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Google has confirmed rumors that a search algorithm update took place on Monday. Some sites may have seen their rankings improve, while others may have seen negative or zero change.

Google has posted on Twitter that it released a “broad core algorithm update” this past Monday. Google said it “routinely” does updates “throughout the year” and referenced the communication from the previous core update.

Google explained that core search updates happen “several times per year” and that while “some sites may note drops or gains,” there is nothing specific a site can do to tweak its rankings around these updates. In general, Google says to continue to improve your overall site quality, and the next time Google runs these updates, hopefully, your website will be rewarded.

Google explained that “pages that were previously under-rewarded” would see a benefit from these core updates.

Here is the statement Google previously made about this type of update:

Each day, Google usually releases one or more changes designed to improve our results. Some are focused around specific improvements. Some are broad changes. Last week, we released a broad core algorithm update. We do these routinely several times per year.

As with any update, some sites may note drops or gains. There’s nothing wrong with pages that may now perform less well. Instead, it’s that changes to our systems are benefiting pages that were previously under-rewarded.

There’s no “fix” for pages that may perform less well, other than to remain focused on building great content. Over time, it may be that your content may rise relative to other pages.

Here is Google’s confirmation from today about the update on Monday:

Screenshot 4

 

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz

Published in Search Engine

Have spent more than half an hour searching for a PDF document online, only to find that the document you have found is not in PDF format you need. As I have mentioned you can open the PDF before you download it in the web browser. However, you have to find the PDF files first. To make sure the file you get is exactly PDF format, you need to use PDF search engine. If you want to edit and manage the PDF documents you have collected, you might want to check the part 2 in which an efficient PDF tool will be introduced.

Top 5 PDF Search Engine Sites to Get Free PDF eBooks

1. Ebook3000

Ebook3000 is a nice PDF search engine for PDF files (ebooks, documents & forms). And it is a library of free ebook downloads with over 17 categories available. You can also type in the keywords in the search box, then all the related PDF files are displayed here. I like it very much because of its magazines. You could always find a lot of PDF and ePub documents there.

free PDF search

2. Search PDF

Search PDF is another great PDF search engine which able to help you find and download PDF files (eBooks, tutorials, forms, etc.). You just go to its website, search for the PDF files you need. If you want to save the time, you can have the plug-in added to your Firefox search bar. Whenever you need a PDF file, you just type in the Firefox search bar to get it.

pdf search engine

3. PDF Search Engine

PDF Search Engine likes an online library whose services are available to the people without any time limit and charges. It is a book search engine search on sites, forums, message boards for pdf files. You can find and download a tons of e-books by searching it or browsing through the full directory. You can also the last 20 PDFs which was downloaded by the other users lately.

free PDF search engine

4. Book Gold Mine

Book Gold Mine serves a large collection of quality e-books, lectures, notes, and other kinds of documents at no cost to the user. It has the catogeries like biology, business, computer science, math, and physics, if you want to search PDF files like those, it is a useful PDF search engine for you.

free PDF search

5. Google

Now comes to the end of the list. But I have to say do not ignore Google. In Google search engine, you could get everything you need, including PDF files. Whenever you need a PDF file, you can type in keywords, then with "filetype: pdf" in Google search engine. Without the doubt, you can get what you want.

free PDF search engine

More Solutions to Handle Your PDF Files

Getting PDF files online is often the primary step to work on them. More often than not, you would want to manage those files you have collected for future use, or make some modifications to certain PDF content, like inserting some sentences or leaving notes for certain parts to make them indicative to readers. Or you might want to read on e-Readers, like iPad, Sony Reader, Barnes & Nobles Nook, or Kindle after you get some interesting PDF eBooks.

PDFelement is the all-in-one PDF solution which is embedded in all those functions you can imagine for PDF. It is capable of converting PDF to dozens of documents format, including Word, Excel, PPT, EPUB, TIFF, RTF, image and more. A complete series of comment tools are available for making PDF illuminous to readers, such as inserting the note, highlight PDF content or drawing markups as you need.

pdf editor

Moreover, you are able to manage the PDF files as you need. For example, you can combine batch files into a single PDF or just split a single one into several pages, or crop certain parts of PDF pages to make them accessible for reuse. Another amazing feature is the OCR function which can turn scanned PDF into editable and searchable.

Step 1. Convert PDF to e-Readers Friendly Format

After you get some interesting PDF eBooks, you might want to read on e-Readers, like iPad, Sony Reader, Barnes & Nobles Nook, or Kindle, etc. To enhance your reading experience, you should convert PDF to EPUB, because PDF is too large to read on portable devices, while EPUB is suitable to read on any e-Readers.

All you need to do is to import the PDF files into PDFelement, move to the "Home" tab and hit the "To Others" button, select the "Convert to EPUB" from the drop-down menu. Seconds later, you will see the EPUB files ready for use.

convert pdf to epub

Step 2. Combine PDF Files as You Want

If you are working on research papers, collecting PDF files from website won’t do much good to the writing process. You still should organize those documents and make them easy to retrieve and look up.

To combine multiple PDF files, go to the homepage and click the "Combine PDF" button, add all the files you need to merge. One click and you will have all those documents combined into one in seconds.

combine pdf files

Step 3. Edit Scanned PDF (Optional)

You would need the OCR function if the PDF documents you found are image-based. You are unable to make changes to scanned PDFs if you don’t recognize them to editable PDF. Before you try to work on scanned PDF, you should perform OCR first.

Import the scanned PDF documents into PDFelement, and you will see a notice to inform you of performing OCR. Hit on the "Perform OCR" button and all you have to do is to wait for just several seconds, and the PDF can be modified as you want. Click on the "Edit" button on the upper left to start the editing process. You can edit text and images by clicking the "Edit" button.

edit scanned pdf

 Source: This article was published pdf.wondershare.com

Published in Search Engine

Any document type that the publishing-API knows about can be added to our internal search. By default, all document types in internal search also get included in the GOV.UK sitemap, which tells external search engines about our content.

The app responsible for search is Rummager. Rummager listens to RabbitMQ messages about published documents to know when to index documents. For the new document type to be indexed, you need to add it to a whitelist.

Rummager has its own concept of document type, which represents the schema used to store documents in Elasticsearch (the search engine).

Normally, you’ll map your document type an existing rummager document type. If in doubt, use “edition” - this is used for most documents.

Then, modify mapped_document_types.yml with the mapping from the publishing API document type.

If you want a search to be able to use metadata that isn’t defined in any rummager document type, then you’ll need to add new fields to rummager.

Rummager knows how to handle most of the core fields from the publishing platform, like title, description, and public_updated_at. It looks at the body or parts fields to work out what text to make searchable. If your schema uses different fields to render the text of the page, update the IndexableContentPresenter as well.

The part of rummager that translates between publishing API fields and search fields are elasticsearch_presenter.rb. Modify this if there is anything special you want a search to do with your documents (for example: appending additional information to the title).

2. Add the document type to migrated_formats.yaml

Add the document_type name to the migrated list in rummager.

3. Reindex

Reindex the govuk index following the instructions in Reindex an Elasticsearch index

4. Republish all the documents

Republish all the documents. If they have been published already, you can republish them with the publishing-api represent_downstream rake task:

rake represent_downstream:document_type[new_document_type]

You can test that the documents appear in search through the API using a query such as:

Source: This article was published docs.publishing.service.gov.uk 

Published in Search Engine

If you're looking for simple ways to find what is available on the Invisible Web, curated directories like the ones listed in this article can be extremely useful tools to use. You can use any of these resources to find what is available on the Web that is not as easily searchable from a general search engine query. 

The Invisible Web is easily accessible..that is, if you know where to look. Many individuals and institutions have put together invisible Web directories, which you can use as a jumping off point to surf the Invisible Web.

Here are just a few:

  • The University of Michigan has put together OAIster, (pronounced "oyster") and encourages you to "find the pearls" on the Invisible Web. They have millions of records from more than 405 institutions as diverse as African Journals Online and the Library Network of Western Switzerland.
  • LookSmart's Find Articles.com lets you search print publications for articles; anything from popular magazines to scholarly journals. Be sure to check out their Furl tool to organize your Invisible Web search snippets.
  • The Library Spot is a collection of databases, online libraries, references, and other good info from the Invisible Web. Be sure to check out their "You Asked For It" section, where popular readers' questions are featured.
  • The US Government's official web portal is FirstGov.gov, an extremely deep (as in lots of content) site. You could spend hours here. It's interesting to note how much stuff you can get done online here as well, such as renew your driver's license, shop government auctions, and contact elected officials.
  • Search the vast holding of the UCLA Library online, including their special collections only found on the Invisible Web.
  • Check out Infoplease.com and its searchable Invisible Web databases. Results come from encyclopedias, almanacs, dictionaries, and other online resources only found on the Invisible Web.
  • The Central Intelligence Agency has the World Factbook, a searchable directory of flags of the world, reference maps, country profiles, and much, much more. Great for geography buffs or anyone who wants to learn more about their world.
  • The University of Idaho has created this Repository of Primary Sources, which contains links to manuscripts, archives, rare books, and much more. Covers not only the United States but countries all over the world.
  • Lund University Libraries maintains the Directory of Open Access Journals, a collection of searchable scientific and scholarly journals on the Invisible Web.
  • Looking for scientific information on the Invisible Web? Go to Scirus.com first. You can search either scholarly sources or Web sources or both.
  • Canada, ay? Then check out the Archival Records of Alberta. This is a web gateway to photographs, census records, and other archival records.
  • Want to find a plant that will survive overwatering, lack of sunlight, and general forgetfulness? You can probably find something in the USDA's Plants Database on the Invisible Web.
  • The Human Genome Database contains anything you would ever want to know..well, about the human genome on the Invisible Web, at least.
  • If you've got a medical question, check out The Combined Health Information Database, or CHID online. Its searchable subject directory is very user-friendly, and you can find information on pretty much anything to do with human health here.
  • Nonprofit organizations need searching tools too. The National Database of Nonprofit Organizations is an extensive site on the Invisible Web that not only provides locations and contact information for nonprofits but also gives detailed fiscal reports.
  • EEVL Xtra, a service put together by Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland. This excellent service has the ability to cross-search 20 engineering, mathematics and computing databases, including content from 50 publishers. Find articles, websites, and more on the Invisible Web.

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Published in Deep Web

Looking for an important file or message among endless emails in your inbox is no fun, especially if you need it right before a meeting starts. You’ve tried using the basic search box at the top of Gmail and found out that it didn’t help either. Don’t worry, we’ve rounded up 6 search operators that will help you sort through your inbox to get what you need in a jiffy.

1. Where did I put that file?

Looking for a file your colleagues sent you ages ago? Don’t remember the file’s specific name but you do recall some keywords? That’s a good start. Simply type a keyword after filename: to search for a particular file. For example, you can type filename: minutes to search for a file named meeting minutes. Don’t even remember a part of the name but know what type of file it is? Then you can also use the same search operator to search for a file type. For example, type filename: doc to search for document files.

2. CC or BCC

There are times when you want to narrow down the recipients: whether they are direct, carbon copy (cc), or blind carbon copy (bcc) receivers. The basic “To” search boxes are proven to be useless in this case. What you can do to be more specific is to type cc: or bcc: followed by the recipients’ names or email addresses. For example, instead of typing “anna” in the “To” search box, you can type cc: anna to look for email sent to Anna as a carbon copy (cc) only. Note that you won’t be able to find messages that you received on bcc.

3. Search by time period

You don’t have to remember the exact dates to be able to search for a specific email. With the search operators before: or after:, you can just type the period when the email is sent or received. Don’t forget to use the date format yyyy/mm/dd, otherwise, Gmail wouldn’t get it. By typing after: 2016/07/01before: 2016/07/15, Gmail will look for emails sent or received between July 1, 2016 and July 15, 2016.

4. Search for read, unread, or starred messages

You can search for messages that are read, unread, or starred by using is:read, is:unread, is:starred. By typing is:read is:starredfrom:Anna you are searching for messages from Anna that have been read and marked with a star. If you have more than one type of stars (or if you don’t, we suggest you learn how to manage your emails with Gmail’s stars option), you can type has:green-star to search for messages marked with that color.

5. Don’t ignore Spam or Trash

Whether using the simple search box or search operators suggested above, both ignore emails that are in Spam or Trash box. And from time to time, important emails can mistakably be thrown into Trash box for some unknown reasons. Use in:anywhere to look everywhere in your inbox, including those two places, to make sure that no important email has slipped through.

6. Look in the chat box too

We all hate it when our colleagues send important files or message via a chat box. That makes it difficult when searching for them later. But by typing is:chatfollowed by keywords or name of the person you’re communicating with, you can actually search for messages or files in the chat log. Next time you can tell your colleagues to send vital files or information via proper email instead. But if that still doesn’t work, now you know how to help yourself.

When it comes to managing and sorting through confidential emails in your inbox, no one can do it besides you. Yet there are still the matters of database management and security to take into consideration. Why not outsource those issues to us and enjoy a more carefree communication with your colleagues and customers? Call us today to see what our experts can do for you.

 Source: This article was published techadvisory.org

Published in How to

Contents

How to Use the Advanced Search Form

The Advanced Search form lets you focus your search, giving you more precise results.

You can access the Advanced Search in several ways:

  • Clicking on the Advanced Search link found in the Search box on the home page
  • Clicking on Advanced Search in the Modify Search box on the Search Results page.
  • Choosing Advanced Search from the Find Studies menu

    To use the Advanced Search form, enter search terms in one or more fields and then click on Search.

  • A list of search results will be displayed. The total number of studies found is shown below the search box, along with your search terms.
  • The first column of the search results list, Row, indicates the order in which the studies are listed. Studies that most closely match your search terms are listed first. The Status column shows which studies are recruiting new volunteers and which studies are not recruiting new volunteers. (For more details on search results, see How to Use Search Results.)

Search Tips

  • You do not need to use all the search fields. Fill in only the fields that are needed for your search.
  • Click on a field label, such as Study Type, to learn more about it.
  • Try using operators such as OR and NOT to broaden or narrow your search.
  • If your search results do not include enough studies, consider clearing one or more search fields on the form and trying the search again.

Search Term Highlighting

The words you type in the Advanced Search form fields will be highlighted in the text of the study record. Search words and synonyms for search words will be highlighted. For example, if your search words are heart attack, the words "heart" and "attack" as well as synonyms for heart attack, such as myocardial infarction, will be highlighted.

Searches Using the Operators OR, NOT, and AND

Words such as OR, NOT, and AND (in uppercase letters), are known as search operators. You can use these words to tell the ClinicalTrials.gov search function to broaden or narrow your search. Here are some ways you can use search operators:

  • Use OR to find study records that contain any of the words connected by OR.

    Example: aspirin OR ibuprofen

    This search finds study records containing either the word "aspirin" or the word "ibuprofen." Using OR broadens your search.

  • Use NOT to find study records that do not contain the word following NOT.

    Example: immunodeficiency NOT AIDS

    This search finds study records containing the word "immunodeficiency" but excludes records containing the word "AIDS" from the search results. Using NOT narrows your search.

  • AND is not necessary because the search function will automatically find study records that contain all the words specified in the search. However, you may use AND to separate distinct concepts. 

  • Use ORNOTAND, and parentheses to create more complicated search expressions.

    Use parentheses in searches that contain more than one operator (OR, NOT, AND). This means that the words that are together in parentheses will be treated as a unit.

    Example: (heart disease OR heart attack) AND (stroke OR clot)

    This search finds study records containing either the phrase "heart disease" or the phrase "heart attack" as well as records containing either the word "stroke" or the word "clot."

  • Using AND and OR as operators can sometimes be confusing.

    The correct way to search for a phrase such as:

    "ear, nose, and throat conditions"

    is to enter:

    (Ear OR Nose OR Throat) AND Conditions

    However, if you want to find studies with exactly the phrase "ear, nose, and throat" then you should enclose the phrase in quotes.

 Source: This article was published clinicaltrials.gov

Published in How to

Need to find a job? These are the best job search engines on the web

If you're in the market for a new job, you'll want to check out this list of the best eight job search engines on the web. All of these job search tools offer unique features and can streamline your employment search efforts so your efforts are more productive. Each one is an incredibly useful tool that will help you localize your search, find interesting new positions that correlate to your experience and interests, and help you to find employment in a wide variety of genres. 

1- Monster.com

Monster Logo
Monster

Newly redesigned Monster.com is one of the oldest job search engines on the Web. While some of its usefulness has been diminished in recent years due to a lack of good filtering and too many posts by spammy recruiters, it's still an important site on which to conduct a job search. You can narrow your search by location, keywords, and employer; plus, Monster has plenty of job search extras: networking boards, job search alerts, and online resume posting.

Employers can also use Monster.com to find employees for a nominal fee, a useful tool for those looking to expand their hiring repertoire, find a new full-time or contract employee, or gather a pool of potential applicants for an upcoming position.  More »

Indeed logo
Indeed

Indeed.com is a very solid job search engine, with the ability to compile a resume and submit it onsite for employer searches of keywords, jobs, niches, and more. Indeed uncovers a wide variety of jobs and fields that you wouldn't normally find on most job search sites, and they do a good job of making their job search features as easy to use as possible. You can subscribe to job alerts via email; you can set these up for a certain keyword, geolocation, salary, and much more. 

In addition, Indeed makes it as simple as possible to keep track of jobs you've applied for; all you need to do is create a login (free) and every job you've applied for from within Indeed.com or that you've just expressed interest in will be saved to your profile. 

Daily and weekly alerts can be created with notifications going to your inbox; criteria include job title, location, salary requirements, and skill sets.  More »

USAJobs
USA Jobs

Think of USAjobs as your gateway into the huge world of US government jobs. Navigate to the USAjobs.gov home page, and you'll be able to narrow your search by keyword, job title, control number, agency skills, or location. One particularly interesting feature is the ability to search worldwide within any country that currently is advertising a vacancy. 

Just like many other job search engines on this list, you can create a user account (free) on USAjobs.gov, making the application process for government jobs extremely streamlined and easy.  More »

CareerBuilder Logo
Career Builder

CareerBuilder offers job searchers the ability to find a job, post a resume, create job alerts, get job advice and job resources, look up job fairs, and much more. This is a truly massive job search engine that offers a lot of good resources to the job searcher; I especially appreciate the list of job search communities. 

According to the CareerBuilder website, more than 24 million unique visitors a month visit CareerBuilder to find new jobs and obtain career advice, and offers job searches in over 60 different countries worldwide.  More »

5- Dice

DiceLogo
Dice

Dice.com is a job search engine dedicated to only finding technology jobs. It offers a targeted niche space for finding exactly the technology position you might be looking for.

One of the most appealing features that Dice offers is the ability to drill down to extremely specialized tech positions, giving job seekers the opportunity to find the niche tech jobs that are sometimes elusive on other job search engines.  More »

6- SimplyHired

SimplyHired Screenshot
Simply Hired

SimplyHired also offers a unique job search experience; the user trains the job search engine by rating jobs he or she is interested in. SimplyHired also gives you the ability to research salaries, add jobs to a job map, and view pretty detailed profiles of various companies.

If you're looking for a good job search engine that focuses on local job listings, SimplyHired can be a good choice. You can browse by town, by zip code, or by state to find the job that might be right for you.   More »

7- LinkedIn

linked in logo
LinkedIN

LinkedIn.com combines the best of two worlds: the ability to scour the Internet for jobs with its job search engine, and the opportunity to network with like-minded friends and individuals to deepen your job search.

LinkedIn's job postings are of the highest quality, and if you are connected to someone who already knows about that particular job, you've got a way in before you even hand in your resume.  More »

8- Craigslist

Craigslist logo
Craigslist

There are all sorts of interesting jobs on Craigslist. Just find your city, look under Jobs, then look under your job category. Non-profit, systems, government, writing, etc. jobs are all represented here.

You can also set up various RSS feeds that pertain to whatever job you might be looking for, in whatever location.

Caution: Craigslist this is a free marketplace and some of the jobs posted at on this site could be scams. Use caution and common sense when replying to job listings on Craigslist.  More »

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Published in Search Engine

What would you do if your most private information was suddenly available online, for anyone to see? Just imagine: picturesvideos, financial information, emails...all accessible without your knowledge or consent to anyone who cares to look for it.  We've probably all seen news items come out about various celebrities and political figures who have been less careful than they should be with information that was not meant for public consumption.

Without proper oversight of this sensitive information, it can become available to anyone with an Internet connection.

Keeping information safe and protected online is a growing concern for many people, not just political figures and celebrities. It's smart to consider what privacy precautions you might have in place for your own personal information: financial, legal, and personal. In this article, we're going to go over five practical ways you can start protecting your privacy while online to guard yourself against any potential leaks, avoid embarrassment, and keep your information safe and secure.

Create Unique Passwords and Usernames for Each Online Service

Many people use the same usernames and passwords across all their online services. After all, there are so many, and it can be difficult to keep track of a different login and password for all of them. If you're looking for a way to generate and keep track of multiple secure passwords, KeePass is a good option, plus it's free: "KeePass is a free open source password manager, which helps you to manage your passwords in a secure way.

You can put all your passwords in one database, which is locked with one master key or a key file. So you only have to remember one single master password or select the key file to unlock the whole database. The databases are encrypted using the best and most secure encryption algorithms currently known (AES and Twofish)."

Don't Assume Services are Safeguarding Your Information

Online storage sites such as DropBox do a pretty good job of keeping your information safe and secure. However, if you're concerned that what you're uploading is especially sensitive, you should encrypt it - services like BoxCryptor will do that for you for free (tiered pricing levels do apply).

Be Careful Sharing Information Online

We're asked to fill out forms or log into a new service all the time on the Web. What is all this information used for? Companies make a lot of money analyzing and using the data that we are freely giving them. If you'd like to stay a little bit more private, you can use BugMeNot to avoid filling out unnecessary forms that ask for too much personal information and keep it for other uses.

Never Give Out Private Information

We should all know by now that giving out personal information (name, address, phone number, etc.) is a big no-no online. However, many people don't realize that the information that they are posting on forums and message boards and social media platforms can be put together piece by piece to create a complete picture. This practice is called "doxxing", and is becoming more of a problem, especially since many people use the same username across all of their online services.

In order to avoid this happening, be extremely cautious in how much information you're giving out, and make sure you don't use the same username across services (see the first paragraph in this article for a quick review!).

Log Out of Sites Often

Here's a scenario that happens all too often: John decides to take a break at work, and during that time, he decides to check his bank balance. He gets distracted and leaves the bank balance page up on his computer, leaving secure information out for anyone to see and use. This kind of thing happens all the time: financial information, social media logins, email, etc.

can all be compromised extremely easily. The best practice is to make sure you're on a secure computer (not public or work) when you're looking at personal information, and to log out of any site you might be using on a public computer so that other people who have access to that computer will not be able to access your information. 

Prioritize Online Privacy

Let's face it: while we'd like to think that everyone we come in contact with has our best interests at heart, this is sadly not always the case — and especially applies when we're online. Use the tips in this article to protect yourself from unwanted leaks of your personal information on the web. 

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Published in Internet Privacy

Keyword research is important when you want to find new areas of growth and increase traffic to your site, but deciding which terms to focus your efforts on can be a complicated task. Before you start to target a new keyword, it’s crucial to estimate how much time and effort it will take to achieve high rankings for each search term, along with how much value each keyword has.  Knowing this will help you prioritize your list and only go after terms that will yield the best possible outcome.

You can accomplish this by looking at two things, competition (difficulty to rank), and potential value (search volume).  Potential value is easy to measure using the Google Keyword Planner tool, but difficulty to rank is more complex to calculate.

The easiest way to measure difficulty to rank is to perform a Google search and see how many pages are indexed for each of your keywords:

Google Search Keywords - Education

But this is extremely broad and usually returns several millions results, making it next to impossible to truly assess keyword difficulty. In order to get a more realistic idea of the competition, you want to focus only on pages that have been optimized for the search engines.

To get a more accurate number you can use two of Google’s advanced search operators to return more targeted results:

Google Search Operator - allintitle: education

allintitle:keyword – returns only pages where the keyword is used in the title tag

Google Search Operator - allinurl: Education

allinurl:keyword – returns only pages where the keyword is used in the URL

This information is much more useful than a basic Google search because it removes the noise and lets you see only websites that have optimized their titles & urls, giving us a clearer picture of the competition.

Now that you’ve focused on a keyword’s competition based on title & url, the next step is to prioritize your list of keywords and target the ones that have a combination of high search volume and low competition. I started with a list of 20 keywords and narrowed the list down to the top 5.

Keyword Research - 20 top education keywords - nursing

Avg. Monthly Searches = Keyword’s search volume from Google Keyword Planner

URL Competition = Number of results returned for an allinurl: search

Title Tag Competition = Number of results returned for an allintitle: search

In order to find the keywords that have the highest search volume and the lowest competition calculate the “opportunity” for both title & url. Keywords with the highest “opportunity” have the greatest chance of getting on page one of Google, relative to search volume. Opportunity provides a balance between search volume and competitiveness.

Keyword Competition - 20 top education keywords opportunity - nursing

URL Opportunity = Avg. Monthly Searches divided by URL Competition

Title Tag Opportunity = Avg. Monthly Searches divided by Title Tag Competition

As an added step, you can add extra weight to either URL or Title Tag Opportunity by multiplying by a given percentage, if you think one gives off a stronger ranking signal than the other.

Once you have URL Opportunity & Title Tag Opportunity, calculate the Full Opportunity by adding the two together.

20 top education keywords full opportunity - nursing

Full Opportunity = URL Opportunity + Title Tag Opportunity

Full Opportunity shows the big picture in regard to difficulty to rank for a term based on title tag & url optimization, while maximizing the potential for traffic based on monthly search volume.

To prioritize your list and select the top 5 keywords, just sort Full Opportunity from High to Low.

Top 5 education keywords ranked - nursing

Please keep in mind this is just one method for determining keyword difficulty; there are several other factors to consider when trying to assess the competition for a given term, such as:

  • Quality of the page content
  • Moz Page Authority
  • Moz Domain Authority
  • Number of external links pointing to each ranking page
  • Number of domains linking to each ranking page
  • Social metrics (Facebook & Twitter shares)

Using this method, I provide clients with keywords to develop new content around, whether blog posts or new pages within their websites. I also use this method when suggesting reoptimization for existing pages that are performing poorly.

Source: This article was published leverinteractive.com By Kevin DalPorto

Published in Search Engine

Click to viewIt's no surprise that the killer feature in Google's email offering, Gmail, is its search capability. Google's king of the web because it makes information on its billions of pages findable; likewise, Gmail makes the megabytes of messages that get pumped into your inbox every day manageable through laser-specific search. If you know how to construct the right query in Gmail, you can slice and dice your messages any way you see fit. Plug those queries into filters and Gmail will automatically process your mail for you as it arrives. Gmail's advanced search, filters and labels make it a god amongst insects in the world of web-based email, but it takes a little know-how to get it working for you.

Let's talk search

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From its inception, the Gmail philosophy has been "Search, don't sort." While that works for finding a specific message, it's not the best way to get organized with your email. There's a point at which sorting is essential, especially for those of us who deal with a lot of email. Luckily, searching and sorting are not mutually exclusive. Gmail came with filters and labels baked in, and a little extra-Gmail ingenuity gave us persistent search. Below I'll go into both in detail. 18s0etp8o9qm4png.png

Gmail has an extensive list of simple search operators, and a serious Gmailer should get to know and love most of them. However, there are two Gmail search tricks that aren't well-known (one isn't even documented) that, combined with the search operators, turn Gmail searches into something fierce: parentheses and curly brackets.

And/Or searches

When you construct a complicated query in Gmail, the search terms are all by default grouped with AND, meaning that every match to a search like to:adam subject:iPhone is both to me and has iPhone somewhere in the subject. The a Gmail documentation recommends using the OR operator when only one term needs to match. Our search might then become to:adam OR subject:iPhone meaning that every match is either addressed to me, has iPhone in the subject, or both. The problem with using OR is that complex queries tend to turn into endless strings of ORs, and they're just not all that manageable.

Instead, surround the disjunctive search terms with curly brackets {}. Searching Gmail with {to:adam subject:iPhone}will yield the same results as the OR search above while allowing you more room for tweaking the terms and saving you from typing an endless string of ORs. Everything inside the curly brackets is assumed to be linked with OR.

Similarly, search terms surrounded by parentheses () group every item with an AND. Granted, AND is the default for search terms, but parentheses can still come in very handy when things get complicated. For example:

{to:(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) subject:Quicksilver}

This query will match all emails that are addressed to both This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or that contain Quicksilver in the subject. Before I got into brackets I'd have probably written this query as(to:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) OR subject:Quicksilver which isn't terrible, but becomes more and more complicated as search terms grow.

Now that you understand how to construct complex queries for Gmail using brackets and parentheses, how can you put them to good use?

Persistent search 

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Since it's not worth your time to create complicated search queries every time you want to find a group of emails, especially if it's a search you're going to make often, you'll want to create persistent searches.

Using either the a Better Gmail Firefox extension with persistent searches enabled, you can create and save persistent searches in Gmail that work like Gmail labels, except that they're dynamic. That makes persistent searches more like Smart Folders; labels, on the other hand, are more like traditional folders. For example, when persistent search is first enabled (whether with Greasemonkey or Better Gmail), it comes with several saved searches already built in, like the TODO search, which submits the following search query:

to:me {in:inbox is:unread}

Clicking on the saved TODO search will give you a dynamic list of emails addressed to you that are

Click to viewIt's no surprise that the killer feature in Google's email offering, Gmail, is its search capability. Google's king of the web because it makes information on its billions of pages findable; likewise, Gmail makes the megabytes of messages that get pumped into your inbox every day manageable through laser-specific search. If you know how to construct the right query in Gmail, you can slice and dice your messages any way you see fit. Plug those queries into filters and Gmail will automatically process your mail for you as it arrives. Gmail's advanced search, filters and labels make it a god amongst insects in the world of web-based email, but it takes a little know-how to get it working for you.

Filters and building large queries

 18s0etr7rtppcpng.png

Filters come in handy when you want to perform certain actions on email when it arrives—actions like archiving, forwarding, and labeling.* If you're planning to set up complex filters, the first thing you should do is expand Gmail's filter input,** turning it from a one-line input box to a textarea. That way you can add line breaks to your queries to help keep them much better organized.

 Since Gmail search operators work in filters, you can forego the other filter inputs and push your query into the Has the words field (or not, depending on which you prefer). To give you an example of why this sort of multi-line input is useful, I'll show you a filter I use to label and archive all of my Lifehacker tips email so that my inbox only shows email from my fellow editors and bosses across the Gawker media network.

-from:{ *@lifehacker.com *@gawker.com *@gizmodo.com *@defamer.com *@wonkette.com *@idolator.com *@fleshbot.com *@kotaku.com *@deadspin.com *@gridskipper.com *@consumerist.com *@valleywag.com *@jezebel.com }

As you can see, this query uses the hyphen -, which negates the content of the following curly bracketed section. In my example, any email that does notmatch one of these handles (i.e., any email not sent from A or B or C...) gets archived and labeled "Lifehacker Tips." If I decide a contact has earned inbox status, I can just add their email to the end of the list (luckily Gmail doesn't remove the line breaks so the query retains its friendly format when I need to edit it).

This particular filtering technique may not be practical if you don't receive hundreds of email a day like we do at Lifehacker, but it's a great way to keep your inbox streamlined to only the most important messages, and it illustrates how much easier it is to understand and organize the search in expanded form with brackets than in one long line connected with OR. Handy, right?

So how do I use this?

How you put these tips to use is completely dependent on your needs. If you have never had any trouble building a filter or persistent search that does exactly what you need, then you probably won't need the parentheses and curly brackets. On the other hand, if you've had problems getting just the right query, those two tools combined with the rest of Gmail's search operators can get you nearly any result you need.

The examples above are intended to provide a framework for understanding how to construct complex filters and persistent searches in Gmail, but if you've already put together your own killer filters and searches, please share them with the class in the comments.

*Remember, the label, in, and is search operators will not work in filters because filters are only applied to emails when they arrive. These operators should be reserved for your [persistent] searches.

** While I don't know of a useful way to expand the regular search input boxes to textareas, enabling multi-line input box pasting should let you construct your more complex queries in a text editor and then copy-and-paste them to the Gmail search box.
Source: This article was published lifehacker.com
Published in Search Engine
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