Website Search
Research Papers
plg_search_attachments
Articles
FAQs
Easy Profile - Search plugin
Courses & Exams
Pages
Specialized Search Engines
Events Calender
Upcoming Events

Source: This article was Published in help123.sg - Contributed by Member: Dorothy Allen

The internet is full of websites that are fake or fraudulent, and we understand that it can be challenging to determine if a website is credible. Here are some tips you can use to find out if a website is legitimate:

1) Ensure that the contact information is valid

Credible websites provide updated and accurate contact information. Legitimate companies will always list ways you can get in touch with them. Always validate the contact information provided if you are unsure of its credibility.

2) Look out for spelling or grammatical mistakes

Spelling mistakes and grammatical inconsistencies in a website is an indication that the site may not be credible. Legitimate companies or website owners take effort to present information in a clear and error-free manner.

3) Double-check the web address to make sure it is the original

The website address bar contains vital information about where you are on the internet and how secure the page is. Paying attention to these details can minimize the risk of falling into a phishing scam or any other form of scams which hackers or cybercriminals have created to dupe web users.

Many fraudulent websites use domain names that reference well-known brands to trick unknowing users into providing sensitive personal information. It is good to always practice caution when visiting websites to make sure it is the official website you are visiting.

4) Ensure that the website is secure

Another piece of vital information that can be picked up from the website address bar is the website's connection security indicator. A secure website is indicated by the use of "HTTPS" instead of "HTTP", which means that the website's connection is secure and any information exchanged between you and the website is encrypted and safe.

5) Is the offer too good to be true?

Fraudulent and scam websites use low prices or deals that are too good to be true to lure internet users or shoppers to purchase fake, counterfeit, or even non-existent products. If you encounter a website which offers prices that sounds too good to be true, be suspicious about it. Always ensure that the website is legitimate before making any purchase!

Published in Internet Privacy

Internet Phishing Scam, Example 1

Here they are, revealed: the phishingcon games of the Internet. They prey on ignorance, tug your heart strings, and promise professional services while secretly taking your account numbers and passwords. Don't get suckered by these convincing phish emails and web pages! Take ten minutes and see what internet phishing and email scams really look like.

Probably the most damaging kind of email spoof is the "phishing" email. With this type of attack, a clever con artist is trying to lure you not to buy something, but to enter your account and password information, which can then be used for financial gain. Although eBay and PayPal are common targets, any company is fair game. This example above only shows one of many ways phishermen will attempt to con you into divulging your private information.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

Internet Investment Scam, example 2: Pump and Dump Investment

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to deceive you somehow. In this case, by artifically generating excitement around a stock, the con men can lure hundreds of people to purchase a particular stock. This purchasing excitement artificially inflates and "pumps up" the value of the stock, whereupon the con men will "dump" sell their own shares to reap the dishonest profits. This "pump and dump" spamming is a form of "phantom trading", which is illegal.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 1

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Job Offer Scam, example 1

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.\

Be skeptical about any email that promises high profits for minimal investment. If it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, Example 1

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Phishing Scam, example 2

Like all "phishing" emails and web pages, a clever con artist is trying to lure you into entering your account and password information. While eBay and PayPal users are the people most targeted by phishermen, anyone is fair game for them. This example above only shows one of many ways they will attempt to con you into divulging your private login information.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

Internet Phishing Scam, example 3

Like all "phishing" emails and web pages, a clever con artist is trying to lure you into entering your account and password information. While eBay and PayPal users are the people most targeted by phishermen, anyone is fair game for them. This example above only shows one of many ways they will attempt to con you into divulging your private login information.



Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 2

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Phishing Scam, example 4

Like all "phishing" emails and web pages, a clever con artist is trying to lure you into entering your account and password information. While eBay and PayPal users are the people most targeted by phishermen, anyone is fair game for them. This example above only shows one of many ways they will attempt to con you into divulging your private login information.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to login through a link in the email. No legitimate online financial service will ever ask you to login this way.

The 419 Internet Scam, Example 2:

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.



Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 3

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Scam: 419, example 4

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 5

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 6

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.



Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 7

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 8

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet 419 Scam, example 9

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that asks you to move money, especially large sums. A legitimate financier would use legitimate means to move that kind of money. Even if they were only semi-legitimate: why would they find random people through random email to move millions of dollars? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 3

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.



Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Investment Scam, example 3: Pump and Dump Scamming

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to deceive you somehow. In this case, by artificially generating excitement around a stock, the con men can lure hundreds of people to purchase a particular stock. This purchasing excitement artificially inflates and "pumps up" the value of the stock, whereupon the con men will "dump" sell their own shares to reap the dishonest profits. This "pump and dump" spamming is a form of "phantom trading", which is illegal.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Lottery Scam, example 4

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any email that claims you have won a prize. A legitimate lottery would not contact you via email; they would be calling you via telephone. And keep in mind: if you never entered the contest, how did you win? As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Investment Scam, example 4

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Internet Investment Scam, example 5

Like all con games, be they online or in person, the con man is trying to get you to entrust him with your cash or access to your cash.

Be skeptical about any random unsolicited email that promises stock tips. If these were legitimate investment planners with legitimate stock advice, they would be dealing with their own existing clients, not recruiting via random email. As with any smart skepticism: if it's too good to be true, it probably is a scam.

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Paul Gil

Published in Internet Privacy

Cybercrime is everywhere, and the least you can do is read up about it. You might think Internet and email scams only affect those who are not tech savvy or do not keep up with the daily news, but that is not true. From IT professionals to teachers, to journalists, people from all fragments of society and professional fronts have fallen for these immaculately planned online fraudsBusiness Compromise ScamsPharming, etc, which might confuse anybody. And the notion of risk-taking obviously does not work in this context. With the advent of social network and the wide usage of emailing, these scams acquired quite a foothold.

Common Online, Internet & Email scams

Here are the 10 Internet and email scams you should look out for:

Nigerian Scam

Possibly the most talked about scams, these operate mostly through the mail and messaging services. People usually receive mails from a fake Nigerian individual, who claims to be from a very wealthy family and is looking for somebody to donate her money. Usually, these scams are fronts for black money or identity theft. The user is promised a huge amount of money if he or she would share his details, and a surprising number of people fall for it. They will also ask the unwitting user to sign a number of legal forms, which are actually pretty effective in taking money out of your account.

International Lottery Scam

The lottery scam is perhaps the oldest and most obvious scams in the history of Internet fraud, and yet people are duped by it. Basically, a mail reaches your server from an unknown lottery company, and it looks official and almost real. But there are obviously some red flags which expert can point out. Usually, when this happens, the mail will not address you by your name or your personal details. They promise to transfer millions of dollars into your personal account, if you give them your bank details, and then, of course, they drain the money out of your account. Millions of people around the world have lost a massive amount of their earnings through this scam. Sometimes, the emails take the name of a famous lottery company, which might be a global name, and with high-end techniques, conmen have better means of faking their credentials, so you should always be on the lookout.

Travel scams

This kind of fraud is pretty relevant even today, as people who are on these websites or get the fraudulent emails are not at all expecting to get swindled. People see huge discounts or really low rates on some travel packages and fall for it. They will also ask for your private details, and you will need to pay some money. Usually, these are quick scams and won’t drain your account, but you will never see the money you spent or get any tickets. Whenever you receive such a mail or spot something suspicious on a website, it is best to double-check.

Credit Card Scams

These frauds are also hugely common.Usually, you will get a mail from your an operator who claims to be your bank. They will tell you your credit/debit card has been canceled, or you are facing some breach in your account and thus, need to act fast. Most people, in a state of panic, give out their credit card details, One Time Passwords, and even their pin numbers. It is very important to remember that your bank would never ask you for this kind of sensitive information over mail or phone, and be careful.

Job Scams

These kinds of frauds prey upon those who are vulnerable. Most people are looking for jobs update their personal details, like mail ids and names on employment search portals. Anybody can access those details and contact the user. You will get a mail, asking for your resume, educational details, and other credentials. They will promise you an interview and possibly ask for a token amount of money, which would be reverted back to you upon hiring or at a later time. These scams are usually fronts for identity thefts and money swindling.

Digital payment scams

These are the easiest and the most dangerous frauds there is, and everybody should take note since people are so tech-reliant right now. Millions of people use digital wallets or online payment portals like PayPal or Venmo. Users often get an alert on their mail about how their account has been hacked, or an amount of money has been taken out of their account. Usually, people panic, and it never occurs to them that they are being duped by a third party.

Online ad scams

These are similar to the employment scam routine, just a little more creative. When you post an item for sale on a portal or post an ad to buy a specific item, in websites like eBay or Craigslist, or any other platform, fraudulent people can access those details and get back to you. They’ll tell you they have what you are looking for, and might even share pictures with you, but these offers usually come with a payment-first policy, and after you pay them,  you don’t hear back from them.

Investment scams

These frauds are like a short-term Ponzi scheme. You might get alerts or emails offering you ‘double your money on a month’ plans or any other such scams. Some fake portals even have provisions for your verification, where they ask you for a token amount of money, and hence dupe you.

Disaster relief or rescue scams

Whenever you get a mail asking you to donate money to a charity or a rescue operation, never respond to them. Most people obviously fall for these as they want to support a cause, but as there is no way to verify these scams, and people usually donate a substantial amount of money to disaster relief, this is a very dangerous fraud.

Ask for help scams

These frauds are more personal in nature, and you might get a mail with very specific details about a certain person, stuck in a situation in a random country, from where he/she cannot get back home and will ask for your money. People often get blindsided by the personal nature of these emails, but it is very important to remember that these are usually chain emails, and ask people to send over financial help.

Online scams are a huge risk as you can encounter them anywhere, and the smartest of people get affected by it, as they never see it coming. Whenever you encounter anything on a new portal or website, it is always best to verify their credentials before you send in your money or personal details.

Be aware, Stay safe!

 Source: This article was published thewindowsclub.com

Published in Internet Privacy
There's nothing quite like the feeling of pure, ice-cold hydration. Some of us get our water for free from the tap. The rest pay for it — at the cost of roughly $100 billion a year.
 
At that steep a price tag, you might assume buying the bottled stuff would be worth it. In most cases, you'd be wrong.
 
For the vast majority of Americans, a glass from the tap and a glass from the bottle are virtually identical as far as their health and nutritional quality are concerned. In some cases, publicly-sourced tap may actually be safer since it is usually tested more frequently.
 
There are exceptions, however — people living near private wells do not enjoy the same rigorous testing as those whose water comes from public sources, and some public sources are not properly screened, as was recently seen in Flint, Michigan.
 
But there are plenty of reasons to stop shelling out for bottled water. Read on to find out all the things you didn't know about your drinking water.

The first documented case of bottled water being sold was in Boston in the 1760s, when a company called Jackson's Spa bottled and sold mineral water for "therapeutic" uses. Companies in Saratoga Springs and Albany also appear to have packaged and sold water.

Sources: GreatLakesLaw.orgFineWaters.com

Across the globe, people drink roughly 10% more bottled water every year, but Americans continue to consume more packaged H2O than people in other countries do.

Source: Container Recycling Institute

At 12.8 billion gallons, or 39 gallons per person, Americans today drink more bottled water than milk or beer.

Source: Beverage Marketing Corporation 

Last year was the first time Americans drank more bottled water than soda. "Bottled water effectively reshaped the beverage marketplace," Michael C. Bellas, Beverage Marketing's chairman and CEO, said in a recent statement.

Source: Beverage Maketing Corporation

It's not cheap. At an average cost of $1.22 per gallon, we're spending 300 times more on bottled water than we'd spend to drink from the tap. But that number could be even higher, some analysts have pointed out, since most sales are for single bottles.

Source: Business Insider

Soda companies are aware of how lucrative bottled water can be — corporations from Coca-Cola to PepsiCo have been investing in bottled water. Pepsi recently bought a 30-second Super Bowl ad to debut its new premium bottled water brand "LIFEWTR."

But research suggests that for most Americans, the stuff in a bottle is not better for you than the stuff in your tap. In fact, a recent report found that almost half of all bottled water is actually derived from the tap. In 2007, Pepsi (Aquafina) and Nestle (Pure Life) had to change their labels to more accurately reflect this.

Sources: Food and Water WatchCNN

Tap water is also typically tested for quality and contamination more frequently than bottled water. The Environmental Protection Agency is responsible for conducting those tests.

Tap water is also typically tested for quality and contamination more frequently than bottled water. The Environmental Protection Agency is responsible for conducting those tests.
Unsplash/Averie Woodard
Source: Natural Resources Defense Council

However, if you live in one of the 15 million (mostly rural) US households that gets drinking water from a private well, the EPA isn't keeping an eye on your water quality. "It is the responsibility of the homeowner to maintain the safety of their water," the agency states on its website.

However, if you live in one of the 15 million (mostly rural) US households that gets drinking water from a private well, the EPA isn't keeping an eye on your water quality. "It is the responsibility of the homeowner to maintain the safety of their water," the agency states on its website.
Drinking water, including that from wells, can become contaminated.Aungkul Intaraprasong/Shutterstock
Source: EPAScientific American

Research suggests that the water from many of these wells is not safe to drink. In a 2011 report, 13% of the private wells that geologists tested were found to contain at least one element (like arsenic or uranium) at a concentration that exceeded national guidelines.

Research suggests that the water from many of these wells is not safe to drink. In a 2011 report, 13% of the private wells that geologists tested were found to contain at least one element (like arsenic or uranium) at a concentration that exceeded national guidelines.
Dora Martinez cooks food at her home in a trailer park near Fresno, Calif. in 2015. She and her neighbors get notices warning that their well water contains uranium at a level considered unsafe by federal and state standards.AP Images
Sources: Scientific AmericanUS Geological Survey

The recent resurgence in bottled water's popularity may be due to rising concerns about the purity of tap water. A recent Gallup poll found that 63% of Americans worried a "great deal" about the pollution in drinking water — the highest percentage since 2001.

And when it comes to taste, most of us probably can't tell the difference. A recent blind taste test survey by students at Boston University found that only a third taste-testers identified the tap water sample correctly.

Source: Boston University

Making bottled water is also an extensive, resource-heavy process. A study in the journal Environmental Research Letters found that roughly 32-54 million barrels of oil went into producing the amount of bottled water consumed in the US in 2007.

Making bottled water is also an extensive, resource-heavy process. A study in the journal Environmental Research Letters found that roughly 32-54 million barrels of oil went into producing the amount of bottled water consumed in the US in 2007.
Source: Live Science

It also takes more water to make a bottle of water than it does to fill it. A recent study from the International Bottled Water Association found that North American companies companies use 1.39 liters of water to make one liter of the bottled stuff.

It also takes more water to make a bottle of water than it does to fill it. A recent study from the International Bottled Water Association found that North American companies companies use 1.39 liters of water to make one liter of the bottled stuff.
Pete Norton/Getty Images
Source: International Bottled Water Association

But hey, you might be thinking: At least they get recycled, right? For every six water bottles Americans use, only one makes it to the recycle bin, according to National Geographic.

This article was published in businessinsider.com by Erin Brodwin
Published in Others

A dangerous email phishing scam is doing the rounds today. Employees at multiple organizations that use Google for email, as well as thousands of personal Gmail customers, are all reporting the same scam.

Published in News & Politics

The promise of free money should raise red flags, but what if it comes from a supposed friend?

It starts with a Facebook message.

“You’re contacted by your friend who says, ‘Hey, did you get your $250,000?’ You’re going, ‘What do you mean $250,000?'” said Greg Dunn, CEO, Better Business Bureau Hawaii.

Dunn says the scammer hijacks an account and uses its friend list to send messages, hoping people will respond.

“The next step is they send you a link to a Facebook page and that Facebook page is for a fake organization that is the World Tax and Health Organization of the world federal government, which is all completely farcical,” Dunn explained.

That’s where you’re told to enter your personal information, such as your occupation, date of birth, annual income, and mother’s middle name. Then you’re told you need to pay a $550 fee for the processing of the $250,000 check.

“You may receive then a fake document, a money order, a check for $275,000. You’re thinking, ‘Wow, this is great. I got extra money.’ So you go down to the bank and it’s a money order or a cashier’s check you deposit it at the bank,” Dunn said.

Then you’re told too much money was sent by mistake and you need to send back $25,000. It’s only when the check bounces you realize it was a scam.

Dunn says the scam has been targeting members of non-profit organizations and community groups, and at least one person here in Hawaii reported falling for the scam.

The BBB says be careful when responding to email or social media messages asking for money or personal information, even if it looks like it’s from a friend.

If you’re not sure, call the person on the phone to verify the authenticity of the message, and if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Source : khon2.com

Published in Social

Impostor scams resulted in more than 400,000 complaints to the FTC last year. Find out what they are and how to protect yourself from them.

Falling victim to a scam can be embarrassing, frightening, and financially devastating. Unfortunately, sophisticated scam artists know whom to target and how to use psychological tricks to get countless smart, hardworking people to part with their cash.How many people fall victim to scams? Far more than most people realize. Just one specific type of trick -- called an impostor scam -- led to 406,578 complaints to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission in 2016 alone. Impostor scams prompted the second-highest total number of consumer complaints to the FTC, with only debt collectors causing consumers more trouble. This was the first time more people alerted the FTC to impostor scams than to identity theft.Because impostor scams are cleverly designed to play on your fears, it's hard to avoid falling for them. If scams were easy to avoid, consumers wouldn't have suffered $744 million in losses from fraud in 2016.The seven tips below can help you keep yourself safe and avoid losses.

1. Know the common tricks

Impostor scams begin when a scammer calls, sends an email, or sends a letter. The scam artist pretends to be someone they aren't so they can convince you to send them cash or give them your personal information.Scammers usually pretend to be someone in a position of authority or a family member in dire trouble. Common tactics are used again and again by thieves who know what kinds of correspondence prompt people to send money. Some of the most common impostor scams include:

  • The IRS impostor scam: You get a call and are told you owe back taxes. You're threatened with fines, fees, arrest, or deportation if you don't wire money immediately.
  • The "government agent" impostor scam: Someone from "the government" calls with great news: You've won a lottery. You just have to wire taxes and fees first in order to collect your payment.
  • The "debt collector" impostor scam: You get a call or a letter alerting you to the fact you've been sent to debt collections. The letter might look like it comes from a law firm or from a court. It will warn you of dire legal consequences if you don't quickly wire money.
  • The grandparent impostor scam: Your "grandson" or "granddaughter" calls in desperate trouble. They're trapped somewhere and need you to wire cash right away so they can get home. They definitely don't want you to tell Mom and Dad.

All these scams have two things in common: a sense of urgency and a claim that something bad will happen if you don't pay up. If you're told there's a problem your cash can solve, think twice about giving in to the fear the caller tried to instill in you.

2. Do an internet search before sending cash

When an impostor scam is being operated, scammers don't just target one person; they'll call thousands of people and present the exact same scenario. This works to your benefit, because these scams make the news.If you've received an email, letter, or phone call alerting you to a situation that requires you to send money or provide personal information, take to the internet and type the scenario into a search engine. You may immediately find warnings about a scam that is sweeping the nation.It's unlikely that your grandson is trapped in Canada at the exact same time there's a major scam going on where people pretend to be grandkids trapped in foreign countries -- so if that scenario comes up in your search, you'll know you were targeted by a trickster.

3. Protect your social-media accounts

Impostor scams are most effective when the caller seems to have information about you and your family. Your "grandson" may know the names of his mom, dad, and siblings. The "debt collector" may have details about where you live, where you work, and the car you drive.How do scammers get this info? Often, you unwittingly give it to them by sharing your life on social media. Your Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and other accounts provide lots of details. Scammers use this personal information to convince you they know who you are.To reduce the chances that your social-media information will be used against you, consider making your accounts private so only friends and family can see what you post. If you must have public profiles and pages, be cautious about the personal information you provide and be aware that others could use your data to trick you.

4. Don't trust caller ID

When a scammer calls and tells you they're from the IRS, Health and Human Services, or another government agency, your caller ID may show that the phone call actually is coming from the federal government.The problem is that the caller ID may not be correct. The Federal Trade Commission warns that caller IDs can be faked. Scammers make calls look as if they are coming from official sources, even though the call may be coming from anywhere in the United States, or even from outside the country.Although you shouldn't trust caller ID to prove a call is legitimate, write down the number if you suspect you're being scammed. The FTC might be able to use it to trace the party who is committing impostor crimes.

5. Tell the caller you'll call back

A perpetrator of an impostor scam wants you to provide your personal information or commit to sending money during the first phone call. But you don't have to let the call you received be the only contact. Tell the caller you'll call back, hang up, and go online to look up the official number of whoever was supposedly calling.If the call came from the "IRS," go to the IRS.gov website to find contact details. If the call was from your "bank" or a "law firm," call back a number you find on the company's official website. If the call was supposedly from your grandchild, call the number you have stored under their name -- and if you don't have one, call their parents. Whoever you get on the line can tell you whether the call was legitimate.

6. Never, ever send funds via wire transfer

It's extremely unlikely that there's a legitimate situation that would require you to wire money. If you owe someone cash, there should be multiple ways to pay -- including sending a check in the mail. A wire transfer isn't a common payment method, and in fact, the FTC categorically states: "The government will not ask a consumer to wire money, and it is illegal for telemarketers to ask you to pay by wire."Scammers prefer wire transfers because the money is difficult to trace and virtually impossible to recover. If you're asked to send money via a wire transfer, this is a likely scam. Just don't send it.

7. File a complaint with the FTC

If you get a call you think is a scam, let the FTC know by filing a complaint at ftc.gov/complaint. The FTC won't help you to resolve your specific situation, but it will provide information about steps to take if you suspect a scam.The FTC will also record your complaint to track patterns of criminal behavior. The information you provide could help others avoid becoming victims.

The $16,122 Social Security bonus you could be missing 
If you're like most Americans, you're a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known "Social Security secrets" could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. For example: one easy trick could pay you as much as $16,122 more... each year! Once you learn how to maximize your Social Security benefits, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we're all after. Simply click here to discover how to learn more about these strategies.

Teresa Kersten is an employee of LinkedIn and is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors; LinkedIn is owned by Microsoft. Christy Bieber has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Source : fool.com

Published in How to

Indian police have busted an internet scam in which around 650,000 people lost a combined 3700 crores rupees ($549 million) after sending money to a company that promised they would earn cash by clicking on web links, police said on Friday.

Police, who described the pyramid-style scheme as one of India’s biggest ever, said they had arrested three ringleaders on the outskirts of New Delhi, the capital, and seized more than 500 crore rupees ($74 million) from bank accounts.

“They learned that if you give some money back to members, the investments would go up exponentially,” Amit Pathak, head of a police cyber crime unit in India’s populous northern state of Uttar Pradesh, told Reuters.

The men ran a series of websites that promised would-be subscribers a chance to earn five rupees ($0.07) each time they clicked or liked web links sent to their mobile phones, police said.

The unsuspecting investors each paid thousands of rupees into the company’s bank accounts to join the scheme, but the web links they received were fake.

The company running the alleged scam had operated for years, but earned almost all the money over a few months from last August, after it began to distribute some of the proceeds, using the beneficiaries to draw in more investors.

Police said the ringleaders had not yet appointed lawyers as the chargesheet was still being prepared.

When police raided the company’s head office in the city of Noida they found 250 passports of employees and members who had been rewarded with a holiday to Australia.

The scammers planned to film the holiday and then post it online as promotional material to lure more subscribers.

The alleged mastermind spent some of the proceeds on houses, cars and celebrity parties. Pathak said it would take time to trace most of the money, and several bank employees were believed to be involved.

“It’s a very big task for us. We have brought in the income-tax department, and other government agencies, to trace the money,” Pathak said.

Cyber crime in India, home to the world’s second largest number of internet users, jumped 350 percent in the three years to 2014 as criminals exploited booming smartphone use, a study by auditing services firm PwC and industry lobby group Assocham showed last year.

Source : http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/indian-police-have-busted-3700-crore-pyramid-scheme-style-internet-scam-360854.html?utm_source=rhs_most_commented

Published in Internet Privacy

If, like me and my clients, you ever receive an email about a domain name expiration, proceed with great suspicion — because many of these "notices" are a sham. They're designed to sell you services you don't need or to trick you into transferring your domain name to another registrar.

Usually, the emails can safely be ignored.

Here's an example:

As shown in the image above, an important-looking email from "Domain Service" refers to a specific domain name in the subject line. The body of the email states that it is an "EXPIRATION NOTICE." However, the finer print states that the expiration is not for the domain name registration itself but instead for "search engine optimization submission" — services that the recipient of the email has never purchased (and probably doesn't want).

Many recipients of these emails likely click the payment link thinking they should do so to ensure that their domain names don't expire.

While this is obviously misleading, it isn't new.

In 2010, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission warned about these frauds in a press release titled "FTC Halts Cross Border Domain Name Registration Scam." The FTC said:

The Federal Trade Commission has permanently halted the operations of Canadian con artists who allegedly posed as domain name registrars and convinced thousands of U.S. consumers, small businesses and non-profit organizations to pay bogus bills by leading them to believe they would lose their Web site addresses unless they paid. Settlement and default judgment orders signed by the court will bar the deceptive practices in the future.
In June 2008, the FTC charged Toronto-based Internet Listing Service with sending fake invoices to small businesses and others, listing the existing domain name of the consumer's Web site or a slight variation on the domain name, such as substituting ".org" for ".com." The invoices appeared to come from the businesses' existing domain name registrar and instructed them to pay for an annual "WEBSITE ADDRESS LISTING." The invoices also claimed to include a search engine optimization service. Most consumers who received the "invoices" were led to believe that they had to pay them to maintain their registrations of domain names. Other consumers were induced to pay based on Internet Listing Service's claims that its "Search Optimization" service would "direct mass traffic" to their sites and that their "proven search engine listing service" would result in "a substantial increase in traffic."The FTC's complaint charged that most consumers who paid the defendants' invoices did not receive any domain name registration services and that the "search optimization" service did not result in increased traffic to the consumers' Web sites.

And, in 2014, ICANN issued a similar warning, "Be Careful What You Click: Alert of New Fraudulent Domain Renewal Emails." In its alert, ICANN said:

Recently, online scammers have targeted domain name registrants with a registration renewal scam in order to fraudulently obtain financial information. The scam unfolds as follows. The scammer sends an email to a domain registrant that offers an opportunity to renew a registration, and encourages the email recipient to "click here" to renew online at attractively low rates. These emails appear to be sent by ICANN. The scammers even lift ICANN's branding and logo and include these in both the body of the email message and at the fake renewal web page, where the scammers will collect any credit card or personal information that victims of the scam submit.

Here are some simple steps to avoid falling for these types of scams:

  • Check your domain name registrations to ensure that the email contacts in the "whois” records are accurate and that, in the case of domain names owned and used by companies, only current personnel educated about the domain name system are listed as contacts (because the fraudsters send their notices to contacts in the whois records).
  • Don't click on any links in a suspicious email about a domain name "expiration." These links typically contain tracking technology that enable the sender to identify the simple fact that you have clicked — which could increase the likelihood you will receive further notices or spam.
  • If you are truly concerned that a notice may be legitimate or that your domain name may be at risk of expiring, simply check its expiration date in the whois record. Then, confirm with your current registrar that the domain name is set to auto-renew (if desired) and that your payment information is accurate. If you plan to keep the domain name for a long time, consider renewing it for the longest possible term (often 10 years).
  • Set your domain name's lock status (at your registrar) to help prevent unauthorized transfers. To see whether your domain name is locked, look for a status such as "clientTransferProhibited" in the whois record.
  • And, of course, simply delete any suspicious "expiration" emails.

Author:  Doug Isenberg

Source:  http://www.circleid.com/

Published in Internet Privacy

Cybercriminals are targeting people using Apple products as they are more likely to have disposable income, a security expert has warned.

Blogger Graham Cluley said that while malware was more common on Windows, Apple customers could not "afford to be lackadaisical" about security.

On Monday, hereported a text message scamthat tried to trick people into handing over account information.

Apple's supportsite warns customersnot to enter details on spoof sites.

The text message scammers sent out alerts to victims' smartphones, claiming their Apple ID accounts were going to expire. The message encouraged people to visit a fake website where they were asked to enter their account information.

"It tried to grab personal information and credit card details with the aim of committing identity theft," said Mr Cluley.

"They deliberately took advantage of people's trust in the Apple brand to steal information.

"Avoid clicking on links in emails because they might take you somewhere phishy. Instead go to the website directly and log in that way." Spoof Apple website

The spoof website has since been blocked by web browsers such as Chrome and Firefox.

Apple's support website says customers "should never enter Apple account information on any non-Apple website".

"In general, all account-related activities will take place in the iTunes application directly, not through a web browser," it explains.

On Tuesday, Mr Cluley reported on a second scam disguised as an update to Adobe Flash, which encouraged victims to install a new version of the software.

In a blog about a discovery by the security firm Integohe wrote: "The best advice for many users may be to ensure that you have configured Adobe Flash Player to automatically update itself."

Apple's Mac OS X operating system does have a safeguard, enabled by default, that prevents people installing software written by unknown developers. However, it appears the attackers were able to circumvent this.

"The fake Flash update attack appears to have used a stolen Apple Developer certificate, suggesting that some third-party Mac developers may be being sloppy about their own security and putting the rest of us at risk as a result," Mr Cluley told the BBC.

"The truth is that criminals will go where the money is.

"Apple products cost more than some of their competitors so it's likely that their customers have more disposable income. That's cash which the bad guys would like to have filling their pockets."

Source : bbc

Published in Market Research
Page 1 of 2

Upcoming Events

There are no up-coming events

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait
online research banner

airs logo

AIRS is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Subscribe to AIRS Newsletter

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

Follow Us on Social Media