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Internet Phishing Scam, Example 1

Here they are, revealed: the phishingcon games of the Internet. They prey on ignorance, tug your heart strings, and promise professional services while secretly taking your account numbers and passwords. Don't get suckered by these convincing phish emails and web pages! Take ten minutes and see what internet phishing and email scams really look like.

Probably the most damaging kind of email spoof is the "phishing" email. With this type of attack, a clever con artist is trying to lure you not to buy something, but to enter your account and password information, which can then be used for financial gain. Although eBay and PayPal are common targets, any company is fair game. This example above only shows one of many ways phishermen will attempt to con you into divulging your private information.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

Internet Investment Scam, example 2: Pump and Dump Investment

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to deceive you somehow. In this case, by artifically generating excitement around a stock, the con men can lure hundreds of people to purchase a particular stock. This purchasing excitement artificially inflates and "pumps up" the value of the stock, whereupon the con men will "dump" sell their own shares to reap the dishonest profits. This "pump and dump" spamming is a form of "phantom trading", which is illegal.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 1

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Job Offer Scam, example 1

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.\

Be skeptical about any email that promises high profits for minimal investment. If it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, Example 1

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Phishing Scam, example 2

Like all "phishing" emails and web pages, a clever con artist is trying to lure you into entering your account and password information. While eBay and PayPal users are the people most targeted by phishermen, anyone is fair game for them. This example above only shows one of many ways they will attempt to con you into divulging your private login information.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

Internet Phishing Scam, example 3

Like all "phishing" emails and web pages, a clever con artist is trying to lure you into entering your account and password information. While eBay and PayPal users are the people most targeted by phishermen, anyone is fair game for them. This example above only shows one of many ways they will attempt to con you into divulging your private login information.



Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 2

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Phishing Scam, example 4

Like all "phishing" emails and web pages, a clever con artist is trying to lure you into entering your account and password information. While eBay and PayPal users are the people most targeted by phishermen, anyone is fair game for them. This example above only shows one of many ways they will attempt to con you into divulging your private login information.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

The 419 Internet Scam, Example 2:

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.



Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 3

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Scam: 419, example 4

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 5

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 6

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.



Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 7

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 8

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 9

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 3

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.



Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Investment Scam, example 3: Pump and Dump Scamming

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to deceive you somehow. In this case, by artificially generating excitement around a stock, the con men can lure hundreds of people to purchase a particular stock. This purchasing excitement artificially inflates and "pumps up" the value of the stock, whereupon the con men will "dump" sell their own shares to reap the dishonest profits. This "pump and dump" spamming is a form of "phantom trading", which is illegal.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 4

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Investment Scam, example 4

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Investment Scam, example 5

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Paul Gil

Categorized in Internet Privacy

A dangerous email phishing scam is doing the rounds today. Employees at multiple organizations that use Google for email, as well as thousands of personal Gmail customers, are all reporting the same scam.

Categorized in News & Politics

Sophos researchers pulled the covers off a phishing scam hitting Amazon customers who are looking for deals on electronics that are too good to be true.

The scam is run by the supposed Amazon merchant Sc-Elegance and hooks victims by offering products at well below market prices, Sophos reported. Sc-Elegance has been caught using this tactic before on Amazon.

The con starts when the victim attempts to check out. A message appears stating the product is no longer available, but then the vendor will email the target saying the item is available and can be purchased by clicking on an imitation Amazon link included in the email. The link leads to a fake, but quite real looking, Amazon payment screen where all of the victim's Amazon login, payment and personal information is asked for.

Sophos said a few clues exist pointing out the scam. There are some misspellings and the site's domain is outside of Amazon's.

Author: Doug Olenick
Source: https://www.scmagazine.com/amazon-customers-targeted-in-phishing-scam/article/631319

Categorized in News & Politics

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