Website Search
Research Papers
plg_search_attachments
Articles
FAQs
Easy Profile - Search plugin
Courses & Exams
Pages
Specialized Search Engines
Events Calender
Upcoming Events

Google's Project Dragonfly was a secret prototype search engine intended to pave the way for the company's return to China; it featured censored search results that complied with Chinese state rules banning searches for topics like "human rights," "student protest" and "Nobel prize."

Leaked details of Dragonfly, reported in The Intercept, paint a picture of a search tool that doesn't merely limit access to information, but also assists Chinese state agents in retaliating against people who sought access to banned information.

In particular, Dragonfly logged each search and associated it with the user's phone number.

Dragonfly was also reportedly built to help the Chinese authorities falsify pollution data by substituting official numbers for observations made by disinterested parties. Pollution is a fraught political topic in China, with citizens frequently upset over the state's failure to keep their air breathable. The Chinese government has a history of falsifying pollution data and suppressing independent figures.

Sources familiar with the project said that prototypes of the search engine linked the search app on a user’s Android smartphone with their phone number. This means individual people’s searches could be easily tracked – and any user seeking out information banned by the government could potentially be at risk of interrogation or detention if security agencies were to obtain the search records from Google.

“This is very problematic from a privacy point of view, because it would allow far more detailed tracking and profiling of people’s behavior,” said Cynthia Wong, senior internet researcher with Human Rights Watch. “Linking searches to a phone number would make it much harder for people to avoid the kind of overreaching government surveillance that is pervasive in China.”

Source: This article was Published boingboing.net

Published in Search Engine

Here's what some marketers are saying about the move to include same meaning queries in exact match close variants.

Marketer reactions to the news that Google is yet again degrading the original intent (much less meaning) of exact match to include “same meaning” close variants is ranging from pessimism to ho-hum to optimism.

Expected impact on performance

“The impact of this will probably be most felt by accounts where exact match has historically been successful and where an exact match of a query made a difference in conversions — hence the reason you’d use exact in the first place,” said digital consultant and President of Netptune MoonJulie Friedman Bacchini.

Friedman Bacchini said the loss of control with exact match defeats the match type’s purpose. Many marketers use exact match to be explicit — exacting — in their targeting and expect a match type called “exact” to be just that.

Brad Geddes, the co-founder of ad testing platform AdAlysis and head of consultancy Certified Knowledge, said one problem with expanding the queries that can trigger an exact match keyword is that past changes have shown it can affect the overall performance of exact match. “The last change meant that our ‘variation matches’ had worse conversion rates than our exact match and that we lowered bids on most exact match terms. This change might just drive us from using it completely, or really hitting the negative keywords.”

Like Geddes, Andy Taylor, associate director of research at performance agency Merkle, also said they saw an increase in traffic assigned as exact match close variants with the last change, “and those close variants generally convert at a lower rate than true exact matches.”

Yet, others who participated in the test see the loosening of the reigns as a positive action.

One of the beta testers for this change was ExtraSpace Storage, a self-storage company in the U.S. with locations in more than 40 states. The company says it saw positive results from the test.

“The search queries were relevant to our industry and almost all of our primary KPIs saw an overall improvement,” said Steph Christensen, senior analyst for paid search at ExtraSpace.

Christensen said that during the test they did not do any keyword management, letting it run in a “normal environment to give it the best chance to provide the truest results.” She says they will continue to watch performance and make adjustments as needed after it’s fully rolled out by the end of October.

Advertisers as machine learning beneficiaries or guinea pigs

A big driver of these changes, of course, is machine learning. The machine learning/artificial intelligence race is on among Google and the other big tech companies.

Google says its machine learning is now good enough to determine when a query has the same intent as a keyword with a high enough rate of success that advertisers will see an overall performance lift.

Another way to look at the move, though, is that by opening up exact match to include same meaning queries, Google gets the benefit of having marketers train its algorithms by taking action on query reports.

Or as Geddes, put it: “Advertisers are basically paying the fee for Google to try and learn intent.”

Geddes’ point is that this change will help Google’s machine learning algorithms improve understanding of intent across millions of queries through advertiser actions and budgets.

“The fact that Google doesn’t understand user intent coupled with how poor their machine learning has been at times, means we might just move completely away from exact match,” says Geddes.

Of the example Google highlighted in its announcement, Geddes says, “If I search for Yosemite camping; I might want a blog article, stories, social media, or a campground. If I search for a campground — I want a campground.” (As an aside, from what I’ve found it appears Google doesn’t even monetize “Yosemite camping” or “Yosemite campground” results pages that it used as examples.)

Expected workflow changes

One big thing Google has emphasized is that these close variants changes allow advertisers to focus on things other than building out giant keyword lists to get their ads to show for relevant queries. Rather than doing a lot of upfront keyword research before launching, the idea is that the management will happen after the campaign runs and accumulates data. Marketers will add negatives and new keywords as appropriate. But this reframing of the management process and what amounts to a new definition of exact match has marketers thinking anew about all match types.

“The further un-exacting of exact match has me looking at phrase match again,” says Friedman Bacchini. “I definitely see it impacting use of negatives and time involved to review SQRs and apply negatives properly and exhaustively”.

Taylor agrees. “This change places more importance on regularly checking for negatives, but that has already been engrained in our management processes for years and won’t be anything new.”

Geddes said that advertisers might come up against negative keyword limits, which he has seen happen on occasion. Rather than relying heavily on adding negatives, he says they may consider only using phrase match going forward.

In addition to having ads trigger for queries that aren’t relevant or don’t convert well, there’s the matter of having the right ad trigger for a query when you have close variants in an account already.

Matt van Wagner, president and founder of search marketing firm Find Me Faster, says the agency will be monitoring the impact before assessing workflow adjustments, but is not anticipating performance lifts.

“We’ll watch search queries and how, or if, traffic shifts from other ad groups as well as CPC levels. We expect this to have neutral impact at best,” says van Wagner, “since we believe we have our keywords set to trigger on searches with other match types.”

Along those lines, Geddes says it will be critical to watch for duplicate queries triggering keywords across an account to make sure the right ad displays. It puts new focus on negative keyword strategies, says Geddes:

Google will show the most specific matching keyword within a campaign; but won’t do it across the account. So if I have both terms in my account as exact match (“Yosemite camping” and “Yosemite campground”), with one a much higher bid than the other, my higher bid keyword will usually show over my actual exact match word in a different campaign. That means that I now need to also copy my exact match keywords from one campaign and make them exact match negatives in another campaigns that is already using exact match just to control ad serving and bidding. I should never have to do that.

Measuring impact can be challenging

The effects of the change will take some time to unfold. Taylor says it took several months to see the impact of the last change to exact match close variants.

It’s difficult to calculate the incremental effect of these changes to close variants, in part says Taylor, because some close variant traffic comes from keywords – close variants or other match types — that are already elsewhere in the account.

“Google gives a nod to this in its recent announcement, saying that ‘Early tests show that advertisers using mostly exact match keywords see 3 percent more exact match clicks and conversions on average, with most coming from queries they aren’t reaching today,’” Taylor highlights with bolding added.

Another complicating factor, particularly for agencies, is that the effects of these changes don’t play out uniformly across accounts. Taylor shares an example:

An advertiser saw traffic on one of its key brand keywords shift to a different brand keyword several months after the close variants change last year.

“The normal reaction might be to use negatives to get that traffic back over to the correct keyword, but we were getting a better CPC and still getting the same traffic volume with the new variation,.

It didn’t make much sense, especially given Google’s continued assertion even in the current announcement that ‘Google Ads will still prefer to use keywords identical to the search query,’ but if the clicks are cheaper, the clicks are cheaper. This also speaks to how there’s not really a universal response to deploy for changes in close variants, aside from being mindful of what queries are coming in and how they’re performing.”

Looking ahead

Performance advertisers go where they get the best results.

“At the end of the day, the question is if poorer converting close variant queries might pull keyword performance down enough to force advertisers to pull back on bids and reduce overall investment,” said Taylor. “Generally speaking, giving sophisticated advertisers greater control to set the appropriate bids for each query (or any other segment) allows for more efficient allocation of spend, which should maximize overall investment in paid search.”

Geddes says their “priority is to make sure our Bing Ads budgets are maxed and that we’re not leaving anything on the table there. If our [Google] results get worse, we’ll also move some budgets to other places. But this might be one where we really have to do another account organization just to get around Google’s decisions.”

After the change has fully rolled out and they have enough data to act on, ExtraSpace’s Christensen said they will evaluate again. “Since we have such a large [account] build, when we do decide to make any changes we will have to show how we can do this at scale and maintain performance.”

Bacchini calls attention to the current misnomer of exact match and said Google should get rid of exact match altogether if it’s going to take away the original control of exact match. “It is particularly sneaky when you think of this move in terms of less sophisticated advertisers,” said Bacchini. “If they did not click on the ‘Learn More’ link below the formatting for entering in match types for keywords, how exactly would they know that Google Ads does not really mean exact?”

Source: This article was Published searchengineland.com By Ginny Marvin

Published in Search Engine

Did you ever need data on a topic you wanted to research, and had a hard time finding it? Wish you could just Google it? Well, now you can do that.

With data science and analytics on the rise and underway to being democratized, the importance of being able to find the right data to investigate hypotheses and derive insights is paramount

What used to be the realm of researchers and geeks is now the bread and butter of an ever-growing array of professionals, organizations, and tools, not to mention self-service enthusiasts.

Even for the most well-organized and data-rich out there, there comes a time when you need to utilize data from sources other than your own. Weather and environmental data is the archetypal example.

Suppose you want to correlate farming data with weather phenomena to predict crops, or you want to research the effect of weather on a phenomenon taking place throughout a historical period. That kind of historical weather data, almost impossible for any single organization to accumulate and curate, is very likely to be readily available by the likes of NOAA and NASA.

Those organizations curate and publish their data on a regular basis through dedicated data portals. So, if you need their data on a regular basis, you are probably familiar with the process of locating the data via those portals. Still, you will have to look at both NOAA and NASA, and potentially other sources, too.

And it gets worse if you don't just need weather data. You have to locate the right sources, and then the right data at those sources. Wouldn't it be much easier if you could just use one search interface and just find everything out there, just like when you Google something on the web? It sure would, and now you can just Google your data, too.

That did not come about out of the blue. Google's love affair with structured data and semantics has been an ongoing one. Some landmarks on this path have been the incorporation of Google's knowledge graph via the acquisition of Metaweb, and support for structured metadata via schema.org.

Anyone doing SEO will tell you just how this has transformed the quality of Google's search and the options content publishers now have available. The ability to markup content using schema.org vocabulary, apart from making possible things such as viewing ratings and the like in web search results, is the closest we have to a mass-scale web of data.

This is exactly how it works for dataset discovery, as well. In a research note published in early 2017 by Google's Natasha Noy and Dan Brickley, who also happen to be among the semantic web community's most prominent members, the development was outlined. The challenges were laid out, and a call to action was issued. The key element is, once more, schema.org.

schemaorgattributes.png 

Schema.org plays a big part in Google's search, and it's also behind the newly added support for dataset search. (Image: Go Live UK)

Schema.org is a controlled vocabulary that describes entities in the real world and their properties. When something described in schema.org is used to annotate content on the web, it lets search engines know what that content is, as well as its properties. So what happened here is that Google turned on support for dataset entities in schema.org, officially available as of today.

The first step was to make it easier to discover tabular data in search, which uses this same metadata along with the linked tabular data to provide answers to queries directly in the search results. This has been available for a while, and now full support for dataset indexing is here.

But is there anything out there to be discovered? How was Google's open call to dataset providers received? ZDNet had a Q&A with Natasha Noy from Google Research about this:

"We were pleasantly surprised by the reception that our call to action found. Perhaps, because we have many examples of other verticals at Google using the schema.org markup (think of jobs, events, and recipes), people trusted that providing this information would be useful.

Furthermore, because the standard is open and used by other companies, we know that many felt that they are doing it because it is 'the right thing to do.' While we reached out to a number of partners to encourage them to provide the markup, we were surprised to find schema.org/dataset on hundreds, if not thousands, of sites.

So, at launch, we already have millions of datasets, although we estimate it is only a fraction of what is out there. Most just marked up their data without ever letting us know."

NOAA's CDO, Ed Kearns, for example, is a strong supporter of this project and helped NOAA make many of its datasets searchable in this tool. "This type of search has long been the dream for many researchers in the open data and science communities," he said. "And for NOAA, whose mission includes the sharing of our data with others, this tool is key to making our data more accessible to an even wider community of users."

Under the hood

In other words, it's quite likely you may find what you are looking for already, and it will be increasingly likely going forward. You can already find data from NASA and NOAA, as well as from academic repositories such as Harvard's Dataverse and Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), and data provided by news organizations, such as ProPublica.

But there are a few gotchas here, as datasets are different from regular web content that you -- and Google -- can read.

To begin with, what exactly is a dataset? Is a single table a dataset? What about a collection of related tables? What about a protein sequence? A set of images? An API that provides access to data? That was challenge No. 1 set out in Google's research note.

Those fundamental questions -- "what is topic X" and "what is the scope of the system" -- are faced by any vocabulary curator and system architect respectively, and Noy said they decided to take a shortcut rather than get lost in semantics:

"We are basically treating anything that data providers call a dataset by marking schema.org/dataset as a dataset. What constitutes a dataset varies widely by discipline and at this point, we found it useful to be open-minded about the definition."

That is a pragmatic way to deal with the question, but what are its implications? Google has developed guidelines for dataset providers to describe their data, but what happens if a publisher mis-characterizes content as being a dataset? Will Google be able to tell it's not a dataset and not list it as such, or at least penalize its ranking?

Noy said this is the case: "While the process is not fool-proof, we hope to improve as we gain more experience once users start using the tool. We work very hard to improve the quality of our results."

google-data-tech-analytics2-ss-1920.jpg

Google and data has always gone hand in hand. Now Google takes things further, by letting you search for data.

Speaking of ranking, how do you actually rank datasets? For documents, it's a combination of content (frequency and position of keywords and other such metrics) and network (authority of the source, links, etc). But what would apply to datasets? And, crucially, how would it even apply?

"We use a combination of web ranking for the pages where datasets come from (which, in turn, uses a variety of signals) and combine it with dataset-specific signals such as quality of metadata, citations, etc," Noy said.

So, it seems dataset content is not really inspected at this point. Besides the fact that this is an open challenge, there is another reason: Not all datasets discovered will be open, and therefore available for inspection.

"The metadata needs to be open, the dataset itself does not need to be. For an analogy, think of a search you do on Google Scholar: It may well take you to a publisher's website where the article is behind a paywall. Our goal is to help users discover where the data is and then access it directly from the provider," Noy said.

First research, then the world?

And what about the rest of the challenges laid out early on in this effort, and the way forward? Noy noted that while they started addressing some, the challenges in that note set a long-term agenda. Hopefully, she added, this work is the first step in that direction.

Identifying datasets, relating them, and propagating metadata among them was a related set of challenges. "You will see", Noy said, "that for many datasets, we list multiple repositories -- this information comes from a number of signals that we use to find replicas of the same dataset across repositories. We do not currently identify other relationships between datasets."

Indeed, when searching for a dataset, if it happens to be found in more than one locations, then all its instances will be listed. But there is also something else, uniquely applicable to datasets -- at least at first sight. A dataset can be related to a publication, as many datasets come from scientific work. A publication may also come with the dataset it produced, so is there a way of correlating those?

Noy said some initial steps were taken: "You will see that if a dataset directly corresponds to a publication, there is a link to the publication right next to the dataset name. We also give an approximate number of publications that reference the dataset. This is an area where we still need to do more research to understand when exactly a publication references a dataset."

pasted-image-0.png

Searching for datasets will retrieve not only multiple results for your query, but also multiple sources for each dataset. (Image: Google)

If you think about it, however, is this really only applicable to science? If you collect data from your sales pipeline and use them to derive insights and produce periodic reports, for example, isn't that conceptually similar to a scientific publication and its supporting dataset?

If data-driven decision making bears many similarities to the scientific process, and data discovery is a key part of this, could we perhaps see this as a first step of Google moving into this realm for commercial purposes as well?

When asked, Noy noted that Google sees scientists, researchers, data journalists, and others who are interested in working with data as the primary audience for this tool. She also added, however, that as Google's other recent initiatives indicate, Google sees these kinds of datasets becoming more prominent throughout Google products.

Either way, this is an important development for anyone interested in finding data out in the wild, and we expect Google to be moving the bar in data search in the coming period. First research, then the world?

Source: This article was Published zdnet.com By George Anadiotis

Published in Search Engine

Following LinkedIn’s launched back in 2002, the platform became known as the place to be for recruiters and job seekers alike. It was (and still is), the place to house your digital resume for the world to see. Today, however, LinkedIn has flourished into a full-fledged social network for professionals from all walks of life. It’s a place to find jobs, headhunt, network, and share industry knowledge. As of January 2018, LinkedIn had over 250 million active users, of which 40 percent use the social media platform on a daily basis. But more interestingly, LinkedIn has proven to be ideal for finding new B2B leads, with B2B marketers stating that 80 percent of their leads have come from LinkedIn.

Renee Smith, the technical marketer at Los Angeles-based Salted Stone, couldn’t recommend LinkedIn enough when we asked her about B2B marketing. “LinkedIn is built for B2B marketers. [LinkedIn is] comprised entirely of professionals aligning themselves directly with their business,” she said.

What is LinkedIn Advanced Search?

LinkedIn advanced search is a faceted search feature that can help you narrow down your search criteria in a number of different ways. You can search for people or companies, filter your results by industry, past companies, connection degrees, schools, regions, occupations, and more.

In this article, we’ll show how to use LinkedIn advanced search to find new B2B leads. To demonstrate, I’ll be targeting New York-based CEOs in the IT industry.  

1. Access LinkedIn Advanced Search

To get started with LinkedIn Advanced Search, simply click on the LinkedIn search bar.

Now, choose from either “People,” “Jobs” or “Posts.” If you’re hunting for B2B leads, you’ll want to click “People”. You’ll then be presented with a new navigation bar with additional options. From this interface, you can filter your search by location, connections, and current company.

However, clicking the “All Filters” button will send you into LinkedIn Advanced Search mode, with even more options.

2. Apply the Relevant Filters

You should now be looking at all the filters LinkedIn Advanced Search has to offer.

Because I’m looking for CEOs in New York working in the IT industry, I can start by filling in the fields like so:

  • “Title” field with “CEO”
  • “Location” field with “New York”
  • “Industry” field with “Information Technology and Services” (Note, industries are already configured, you just need to check the right box).

Once all the relevant filters have been selected, you can then click on “Apply.”  

3. Review Search Results

You will now be shown a search results page showing you all the LinkedIn members who match your search criteria. As you can see, I’ve found a long list of LinkedIn users who are New York-based, CEOs and working in the IT industry.

Exactly how you approach each lead is your call. You could send them a message or connect with them before engaging via direct messages or by commenting on their content.

Engage Prospective Leads, Don't Pitch Them

LinkedIn’s advanced search function is a truly underestimated tool for marketing and sales professionals. But to get the most out of each connection you make, Monica Wolyniec, marketing, and communications manager at New York City-based Boomset, Inc. recommended taking a softer approach to LinkedIn leads. “Don't connect [just] to pitch. Engage, connect, and converse in order to add value to your prospect's pain points,” she advised.

Create and Share Industry Content

Dhaval Doshi, the founder, and director of Mumbai, India-based Smarthome NX, concurred. He urged marketers and professionals to leverage content marketing on LinkedIn in order to woo B2B leads. “Document your journey as a professional or entrepreneur and publish as many videos [or articles] as possible to build authority.

 Source: This article was Published cmswire.com By Kaya Ismail

Published in How to

If you’ve stumbled across an image on the internet—perhaps on your favorite social media site—and you want to know more about it, you can always ask the person responsible for the post. Odds are good that they probably just cribbed the image from somewhere else, and don’t know any more about where it came from. But that’s fine. You can also take on the detective work yourself, and there are plenty of resources to help you out.

Find your image on Google or Tineye

Most people probably know that you can perform a simple reverse image search on sites like Tineye—two of the top places most people recommend if you’re trying to find the source of an image, a higher-quality version, or websites that can provide more context about the image itself. (On Google, that’s as easy as pulling up the site, clicking on the camera icon, and dropping in an URL or uploaded an image. Tineye works similarly.)

To make this process even easier, Google has baked this capability directly into chrome—just right-click on an image and select “Search Google for image”—or you can install a Firefox extension that does the same thing. Tineye users on Firefox also have extensions that do the same thing: Right-click on an image and you’ll be able to perform a Tineye search without having to first visit the website.

Use a lot of reverse-image sites at once

There’s also the nuke. Or, rather, ImgOps, which is an excellent website that combines a number of reverse-image search tools under one roof.

Drop in an image’s URL (or upload a picture), and you’ll be able to quickly do a reverse image search across a number of different services just by clicking on the provided hyperlinks (including Google, Bing, Tineye, Reddit, Yandex, and others). The site is also incredibly useful if you want to dump the image to a GIF host, edit it, search it for hidden data, or convert it to another file format entirely.

And if you want those kinds of powers baked directly into your browser, the extensions Noobox for Chrome and Search by Image” for Firefox allow you to right-click on a photo and pick a number of different reverse-image tools to search through.

See what an image’s EXIF data can tell you

If neither Google Reverse Image Search or TinEye are very helpful to you, you can always try dropping the image into an EXIF viewer, which could possibly tell you a bit more about how it was taken (or where, if you’re trying to look up how you can visit the location of a stunning photograph you saw). This might not work in most instances if the person responsible for the image, or the sites it's been shared on, have stripped the EXIF information from the photo, but it’s an option.

Bother others who might know more about an image than you

Similarly, online communities like the subreddit Help Me Find” might also be able to shed a little light on an image you stumbled across. It’s no guarantee—and I wouldn’t blast them with daily requests—but it’s another good option for learning more about a particular image. Happy hunting!

Source: This article was Published lifehacker.com By David Murphy

Published in Search Engine

Some SEOs are seeing more fluctuations with the Google rankings now, but Google has confirmed the August 1 update has been fully rolled out.

Google has just confirmed that the core search algorithm update that began rolling out a week ago has now finished fully rolling out. Google search liaison Danny Sullivan said on Twitter, “It’s done” when I asked him if the rollout was complete.

Danny did add that if we are seeing other changes, “We always have changes that happen, both broad and more specific.” This is because some of the tracking tools are seeing more fluctuations today, and if they are unrelated to this update, the question is what they can be attributed to.

Here is Danny’s tweet:

@dannysullivan is the rollout of the core update complete? Seeing fluctuations today.

It's done. That said, we always have changes that happen, both broad and more specific.

Based on our research, the August 1 update was one of the more significant updates we have seen from Google on the organic search side in some time. It continued to roll out over the weekend and has now completed.

Google’s current advice on this update is that webmasters do not need to make any technical changes to their websites. In fact, the company said, “no fix” is required and that it is aimed at promoting sites that were once undervalued. Google has said that you should continue to look at ways of making your overall website better and provide even better-quality content and experiences to your website visitors.

Now that the rollout is complete, you can check to see if your site was impacted. But as Danny Sullivan said above, there are always changes happening in search.

Source: This article was Published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz

Published in Search Engine

The world has changed in recent times, and there has been the technological advancement that has made the life of people more comfortable, faster, and secure than it was before. People were not aware in the past that how useful this advanced technology can be for their personal as well as social lives.

Today, people are involved in socializing with the world on popular applications online such as Facebook, and many others. Many people are into blogging and content writing for the websites which need several measures to be fulfilled to attract the traffic on their sites.

For the help of these people, two best tools are developed by smallseotools.com: Reverse Image Search and Word Counter. Reverse image search is a CBIR (content-based image retrieval) technique that involves the particular image to be searched to retrieve the information regarding that image. Word counter is the tool that provides users with the information about the characters with and without spaces, number of words and much more.

Reverse Image Search

Reverse image search technology helps you to get to know about who else in the world is manipulating or using the image that belongs to you without seeking permission or copyrights. The image search ensures the compliance with copyright regulations.

The reverse image searching should be used by everyone who is into socializing or running any website. You can use reverse image search as a free online utility that helps you to figure out who is duplicating the picture that belongs to you.

It is quite impossible for you to identify the person who is misusing your picture on the internet because there are numerous websites present, and you can’t go through each of them for detecting who has duplicated your photo. To help you do this work faster and to provide you with knowledge about the misuse of your image or art, reverse image search tool takes few seconds and presents you with the results related to the picture.

Furthermore, people can use this tool to find a better resolution version of their desired images by searching with the lower resolution picture. This helps them posting a good quality picture that has better resolutions. This would make it possible for people to attract more people towards the pictures that they upload.

The reverse photo search can be used on any device whether it is MAC, Linux or OS. No specific operating device is compatible with reverse image search, and it can be consumed for free at any time around the globe.

Search with the picture is easy to use the tool, it does not require training or any tutorial videos to people for being able to use it. The search by a picture with this image search engine can be done in many ways. To search the reverse image search you can upload the file from your device’s gallery, you can drag the image and drop it in the drop box, or you can enter the URL of the image in the search box.

After that just by clicking on the search icon, you’ll be provided with the results (if any) on the screen. You’ll be able to see who else in this world is manipulating the content that belongs to you.

To help yourself in protecting your privacy, image reverse search by smallseotools.com is highly recommended as it is fully secured tool that does not saves the image that you search instead helps you to find out who else is misusing the image.

Word Count Checker

Word counter provides the user with the detailed statistics of syllables, sentences, the average length of words and phrases, keywords, estimated reading and speaking time, etc.

The word count tool is helpful for students who are most likely to be involved in writing tasks. Students are often assigned for the writing of work with the limit provided about the number of words. There is a bit of leeway given; however, if your word limit exceeds too much, then this would lead to a loss of marks.

It will be a waste of time and effort if you count the number of words yourself when this efficient tool is available. Teachers can make use of this tool for checking whether the students wrote in the given length or it exceeded to evaluate and mark them.

As a blogger or content writer, you may be needed to write for someone in a given limit. Here, the word count is the distinctive element that helps bloggers build their credibility. It can be a helpful tool if you own the site, if the text is within a specific length, then it would result in a higher rank for the website. The content writers have to maintain the keyword density; this tool can help them know about the top keyword used in the article.

To use the word counter, you need to enter the text in the space provided. You can also copy and paste the text in the box. The word calculator will show the results as you type. Moreover, there is an option to upload the file in the field provided, it will upload the data in the box, and you will be shown the results immediately. To clear the text for making other word count search, you can click on a button and the text box will be cleared.

The limitation of the file upload on SmallSEOTools word counter is 10 MB size for any file. However, there is no text limit about the number of words. The character count tool accepts variety of file formats like .docx, .txt, and .doc. The word count tool works on the text format most efficiently.

The word count tool is available for 100% free for all the users around the globe. Now people need not rely on the software like MS Word which first needs to be installed on the devices. You can use this tool for free

Source: This article was Published techworm.net By Abhishek Kumar Jha

Published in Search Engine

Safe Search is a built-in security feature that filets out inappropriate web content. Although it used to be quite easy to disable or enable Safe search for Internet Explorer, the default behavior has changed with the launch of Windows 10.

Even though the Edge browser includes a setting that allows users to disable Safe Search, for some users Safe Search refuses to be disabled due to a glitch, child account type or browser setting. Here’s the error message that most affected users see after being unable to disable SafeSearch:

“We’ve set SafeSearch to strict because your browser communicated your preference for a safe web browsing experience”

Some users have been reaching us with questions after being unable to disable Safe Search for Microsoft Edge and/or Internet Explorer. Whenever this issue occurs, the user is unable to disable Safe for multiple search engines including Bing, Google or Yahoo. The restriction also applies to Youtube and a few other content websites.

As per most user reports, this particular issue is either caused by an internal Edge bug or by the fact that the current account is enabled as a child account with limited privileges.

If you’re currently struggling to turn off Safe Search for Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer, this article will give you some basic troubleshooting guides. Please follow the methods below in order until you stumble upon a fix that resolves the Safe Search won’t rurn off issue.

Method 1: Turning Safe Search Off from inside the Search Engine’s Settings

Before we dig into other troubleshooting guides, let’s see if you’re trying to turn off Bing’s SafeSearch setting from the right menu. Since disabling or enabling SafeSearch is no longer done through your browser settings, you’ll need to navigate to the home page of your search engine.

Please follow the guide specific to your preferred search engine to turn Safe Search Off.

Here’s a quick guide on turning Bing SafeSearch on or off for the Bing search engine:

  1. Open Internet Explorer or Edge Browser and navigate Bing.com.
  2. Make sure you are signed in with your user account, then click on the action button (top-right corner) and click on Settings.
  3. In the Settings menu of Bing, go to the Search section and set SafeSearch to Off.
  4. Hit Save button at the bottom of the menu and see if Safe Search is now disabled when using Bing.

Here’s a quick guide on how to disable Safe Search for Google search engine:

  1. Open Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer and access the Google Search Engine.
  2. Make sure you are logged in with your Google account and search for something.
  3. Above the search results, click on Settings and then choose to Turn off SafeSearch.
    In the event that this method wasn’t effective in disabling Safe Search, move down to the next method below.

Method 2: Apply all pending Windows updates

If the first method wasn’t effective, let’s eliminate the possibility of an internal bug. The inability to turn off Safe search is a known Windows 10 bug that Microsoft has already addressed with a couple of hotfixes.

If you’re unable to turn Safe Search off due to Windows 10 glitch, applying all the pending Windows updates will automatically resolve the issue. Here’s a quick guide on applying all the pending Windows updates:

  1. Press Windows key + R to open up a Run box. Next, type “ms-settings:windowsupdate” and hit Enter to open the Windows Update tab from the Settings menu.
  2. In the Windows Update screen, click the Check for updates button and wait until the analysis is complete.
  3. Once Windows figures out which updates need to be applied and their order, start following the on-screen prompts to apply them to your system. Keep in mind that depending on how many pending updates you have, your PC might restart several times.
  4. After every startup, return to the Windows Update screen and install every pending update until there is none left.
  5. Once all updates are installed, perform a final restart. At the next startup, see whether you are able to disable Safe Search. If the feature is still refusing to be turned off, continue down with the next method below.

Method 3: Disabling Safe Search via the InPrivate mode

Some users have managed to disable Safe Search by using the InPrivate mode. In the instance that the Safe Search setting is locked to Strict or Moderate, you can try to modify the setting from an InPrivate mode in the Edge browser.

Here’s a quick guide on disabling Safe Search from an InPrivate window of Microsoft Edge:

  1. Open Microsoft Edge and press Ctrl + Shift + P to open a new InPrivate window.
  2. In the newly opened InPrivate window, navigate to the search engine of your choice, and follow Method 1again to disable Safe Search (while in an InPrivate window).

If disabling Safe Search from an InPrivate window wasn’t effective, move down to the final method.

Method 4: Creating a new Windows user account

Some users have finally managed to resolve the issue and disable Safe Search after creating a new Windows user account. As it turns out, Windows 10 is capable of overriding the Safe Search settings of your search engines if the active account is enabled as a child of another one.

In this case, the solution would be to create a new user account and grant it administrative privileges. Here’s a quick guide on how to do this:

  1. Press Windows key + R to open up a new Run box. Then, type “netplwiz” and hit Enter to open up the User Accounts window.
  2. In the User Accounts window, expand the Users tab and click the Add button.
  3. In the next window, click on Sign in without a Microsoft account to proceed.
  4. Then, click on Local Account and hit the Next button.
  5. Insert your account name and password and hit the Next button again to complete the process.
  6. Sign-in with your newly created user account either by logging out or by restarting your PC and see if the Safe Search won’t Turn Off issue has been resolved.

 Source: This article was Published appuals.com By Bill Wilson

Published in Search Engine

Google is working with publishers to make it easier to view data journalism in search results, as announced on its blog today. It’s one of the steps Google News Initiative is taking to make data journalism more visible, with the field quickly growing across media. Over half of all newsrooms now have dedicated data journalists, and this feature aims to pinpoint the most useful results from pages containing data tables.

“Data journalism takes many forms, and it’s not always clear from the headline that there is potentially useful data within that document or story,” Google News Lab’s Simon Rogers wrote in today’s blog post. “It isn’t always easy for Google Search to detect and understand tables of data to surface the most relevant results.”

News organizations have the option to add additional structured data to note which parts of their page will be the most relevant in search results. Adding this structured data to the existing HTML of their page, they’ll be able to control how the tables will be presented to readers when searching. One of the early participants is ProPublica, which has been testing the feature with its interactive databases like the Nonprofit Explorer.

The feature is currently in pilot, so search results may not frequently turn up datasets just yet. Developers can look into how to make their datasets more discoverable here.

Source: This article was published theverge.com By Dami Lee

Published in Search Engine

Want to quietly opt out of an email chain or take back that pathetic note to your ex? Gmail can help.

Google overhauled Gmail with a new look and a host of new features including Smart Compose, and you can get the new Gmail right now. While the new additions are appreciated, Gmail has a number of oldies but goodies that you may have overlooked. Here are seven such features that make Gmail awesome.

Mute annoyingly noisy email threads

Muting group texts are probably the single greatest thing about owning an iPhone at Cricket Wireless) (or at least texting on an iPhone), and Gmail offers a similar ability to mute noisy email threads. If you got put on a group email and no longer care to follow the back-and-forth replies, you can opt out. Open the thread, click the triple-dot button at the top and click Mute. The conversation will be moved to your archive, where it will remain even when more replies arrive. 

If you later get curious about what you missed, you can always find it in the All Mail view of Gmail, which includes your archived messages. You can then unmute the conversation if you so choose by opening the conversation and clicking the Move to Inbox button at the top of the page.

Send and archive for the win

You can add a second send option for all replies and email forwards that archives the conversation with your reply or forward. It's helpful for keeping your inbox orderly. And don't worry, the conversation will pop back up in your inbox if someone replies to it. To set it up, click the gear icon in the top right and go to Settings > General > Send & Archive, select Show "Send & Archive" button in reply and then scroll down and hit the Save Changes button. Now, you'll see a blue Send-and-archive chive button next to the regular Send button at the bottom of replies and forwards.

gmail-send-and-archive
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET

Set undo send to 30 seconds

There's an undo option for emails you send and then immediately regret sending, whether it's because of a typo or your current emotional state. Or maybe you just hit send by accident when you were in the middle of composing your missive. Go to Settings > General > Undo, select the maximum time limit of 30 seconds and then scroll down and hit the Save Changes button. (The other options are 5, 10 and 20 seconds). After you hit send, look for the banner that pops up at the bottom of the screen that says "Your message has been sent." Click Undo to bring it back.

Hiding in plain sight: Advanced search

With Google behind Gmail, it's no surprise that Gmail offers powerful search functionality. You've likely used the search bar above your inbox to dig up an old email based on a keyword or sender, but it can do so much more. Click the little down-arrow button on the right of the search bar to open Gmail's advanced search panel where you can search for date ranges and attachment sizes, by subject line and with other filters.

gmail-advanced-search
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET

Preview pane for an Outlook-like look

If you've got a big display, then I encourage you to make use of your luxurious screen real estate and use Gmail's preview pane. It makes Gmail look and feel more like Outlook, where you can view and respond to messages without leaving the inbox. Head to Settings > Advanced, click Enable for Preview Pane and then scroll down and hit the Save Changes button. You'll see a new button at the top of your inbox that lets you toggle the preview pane on and off and choose to split your inbox horizontally or vertically.

Choose your tabs

Gmail does an admirable job of filtering your inbox so the messages you care about go to your inbox while the rest get relegated to the Social or Promotional tabs. Go to Settings > Inbox > Categories and you can choose which tabs you want at the top. Or if you simply ignore all tabs other than your Primary inbox, then you can uncheck all but Primary for a streamlined, tab-less Gmail experience.

Email large attachments via Google Drive

There's a little Drive icon at the bottom of Gmail's compose window. It lets you attach files you have stored in Drive or simply send a link. For Google Drive formats -- Docs, Sheets, Slides and so on -- your only option is to send a link to the file. For other file types -- PDFs, Word docs, images -- you have the option of sending them as an attachment or a Drive link, which lets you share files larger than Gmail's 25MB size limit for attachments.

Source: This article was published cnet.com By MATT ELLIOTT

Published in Others
Page 1 of 26

Upcoming Events

There are no up-coming events

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait
Internet research courses

airs logo

AIRS is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Subscribe to AIRS Newsletter

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

Follow Us on Social Media