cofounder of Google counterpart, Sergey Brin, by £1 billion.

13. Larry Page: Net worth — £34.2 billion. Page beats his cofounder of Google counterpart, Sergey Brin, by £1 billion.
Chris Hondros/Getty Images

12. Bernard Arnault: Net worth — £35.2 billion ($45.69 billion). Arnault is the Chairman and CEO of the world's largest luxury goods company, LVMH.

12. Bernard Arnault: Net worth — £35.2 billion ($45.69 billion). Arnault is the Chairman and CEO of the world's largest luxury goods company, LVMH.
Reuters/Charles Platiau

11. Michael Bloomberg: Net worth — £39 billion ($50.62 billion). He is the founder, owners and CEO of the huge global financial services, mass media, and software company Bloomberg. He has also pledged half of his fortune to charity after his death.

11. Michael Bloomberg: Net worth — £39 billion ($50.62 billion). He is the founder, owners and CEO of the huge global financial services, mass media, and software company Bloomberg. He has also pledged half of his fortune to charity after his death.
Lori Hoffman/Bloomberg

10. Larry Ellison: Net worth — £40.6 billion ($52.7 billion). He is the founder and chairman of the international giant Oracle. He is also big into yacht racing and buying whole Hawaiian islands.

10. Larry Ellison: Net worth — £40.6 billion ($52.7 billion). He is the founder and chairman of the international giant Oracle. He is also big into yacht racing and buying whole Hawaiian islands.
Oracle executive chairman Larry EllisonOracle

9. Carlos Slim Helu and family: Net worth — £46 billion ($59.71 billion). He is Mexico's wealthiest man and one of the richest self-made billionaires in the world after taking control of Latin America's biggest mobile telecom firm America Movil.

9. Carlos Slim Helu and family: Net worth — £46 billion ($59.71 billion). He is Mexico's wealthiest man and one of the richest self-made billionaires in the world after taking control of Latin America's biggest mobile telecom firm America Movil.
Reuters

8. Mark Zuckerberg: Net worth — £47.7 billion ($61.92 billion). The 32-year-old is the chairman, CEO, and cofounder of social networking giant Facebook.

8. Mark Zuckerberg: Net worth — £47.7 billion ($61.92 billion). The 32-year-old is the chairman, CEO, and cofounder of social networking giant Facebook.
Founder and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerber gives his speech during the presentation of the new Samsung Galaxy S7 and Samsung Galaxy S7 edge on February 21, 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. David Ramos/Getty Images

7. John & Jacqueline Mars: Net worth — £49 billion ($63.6 billion). The brother and sister are heirs to the confectionary empire that makes Mars Bars.

7. John & Jacqueline Mars: Net worth — £49 billion ($63.6 billion). The brother and sister are heirs to the confectionary empire that makes Mars Bars.
Reuters

6. Warren Buffett: Net worth — £61.6 billion ($79.96 billion). The legendary investor is also considered the most successful investor in the world, as chairman and largest shareholder of Berkshire Hathaway. He has also promised to give 99% of his fortune away to philanthropic causes.

5. Jeff Bezos: Net worth — £61.8 billion ($80.22 billion). He is the founder, chairman, and CEO of the world's largest online shopping retailer Amazon. He is also an investor in Business Insider through his personal investment company Bezos Expeditions.

4. Amancio Ortega: Net worth — £63.5 billion ($82.42 billion). Ortega founded Inditex in 1985, which owns brands like Zara, Pull & Bear, Bershka, and Massimo Dutti. He also owns around 60% of the company.

4. Amancio Ortega: Net worth — £63.5 billion ($82.42 billion). Ortega founded Inditex  in 1985, which owns brands like Zara, Pull & Bear, Bershka, and Massimo Dutti. He also owns around 60% of the company.
Amancio Ortega attends the International Jumping of Monte Carlo in 2012.Piovanotto Marco/ABACA/PA Images

3. Bill Gates: Net worth — £70.8 billion ($91.9 billion). Gates made his fortune from cofounding the world's largest PC software company Microsoft.

2. Charles & David Koch: Net worth — £78.9 billion ($102.4 billion). Charles has been the chairman and CEO of the US' second largest private company Koch Industries since 1967. It is a family run business and his brother David is vice president.

2. Charles & David Koch: Net worth — £78.9 billion ($102.4 billion). Charles has been the chairman and CEO of the US' second largest private company Koch Industries since 1967. It is a family run business and his brother David is vice president.
Charles (left) and David KochYouTube still, Reuters

1. The Walton family: Net worth — £100.6 billion ($130.59 billion). The American family are the founders of the world's largest retailer, Walmart. The three most prominent living members are Jim, Rob and Alice.

1. The Walton family: Net worth — £100.6 billion ($130.59 billion). The American family are the founders of the world's largest retailer, Walmart. The three most prominent living members are Jim, Rob and Alice.
Walton family members (L to R) Jim, Rob and Alice Walton speak onstage at the Wal-Mart annual meeting in Fayetteville, Arkansas, June 5, 2015.Reuters
Source : This article was published businessinsider.com By Lianna Brinded
Categorized in Business Research

Internet privacy was once again thrust into the limelight recently when President Donald Trump signed a bill that would allow internet service providers to sell your browsing history to third parties like advertisers.

As much as the news rekindled concerns around internet privacy, little has actually changed. The signed bill is generally keeping things as they are. The outrage comes from the fact that the bill is rolling back an Obama-era measure to prevent ISPs from tracking and selling your browsing history, which didn't have time to take effect before he left office.

Still, some of you may be looking for ways to browse the web privately, and one of the most prominent solutions is to use a virtual private network, or VPN, which cloaks your online activity.

Here's what VPNs are, what they do, and what to look out for if you're an average person using the internet.

A VPN essentially hides your internet activity from your internet service provider, which means it has nothing to sell to third parties.

A VPN essentially hides your internet activity from your internet service provider, which means it has nothing to sell to third parties.

If the internet is an open highway, VPNs act like a tunnel that hides your internet traffic. The VPN encrypts your internet traffic into a garbled mess of numbers that can't be deciphered by your ISP or a third party. 

Most VPNs also hide identifying details about your computer from ISPs.

Most VPNs also hide identifying details about your computer from ISPs.

Any device that's connected to your ISP's network has an IP address, which looks like a series of numbers. Many Americans have multiple devices, so ISPs use IP addresses to see which device has accessed which websites and where.

Without an IP address, your devices wouldn't be able to communicate with the websites you want to look at, and you wouldn't be able to browse the internet.

VPN services hide the IP addresses on the devices you use with the VPN and replace them with IP addresses from one of their servers, which can be located anywhere in the world. So if you're in the US but are connected to a VPN server in Europe, ISPs will see the VPN's European server's IP address instead of your device's.

Can't ISPs track my browsing history through the VPN's IP address?

They could if you were the only user on that VPN server. But several users are usually using the same VPN IP address, so they can't determine whether a browsing history belongs to you, specifically. It's like searching for a needle in a stack of needles.

VPN services aren't perfect.

By using a VPN, you're still switching the trust of your privacy from your ISP to your VPN service. With that in mind, you need to make sure the VPN you use is trustworthy and doesn't store logs of your browsing history.

Certain VPN services say they don't log your browsing activity and history while you're connected to their servers. It means ISPs or a third party can't retroactively check your browsing history, even if it could decrypt the VPN's encryption "tunnel," which is unlikely in the first place.

For an extra layer of protection, choose a VPN whose servers are based outside the US. That protects against the possibility of legal entities in the US trying to access your browsing history through court orders.

They can slow down your internet speed.

The "internet" travels incredibly quickly around the world, but it's still bound by the laws of physics.

Since VPN services reroute your internet traffic through one of its servers somewhere around the globe, your internet speed could be slightly reduced.They essentially make your internet traffic take a longer route than it usually would, which means things can take longer to load.

The further away the VPN server is from your location, the longer the distance your internet traffic has to travel, which can end up in slower internet speeds. 

Most free VPN services may not be enough to protect your privacy.

Many free VPN services simply hide your IP address and don't encrypt your data, and it's the encryption part that protects your privacy more thoroughly.

You have to pay extra for privacy.

Paying extra for a premium VPN service on top of your internet bill so you can browse privately isn't very appealing. 

Should you get a VPN?

Should you get a VPN?

By getting a VPN in light of the recent events, you're preventing your ISP from tracking your activity and selling your browsing history to a third party to make more money out of your subscription. 

Some people don't want their browsing history to be seen by ISPs, nor do they want it to be sold to advertisers, even if it isn't tied to you personally. Some ISPs have said they value their customers' privacy and don't track their activity, but some of their language surrounding this subject can be vague.

Secondly, it seems fair to be recompensed for providing, albeit involuntarily, your precious browsing histories, as advertisers covet them to find out what you're interested in and show you targeted ads. If my ISP is making money out of selling my browsing history, I'd expect my monthly internet bill to be reduced, as I'm technically providing my ISP a service by browsing the web and exposing my interests. 

The likelihood of this happening, however, is uncertain and perhaps unlikely considering it's now an ISP's "right" to sell your browsing history to third parties. There's no law out there that forces ISPs to compensate their customers for providing their browsing histories, so don't expect them to anytime soon.

In a way, you can't blame the ISPs.

In a way, you can't blame the ISPs.

ISPs can see which sites you're visiting, anyway, because they can tell what internet traffic is going through which IP address. From their point of view, they might as well make money out of it. There's certainly a market for browsing histories, and after all, a business is in the business of making money.

Still, not everyone is comfortable with having their activity tracked at all — or having to opt out versus opting in — even if they have a squeaky-clean, legal web-browsing history.

 

Author: Antonio Villas-Boas
Source: businessinsider.com

Categorized in Internet Privacy

CREDIT: Shutterstock

Within each of us are two competing sides, a polarity of character. Only one leads to greatness

Do you ever wonder why some people succeed and others don't? We've all seen deserving people who never quite got things off the ground, and others who made it look easy. It doesn't always seem to make sense.

Over the past three decades of coaching top leaders and entrepreneurs all over the world, I have worked with every type of person and every type of personality you can imagine. The thing I've found consistently in people who succeed is the understanding that the same traits that made them successful have a flip side--a opposing counterpart--that can lead to their downfall through a gap in their leadership.

In my new book, The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness, I identify seven leadership archetypes that lead to success. And within each I also identify a polarity, an opposing counterpart. For every archetype that can make you great has a flip side that leads to a gap. This is especially true for high-achieving individuals. Your success hinges on knowing your own attributes and how to leverage them to play from your strengths and avoid the gaps.

Here is a summary of the seven archetypes and their gaps: understand them and learn how to use them to guide yourself to stand in your greatness.

The Rebel

The Rebel wants to make an impact on the world and embarks on quests to achieve remarkable things. The rebel is driven by confidence. But leading to the gap, the Rebel can instead feel like the Imposter, characterized by self-doubt. The Imposter appears when you find yourself constantly having to fight off negative messages in your mind


Three ways to leverage the Rebel and banish the Imposter:

  • Make a list of all things you do well and review them daily. When your competence goes up, so does your confidence.
  • Surround yourself with people who believe in you. When you spend time with people who reflect who you want to be and how you want to feel, their energy is contagious.
  • Stop comparing yourself with others. It's a waste of time and a thief of success.

The Explorer

The Explorer is driven to innovate and create new opportunities, new products, new businesses. Fueled by intuition, they test the boundaries and limits of what is known. They reject the status quo and are constantly looking for something new, listening to their inner voice to forge a new path. But leading to the gap, the Explorer can become the Exploiter, characterized by manipulation. The Exploiter appears when you feel stressed or out of control, bringing a need to micromanage and feel in control of things. It's especially damaging to anyone whose work depends on creativity.

Three ways to leverage the Explorer and banish the Exploiter:

  • Quiet the analytic mind and let the intuitive mind speak loudly. No problem can be solved with the same mind that created it.
  • Let go of control. You lose only what you cling to.
  • Allow yourself to wonder. Accept what is, let go of what was and hold to the wonder of what will be.

The Truth Teller

The Truth Teller embraces candor, even when it makes people uncomfortable. They speak with openness and honesty, driven by a sincere desire to be of service. For truth tellers, speaking up is a duty. But leading to the gap, the Truth Teller can become the Deceiver, characterized by the creation of suspicion. It's the leader who withholds information, the boss who tells half-truths, the manager who doesn't address concerns--all forms of holding back that create a culture of suspicion.

Three ways to leverage the Truth Teller and banish the Deceiver:

  • Always tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. It may hurt for a while, but deceit hurts forever.
  • Let people be part of the solution. Whatever the problem, allow others to participate in solving it.
  • Talk straight. Say what you mean and mean what you say.

The Hero

The Hero is courageous--willing to put their career at risk for a shot at greatness. Heroes act when others will not, even in the face of fear and overwhelming opposition. But leading up to the gap, the Hero can become the Bystander, characterized by fear. The Bystander is paralyzed by inaction and driven by fear. They keep you playing small and stuck where you are.

Three ways to leverage the Hero and banish the Bystander:

  • If you see something, do something. The things we fail to do become our limits.
  • If you hear something, say something. Treat fear as an obstacle that can be overcome.
  • Feel the fear but do it anyway. Everything you want is on the other side of fear.

The Inventor

The inventor is brimming with integrity, constantly searching for the best way to improve processes and products and to perfect their craft. They are experimenters who make many small bets and are willing to fail in pursuit of big wins. They seek quality and excellence, with integrity always paramount. But leading up to the gap, the Inventor can become the Destroyer, characterized by corruption. Willing to cut corners and do whatever is expedient, the Destroyer works by compromising quality.

Three ways to leverage the Inventor and banish the Destroyer:

  • Make excellence a habit. Treat everything you do as your very best work.
  • Keep your promises. Don't agree to anything you don't intend to do.
  • Make integrity part of everything you do. There's no other path to becoming a person of thorough integrity.

The Navigator

The navigator has a way of making the complicated simple and the simple understandable, masterfully steering their organization and the people within it to ever better outcomes. Their hallmark is trust--given and received. But leading up to the gap, the Navigator can become the Fixer, marked by arrogance. The Fixer tells people what to do instead of navigating the way alongside them, bossy and often aggressive.

Three ways to leverage the Navigator and banish the Fixer:

  • Fix the fixer within you. Remember that trying to fix people isn't a good way to be valued or appreciated.
  • Empower people. Show them they're smarter than they think.
  • Set boundaries and don't cross them. Teach people how to treat each other by modeling a good example of not crossing boundaries. Once you set them, keep them.

The Knight

The Knight loyalty is everything. They are always looking for opportunities to serve and protect. But leading up to the gap, the Knight can become the self-serving Mercenary, who tries to lead by self-absorption or self-obsession is a person who will not succeed.

Three ways to leverage the Knight and banish the Mercenary:

  • Learn what it means to serve others. Everyone can succeed when everyone serves.
  • If you want respect, first give respect. It's a two-way street.
  • Protect what you love and those you love. The best protection of all is loyalty.

The people who succeed--the Rebels, Explorers, Truth Tellers, Heroes, Inventors, Navigators and Knights--know how to stand in their greatness, while the others--the Imposters, Exploiters, Deceivers, Bystanders, Fixers and Mercenaries--lead from their gaps inevitably fall short of the mark.

If you are interested in learning more about the leadership gap and how it can help you understand the patterns that will help you succeed, order your copy of The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness

Source :www.inc.com

Categorized in Others

You probably don’t want to admit it but you love distractions. In fact, just like monkeys, you get a shot of dopamine every time something pulls you in another direction. Why do you think you check your email so much?

Want to be more productive and get your focus back? There are no secret tricks here… do one thing at a time. Stop multitasking its just another form of distraction.

Easier said than done, I know.

Recently I sat down with Tony Wong, a project management blackbelt whose client list includes Toyota, Honda, and Disney, to name a few. He’s an expert in keeping people on task, so I thought he’d be a good person to ask.

Here are his tips for staying productive:

  • Work backwards from goals to milestones to tasks. Writing “launch company website” at the top of your to-do list is a sure way to make sure you never get it done. Break down the work into smaller and smaller chunks until you have specific tasks that can be accomplished in a few hours or less: Sketch a wireframe, outline an introduction for the homepage video, etc. That’s how you set goals and actually succeed in crossing them off your list.
  • Stop multi-tasking. No, seriously-;stop. Switching from task to task quickly does not work. In fact, changing tasks more than 10 times in a day makes you dumber than being stoned. When you’re stoned, your IQ drops by five points. When you multitask, it drops by an average of 10 points, 15 for men, five for women (yes, men are three times as bad at multitasking than women).
  • Be militant about eliminating distractions. Lock your door, put a sign up, turn off your phone, texts, email, and instant messaging. In fact, if you know you may sneak a peek at your email, set it to offline mode, or even turn off your Internet connection. Go to a quiet area and focus on completing one task.
  • Schedule your email. Pick two or three times during the day when you’re going to use your email. Checking your email constantly throughout the day creates a ton of noise and kills your productivity.
  • Use the phone. Email isn’t meant for conversations. Don’t reply more than twice to an email. Pick up the phone instead.
  • Work on your own agenda. Don’t let something else set your day. Most people go right to their emails and start freaking out. You will end up at inbox-zero, but accomplish nothing. After you wake up, drink water so you rehydrate, eat a good breakfast to replenish your glucose, then set prioritized goals for the rest of your day.
  • Work in 60 to 90 minute intervals. Your brain uses up more glucose than any other bodily activity. Typically you will have spent most of it after 60-90 minutes. (That’s why you feel so burned out after super long meetings.) So take a break: Get up, go for a walk, have a snack, do something completely different to recharge. And yes, that means you need an extra hour for breaks, not including lunch, so if you’re required to get eight hours of work done each day, plan to be there for 9.5-10 hours.

Author: Ilya Pozin
Source: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2DLdeK/www.inc.com/ilya-pozin/7-things-highly-productive-people-do.html/?_notoolbar&_nospa=true

Categorized in Science & Tech

COULD AMERICA BE the first country to put humans on Mars? Should it be? And is it a race we can win?

As President Donald Trump takes office, that’s one of the many questions facing him and leaders in Congress about the future of our human spaceflight program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

We believe the answer is—and must be—a resounding yes.

Human space flight is difficult, and space flight to Mars and back would be even more so. But successfully sending an American to Mars must be the centerpiece of NASA’s human spaceflight program.

With great pride and confidence, our new President and Congress should commit together to NASA sending Americans to Mars by 2033—a realistic goal consistent with the demands of both rocket science and political science. This date is also consistent with celestial mechanics, physics, engineering challenges that can be met, the support of key stakeholders in the public and private sectors, and a reasonable expectation of the investments Congress can provide.

When we Americans sent our countrymen to the Moon more than 50 years ago, leaders at NASA wanted the next destination in our solar system to be Mars. A human mission to Mars was proposed by NASA as the logical follow on to Apollo, but cost considerations and the fractious politics of the Vietnam Era put an end to that dream, temporarily.

Since then, the world watched as we flew our space shuttle for decades and then retired the program.

The world saw us play a central role in building and operating the International Space Station. The world saw us foster the rise of new entrepreneurial space companies that are now routinely delivering cargo to the International Space Station and are on track to send Americans to low Earth orbit in the next few years.  

We hope the world will watch us be the first to send Americans to Mars and bring them home safely.

There are three clear reasons why Americans should explore Mars. For science, the now well-established presence of water and early habitability of Mars offers the chance to help answer a fundamental question: “Are we alone?” Finding even extinct Martian life would forever change the way we view ourselves. Second, a national push to go to Mars would require new technologies, goods, and services that would yield an enormous return on investment to our economy. With such an effort, the American space program could generate considerable economic activity and create many US-based jobs.

Third and most importantly, the European Space Agency, Russians, and Chinese continue to accelerate their human spaceflight programs. Americans must not cede the finish line. Our country should not wait until we receive the news that someone else has won the race to Mars for our leaders in Washington to ask, “How’s our space program doing? Why didn’t we get first place?” It will be too late. We must ask those questions now.

After all, history shows us that nations that fail to explore succeed in becoming stagnant.

America must explore.

And exploring Mars is achievable under reasonably expected future budget allocations for NASA. During the space race under President Kennedy and then President Johnson’s leadership, NASA claimed 4 percent of the overall federal budget. Today, NASA’s budget is 0.5 percent of the federal budget; the agency receives about $19 billion per year, of which about $8 billion is spent on human space flight. With the right approach and planning, including a potential handoff of the International Space Station to a commercial entity, these funds could be redirected for a successful human mission to Mars. Our leaders in Washington could speed up the timeline for a successful mission, and national victory, with additional investments.

The dream of sending people to Mars is alive. We need to make the program and strategy to do it a reality. The alternative is to give up, to take our players off the field, to concede the human exploration space frontier to other countries, and thereby guarantee defeat.

Could a person walk on Mars? And is that person alive today? On both questions, we have no doubt. The first person to walk on Mars is somewhere on our planet, possibly still in a classroom, pondering the heavens. They might already be a young adult unknowingly at the beginning of a great adventure.

The big question before us and our leaders in Washington is whether we will make the investments and develop the plan we need to ensure that budding explorer and soon-to-be pioneer is an American.

Author: NORM AUGUSTINE, MARK KELLY, AND SCOTT HUBBARD. NORM AUGUSTINE, MARK KELLY, AND SCOTT HUBBARD
Source: https://www.wired.com/2017/01/put-people-mars-2033-good-nation

Categorized in Science & Tech

For many, Google+ may still be seen as the punchline to jokes about failed social networks, but the Google product still has a large and loyal following — just not necessarily among the groups you might think.

And, for better or worse, Google is still invested in supporting the network and its users. The company announced Tuesday that it's officially phasing out the site's "classic" design in favor of a redesigned look that emphasizes photos and minimizes the amount of white space. 

The redesign was actually unveiled last year, but up until now the company allowed users to switch back to the old design. That will change on Jan. 24, when all users will be switched to the new look.

Additionally, Google is adding a handful of other new features meant to appeal to longtime Google+ users. The network is tweaking comments so that low-rated ones are hidden from posts by default, adding the ability to zoom in on photos and bringing back its events feature, which allows users to create and share events much as they would on Facebook and other social networks.  

That all sounds well and good (even if the features are relatively basic), but you might be wondering why anyone is still using Google+ to begin with. The truth is that for all its missteps and flaws, Google's social network has remained a popular destination for certain online communities.  

One major group is photographers, who latched onto the network early in its history as a place to share photos and swap tips. The Landscape Photography Community, more than a million members strong, remains one of the most engaged communities on Google+, according to the company. And, over on Street Photographers, 369,163 members share boatloads of photos a day. 

Those may seem obvious, but there are other oddly specific communities that are really active on Google+. Together, The Art of Bread (for bread makers and lovers), Board Games (for board game enthusiasts) and Toy Photographers (primarily close-up shots of Lego men and other tiny toys) make up some of the most engaged communities, according to Google. 

There are also, of course, groups with large followings devoted to more mainstream aspects of popular culture, like Harry Potter fandom, or Pokémon devotees and One Directioners.  

These groups, by the way, are passionate not just about the topics they engage with, but the network itself. (Don't believe me? Just take a look at some of the comments on Google Plus' own profile.) So, while the Google+ jokes will likely keep on coming, don't expect the company's updates, infrequent thought they may be, to stop. 

Author: KARISSA BELL
Source: http://mashable.com/2017/01/18/who-is-using-google-plus-anyway/?utm_cid=mash-prod-nav-sub-st#50rEkH5nfiq8

Categorized in Social

In 2014, Dave Kerpen, chief executive of Likeable Local and author of "The Art of People," received a postcard that illustrated the traits and behaviors of successful and unsuccessful people.

The card came from fellow Entrepreneurs' Organization member Andy Bailey, the chief executive of Petra Coach, a business-coaching service. Although the two CEOs have never met, Kerpen said in a 2014 LinkedIn post that the postcard has had a profound effect on him, "reinforcing values I believe in and reminding me on a daily basis of the attitudes and habits that I know I need to embrace in order to become successful.

"The postcard, at right, points out 16 big differences between successful and unsuccessful people. Below we highlight six of our favorites, plus seven others Kerpen shared with us in a recent interview.

Read on to find out what distinguishes superstars from everyone else:

1. Successful people embrace change; unsuccessful people fear it

"Embracing change is one of the hardest things a person can do," Kerpen says in his 2014 LinkedIn post.

With the world moving fast and technology accelerating at a rapid speed, it's imperative that we embrace these changes and adapt, rather than fear, deny, or hide from them, he says. Successful people are able to do just that.

2. Successful people talk about ideas; unsuccessful people talk about people

Instead of gossiping about people, which gets you nowhere, successful people discuss ideas.

"Sharing ideas with others will only make them better," Kerpen says.

3. Successful people accept responsibility for their failures; unsuccessful people blame others

Truly successful leaders and businesspeople experience ups and downs in their lives and careers, but they always accept responsibility for their failures.

He says blaming others solves nothing: "It just puts other people down and absolutely no good comes from it."

4. Successful people give others all the credit for their victories; unsuccessful people take all the credit from others

Letting people have their moments to shine motivates them to work harder and, consequently, makes you look better as a leader or teammate.

5. Successful people want others to succeed; unsuccessful people secretly hope others fail

"When you're in an organization with a group of people, in order to be successful, you all have to be successful," Kerpen says.

That's why the most successful people don't wish for their demise — they want to see their coworkers succeed and grow.

6. Successful people continuously learn; unsuccessful people fly by the seat of their pants

The only way to grow as a person, professional, and leader is to never stop learning.

"You can be a step above your competition and become more flexible because you know more," he writes. "If you just fly by the seat of your pants, you could be passing up opportunities that prevent you from learning (and growing!)."

7. Successful people ask how they can help others; unsuccessful people ask how they can help themselves

Kerpen told Business Insider that the best question you can ask when you first meet an influential person isn't "How can you help me?" but "How can I help you?"

Of course, you should be willing and able to help the person if they take you up on your offer.

But regardless of whether they accept or decline, he says simply offering your assistance makes people feel warmer toward you, and makes them more inclined to help you when you need it.

8. Successful people take a chance and ask for what they want; unsuccessful people are afraid of failure

"Rejection and failure are two of the most paralyzing fears," he says, and they often prevent people from asking for what they really want.

"If we don't ask for what we want we think on some level that we can't fail; we can't get rejected," Kerpen says. "But in reality we're almost guaranteed that we're going to fail because we're not going to get what we want.

"In "The Art of People," he gives the example of a salesperson who was failing to win any customers, simply because she wasn't asking directly for their business at the end of her pitch. Once she started being more forthright, her sales increased.

If you want to be successful, your mantra should be something like "Embrace the fear of no; then ask for the yes."

9. Successful people are always looking to better understand themselves; unsuccessful people don't care about introspection

"The first step in learning how to better influence others to get what you want in your career and in life, is to understand yourself," Kerpen writes in the book.

Specifically, he says you should understand your unconscious motivations, what shifts your mood, and how you best interact with others.

If you're looking to learn more about yourself, Kerpen recommends the Enneagram assessment, cowritten by Mario Sikora. The assessment divides people into nine categories, including those who strive to be connected and those who strive to be detached.

You can find the Enneagram in Sikora's book, "Awareness to Action," or in "The Art of People."

10. Successful people listen first and never stop listening; unsuccessful people talk too much

Kerpen says that the single most important and underrated skill in business, social media, and life in general is listening.

It's hard to do, he said, because when we get excited about our ideas, all we want to do is talk about them. But the less we talk, the easier it is to persuade other people to like those ideas — and to like us.

Kerpen writes: "Listening and letting people talk is key to winning them over in life, in business, and in all human relationships."

11. Successful people are vulnerable and transparent; unsuccessful people are protected and secretive

In the book, Kerpen writes that we learn from an early age that crying, and showing emotion in general, is a sign of weakness.

Yet he experienced firsthand the power that comes from letting yourself be vulnerable. At a management retreat for Likeable Media's executive team, Kerpen asked everyone to share the most difficult experiences they'd ever had and what they learned from them.Several people, including Kerpen himself, ended up crying, and as a result they felt "superconnected as a group.

"Kerpen writes:

As it turns out, sincerely powerful emotions — especially those powerful enough to cause tears — are quite influential in connecting with other people. If you can get yourself to experience a level of vulnerability with someone to the point where you're moved to tears, you will be able to relate to that person — and he or she can relate to you — on a much deeper level.

12. Successful people keep a positive attitude; unsuccessful people get negative too often

Kerpen writes in the book that a positive attitude is contagious, especially when it comes from a leader.

At a conference he attended more than a decade ago, one of the speakers recommended that people answer "Fantastic!" instead of something lukewarm like "fine" when someone asks, "How are you?

"Kerpen writes that the speaker "claimed that by using this word, you'll attract whoever you're talking to and make that person want to be around you, because no matter how anyone else is feeling, fantastic is probably better, and who wouldn't want to feel fantastic?"

13. Successful people are committed to gratitude and acts of kindness; unsuccessful people put themselves first

Kerpen concludes "The Art of People" by revealing the ultimate paradox, as explained by his wife: "The secret to getting everything you want at work and in life is treating people well, not trying to get everything you want.

"In other words, nice guys finish first, he says.

Here's an example of how being nice may have helped Kerpen's career. After meeting with a venture capitalist named Rich, Kerpen sent him a bonsai tree as a way of thanking him for his time.

Unfortunately, before he even received the bonsai, Rich decided not to invest in Kerpen's business. Once the bonsai arrived, however, Rich moved to introduce Kerpen to another VC who might be a better fit, and that second VC ended up investing in Kerpen's business.

Author: Jacquelyn Smith and Shana Lebowitz
Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/major-differences-between-successful-and-unsuccessful-people-2016-3/#-1

Categorized in Others

Six People Search Engines You Can Use to Find Anyone

If you need to do a little bit of sleuthing about someone, the Web can be a fantastic resource. Track down an address or a phone number, find a long-lost school friend, or simply verify information with this list of the best six people search engines on the Web. All of these search engines are hyper-focused on finding only people-related information. Note: at the time of this writing, all the information in these resources are free. Read Should I Pay To Find People Online? for more information about whether you should pay to find someone online.

1 Pipl

Pipl is a people search engine that scours the Invisible Web for information; basically, what that means is that you're going to get more than just the usual search engine results for whatever name you might be searching for. Pipl searches across social networking services, search engines, databases, etc. to find tidbits you might not usually find on a rudimentary search using a more generalized search engine. One interesting thing that sets Pipl apart; they offer special services for non-profits at a steep discount in order to create more ways for these organizations to service their clients.

2 Wink

Wink searches across what you would find using a regular search engine as well as across social communities, online profiles, etc. You can also use Wink to manage your online presence by creating a Wink profile. You can "claim" and add various places where you might be active online, and manage them all in one convenient place. If you're looking for small tidbits of information across many different sources, Wink is a good choice to continue to put the clues together about whatever you might be looking for.

3 Facebook

As one of the world's largest social networks with hundreds of millions of people on this platform on a daily basis, it makes sense to use Facebook as an incredibly useful tool to find people online. You can use Facebook to search for people you went to high school and college with, as well as work colleagues, friends from elementary school, and non-profit organizations.

Facebook is also great for finding people in specific geographic locations living in your local area that you might not know about, as well as any kind of association, club, or group. While many people keep their Facebook profiles private (meaning that information is only visible to those in their immediate circles of friends and family), many people do not, which gives anyone who wants to find it immediate access to whatever they may be putting online.

4 PeekYou

PeekYou adds an interesting twist to the world of free people search engines; it allows you to search for usernames across a variety of social networking communities. For instance: say you would like to learn more about the person who uses the handle "I-Love-Kittens"; you can use PeekYou to see what else they might be doing on the Web under that username (related: there's an astonishing amount of information you can dig up on someone using only their username. Read How to Track Someone Using Only a Username for more information).

5 LinkedIn

You can use LinkedIn to search through professional networks; you can also add your profile to network with other people with similar interests. By viewing other LinkedIn users' profiles, you can pick up quite a bit of interesting information: where they work, who they work with, their former positions, current or former supervisors, any kind of recommendations they might have received, and much more. Depending on privacy settings, you might not be able to see everything that someone on LinkedIn has provided in their profile; in addition, don't forget that if you are a registered user on LinkedIn, the fact that you looked at someone's profile will be made known to them.

6 Zabasearch

Zabasearch is a free people search engine that scours freely accessible public information and records. Everything found at Zabasearch is culled from public domain information, such as databases, court records, and phone directories.

 

Author: Wendy Boswell
Source: https://www.lifewire.com/search-engines-that-top-the-web-3482269

 

Categorized in Search Engine

We all have that one person at work or school who is effortlessly organized. They never seem to miss any deadlines, always finish their work with time to spare, and always know where they can find what they are looking for.

And let’s face it: you are obviously jealous of them. But why? Why be jealous when you can actually learn from them and be the same as them? They do seem to be on the right track with life, don’t they?

Being organized isn’t just something you adapt to. Well, okay, initially it is. But slowly as you dwell in your organized lifestyle, you tend to start taking it more as a mindset rather than a way of living. For instance, you begin living your life in an organized manner, with each and every thing in your routine well thought out. And then comes a time where your systems and your rituals are actually morphed into your routine, and your mind adapts to them as habits. If you actually happen to get to this stage; congratulations, you’ve officially become an organized person.

Without further ado, let’s get you introduced to the 20 daily habits of highly organized people. Don’t worry, it’s nothing you can’t handle!

1. They read/address emails on a daily basis

Here’s the deal: it doesn’t matter at what time of the day you check your inbox. What matters is that you have a dedicated timeslot each day, let’s say, half an hour, for reading and answering all your emails. Your cluttered up inbox won’t go anywhere unless you handle it appropriately.

2. They also read/address mail on a daily basis

If you have a pile of mail, then dedicating some of your time to sort these bad boys out on a daily basis, just like your emails, won’t hurt.

3. They clear paper piles off their desk

There should absolutely be no space at all for clutter on your desk. If there are piles of paper that need to be sorted out, get straight to it!

4. They have specific routines and rituals set for the start and end of every day

Staying organized isn’t all about being uptight. You should always spare some time out for things that make you who you are. You don’t want to be a prisoner of your routine now, do you?

5. They put everything where it belongs

Each and every thing is supposed to go in its rightful place. Don’t leave your socks in the fridge!

6. They follow a to-do list

Following a to-do list is like your primary source of organization. Never miss out on it!

7. They prioritize

What’s more important? Get to it first! Don’t forget to prioritize. Postpone whatever that can be done sometime later and get to the dirty-bits first.

8. They leave room for last minute changes in the list

You’re doing just fine with your daily routine and are almost half-way through, when it out of nowhere, your best friend calls you up for an urgent meeting. Did you leave enough room for this sudden readjustment in your to-do list? You had better!

9. They have some “me-time” every day

Again, it’s not about being a prisoner of your routine when you can always cut some time out for yourself. Read a book, watch a movie, hit the gym; whatever that floats your boat!

10. They never leave anything undone

This is the holy grail of staying organized. Don’t leave any task half done. Leaving unfinished business is the hallmark of a disorganized person.

11. They stay well-nourished throughout the day

Your routine needs you in order to complete. You need food in order to complete your routine. What can you possibly do without enough energy? It’s a simple equation.

12. They always plan the coming day in advance.

Once you’re done with your day, then would be a good time to plan for the coming day. Every day needs its own unique to-do list!

13. They set alarms and reminders

You can’t leave room for error. Have everything on your side to help you avoid them. Set alarms, reminders, and whatever else you need to deal with your tasks on time.

14. They know how to filter relevant information

The best example in this regard is your notification list. The latest cat video on the Internet is irrelevant. The email you just received from your client is top priority. Make sure you know how to differentiate between these two.

15. They are not perfectionists

Not everything can be just the way you want it. Sometimes, “good enough” really is enough to get you by. So know where the most feasible option would suffice, and forget about making things perfect.

16. They leave no room for clutter

As mentioned earlier, clutter is your worst enemy. Leave no room for it on your territory!

17. They keep all the essentials within touching distance

Pen? Paper? Smartphone? Spare underwear? Yes, you can need any of those at any point. Keep them around you so you don’t face any problems during emergencies.

18. They are always prepared to face any mishaps

Staying organized is mainly all about preparing yourself to face turmoil, whenever it shows up. Don’t be afraid of tackling mishaps head on, deal with the elephant in the room first.

19. They opt for the simplest solutions

You don’t need only the best pen in the whole world to do your paperwork. A mere pencil will be enough. Follow the same ideology regarding everything else. Pick the simplest problem-solver!

20. They practice maintenance

This doesn’t mean you need to be a top quality handyman. You don’t even need to be tech-savvy for this one. So long as you know how to keep everything up-to-date and maintained, there is no one that can disturb you in your organized glory!

Author:  Daniel Philben

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/20-daily-habits-highly-organized-people.html

Categorized in Others
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