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[Source: This article was published in nytimes.com By Whitson Gordon - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore]

Even if you’re already a Google pro, these tricks will get you to your desired results even faster.

Like it or not, Google is most people’s portal to the internet. And when you’re searching for something simple — like the latest news about Iran — Google will usually get you what you want on the first try. But if you’re trying to find something a bit more niche, you may need to do some digging. Here are a few tricks to keep up your sleeve that will make life easier.

Use quotation marks to find a specific phrase

It’s one thing to search for a couple of words, like Sony HT-Z9F soundbar, and find the product(s) you’re seeking. But let’s say you need more specific information — like the dimensions of the speaker drivers inside that soundbar. Searching for HT-Z9F soundbar driver diameter does not return any pages that list that particular spec, nor does including the word inches. Instead, we need to think about how this would exactly be phrased on the page, and use quotation marks to narrow our search.

When you put quotation marks around a collection of words, it tells Google to look for the words only in that order. So, sony HT-Z9F inch drivers (don’t worry, capitalization doesn’t matter) will search for any page that has the words “inch” and “drivers” on it — but not necessarily together. Searching HT-Z9F soundbar “inch drivers” on the other hand, narrows our search considerably, producing a result right at the top that lists the exact spec we’re looking for: 2.5-inch drivers. (If you can’t find the terms you searched for on the resulting page, press Ctrl+F on your keyboard — Command+F on a Mac — to locate your words on that page.) Bonus tip: If you’re looking for a specific page but aren’t sure the exact words it uses, you can put an asterisk in those quotes to symbolize any word. For example, if you forgot the title of Taylor Swift’s dance-pop single from “1989,” you could search taylor swift “* it off” and find the “Shake It Off” lyrics you’re hunting down.

Exclude words with the minus sign

It’s frustrating when a search returns oodles of results that have nothing to do with what you’re looking for. This is especially common with homonyms — words that are spelled and pronounced the same but have different meanings. For example, let’s say you’re searching for a music group to play at your wedding. Searching for wedding bands brings up a ton of results, but most are for wedding rings — often called bands — not musicians that play at wedding receptions. The minus sign is your friend here. Think of a word that would appear on all the irrelevant pages — in this case, “jewelry” or “jeweler” is probably a good bet — and include it with a minus sign in your search: wedding bands -jewelry. Just like that, you’ve got yourself a bunch of sites that review wedding bands across the country.

I also use this often for products with similarly-named siblings — say, Apple’s MacBook line, which includes the MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro. Getting too many results for the Air and Pro? Just eliminate them from your search with macbook -air -pro and you’ll get more relevant results.

Narrow your search to a specific time period

If your head is spinning after that last one, here’s an easy tip for you. Occasionally, search results will consist of older articles that have ranked on a given topic but haven’t been updated to include recent changes. If you encounter this problem, you can put a date restriction on the results by clicking the Tools button under Google’s search bar, and then clicking the “Any Time” drop-down. You can narrow your results to the previous week, month, year, or a custom time frame.

Search your favorite sites with the “site:” operator

If you’re looking for an article you read a while back, but can’t find now — or if you specifically want to see what one of your most trusted sites has to say about a topic — you can use the site: operator to limit your search to that specific publication. (This is especially useful for sites that don’t have a search function — though it’s often better than a site’s built-in search bar, too.)

Let’s say I want to read about the Iran nuclear deal, but I prefer coverage from The New York Times. Instead of just Googling US iran deal for the latest news, I can search site:nytimes.com Iran deal to see coverage only from The Times. This also allows me to see everything The Times has done on the topic going back weeks or months, rather than my results getting cluttered with versions of today’s news from other publications.

Add search shortcuts to your browser’s address bar

Ready for a more advanced lesson? Tricks like the site: operator are great, but they take a while to type out — especially if you search for Times content regularly. You can save yourself precious seconds on every search by creating a short keyword for bits of text you search regularly, if your browser supports it, and most do. That way, instead of typing site:nytimes.com every time, you can just type nyt in your browser’s address bar, add your search terms, and get right to the good stuff.

To do this, perform an example search on Google, then copy the URL from the address bar. Using the above example, my

URL is: https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Anytimes.com+iran+deal

This is what we’ll use to create our shortcut. In Chrome, right-click the address bar, choose “Edit Search Engines,” and click “Add” to create a new one with nyt as the keyword. In Firefox, right-click the Bookmarks Bar and create a new bookmark instead with nyt as the keyword. Paste the search URL you copied earlier into the “Search Engine” or “Location” box, and replace your search terms with %s (making sure to leave in any terms you want to keep as part of the keyword). So, since I want my nyt shortcut to search site:nytimes.com and whatever search terms I add, my URL would look like this: https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Anytimes.com+%s

See how I replaced iran+deal with %s in the URL? Now, whenever I type nyt into the address bar, I can search The New York Times for any terms I want. I use this for all kinds of common searches: sites I like (nyt searches site:nytimes %s), authors I trust (jk searches Jolie Kerr %s), or — if you want to get really advanced — other URL tricks, like getting driving directions from Google Maps (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&q=from+123+main+street+to+%s).

Find the source of a photo with reverse image search

Finally, not all searches are made up of words. Sometimes, it can be handy to know where a certain photo came from, or to find a larger version of it. You probably know you can type a few words to find a photo with Google’s Image Search, but you might not have realized it works in the other direction too: Drag an image into Image Search and Google will find other versions of that photo for you. A few years ago, I was searching for an apartment, and found one that looked great — it had the number of bedrooms I needed, in the part of town I wanted to be in, and the photos looked nice. But I found it on one of those “members only” apartment listing sites, so I had to pay a monthly subscription in order to get the name, address and contact info of the complex. Not to be outdone, I dragged the building’s photo to my desktop, then dragged it into Google Images. Google immediately found another site that had used that photo: the building’s official website, where I could call or email and ask directly about open units for rent.

Google isn’t the only site that has this feature, either. TinEye is a similar tool with a few more options, if you’re trying to find where the image first appeared. EBay’s iPhone and Android apps also let you search by image, which is useful if you’re trying to find a rare piece of china with no markings, or something like that. It doesn’t always work, but when you’re in a bind, it’s worth a shot — and if nothing else, it may give you another clue to add to your search terms.

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was published in heartland.org By Chris Talgo and Emma Kaden - Uploaded by the Association Member: Grace Irwin]

The U.S. Department of Justice announced it will launch a wide-ranging probe into possible antitrust behavior by social media and technology giants. Although no companies were specifically named, it’s not hard to guess which corporations will be in the limelight: Amazon, Facebook, and, of course, the mother of all technology titans, Google.

There is certainly a case to be made that these companies have been shady with private user data, stifled competition, and manipulated the flow of information to their benefit. But it’s worth considering whether or not a federal government investigation and possible destruction of these influential companies are really necessary.

As perhaps one of the most powerful companies in the world, Google has the most to lose if the federal government intervenes. According to research by Visual Capitalist, 90.8 percent of all internet searches are conducted via Google and its subsidiaries. For comparison’s sake, Google’s two main competitors — Bing and Yahoo! — comprise less than 3 percent of total searches.

Due to its overwhelming dominance of the search engine industry, Google has nearly complete control over the global flow of information. In other words, Google determines the results of almost all web-based inquiries.

Of course, this is a potentially dangerous situation. With this amount of control over the dispersal of information, Google has the unique ability to sway public opinion, impact economic outcomes, and influence any and all matters of public information. For instance, by altering search results, Google can bury content that it deems unworthy of the public’s view.

The truth is, not only can Google do these things, it already has done them. The tech giant has a long history of manipulating search results and promoting information based on political bias.

On its face, one can easily see how supporting the regulation and breakup of Google could serve the public good. If executed properly (unlike most government interventions), Google web searches would be free of bias and manipulation. The possible unintended consequences of such an intrusion, however, could dwarf any benefits it might bring.

The internet is the most highly innovative and adaptive medium ever developed. In less than two decades, it has brought about a revolution in most aspects of our daily lives, from how we conduct commerce and communicate to how we travel, learn, and access information. The primary reason for this breathtaking evolution is the complete lack of government regulation, intervention, and intrusion into the infrastructure of the internet.

Right now, Google serves as one of the primary pillars of the internet framework. Yes, Google is far from perfect — after all, it is run by humans — but it is an essential component to a thriving internet ecosystem. But this does not mean Google will forever serve as the foundation of the internet — 20 years ago, it didn’t even exist, and 20 years from now, something new will most likely take its place.

As tempting as it is to tinker with the internet and the companies that are currently fostering the dynamic growth and innovation that make the internet so unique, regulating such a complex and intricate system could lead to its downfall at worst and its petrification at best.

Wanting to keep Google from manipulating consumers is a noble notion, but this should happen from the bottom up, not the top down. Consumers should be the ultimate arbiters of which internet-based companies thrive.

Remember (for those who are old enough) that when the internet became mainstream, navigating it through search engines was extremely primitive and challenging. Early search engines such as AltaVista, Ask Jeeves, and Infoseek barely met consumer expectations.

Fast forward to 2019, and ponder how much more convenient Google has made everyday life. From optimized search capability to email to video sharing to navigation, Google provides an all-inclusive package of services that billions of people find useful — at this point in time. Someday, though, a company will surely produce a product superior to Google that protects user data, takes bias out of the equation, and allows for robust competition, all while maintaining and elevating the quality of service. No doubt customers will flock to it.

The awesome, rapid technology innovations of the past 20 years are due in large part to a lack of government regulation. Imagine what progress could be made in the years to come if the government refrains from overregulating and destroying internet companies. That’s not to say that the government shouldn’t take action against illegal activities, but overregulating this dynamic industry to solve trivial matters would do much more harm than good.

The government should take a laissez-faire approach to regulation, especially when it comes to the internet. Consumers should be able to shape industries according to their needs, wants, and desires without the heavy hand of government intervention.

[Originally Published at American Spectator]

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was published in flipweb.org By Abhishek - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jay Harris]

One of the first question that someone who is getting into SEO would have is how exactly does Google rank the websites that you see in Google Search. Ranking a website means that giving them rank in terms of positions. The first position URL that you see in Google Search is ranked number 1 and so on. Now, there are various factors involved in ranking websites on Google Search. It is also not the case that you can’t rank higher if your website’s rank is decided once. Therefore, you would have the question of how does Google determine which URL of a website should come first and which should be lower.

For this reason, Google’s John Mueller has now addressed this question and explains in a video how Google picks website URL for its Search. John explains that there are site preference signals which are involved in determining the rank of a website. However, the most important signals are the preference of the site and the preference of the user accessing the site.

Here are the Site preference signals:

  • Link rep canonical annotations
  • Redirects
  • Internal linking
  • URL in the sitemap file
  • HTTPS preference
  • Nicer looking URLs

One of the keys, as John Mueller has previously mentioned, is to remain consistent. While John did not explain what he means by being consistent, it should mean that you should keep on doing whatever you do. Now, one of the best examples of being consistent is to post on your website every day in order to rank higher up in search results. If you are not consistent, your website’s ranking might get lost and you will have to start all over again. Apart from that, you have to be consistent when it comes to performing SEO as well. If you stop that, your website will suffer in the long run.

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was published in fbi.gov - Uploaded by the Association Member: Carol R. Venuti]

Operation SaboTor, a multi-agency law enforcement action between January and March 2019 that targeted opioid sales on the Darknet, included this search of a vehicle and a residence in California. The search was the result of an eight-month investigation that led to five arrests.

When Knoxville first responders found a man dead in his home, there was clear evidence on the scene of the heroin that caused his overdose. Also nearby were clues to how the deadly drugs had reached him. Investigators found a padded manila envelope with postage and markings that provided them another link back to the online drug sellers who have proliferated on the Darknet in recent years.

Drug traffickers are increasingly using anonymous online networks to sell narcotics, including potent synthetic opioids like fentanyl, to buyers who can order and receive the drugs without ever leaving home. What can appear to be a regular e-commerce transaction is one of the delivery channels fueling a deadly nationwide epidemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that drug overdose deaths have been on an upward climb for several years, across the United States and across all demographic groups. In 2017 alone, 70,237 people in this country died of a drug overdose; two-thirds of those deaths involved an opioid.

As part of a government-wide effort to address the epidemic, the Department of Justice created the Joint Criminal Opioid and Darknet Enforcement (J-CODE) team in 2018 to leverage the power of federal and international partnerships to combat the complex and deadly threat of online drug sales.

Now in its second year, J-CODE is delivering results through coordinated efforts and the commitment of the nation’s law enforcement agencies to address opioid sales on the Darknet. Building on the success of last year’s Operation Disarray, the J-CODE team led Operation SaboTor between January and March of this year. These concentrated operations in the United States and abroad led to 61 arrests and shut down 50 Darknet accounts used for illegal activity. Agents executed 65 search warrants, seizing more than 299 kilograms of drugs, 51 firearms, and more than $7 million ($4.504 million in cryptocurrency, $2.485 million in cash, and $40,000 in gold).

“This is a new and evolving threat, and we found that no one agency can do it alone.”

Maggie Blanton, special agent, FBI Hi-Tech Organized Crime Unit

J-CODE joins the efforts of the FBI with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), United States Postal Inspection Service (USPIS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Justice (DOJ), and the Department of Defense (DOD). As many of these markets cross borders, Europol is also an invaluable international partner in J-CODE’s efforts to make a global impact on Darknet drug trafficking.

“This is a new and evolving threat, and we found that no one agency can do it alone,” said FBI Special Agent Maggie Blanton of the Hi-Tech Organized Crime Unit at FBI Headquarters. “The FBI may get information from local law enforcement after an overdose or arrest. Through that tip, we can work with our federal partners with the Postal Inspection Service, because so often the drugs are moving through the mail. Our Customs and Border Protection partners are a great resource on understanding trends and preventing drugs from coming into the country from abroad, and our partnership with DEA is critical because of their experience and expertise with drug cases.”

The evidence gathered from that overdose death in Knoxville, for example, was shared with local law enforcement and then with USPIS, the FBI, and other partners. The eight-month investigation led to the arrest of five suspects in the Los Angeles area in March 2019 who are believed to be behind at least two online drug sites that shipped out an estimated 1,500 parcels each month. Search warrants carried out on a residence rented by the suspects and two of their vehicles uncovered drugs, a loaded gun, mailing supplies, computers, cell phones, and transaction receipts.

FBI Special Agent Nathan Cocklin said members of his Hi-Tech Organized Crime squad from the Los Angeles Field Office, along with USPIS inspectors, interviewed the suspects as they were brought into custody. He said the suspects claimed they were just running a business, making money, and not considering the impact of their online sales. “It’s a transaction only,” Cocklin said of the Darknet marketplaces. “They don’t even know each other’s real names.” He said the suspects never considered that a package dropped in a mailbox in Southern California could mean the loss of a life in eastern Tennessee.

Drugs uncovered in a March 2019 search in California of a residence and vehicle involved in a Darknet drug investigation by the Joint Criminal Opioid and Darknet Enforcement (J-CODE) team.
Members of the J-CODE team conduct a search of a residence and vehicle in California in March 2019, where drugs were among the items seized.

A Multi-Agency, Multi-Layered Approach

The Darknet is a part of the Internet accessed through a specialized browser called Tor. Tor allows users to better hide who they are, where they are, and what they are doing online. Darknet marketplaces offer illicit goods that range from hacked bank accounts and stolen credit card information to guns and drugs.

“It’s become easier to get onto the Darknet marketplaces—all you need is a smartphone or computer,” said Chris Oksala, a supervisory special agent with DEA. “There are multiple ways to pay for the drug—from cryptocurrencies to Western Union transfers—and there are multiple ways to shield your identity.”

But on the other side of the seeming ease and anonymity of buying and selling on the Darknet is the hard work being done by law enforcement, in concert, to combat the illegal activity occurring online—from targeting the marketplaces and the sellers to reaching out to those buying illegal wares online.

“These are very complex and time-consuming cases for one agency,” said Kyle Rau, USPIS program manager for Darkweb investigations. “The ‘one government’ approach allows us to tap into each agency’s strength and allows each agency to focus on a particular task.”

The FBI and its law enforcement partners in the United States and abroad have had tremendous success in recent years taking down some of the largest and most profitable Darknet marketplaces. In 2017, law enforcement seized the AlphaBay marketplace, believed to be the largest Darknet market at the time. That seizure was followed by a takedown of Hansa market, another major player.

“It is harder to get the infrastructure up,” stressed Cocklin. “To compare it to a normal drug organization, a dealer is easier to replace than the head of the organization. If you take out a marketplace, you have to rebuild. It takes money and time and undermines trust. Did taking out AlphaBay and Hansa stop everything? No. Did it make an impact? Absolutely.”

The next-level target is the Darknet drug trafficking organizations. The goal of Operation Disarray and Operation SaboTor, along with the ongoing work of J-CODE partners, is to identify and arrest those behind the online sales.

“It takes work, but the FBI, USPIS, DEA, and others are laser-focused on tackling the opioid epidemic on the web.”

Nathan Cocklin, special agent, FBI Los Angeles

The final prong of the J-CODE effort is educating the public on the dangers of opioids by contacting individuals who are known to have purchased drugs online. Sometimes the message arrives too late. In locating and contacting buyers, the J-CODE team often comes across death notices and obituaries. In some cases, agents learn from buyers that they had survived an overdose; in other cases, agents learn from family members that a buyer did not. Oksala stressed that many of the drugs being sold online carry the added danger of unknown, powerful chemicals. “People are making thousands of pills at a time, doing the formulation without any scientific training,” he said.

The agents arrive with information on addiction and treatment, and their very presence challenges the anonymous nature of the Darknet. “If they know someone is looking, people lose faith in the marketplace,” said Rich Sheehan, USPIS assistant inspector in charge. “We’ve proven time and time again that they are not anonymous.”

”We are able to identify people,” said Cocklin. “It takes work, but the FBI, USPIS, DEA, and others are laser-focused on tackling the opioid epidemic on the web.”

Categorized in Internet Privacy

[Source: This article was Published in hannity.com By Hannity Staff - Uploaded by the Association Member: Logan Hochstetler]

Google and other American tech companies were thrust into the national spotlight in recent weeks, with critics claiming the platforms are intentionally censoring conservative voices, “shadow-banning” leading personalities, and impacting American elections in an unprecedented way.

In another explosive exposé, Project Veritas Founder James O’Keefe revealed senior Google officials vowing to prevent the “Trump Situation” from occurring again during the 2020 elections.

The controversy dates back much further. In the fall of 2018, The SEO Tribunal published an article detailing 63 “fascinating Google search statistics.”

The article shows the planet’s largest search engine handles more than 63,000 requests per second, owns more than 90% of the global market share, and generated $95 billion in ad sales during 2017.

1. Google receives over 63,000 searches per second on any given day.

(Source: SearchEngineLand)

That’s the average figure of how many people use Google a day, which  translates into at least 2 trillion searches per year, 3.8 million searches per minute, 228 million searches per hour, and 5.6 billion searches per day. Pretty impressive, right?

2. 15% of all searches have never been searched before on Google.

(Source: SearchEngineLand)

Out of  trillions of searches every year, 15% of these queries have never been seen by Google before. Such queries mostly relate to day-to-day activities, news, and trends, as confirmed per Google search stats.

3. Google takes over 200 factors into account before delivering you the best results to any query in a fraction of a second.

(Source: Backlinko)

Of course, some of them are rather controversial, and others may vary significantly, but there are also those that are proven and important, such as content and backlinks.

4. Google’s ad revenue amounted to almost $95.4 billion in 2017.

(Source: Statista)

According to recent Google stats, that is 25% up from 2016. The search giant saw nearly 22% ad revenue growth in the fourth quarter only.

5. Google owns about 200 companies.

(Source: Investopedia)

That is, on average, as if they’ve been acquiring more than one company per week since 2010. Among those there are companies involved in mapping, telecommunications, robotics, video broadcasting, and advertising.

6. Google’s signature email product has a 27% share of the global email client market.

(Source: Litmus)

This is up by 7% since 2016.

7. Upon going public, Google figures show the company was valued at $27 billion.

(Source: Entrepreneur)

More specifically, the company sold over 19 million shares of stock for $85 per share. In other words, it was valued as much as General Motors.

8. The net US digital display ad revenue for Google was $5.24 billion in 2017.

(Source: Emarketer)

Google statistics show that this number is significantly lower than Facebook, which made $16.33 billion, but much higher than Snapchat, which brought in $770 million from digital display ads.

9. Google has a market value of $739 billion.

(Source: Statista)

As of May 2018, the search market leader has a market value of $739 billion, coming behind Apple, which has a market value of $924 billion, Amazon, which has a market value of $783 billion, and Microsoft, which has a market value of  $753.

10. Google’s owner, Alphabet, reported an 84% rise in profits for the last quarter.

(Source: The Guardian)

The rising global privacy concerns didn’t affect Google’s profits. According to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S, the quarterly profit of $9.4 billion exceeded estimates of $6.56 billion. Additionally, the price for clicks and views of ads sold by Google rose in its favor mostly due to advertisers who pursued ad slots on its search engine, YouTube video service, and partner apps and websites.

Read the full list at The SEO Tribunal.

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was Published in pcmag.com By Max Eddy - Uploaded by the Association Member: Logan Hochstetler]

Once Incognito Mode is engaged in Maps, 'you can search and navigate without linking this activity with your Google account,' says CEO Sundar Pichai

Google first introduced Incognito Mode years ago with the release of the Chrome browser. Now, as part of a larger push to enhance consumer privacy, the search giant is adding Incognito Mode to both Google Search and Google Maps.

When Incognito Mode is engaged in Chrome, your activities aren't stored in your browser history. It also disables cookies, which are used to identify and sometimes track individuals around the web, and turns off browser extensions. It doesn't hide your online activity, as a VPN would.

Google Maps

Google first introduced Incognito Mode years ago with the release of the Chrome browser. Now, as part of a larger push to enhance consumer privacy, the search giant is adding Incognito Mode to both Google Search and Google Maps.

When Incognito Mode is engaged in Chrome, your activities aren't stored in your browser history. It also disables cookies, which are used to identify and sometimes track individuals around the web, and turns off browser extensions. It doesn't hide your online activity, as a VPN would.

Incognito mode for Google Maps will be similar, Google CEO Sundar Pichai explained in a blog post. Once Incognito Mode is engaged in Maps, "you can search and navigate without linking this activity with your Google account," he wrote.

Google Maps Incognito Mode

You may have noticed that when you search in Google, meanwhile, your old searches sometimes pop up again. Google uses your activity to tailor the results for you, but not so with Incognito Mode for Search.

Incognito for Google Maps and Search are coming later this year. Google has already rolled out an Incognito Mode for YouTube. "We strongly believe that privacy and security is for everyone, not just a few," said Pichai.

While this is an important move for Google, it's not yet clear what information will be saved when these new Incognito modes are engaged, and what the limitations will be. We have to assume that, like Incognito for Chrome, you won't be totally invisible.

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in thenextweb.com written by Abhimanyu Ghoshal - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Carol R. Venuti]

The European Union is inching closer to enacting sweeping copyright legislation that would require platforms like Google, Facebook to pay publishers for the privilege of displaying their content to users, as well as monitoring copyright infringement by users on the sites and services they manage.

That’s set to open a Pandora’s Box of problems that could completely derail your internet experience because it’d essentially disallow platforms from displaying content from other sources. In a screenshot shared with Search Engine Land, Google illustrated how this might play out in its search results for news articles:

google
An example of what Google’s search results for news might look like if the EU goes ahead with its copyright directive

As you can see, the page looks empty, because it’s been stripped of all copyrighted content – headlines, summaries and images from articles from various publishers.

Google almost certainly won’t display unusable results like these, but it will probably only feature content from publishers it’s cut deals with (and it’s safe to assume that’s easier for larger companies than small ones).

That would reduce the number of sources of information you’ll be able to discover through the search engine, and it’ll likely lead to a drop in traffic for media outlets. It’s a lose-lose situation, and it’s baffling that EU lawmakers don’t see this as a problem – possibly because they’re fixated on how this ‘solution’ could theoretically benefit content creators and copyright holders by ruling that they must be paid for their output.

It isn’t yet clear when the new copyright directive will come into play – there are numerous processes involved that could take until 2021 before it’s implemented in EU countries’ national laws. Hopefully, the union’s legislators will see sense well before that and put a stop to this madness.

Update: We’ve clarified in our headline that this is Google’s opinion of how its search service will be affected by the upcoming EU copyright directive; it isn’t yet clear how it will eventually be implemented.

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in hothardware.com written by Rod Scher - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Jasper Solander] 

We have all heard of the dark web: a lawless digital world, uncharted and unstructured, full of data -- much of it illegally acquired and illegally for sale -- that cannot be viewed without special tools: proxy servers, TOR browsers, and the like. It's a murky and mysterious place, a place where much information resides but is difficult to unearth for the uninitiated.

Until now. Canada's Echosec Systems Ltd. recently released Beacon, a security tool that's designed to shed some light on the dark web.

Karl1 Karl Swannie is the CEO of Echosec, the company behind Beacon.

"Beacon is a dark web search engine that allows users to search anonymously, without the need for a TOR browser," says Echosec CTO Michael Raypold. "We’ve designed Beacon to be simple to interact with, while incorporating powerful advanced search tools, making searching unindexed data in the dark web as easy as using a surface web search engine."

The idea behind Beacon is that it can be used by a company to potentially head off -- or at the very least mitigate -- a potential disaster. Since the bulk of the data on the dark web is essentially unstructured, the Echosec team crawled the dark web, indexed its content and then build a natural language query interface that allows non-hackers to access that information quickly and easily. Simply put, Beacon is like Google for the dark web.

beacongrabWith Beacon, dark web data can be searched by a variety of criteria. Specific types of data (credit cards, emails, etc.) can be searched for explicitly.

Keep in mind, of course, that not everything on the dark web is illegal.

Says Raypold, "The dark web is a place where you can source illegal or illicit materials because the inherent privacy and anonymity baked into platforms like the TOR network makes buying and selling these goods easier to achieve without repercussions. However, that isn’t to say everything on the dark web is illegal. News organization like the NYTimes and Pro Publica maintain Onion sites for their more privacy-conscious users and to help disseminate news that might otherwise be censored." Still, much of the dark web's content was acquired illegally and can be misused to spread misinformation, victimize vulnerable populations, execute social engineering exploits, or engage in various forms of identity theft.

We all know that information in the wrong hands can be dangerous. Raypold cites the story of Coca-Cola's attempt, some years back, to acquire a Chinese soft drink company. Unbeknownst to high-level Coca-Cola executives, the company's secret plans and negotiation tactics were in fact not secret at all, because Coca-Cola had been previously hacked, thanks to a phishing email opened by a Coca-Cola exec.

Beacon did not exist at that time (2009), but it's likely that some of the information retrieved from the hack and many pilfered emails would have ended up on the dark web; if so, Beacon could have unearthed them, letting the company know of its vulnerability long before 2009 and perhaps allowing Coca-Cola to mitigate the damage. (In the end, the acquisition fell through, most likely because Coca-Cola -- having lost control of its confidential information -- had also lost any leverage it might have had in the negotiations.)

The goal of Beacon, says Raypold, is to allow companies to easily examine data on the dark web as a way of locating the potentially harmful information that’s stored there: this could include stolen corporate emails, company documents, personal info, or other such data that could be detrimental to a company, its brand, or its customers. After all, if your data has been compromised, it's always better to know than not to know.
MikeMike Raypold is the CTO of Echosec, LTD.

"Beacon allows teams to more quickly identify and respond to information that can materially damage a company’s brand and consumer trust," says Raypold. "Being able to quickly identify a sensitive problem also means that you can start putting a solution in place and notify your customers before they find out through other means."



Of course, a security tool is but another weapon in the wrong hands, and weapons can be misused; it's one thing for a pen-tester or white-hat hacker to be in possession of systems that can locate or uncover data, but what about someone finding a way to misuse Beacon? While Raypold notes that it is possible to misuse Beacon, since the tool makes it easier for users to locate data they might otherwise have difficulty finding, he says that the company has taken steps to mitigate that danger.

"First, every Echosec customer must go through a use-case approval process to determine how the customer is using the application and to make sure they are in compliance with the vendors from whom the data Is sourced," says Raypold. "If a potential customer cannot pass the use-case approval process, they do not get access to the system."

Beacon Black

Second, the company has built automated tools and manual processes into its platform and into the company workflows to notify the Echosec team if users attempt to run searches that are in violation of their approved use case.

"The checks built into the platform will outright prevent some searches from being run so that users never receive data that we perceive could be used with malicious intent. Furthermore, some of the vendors from whom we source data have asked us to prevent certain queries from being run, regardless of a customer's use case," says Raypold. (Naturally, the company publishes an "acceptable use" policy, which can be found here.)

Echosec expects to sell Beacon mainly to corporate customers interested in keeping tabs on their intellectual property, corporate secrets, and other sensitive data. White-hat hackers -- such as pen-testers -- could conceivably be a market as well, but the company feels that would be fairly uncommon. And if it did occur, it would simply be viewed as an example of contracted security experts acting on behalf of the ultimate corporate customer.

However, (and by whomever) Beacon is used, it looks as if the murky landscape of the dark web is no longer quite as dark as it once was.

Categorized in Deep Web

[This article is originally published in business2community.com written by Graham Jones - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Joshua Simon] 

Web search is often wasting time for you. There, I have said it. Google is a master illusionist. It makes you think you are working when you are not.

The reason is simple, you can get an answer to any question within seconds. That makes it feel as though you have achieved something. Prior to Google, you may have needed to find a book, look something up in the index, locate the right page and then read it – only to find out it didn’t contain what you wanted. So, you had to choose another book. That might have needed a trip to the library. To find out one fact, it might have taken hours. Now, all it takes is seconds.

Of course, in the past, the information you needed might not have been in a book. You might have needed to speak with someone. Perhaps you could only get the information from an expert. Or, if it was about a company you needed to phone them. Many companies had an “information line” – a special number you could call to speak with someone to get details you needed about the business. All of that took time.

When things take a long time our perception of progress is slow. However, when we can do things rapidly our sense of achievement is heightened. So, when we use the web to search for things which we previously had to look up in a book, take a trip to the library, or make several phone calls, we get a sense of achieving something. It is a psychological illusion that we are working.

It is, therefore, no surprise to discover in recent research that business buyers prefer to obtain information about suppliers using the web, rather than any other tool.

b2b search

According to the study from Path Factory, almost 90% of buyers use web search as their preferred method of finding information. Only one in three people opt for the telephone. That’s no surprise, either. Research from O2, the mobile phone company, found that making phone calls was only the fifth most popular use of a smartphone. It turns out that the most popular use of a mobile phone is to browse the Internet – searching for information.

Web Search is Wasting Time

The problem with web search is that it is often wrong. Yet, most people accept the first result Google provides. For instance, search for “how many planets are there in our solar system” and the first result will tell you that there are eight planets. True, but not quite. Like many other facts, there are nuances which are not explained. Astronomers redefined what constitutes a planet and so our solar system contains eight planets and five “dwarf planets”, including Pluto (which was a planet when I grew up..!). Like many other “facts”, the first information we see on Google misses out the nuance.

Similarly, search for “duplicate content penalty” and you will find thousands of results telling you that you cannot duplicate content on your website because “Google will ban you” or “Google will downgrade your search engine ranking” or some other nonsense. And nonsense it is. Google has said so, repeatedly. Yet, many businesses trying to make their websites optimised for search engines will spend hours and hours recrafting content in order to “remove the penalty”. That’s an activity that is wasting time on work that is unnecessary, all because of search.

However, if you phoned a reliable expert on search engine optimisation you would have received the correct information about duplicating content, avoiding you hours of work. However, to make that phone call and have the conversation is slower than completing a web search and hence it feels less productive.

What this means is, if you need a new supplier you could well make a better selection if you did not use web search. Pick up the phone and speak with people who know the market, such as the contacts you make in business networking. It will feel slower doing this, but the answers you get will be more informed and less prone to the influence of an algorithm. Once you have the recommendations, then use web search to find out about the company.

Making phone calls is becoming a low priority activity. Your office phone rings less than it used to. You feel as though you are being productive because you search and find stuff online, but that is wasting time.

Categorized in Search Engine

 [This article is originally published in mdshakilhossen.com written by MD SHAKIL - Uploaded by AIRS Member: James Gill]

 

Google Power Search (Google Power Search), or Google Power Search, which is why you tell them why you can easily find the results you want from the web.

These are very easy to use. The way we search, the same will be connected to our search network.

Today I will discuss with you some of the advanced Google Search Tips.

Hopefully, stay up with it. Because, today’s search operators will change the way you search Google.

lets start.

1. Allintitle /Intitle search operator

Allintitle When you do a search using this operator, Google will look at the keyword in the search box to match only the titles in all the web properties and only those titles will be displayed on the search results page.

The intitle operator works just like allintitle, the only difference is that the intitle operator works properly for keywords created by a single word (eg: bird), not for keywords with multiple words (eg: how to draw a bird).

Rules of Allintitle or Intitle search operator

All operators should use all lowercase letters (for search operators).

Allintitle or, intitle correct. But Allintitle or Intitle is not right.

After writing allintile, it is not ok to give space, sit directly to the colon (:).

It is not right to use spaces even after the colon sign, so sometimes the results are different.

2. Allinurl /Inurl search operator

Allinurl When you do a search using this operator, Google will search the keyword in the search box and match it with the url in all the web properties and the url in which the keyword can be found only on the search results page.

Rules of Allinurl search operator

All operators should use all lowercase letters (for search operators).

When using allinurl, use all lowercase letters (for search operators).

allinurl correct. But Allinurl is not right.

After writing allinurl, space is not right, sit directly (:) colon.

It is not right to use spaces even after the colon sign, so sometimes the results are different.

3. Site search operator

Site By using this operator you can see the properties of a specific site. Not only that, you can learn more about how many content in that web site indexes Google.

Also, you can check whether a particular post of a site is indexed in Google’s index.

Site search operator Rules of writing

When using the site operator, all lowercase letters will be used.

site correct. But the site is not correct.

After writing the site, it is not ok to give space, directly to the colon (:).

Space is not right after the colon mark, it is not available in the correct result.

4. Location search operator

location, You can easily find out about  any location using this operator.

Rules of writing Location search operator

When using the location operator, you will not be able to do so much like the previous shoots. You can get the results you want, no matter how small or uppercase letters you write.

5. Exact Match Search ” “

If you search using an inverted comma, then you will get the Exact Match search result. Like ‘ ‘

Rules of writing Exact match ” ” search operator

You only need to use an inverted comma before your keyword.

6. Social Media Search @

@ Using this sign you can get information from any social media. Like Mdshakilhossen @facebook.

7. Hashtag Search #

# (Hash) Using this symbol, you can get any information about any hashtag. Like #knowmdshakilhossen

Hashtag # search operator Writing Rules

You only need to use # this symbol before your desired keyword.

8. Wildcards Search *

* By using this Wildcards operator, you can find unknown words from Google’s information in its database.

Wildcards Search * operator Writing Rules

You must use this symbol * in the topic you want to know about. Then Google will show all the words that can sit her

9. related search operator

Related This word can be easily understood by other sites or social media related to any one domain you use.

related Search operator Writing Rules

You will write the related word before and after it will give the colon (:) sign. Enter a space now and then enter the domain you want.

Categorized in Search Engine
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