Whether you are getting stuck on the go and want to convey a message to your team members, or trying to remember something you have forgotten, your phone has become a formidable tool for success. It offers convenience, reliability and more work done in less time. Here are 10 things you will find in the phone of successful people.

Flipboard

Flipboard helps you to stay on top of the news. With Flipboard you have all the stories from around the world collated on your phone, from travel hotspots to magazines to stunning photographs to fun GIFs. Flipboard offers successful people the opportunity to stay ahead of the industry news they are interested in.

DropBox

DropBox is similar to Google Drive as it helps you to access files, send documents and share links. Many entrepreneurs and business leaders have great things to say about this app as it helps them get work done when they are on the go. DropBox is simple to use, playful and informative.

Dragon Dictation

This app improves the productivity of many successful people because it remains the best-working dictation app. While on the go, with this app you can speak into your phone and have your typing done by it. You can send a text message, write an email, or post to Twitter or Facebook with it. Although you need to be connected to the internet while you use it, it remains efficient for keeping in touch and processing your written messages.

Mint

What Mint does for successful people is to manage their finances. With Mint you can keep your eye on all of your personal finances while on the road. Mint consolidates all of your online banking, investment accounts, debts and expenses. If you are leaking money or running into tight financial situations, Mint will suggest ways for you to save.

Evernote

Evernote provides you with a workspace that allows you to store your notes, personal information, files, documents, photos, audio recordings, web pages, images and much more. Evernote also has powerful search features and is beneficial on the go when it comes to referencing information. A premium account provides you with 1,000 MB for just one month.

LinkedIn

With LinkedIn successful people can build their personal brand, make connections, and stay informed on personalized news. Added to these features are also opportunities to get advice and inspiration from industry leaders and influencers, get in the loop about the best jobs available and find people you may know.

Pocket

You don’t need to clutter your workday by reading through an entire story on Bloomberg Business or Washington Post. With Pocket you can simply save such stories and read it at your own convenience.

Casual Project Management

With Casual Project Management you become more visual and collaborative with your work team. CPM is a business tool that makes projects easier, simpler and portrays a more casual tone when connecting with other members of your team. You can keep them in the loop and get to be visually connected at the same time.

Slack

slack-logo

Slack is very beneficial for teams because it alters annoying attachments that comes from other Chat services. It offers a smooth communication for many employees. With Slack you can get everyone on board, search through conversations and never miss a thing. It helps your team to be more productive, as well as offers an easy platform in the process.

The Swizzle

Swizzle helps you put a stop on junk mails that you are tired of receiving but are too busy to unsubscribe from the mailing list. With Swizzle you can unsubscribe and gather up all the bulk mail you receive into a single digest message while you can sift through tthe ones you are interested in at a later and more convenient time. 

Source : lifehack

Categorized in Science & Tech

Have you received a telephone call from someone claiming to be an IRSemployee? This is a scam that has hit taxpayers in all 50 states. The callers tell the intended victims that they owe taxes and must pay immediately using a prepaid debit card or wire transfer. The victims are threatened with criminal charges, arrest, deportation, or loss of a driver’s license. Some of the callers can be quite aggressive and frightening.

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration has received reports of approximately 736,000 contacts by scammers since October 2013. The Inspector General’s office also estimates that approximately 4,550 victims have collectively paid more than $23 million to the scammers.

What can you do to protect yourself? First of all, know that the IRS generally first contacts taxpayers by mail, not by phone. They will never ask for payment by prepaid debit card or wire transfer, and will never ask for a credit card number over the phone. If you receive one of these phone calls, just hang up (even if the caller ID appears as if it is the IRS calling – another part of the scam). As always, never, ever give out personal information to someone who has called you.

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become-an-internet-research-specialistOther things to do if you receive a scam call: 

  1. If you do owe Federal taxes, or think you might, hang up and call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS employees will be able to assist you.

  2. If you do not owe taxes, fill out the “IRS Impersonation scam” form on the Treasury Inspector General’s website, or call 800-366-4484.

  3. You can also file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. Add “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments in your complaint.

Fortunately, progress is being made to stop scamming operations. On October 6, 2016, it was reported that 200 police officers raided nine locations in Mumbai, India that were call centers for these IRS scam calls to the U.S. Seventy people have been arrested and another 630 are being investigated. Prosecution should not be difficult since the calls were recorded, and the police recovered 851 hard disks with the recordings.

Scammers are also using e-mail to find victims. On September 29, IRS issued a warning that scammers are sending a fraudulent version of IRS Form CP2000, which is sent to a taxpayer when income reported by a third-party (such as the taxpayer’s employer) does not match the income reported on the taxpayer’s return. The notice includes a payment request that the recipient mail a check made out to “I.R.S.” to the “Austin Processing Center” at a post office box address. There is also a “payment” link within the e-mail.

The CP2000 form is mailed to taxpayers through the U.S. Postal Service. The IRS does not request personal or financial information by e-mail, text, or social media. Do not open any attachments or click on any links in these e-mails. Instead, forward the e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Most people are nervous about a contact from the IRS, but you can protect yourself against scammers that are playing on this fear – just hang up or hit “Delete”!

Scammers often target older, retired people who are less familiar with fraudulent behaviors on the Internet or via phone calls. If you have an elderly relative or friend, you should reach out to make sure they are aware of this IRS scam. Also, if you are worried that a relative is susceptible to monetary scams due to failing health, early Alzheimer’s disease or other cognitive disabilities, you might want to get a Power of Attorney so you can proactively protect their assets.

Source : natlawreview

Categorized in Others

Remember that scene in War Games when the socially broken code monkeys were explaining to aspiring hacker Matthew Broderick all about "back doors" (i.e. secret pathways planted by programmers)? Well, that's actually a thing.

Coders have a storied tradition of baking in secret passageways (or sometimes, just fun little Easter eggs) that can only be accessed by inputting a special "key." And so that tradition continues in the mobile age.

Unstructured Supplementary Service Data (USSD)—sometimes known as "quick codes" or "feature codes"—is an extra-UI protocol, which allows people to access hidden features. This protocol was originally created for GSM phones, but can be found on CDMA devices as well (if that's a bunch of acronym gibberish to you,here's a quick primer).

These publicly available backchannels allow users to directly communicate with their service provider's computers and/or access back-end features in their device. They are accessed by inputting them into the phone's dialer (the screen you use to start a phone call) and usually begin and end with the * or # keys with a sequence of numbers in between (there's close-to-zero chance that anyone would accidentally access them).

They're not terribly practical. Most people don't really need to know how their local cell towers are performing or what their IMEI number is (more on that later). Still, it can be fun to play around and see what unexpected functionality your phone is hiding beneath the surface.

We would LOVE to provide you with a comprehensive list of the dozens of codes out there, but that would be an exercise in futility. These codes seldom work across different carriers, OSes, or phone models (or even on generations of the same model).

If you really want to try them out, your best bet may be to Google your phone's make and carrier + "USSD" for a tailored, comprehensive list. I attempted a number of codes using an iPhone SE $399.99 at Verizon Wireless (while trading out numerous carrier SIM cards) in addition to a Galaxy S5 and Galasy S7 Edgerunning on AT&T. Some of them worked! Click through our slideshow for 13 codes that I can confirm worked on at least one device. Good luck and have fun!

1-Field Mode: *3001#12345#*

Type *3001#12345#* into your phone's dialer and then press the green call button to access "Field Mode," which can give you access to info about local networks and cell towers.

You'll probably never ever have to know about your local cell tower's "Measured RSSi," but it's fun to look around for a bit.

2-General Test Mode: *#0*#
I could only get this to work on Android. But this prompts a library of different phone operations, which could be operated with a single push (e.g. Sleep, Front Cam, Vibration).

3-Display your IMEI: *#06#
Here's a code which I found out does not work with Verizon on an iPhone, but I could make it work after switching to a T-Mobile SIM. It also worked on my Android AT&T device as well. To access it, type in the above code, and then the green call button to prompt your IMEI number (or your International Mobile Station Equipment Identity number, but you already knew that).

The IMEI is unique to your device. Among other things, the number can help "blacklist" stolen devices or help with customer support.

4-Check Your Call Forwarding: *#67#
This code allows you to check which number your phone is currently forwarding calls to when you're busy or reject a call.

By default, this is probably your carrier's voicemail service, but you can change it to forward to a different number (a home number, office number, or third-party answering service for example). On an iPhone, you can change this number by going to Settings > Phone > Call Forwarding. On Android (varies from system to system), tap the Phone app > hamburger icon > Settings > Call > More Settings > Call forwarding

become-an-internet-research-specialist

5-Get Even More Info on Call Forwarding: *#61#
On my Galaxy phone, this code prompted a pop-up that let me know how long until a call is forwarded to the message center. On the iPhone, regardless of carrier, this code just showed me the same info as *#67# .

6-Check Your Available Minutes: *646#
Apparently this one only works on postpaid plans. I was not able to get it to work on my test iPhone (regardless of carrier; I tried three), but I did get it to work on my Galaxy phone (which happens to have an unlimited texting plan from AT&T). Instead of showing the info on a new screen, it sent my phone a text message.

 

7-Check Your Bill Balance: *225#
Once again, I couldn't get this one to work on the iPhone, but on Android I did get it to prompt a SMS message with my current balance due.

8-Hide Your Phone From Caller ID: #31#
I could only get this to work on Android. But entering this code prompted a pop-up stating that my Caller ID had been disabled. In order to re-instate Caller ID, enter *31# .

9-Check Your Billing Cycle: *3282#
Once again, I could only get this to work on Android. It prompted an SMS message with my billing info.

10-SMS Message Center: *5005*7672#
This code will tell you your SMS message center number. I have no idea why you'd need that info, but there ya go.

11-Activate Call Waiting: *43#
This code will activate call waiting; you can deactivate it by entering #43#.

12-Quick Test Menu (Samsung Galaxy Only) *#7353#
As far as I can tell, this code only works on Samsung Galaxy models (I tested it on my Galaxy S7 Edge). This is similar to the General Test mode mentioned earlier, in that it brings up a menu with a number of one-tap test prompts.

The first test is "Melody," which prompts a jaunty little K-Pop diddy. I don't know who the artist is (it's un-Shazammable!), but a search of the lyrics pointed me to this YouTube clip, with a title that translates to "Samsung Anycall Galaxy basic level - Hey Now (Good bye)." If you have any details on this mobile mystery, drop it in the comments.

 

13-Firmware (Samsung Galaxy Only) *#1234#
Once again, as far as I can tell, this only works on Galaxy devices. But it will let you know your phone's current firmware. So, have fun with that.

Secrets of the ComputerFor it was predicted in 1983...

Source : pcmag

Categorized in Science & Tech

 

In a move that basically confirms the name change for the upcoming Google Pixel phones, the search engine giant has reportedly renamed the Google Nexus Launcher to a new Google Pixel Launcher.

The Nexus Launcher has been here for some time, but it only featured as a beta version. APK files of the launcher have even been availed to different people who have gone ahead to taste the waters. Now, a renowned HTC leaker who goes by the Twitter handle @LlabTooFeR has come in with fresh images of what he calls the Pixel Launcher. Surprisingly, the pictures show basically no difference between the two launchers, only that the leaker says it has a new name.

pixel launcher



Given that there is really not much to gather about the Pixel Launcher other than the less-detailed images, it is not possible to confirm this rumor. Still, it appears that the new launcher is comfortable with handling landscape views, users can still search for apps directly from the app drawer and the sliding arrow that featured in the bottom third of the Nexus Launcher can still be accessible in the new Pixel Launcher, with the same functionality of allowing access to the app drawer. You will also notice the small Google toggle at the top that allows you to access Google Now instantly.

Speculations about Google’s shift from Nexus branding to Pixel branding for the upcoming smartphones started showing up about a week ago. But before that, it had also been rumored that the phones will be dropping the “Nexus” logo in favor of a “G” logo. However, this change of names from the Nexus Launcher to Pixel Launcher could just be what we needed to confirm that indeed the next phones from the search engine giant will be known as Google Pixel and Pixel XL.

Google Nexus


The new Pixel Launcher comes with version number 7.1-3231428, another indicator that the Google Pixel phones could also come preinstalled with a new Android 7.1 Nougat, just as rumors have been pointing out. More leaks have also suggested that Google will go for the latest and fastest Snapdragon 821 SoC, making the phones the first in the U.S. to come out with the chipset. However, ASUS has recently unveiled its ZenFone 3 Deluxe variant that is powered by this same chipset.

Source:http://www.nashvillechatterclass.com/google-nexus-launcher-renamed-pixel-launcher-ahead-pixel-phones-launch/13991/

 

Categorized in Science & Tech

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is cautioning air passengers that they should not turn on or charge their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones while on board and they should not stow them in checked baggage, following reports that a few dozen of the phones' batteries have exploded or caught fire.

The extraordinary caution was published Thursday on the FAA's website. 

"In light of recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices, the Federal Aviation Administration strongly advises passengers not to turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft and not to stow them in any checked baggage," the statement said.

Samsung's parent company announced last week it would exchange phones in 10 countries, including Canada, after disclosing 35 cases of Note 7s that had burst into flames or exploded because of defective batteries from one supplier.

Samsung Electronics Canada says there have been no confirmed incidents in this country, but it's offering a voluntary exchange program for its Canadian customers.

Owners of the phone in Canada can exchange a recalled device for a new one of the same model.

The company says customers can also exchange a recalled device for a Galaxy S7 or Galaxy S7 Edge through the carrier or the retailer that sold the device.

Samsung says Note 7 owners can initiate the exchange by visiting CanadaNote7exchange.expertinquiry.com.

A toll-free phone number is also available: 1-800-517-3507.

Source : http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/faa-samsung-galaxy-note-7-1.3754208

Categorized in Science & Tech

It’s no secret that battery life on smartphones these days are not the best. Most will consider it mostly a hardware issue, seeing companies trading battery size for aesthetic design. But that’s not the entire reason, with a large part being attributed to the software used on our phones.

In the XDA Virtual Office, many of us writers will often find the biggest culprit behind our battery woes are attributed to certain processes running rampant. Namely, Google services.

googleapp

There are currently many ways to provide longer battery life cycles, methods such as: battery banks, battery cases, processor clocking, etc. A usual solution is to disable apps not being used, or apps that are taking up a lot of system utilities. What I wanted to do was disable all of Google’s apps and services on my device, to see if it might give my battery a shot at living longer. Instead of just using a debloater tool, or the stock settings disabler, I chose to go the extra mile, and install Android without any Google Apps, or any Google services.

19jqmv

Since my daily driver doesn’t have an unlockable bootloader (thanks Verizon), I decided to look into the old phones drawer, and chose one of my favorite devices to use. The Motorola Moto X 2014 was the device I had selected for this experiment. For a period of four days, I used the Moto X with CyanogenMod 13 installed, sans any Gapps packages. For comparison, I factory reset the device after the four days was up, installed the same CM 13 zip, and this time installed the Stock Gapps package from the Open Gapps repository.


While using each ROM as a daily driver for four days, I depended on them for many of my usual services. Being that I depend on Google Services on a daily basis, going about this experiment proved rather difficult. Below is a list of the Google Apps I used the most, as well as a list of all the alternatives I used.

appss

 

There are many alternative app stores and repositories on the internet, from the Amazon App Store, F-Droid, XDA Labs, APK Mirror, and plenty of others. To get my apps for this test, I stuck with two store/repositories that I was familiar with using, XDA Labs and APK Mirror.

Going without Google Services on a Google-based platform is no small feat. There was a noticeable lack of functionality across the operating system from day to day. While some services have a browser interface, a couple will only try and direct you to the Play Store… Or the browser site of the Play Store. With Hangouts being one of those without a mobile interface, I was left unable to communicate with a few colleagues and friends.

Speaking of communication errors, Hangouts wasn’t the only service I had trouble with. I may not be a fan of the app, but Snapchat was a complete no go without Gapps. The app requires Play Services to log in, and unfortunately I was left unable to communicate with my friends on two separate services.

Fortunately, my second communication service for my business colleagues was partially functioning. I was able to send and receive messages on Slack, but notifications would not work, as they relied on Google Cloud Messaging. Quite a few other apps had the same issue, meaning I only ever received notifications for calls, texts, and emails.

Trying to substitute google with Cortana was… just not something I subjectively enjoyed. Microsoft’s searching service is welcome competition and is continuing to get better, but it is not enough to compete with the original search engine. The only useful functionality I found with the Cortana app over the mobile page from Google was the option to have a voice search shortcut on my homescreen, which comes in handy more often.

 

Having to rely on the browser for services I couldn’t access otherwise was a bit frustrating. Being used to having YouTube Red, leaving the YouTube site would stop the audio. This was causing me to become irritated more and more often. As a big music fan, I like to listen to and discover all types of music on my phone. While CM’s baked in music app works, the lack of a streaming service caused me to have to resort to alternative, older methods of discovering music.

Using the phone for about a week both with and without Gapps concluded with interesting results. As you can see from the screen captures below, the average screen on time and total battery time on the No Gapps runs was no longer than that of the Gapps runs. However, do notice the steeper slopes in the (slightly shorter) asleep times.

Screenshot 5

These results are not what I expected going into the experiment. Looking at the battery graphs, you can tell that the runs with Gapps yielded more device wake ups, as expected. This is evident by the Gapps runs not only having more active indication on the bars below the graph. The Gapps graphs all have a much more gradual slope associated with them, whereas the No Gapps graphs seemed to level off a lot more often. But screen-on drain was about the same, with the main difference seen in idle drain as expected.

In terms of performance, there was a negligible difference. Apps certainly crashed more often on the Gapps run, with the main culprit being Hangouts (as usual). Running benchmarks on each run seemed redundant, given I was using the same exact processor and CPU and these processes amount to a negligible hit on the processor.

 

All in all, this experiment was fun. Despite the lack of functionality, it was interesting to challenge myself to work around such large limitations. So that brings us to our main inquiry, is it worth it to live sans Google Apps and Services to save a little on battery? To me, the short answer is no. While the battery life was consistent, it was not particularly longer in any way. It might be useful to live Sans Gapps if you are looking to limit yourself from using your phone on a vacation or something, but not much else. If I had to sum up the lack of functionality, I would say the experience is reminiscent of the feature phone days before the smartphone boom.

Source : http://www.xda-developers.com/comparing-battery-life-with-and-without-google-services-a-week-of-minimal-idle-drain/

Categorized in Science & Tech

The FCC’s privacy regulations will be ineffective.

Letter to the editor:

Consumers are growing increasingly concerned about online tracking and privacy protection. In response, the Federal Communications Commission has proposed sweeping new privacy rules specifically on Internet service providers. But, as USA TODAY’s story “They really are watching you: Web tracking surges with online ads” makes clear, it is the huge advertising networks of social and search companies that are really tracking us everywhere we go.

Strangely, the FCC has refused to get involved in privacy matters of Pokémon Go or any other phone application, search engine, social network or streaming video provider. The new privacy proposal is a half measure that only regulates the Internet provider but not the content we visit every day. That’s where the big bucks are made from harvested personal information — location, email, browsing and buying habits and more.

The FCC’s privacy regulations will be ineffective and, by promising protections that aren’t really there, dangerous.

Drew Johnson, Protect Internet Freedom; Las Vegas

 

We asked our followers if they would stop using their favorite websites or phone apps if they were collecting personal information. Tweets edited for clarity and grammar:

Let them have it! The more they know about me, the less crappy ads I’ll see.

— @_ONeill_

They’re welcome to collect whatever info they want. However, I deserve the right to block and collect theirs as well.

— @johnx1doe

Depends on the info. I expect most websites are collecting, and I would push for more stringent privacy and data sharing legislation.

— @JJGolding0

Stop using these sites.

— @NRG_64

Source : http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2016/08/23/phone-giving-away-information-tellusatoday/89220888/

Categorized in Science & Tech
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