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[This article is originally published in searchengineland.com - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Rene Meyer]

By multiple measures, Google is the internet’s most popular search engine. But Google’s not only a web search engine. Images, videos, mobile content — even Google TV!

Major Google Services

Google releases a dizzying array of new products and product updates on a regular basis, and Search Engine Land keeps you up-to-date with all the news. Here are just a few of our popular Google categories, where you can read past coverage:

Google: Our “everything” category, this lists all stories we’ve written about Google, regardless of subtopic.

Google Web Search: Our stories about Google’s web search engine, including changes and new features. Also see: Google: OneBox, Plus Box & Direct Answers, Google: Universal Search and Google: User Interface.

Google SEO: Articles from us about getting listed for free via SEO in Google’s search engine. Also see the related category of Google Webmaster Central.

Google AdWords: Our coverage of Google’s paid search advertising program.

Google AdSense: Stories about Google’s ad program for publishers, which allows content owners to carry Google ads and earn money.

Google Maps & Local: Coverage of Google Maps, which allows you to locate places, businesses, get directions and much more. Also see Google Earth for coverage of Google’s mapping application.

Google Street View: Articles about Google’s popular yet controversial Street View system that uses cars to take photos of homes and business, which are then made available through Google Maps.

Google YouTube & Video: Articles about Google’s YouTube service, which allows anyone to upload video content. YouTube also has so much search traffic that it stands out as a major search engine of its own.

Google Logos: Google loves to have special logos for holidays and to commemorate special events. We track some of the special “Google Doodles,” as the company calls them. Also see our retrospective story, Those Special Google Logos, Sliced & Diced, Over The Years.

Also see our special guide for searchers, How To Use Google To Search.

Google Resources

Further below is a full list of additional Google topics that we track. But first, here are a few sites that track Google in-depth.

First up is Google’s own Official Google Blog. Google also has many other blogs for individual products, which are listed on the official blog. This feed keeps you up-to-date on any official blog post, from any of Google’s blogs. Google also had a traditional press release area.

Beyond official Googledom are a number of news sites that track Google particularly in-depth. These include: Dirson (in Spanish), eWeek’s Google Watch, Google Blogoscoped, Google Operating System, John Battelle, Search Engine Land, Search Engine Roundtable, WebProNewsand ZDNet Googling Google.

The Full Google List

We said Google is more than just a web search engine, right? Below is the full list of various Google search and search-related products that we track. Click any link to see our stories in that particular area:

  • Google (stories from all categories below, combined)
  • Google: Accounts & Profiles
  • Google: Acquisitions
  • Google: Ad Planner
  • Google: AdSense
  • Google: AdWords
  • Google: Alerts
  • Google: Analytics
  • Google: APIs
  • Google: Apps For Your Domain
  • Google: Audio Ads
  • Google: Base
  • Google: Blog Search
  • Google: Blogger
  • Google: Book Search
  • Google: Browsers
  • Google: Business Issues
  • Google: Buzz
  • Google: Calendar
  • Google: Checkout
  • Google: Chrome
  • Google: Code Search
  • Google: Content Central
  • Google: Critics
  • Google: Custom Search Engine
  • Google: Dashboard
  • Google: Definitions
  • Google: Desktop
  • Google: Discussions
  • Google: Docs & Spreadsheets
  • Google: Domains
  • Google: DoubleClick
  • Google: Earth
  • Google: Editions
  • Google: Employees
  • Google: Enterprise Search
  • Google: FeedBurner
  • Google: Feeds
  • Google: Finance
  • Google: Gadgets
  • Google: Gears
  • Google: General
  • Google: Gmail
  • Google: Groups
  • Google: Health
  • Google: iGoogle
  • Google: Images
  • Google: Internet Access
  • Google: Jet
  • Google: Knol
  • Google: Labs
  • Google: Legal
  • Google: Logos
  • Google: Maps & Local
  • Google: Marketing
  • Google: Mobile
  • Google: Moderator
  • Google: Music
  • Google: News
  • Google: Offices
  • Google: OneBox, Plus Box & Direct Answers
  • Google: OpenSocial
  • Google: Orkut
  • Google: Other
  • Google: Other Ads
  • Google: Outside US
  • Google: Parodies
  • Google: Partnerships
  • Google: Patents
  • Google: Personalized Search
  • Google: Picasa
  • Google: Place Pages
  • Google: Print Ads & AdSense For Newspapers
  • Google: Product Search
  • Google: Q & A
  • Google: Reader
  • Google: Real Time Search
  • Google: Search Customization
  • Google: SearchWiki
  • Google: Security
  • Google: SEO
  • Google: Sidewiki
  • Google: Sitelinks
  • Google: Social Search
  • Google: SpyView
  • Google: Squared
  • Google: Street View
  • Google: Suggest
  • Google: Toolbar
  • Google: Transit
  • Google: Translate
  • Google: Trends
  • Google: TV
  • Google: Universal Search
  • Google: User Interface
  • Google: Voice Search
  • Google: Web History & Search History
  • Google: Web Search
  • Google: Webmaster Central
  • Google: Website Optimizer
  • Google: YouTube & Video

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally in searchengineland.com written By Adam Dorfman - Uploaded by AIRS Member:: Issac Avila]

Sure, Google is still bigger, but contributor Adam Dorfman notes that Bing has been introducing significant innovations. Here's why the underdog search engine is worth another look.

When Microsoft announced strong annual financial results July 19, the growth of the company’s cloud services dominated the conversation. But I noticed something else in the company’s numbers: continued growth for Bing. Although Bing accounts for a small share of Microsoft’s revenues, the search platform grew 17 percent year over year.

As TechRadar reported,

As more people used Bing, the search revenue (excluding traffic acquisition costs) also grew, so it looks like things are moving in the right direction.

Bing remains a distant second to Google in terms of market share, but the marketplace needs Bing to grow. A prosperous Bing gives businesses an alternative to Google and another viable platform to grow their visibility.

Google and another viable platform to grow their visibility

Bing’s product improvements are good for brands and good for Google because healthy competition keeps everyone on their toes. Bing’s improvements also help business owners and search marketers in their optimization efforts. Let’s take a look at a number of Bing’s improvements and how we can use them to promote our businesses.

Basic Bing search

On a fundamental level, Bing has enriched basic search to encourage discovery beyond top-level search results. For example, if you use your smartphone to search for “movies” on both Bing and Google, both will show you what’s playing where you live. But Bing also displays tabs for movies on Netflix and Amazon, thus demonstrating an awareness of how we discover movies beyond the theater.

Or a search for the musician Drake on both engines displays prominently in search results news results and video content, but there are more visible social links on Google encouraging further exploration. These differences are subtle, but they matter given how search has become more of a process of deep discovery, especially as we use our voices to do more complex searches.

Along these same lines, Bing recently enhanced search with the rollout of a search entity API, which produces a richer contextual search result. As Bing announced in March:

Bing Entity Search API brings rich contextual information about people, places, things, and local businesses to any application, blog, or website for a more engaging user experience. With Bing Entity Search, you can identify the most relevant entity results based on the search term and provide users with primary details about those entities. With our latest coverage improvements, we now support multiple international markets and many more entity types such as famous people, places, movies, TV shows, video games, and books. With this new API, developers can enhance their apps by exposing rich data from the Bing Knowledge Graph directly in their apps.

A more robust knowledge graph means that businesses need to place more emphasis on the content and data they publish on their own pages, starting with Bing Places for Business. If you’ve been treating Bing Places for Business as an optional alternative to Google My Business, it’s time to start using it as another way to promote your brand.

Visual content

Bing has always been known for being a visually appealing search engine, including its basic layout and home page. From the start, Bing understood that we live in a visual age, with people uploading billions of images and video online every day.

Bing has continuously built upon its embrace of a more visually appealing search aesthetic. For example, Bing presents video search results via appealing thumbnail panels that are easy to explore:

Bing presents video search results via appealing thumbnail

By contrast, video results for Google look more utilitarian and less visually appealing:

 

By contrast video results for Google look more utilitarian and less visually appealing

Bing also recently announced the launch of visual search, which lets people use images to easily navigate the search engine and find content. With the Bing app on your smartphone, you can either take a photo or upload one, and then quickly perform visual searches.

Bing visual search was widely perceived as an answer to Google Lens. But Google’s own visual search capability is limited (iOS users lack access to it), whereas Bing made visual search widely available for Android and iOS.

Bing visual search is important because it’s yet another sign that businesses need to be visually savvy with their own content. Google has been placing more emphasis on the power of strong visuals in its knowledge graphs as a way of making a business more findable and useful to searchers. Visual search has a multitude of applications, an obvious one being for retailers, especially as people don’t always know how to describe a product they’re trying to find, making the use of a photo easier and faster for discovery.

What brands should do

Bing’s enhancement of more complex and visual search alone is a reason brands need to treat Bing as a powerful part of their search toolkit. Although it’s more work to maintain a presence on multiple platforms, the reward is greater, too.

One easy way to better understand Bing is to experience the platform regularly, as people do. If it’s not your default engine, make time to get yourself comfortable using Bing to navigate. Download the Bing app on your mobile device and compare the features to Google’s app. The more you explore through the eyes of your customer, the more likely you’ll find additional ways to be found on both Google and Bing.

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in wired.com Written By BRIAN BARRETT - Uploaded By AIRS Member: Carol R. Venuti]

WHAT FINALLY BROKE me was the recipes.

On July 1, I abandoned Google search and committed myself instead to Bing. I downloaded the Bing app on my phone. I made it the default search mode in Chrome. (I didn't switch to Edge, Microsoft's browser, because I decided to limit this experiment strictly to search.) Since then, for the most part, any time I've asked the internet a question, Bing has answered.

A stunt? Sure, a little. But also an earnest attempt to figure out how the other half—or the other 6 percent overall, or 24 percent on desktop, or 33 percent in the US, depending on whose numbers you believe—finds their information online.

And Bing is big! The second-largest search engine by market share in the US, and one of the 50 most visited sites on the internet, according to Alexa rankings. (That’s the Amazon-owned analytics site, not the Amazon-made voice assistant.) I wanted to know how those people experienced the web, how much of a difference it makes when a different set of algorithms decides what knowledge you should see. The internet is a window on the world; a search engine warps and tints it.

There’s also never been a better time to give Bing an honest appraisal. If Google’s data-hoovering didn’t creep you out before, its attitude toward location tracking and Google+ privacy failings should. And while privacy-focused search options like DuckDuckGo go further to solve that problem, Bing is the most full-featured alternative out there. It’s the logical first stop on the express train out of Googletown.

A minor spoiler: This isn’t an excuse to dunk on Bing. It’s also not an extended “Actually, Bing Is Good” counterpoint. It’s just one person’s attempt to figure out what Bing is today, and why.

Bing Bang Boom

Let’s start with the Bing app, technically Microsoft Bing Search. This almost certainly isn’t how most people experience Microsoft’s search engine, but the app does have over 5 million downloads in the Google Play Store alone. People use it. Besides, what better way to evaluate Bing than drinking it up in its most distilled form?

 

Bing offers a maximalist counterpoint to the austerity of Google, whose search box sits unadorned, interrupted only for the occasional doodle reminder of a 19th-century physicist’s birthday. When you open the Bing app, the act of searching is almost incidental. A high-resolution, usually scenic photograph sweeps the display, with three icons—a camera, a magnifying glass, and a microphone—suggesting but not insisting on the different types of search you might enjoy. Below that, options: VideosNear MeNewsRestaurants. (Side-scroll a bit.) MoviesMusicFunImagesGas.

These are the categories Bing considers worthy of one-tap access in 2018. And honestly, why not? I like videos. I like fun.

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in popsci.com written by David Nield - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Nevena Gojkovic Turunz]

Is your search engine of choice pulling its weight? It's perhaps a choice you've stopped thinking about, settling for whatever default option appears in your browser or on your phone—but as with most tech choices, you've got options.

Google has come to dominate search to the extent that it's become a verb in itself, but here we're going to check how Google stacks up against two of its biggest rivals including Microsoft's Bing, in 2019 and the privacy-focused search site known as DuckDuckGo.

 

Search results

Google Search results

Google results for "Abraham Lincoln."

We don't know what you're searching for, and without running thousands of searches across several months we can't really present you with a comprehensive comparison of how well these search engines scour the web. What we can do is tell you how these services performed on a few sample searches.

First we tried "Abraham Lincoln": All three search engines returned the Wikipedia page first, the History Channel site second, and Britannica third. DuckDuckGo listed Abraham Lincoln news above the search results, even though the 16th President of the United States hasn't really been in the news lately.

bing Search results

Bing results for "Abraham Lincoln."

As we wrote this article a few days after the 2019 Super Bowl, we tried "Super Bowl score" next, and all three search engines produced the right result in a box out above the search results. DuckDuckGo followed this with the official NFL site then some sports news sites, while Bing had a sports news site first and the NFL second. Google listed the score, then Super Bowl news, then some relevant tweets, and then other results.

Next we tried a question, specifically "how many days until Christmas?", to see how our search engines fared. Only Google presented the right answer front and center as part of its own interface, with DuckDuckGo and Bing returning links to Christmas countdown sites instead (though Bing did put "Wednesday December 25" right at the top).

duckduckgo Search results

DuckDuckGo results for "Abraham Lincoln."

For something a little more obscure we tried "Empire of the Sun" (both a 1987 Steven Spielberg movie and a music duo). Google returned the Wikipedia sites for the film then the band at the top, Bing returned the Wikipedia page for the movie then the band's official site, and DuckDuckGo returned the IMDB page for the Empire of the Sun film then the band's official site.

These are slight differences really, and the "best" one really depends on your personal preference (do you want to see Twitter results, or not?). All three sites are obviously very competent with basic searches, but Google obviously has the edge when it comes to finding content besides web pages, as well as answering questions directly (no doubt thanks to all that Google Assistant technology behind the scenes).

Search features

google Search features

Google really will flip a coin for you.

Speaking of Google Assistant, one of the advantages of Google is of course the way it ties into all the other Google apps and services: You can search for places on Google Maps, or bring up images in Google Photos, or query your Google Calendar, right from the Google homepage (as long as you're signed in). Try Googling "my trips" for example to see bookings stored in your Gmail account.

All three of these search engines feature filters for images, videos, news, and products; Bing and Google include a Maps option as well. You can dig in further on all three sites as well—filtering images by size or by color, for example. Google and Bing let you save searches to come back to later, whereas DuckDuckGo doesn't (see the separate section on privacy below).

bing Search features

Bing has a comprehensive image search feature.

Besides from basic searches, Google and DuckDuckGo do very well on extras: Unlike Bing, they can toss a coin, roll a die, or start a timer right there on the results screen, no more clicking required. Meanwhile, both Google and Bing can display details of a flight in a pop-up box outside the search results, whereas DuckDuckGo directs you to flight-tracking websites instead.

All three of our search engines can limit results to pages that have been published recently, but Google and Bing have a "custom date" search option (say 1980-1990, for example) that isn't available on DuckDuckGo. Google and Bing let you search by region too, whereas DuckDuckGo doesn't.

duckduck go Search features

DuckDuckGo can start a timer right in your web browser.

Appearance may not be number one in your list of priorities, but Bing presents its search box on top of an appealing full-screen wallpaper image, with links to news stories and other interesting articles underneath. It's more appealing visually than Google or DuckDuckGo, though Google has its doodles and DuckDuckGo has a few different color schemes to pick from.

As you can see, Google can do just about everything—it has been in the search engine game for a long time, after all. Bing and DuckDuckGo are able to match Google on some features, but not all, which makes it hard to switch from unless you have a specific reason to... and that brings us neatly on to the issue of user privacy.

User privacy

Google User privacy

 

Google knows a lot about you—and can serve up results from other Google apps, like Google Photos.

This is the big feature that DuckDuckGo sells itself on: As we've noted above, it doesn't log what you're searching for, and only puts up occasional advertising, which isn't personalized and can be disabled. If you're tired of the big tech firms hoovering up data on you, DuckDuckGo will appeal.

What's more, the sites you visit don't know the search terms you used to find them—something they can otherwise do by piecing together different clues from your browsing behavior and the data that your computer broadcasts publicly. DuckDuckGo also attaches to encrypted versions of site by default.

Bing User privacy

Bing, like Google, keeps a record of searches you've run.

Cookies aren't saved by DuckDuckGo either, those little files that sit locally on your computer and tell websites when you've visited before. Data like your IP address (your router's address on the web) and the browser you're using gets wiped by default too. You're effectively searching anonymously.

There's no doubt that both Google and Microsoft promise to protect your privacy and use the data they have on you responsibly—you can read their respective privacy policies here and here. However, it's also true that they collect much more data on you and what you're doing, so it's up to you whether you trust Google and Microsoft to use it wisely.

duckduckgo User privacy

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in searchenginejournal.com written by Roger Montti - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Anthony Frank]

Ahrefs CEO Dmitry Gerasimenko announced a plan to create a search engine that supports content creators and protects users privacy. Dmitry laid out his proposal for a more free and open web, one that rewards content creators directly from search revenue with a 90/10 split in favor of publishers.

The goal for New Search Engine

Dmitry seeks to correct several trends at Google that he feels are bad for users and publishers. The two problems he seeks to solve is privacy, followed by addressing the monetization crisis felt by publishers big and small.

1. Believes Google is Hoarding Site Visitors

Dmitry tweeted that Google is increasingly keeping site visitors to itself, resulting in less traffic to the content creators.

“Google is showing scraped content on search results page more and more so that you don’t even need to visit a website in many cases, which reduces content authors’ opportunity to monetize.”

2. Seeks to Pry the Web from Privatized Access and Control

Gatekeepers to web content (such as Google and Facebook) exercise control over what kinds of content is allowed to reach people. The gatekeepers shape how content is produced and monetized. He seeks to wrest the monetization incentive away from the gatekeepers and put it back into the hands of publishers, to encourage more innovation and better content.

“Naturally such a vast resource, especially free, attracts countless efforts to tap into it, privatize and control access, each player pulling away their part, tearing holes in the tender fabric of this unique phenomena.”

3. Believes Google’s Model is Unfair

Dmitry noted that Google’s business model is unfair to content creators. By sharing search revenue, sites like Wikipedia wouldn’t have to go begging for money.

He then described how his search engine would benefit content publishers and users:

“Remember that banner on Wikipedia asking for donation every year? Wikipedia would probably get few billions from its content in profit share model. And could pay people who polish articles a decent salary.”

4. States that a Search Engine Should Encourage Publishers and Innovation

Dmitry stated that a search engine’s job of imposing structure to the chaos of the web should be one that encourages the growth of quality content, like plant a support that holds a vine up allowing it to consume more sunlight and grow.

“…structure wielded upon chaos should not be rigid and containing as a glass box around a venomous serpent, but rather supporting and spreading as a scaffolding for the vine, allowing it to flourish and grow new exciting fruits for humanity to grok and cherish. ”

For chaos needs structure to not get torn apart by its own internal forces, and structure needs chaos as a sampling pool of ideas to keep evolution rolling.”

Reaction to Announcement

The reaction on Twitter was positive.

Russ Jones of Moz tweeted:

russ jones

Several industry leaders generously offered their opinions.

Jon Henshaw

Jon Henshaw (@henshaw) is a Senior SEO Analyst at CBSi (CBS, GameSpot, and Metacritic) and founder of Coywolf.marketing, a digital marketing resource. He offered this assessment:

“I appreciate the sentiment and reasons for why Dmitry wants to build a search engine that competes with Google. A potential flaw in the entire plan has to do with searchers themselves.

Giving 90% of profit to content creators does not motivate the other 99% of searchers that are just looking for relevant answers quickly. Even if you were to offer incentives to the average searcher, it wouldn’t work. Bing and other search engines have tried that over the past several years, and they have all failed.

The only thing that will compete with Google is a search engine that provides better results than Google. I would not bet my money on Ahrefs being able to do what nobody else in the industry has been able to do thus far.”

Ryan Jones

Ryan Jones (@RyanJones), is a search marketer who also publishes WTFSEO.com said:

“This sounds like an engine focused on websites not users. So why would users use it?

There is a massive incentive to spam here, and it will be tough to control when the focus is on the spammer not the user.

It’s great for publishers, but without a user-centric focus or better user experience than Google, the philanthropy won’t be enough to get people to switch.”

Tony Wright

Tony Wright (@tonynwright) of search marketing agency WrightIMC shared a similar concern about getting users on board. An enthusiastic user base is what makes any online venture succeed.

“It’s an interesting idea, especially in light of the passage of Article 13 in the EU yesterday.

However, I think that without proper capitalization, it’s most likely to be a failed effort. This isn’t the early 2000’s.

The results will have to be as good or better than Google to gain traction, and even then, getting enough traction to make if economically feasible will be a giant hurdle.

I like the idea of compensating publishers, but I think policing the scammers on a platform like this will most likely be the biggest cost – even bigger than infrastructure.

It’s certainly an ambitious play, and I’ll be rooting for it. But based on just the tweets, it seems like it may be a bit too ambitious without significant capitalization.”

Announcement Gives Voice to Complaints About Google

The announcement echoes complaints by publishers who feel they are struggling. The news industry has been in crisis mode for over a decade trying to find a way to monetize digital content consumption. AdSense publishers have been complaining for years of dwindling earnings.

Estimates say that Google earns $16.5 million dollars per hour from search advertising.  When publishers ask how to improve earnings and traffic, Google’s encouragement to “be awesome” has increasingly acquired a tone of “Let them eat cake.”

A perception has set in that the entire online search ecosystem is struggling except for Google.
The desire for a new search engine has been around for several years. This is why DuckDuckGo has been received so favorably by the search marketing community. This announcement gives voice to long-simmering complaints about Google.

The reaction on Twitter was almost cathartic and generally enthusiastic because of the longstanding perception that Google is not adequately supporting the content creators upon which Google earns billions.

Will this New Search Engine Happen?

Whether this search engine lifts off remains to be seen. The announcement, however, does give voice to many complaints about Google.

No release date has been announced. The scale of this project is huge. It’s almost the online equivalent of going to the moon.

 

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in thestar.com.my - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Anthony Frank]

The best search engine when it comes to privacy and results on par with Google is Startpage, a Dutch company. — dpa

Most people don't really think much further than Google when it comes to search engines. After all, there's a reason that everyone uses the verb "to Google" when they want to look something up.

But is Google the best search engine, objectively speaking?
In terms of search results, the answer is yes, and also in terms of user satisfaction.

But in terms of data protection, Google has some serious problems.
The best search engine when it comes to privacy and results on par with Google is Startpage, a Dutch company that also scores well when its apps are considered. The data protection regulations are much better, and the engine has many of Google's best features as well.

Startpage allows users to choose language and region manually just like Google. The results are essentially the same because the company uses the same technology as Google – the only difference being that it doesn't use trackers to store your data.

During test runs, Startpage was also able to deal with typos and vague search terms just as well as the US tech giant. – dpa
Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in qz.com written by Matthew De Silva - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Jay Harris]

Google might be stunting your online experience. Today, 75% of desktop and laptop searches pass through the world’s most popular search engine. Google’s next closest competitor, the Chinese search giant Baidu, accounts for just 12%.

Like compasses, search engines are useful tools, guiding us through the oceans of online information. But unlike compasses, they are often dynamic and personalized. Search engines gather data and learn from each input. While that customized aspect makes our searches more efficient, it can subtly undermine our autonomy.

“[W]hen you search, you expect unbiased results, but that’s not what you get on Google,” Gabriel Weinberg, founder of DuckDuckGo, a privacy-focused search engine, writes on Quora. “On Google, you get results tailored to what they think you’re likely to click on, based on the data profile they’ve built on you over time.”

On the surface, that may seem innocuous. But if our options are algorithmically curated, that removes our choice and diminishes our exposure to challenging viewpoints. Weinberg believes filtered searches engines like Google create echo chambers and further polarize society. Through clicks, we construct our own barriers, and eventually, we might become too blind to know they exist.

DuckDuckGo daily direct search queries

DuckDuckGo daily direct search queries

Alternative search engines like DuckDuckGo and Qwant—a French company—are growing in popularity. Because these tools don’t track users, they are less precise than Google, but they help users avoid “filter bubbles” that limit what they see. DuckDuckGo recently surpassed 35 million daily direct search queries. Google, meanwhile, processes 5.5 billion searches per day. Obviously, that’s a massive gap, but the market for privacy-preserving search is growing worldwide.

Google’s advertising machine is another reason to consider other search engines. By studying our search behavior, products are promoted to us by advertisers who have a direct line to our most intimate thoughts and desires. Our online profiles are caricatures of our true selves, but in a very real way, our searches can shape who we become. Advertisers are interjecting themselves, almost invisibly, into this information exchange.

We often treat Google like our personal encyclopedia. The search engine’s sleek design can make us forget that it’s not a private getaway or even an extension of ourselves. Alternative search engines, though, do not fit seamlessly into our digital lives. That honesty is refreshing and it helps remind a person of the physical-digital divide.

If changing your default search engine seems too inconvenient, you can opt out of Google’s personalization, revoking access to search and location histories. Although it’s a mild annoyance, it can help us acknowledge the blinders Google has erected around our queries.

About six months ago, I created a new Google account, so my username would sound more professional. As I used the new profile, I was amazed by how little Google knew about the “new” me. YouTube had forgotten my love of basketball and ice hockey highlights. Instead, I saw recommendations for Vine compilations and prank videos. On search, I no longer saw advertisements for cryptocurrency conferences. Making a new profile showed me that I could recreate myself and have an entirely different online experience. That was unsettling, but eye-opening.

By changing your privacy and advertising settings, you can climb out of Google’s digital silo to encounter the real and unfiltered world. It might require more effort to find what you’re looking for—but at least you’ll know that you’re doing it on your own terms.

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in searchenginejournal.com written by Dave Davies - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Joshua Simon]

As SEO professionals, we generally focus on the question, “How do I rank my page?”

An equally, if not more important question we should be asking is, “How do search engines rank pages?”

Why Search Engines Rank Webpages

Before we dive into how search engines rank webpages let’s stop for a moment and think about why they rank them.

After all, it would be cheaper and easier for them to simply display pages randomly, by word count, by freshness, or any of a variety of easy sorting systems.

The reason they don’t do that is obvious. You wouldn’t use it.

So when we ask the question about rankings, what we need to always keep in mind is that the user we are trying to satisfy is not ours, they belong to the engine and the engines are loaning them to us.

If we misuse that user, they may not return to the engine and thus the engine can’t have that as their ad revenue will decline.

I like to think of the scenario like some of the resource pages on our own site.

If we recommend a tool or service, it is based on our experience with them and we believe they will serve our visitors as well. If we hear they do not, then we will remove them from our site.

That’s what the engines are doing.

But how?

Disclaimer

I do not have eavesdropping devices at Google or Bing. Google has one sitting on my desk and another I carry around with me when I’m not at it but for some reason, the message pickup doesn’t work the other way.

I state this to make clear that the following outline is based on about 20 years of watching the search engines evolve, reading patents (or more often – Bill Slawski’s analysis of patents), and starting each day for many years by reviewing the goings on in the industry from SERP layout changes to acquisitions to algo updates.

Take what I am saying as a highly educated breakdown that’s probably about 90 percent right. If you’re wondering why I think 90 percent – I learned from Bing’s Frederic Dubut that 90 percent is a great number to use when guesstimating.

It’s Only A Simple 5 Steps – Easy

There are five steps to the complete process of ranking a page.

I am not including the technical challenges like load-balancing obviously and I’m not talking about each various signal calculation.

I’m just talking about the core process that every query needs to go through to start its life as an information request and end it as a set of 10 blue links buried beneath a sea of ads.

Understand this process, understand who it is designed to serve, and you will be on your way to thinking properly about how to rank your pages to their users.

I also feel it’s necessary to note that the words used for these steps are mine and not some type of official name. Feel free to use them but don’t expect any one of the engines to use the same terminology.

Step 1: Classify

The first step in the process is to classify the query coming in. The classification of the query gives the engine the information it needs to perform all of the following steps.

Before complex classification could take place (read: back when the engines relied on keywords instead of entities) the engines basically had to apply the same signals to all queries. As we will explore further below, this is no longer the case.

It’s in this first stage that the engine will apply such labels (again, not a technical term but an easy way to think about it) to a query such as:

  • YMYL
  • Local
  • Unseen
  • Adult
  • Question

I have no idea how many different classifications there are but the first step the engine would need to make is to determine which apply to any given query.

Step 2: Context

The second step in the ranking process is to assign context.

Where possible, the engine needs to take into account any relevant information they have on the user entering the query.

We see this regularly for queries, even those we don’t ask. We see them here:

google weather

And we see them here:

google mobile apps

The latter, of course, being an example of where I didn’t specifically enter the query.

Essentially, the second stage in the process is for the engine to determine what environmental and historical factors come into play.

They know the category of the query, here they apply, determine or pull the data related to elements deemed relevant for that query category and type.

Some examples of environmental and historical information that would be considered are:

  • Location
  • Time
  • Whether the query is a question
  • The device being used for the query
  • The format being used for the query
  • Whether the query relates to previous queries
  • Whether they have seen that query before

Step 3: Weights

Before we dive in let me ask you, how sick are you of hearing about RankBrain?

Well, buckle up because we’re about to bring it up again but only as an example of this third step.

Before an engine can determine what pages should rank they first need to determine which signals are most important.

For a query like [civil war] we get a result that looks like:

america civil war

Solid result. But what happens if freshness had played a strong role? We’d end up with a result more like:

google search america civil war

But we can’t rule out freshness. Had the query been [best shows on netflix], I’d care less about authority and more about how recently it was published.

I hardly want a heavily linked piece from 2008 outlining the best DVDs to order on their service.

So, with the query type in hand as well as the context elements pulled the engine can now rely on their understanding of which of their signals applies and with which weightings for the given combinations.

Some of this can certainly be accomplished manually by the many talented engineers and computer scientists employed and part of it will be handled by systems like RankBrain which is (for the 100th time) a machine learning algorithm designed to adjust the signal weights for previously unseen queries but later introduced into Google’s algorithms as a whole.

With the statement that roughly 90 percent of its ranking algorithms rely on machine learning, it can reasonably be assumed that Bing has similar systems.

Step 4: Layout

We’ve all seen it. In fact, you can see it in the civil war example above. For different queries the search results page layout changes.

The engines will determine what possible formats apply to a query intent, the user running the query and the available resources.

The full page of the SERP for [civil war] looks like:

google search america civil war layout

I’ve put an educated guess on the core factor used to determine when each element is present.

The truth is, it’s a moving target and relies on a knowledge of entities, how they connect, and how they are weighted. That’s a highly complex subject so we won’t dive into it here.

What’s important to understand in the context of this piece is that the different elements of any given search results page need to be determined more-or-less on the fly.

This is to say, when a query is run and the first three steps completed the engine will reference a database of the various possible elements to inset onto the page, the possible placements and then determine which will apply to the specific query.

An Aside: I noted above that the search results pages were generated more-or-less on the fly.

While this would be true of infrequent queries, for common queries it is far more likely that the engines keep a database of which elements they have already calculated to fit the likely user intent so as to not have to process that each time.

I would imagine there is a time limit on it after which it refreshes and I suspect that it refreshes the full entry at time of low use.

But moving on, the engine now knows the classification of a query, the context the information is being requested in, the signal weights that apply to such a query, and the layout most likely to meet the various possible intents for a query.

Finally, it’s time for ranking.

Step 5: Ranking

Interestingly, this is probably the easiest step of the process, though not as singular as one might think.

When we think of organic rankings we think of the 10 blue links. So let’s start there and look at the process thus far:

  • The user enters a query.
  • The engine considers the type of query and classifies it to understand what key criteria apply at a high level based on similar or identical previous query interactions.
  • The engine considers the user’s position in space and time to consider their likely intents.
  • The engine takes the query classifications and user-specific signals and uses this to determine which signals should hold what weights.
  • The engine uses the above data to also determine which layouts, formats, and additional data may satisfy or supplement the user’s intent.

With all this in hand and with an algorithm already written, the engine needs simply crunch the numbers.

They will pull in the various sites that can be considered for ranking, apply the weights to their algorithms, and crunch the number to determine the order that the sites should appear in the search results.

Of course, they must do this for each element on the page in various ways.

Videos, stories, entities, and information all change, so the engines need to order not just the blue links but everything else on the page as well.

In Short

The ranking of the site is easy. It’s putting everything together to do it that’s the real work.

You may ask how understanding this can help you with your SEO efforts. It’s like understanding the core functions of how your computer works. I can’t build a processor, but I know what they do, and I know what characteristics make for a faster one and how cooling impacts them.

Knowing this results in me having a faster machine that I need to update and upgrade far less often.

The same is true for SEO.

If you understand the core of how the engine function you will understand your place in that ecosystem. And that will result in strategies designed with the engine in mind and serving the real user – their user.

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in technobleak.com written by Kunal Ambadekar - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Mercedes J. Steinman]

“The Next Generation Search Engines market 2018 – 2023 report cover very impotent details” The Next Generation Search Engines Market report categorizes the market-based Trends, future prospect, Market share, size depending on the total research. And also provide technology, product cost, gross margin, and revenue The report highlights the market size and the important segments, providing quick relevant information about the Next Generation Search Engines market.

The Next Generation Search Engines Market has described the present market scenario in a well-ordered way, highlight the Company development important players engaged in the current market, market identification, industry strategy that will assist our readers to aim regarding Next Generation Search Engines outlook and promote strength and success.

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To analyze and research the Next Generation Search Engines Market status and future forecast, involving capacity, production, value, consumption, growth rate, market share, historical and forecast.

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Next Generation Search Engines Market report 2018 to 2023 focus on major drivers and key players. Next Generation Search Engines market research provides analysis of the market demand, revenue forecasts of the market. The market research report is details study on the industry.

Major Regions covers:-

North America

Europe

Asia-Pacific

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Next Generation Search Engines market will prove as a valuable source of guidance for professional clients like Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 3 level managers, CEOs, CMOs, as well as the interested individual reader’s across the world. Vendor Landscape provide acts as a key development and focus of above professional with common aim to lead the way of Ceramic Sanitary Ware market Worldwide.

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Categorized in Internet Search

[This article is originally published in digitaljournal.com - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Jason bourne]

“ONIONLANDSEARCHENGINE.COM“

People know only one name Google, a search engine by default setting on everyone PC's and works just like water for all. But now a new deep search engine with new specifications. OnionLand Search Engine launched a new search engine i.e.; onionlandsearchengine.com. It is not merely provided deep web information but Anonymity for every user.

OnionLand Search Engine introducing and expanding this new search engine with excellent key features; good results and high-quality access to the information that people actually require with one click. There is a vast section of the Internet which is hidden and not accessible through regular search engines and web browsers. This part of the Internet is known as the Deep Web, and it is about 500 times the size of the Web that we know and everyone can have access to all this information without been tracked, maintaining total anonymity.

Search engines like Google are incredibly powerful, but they can't crawl and index the vast amount of data that is not hyperlinked or accessed via public DNS services. However, there are Deep Web Search Engines that crawl over the TOR network and bring the same result to your regular browser. But, what if, you can still be able to dig the Darknet contents with your regular browsers, without the need of TOR?

OnionLand Search Engine is bringing a big change in human's life because of its Deep Web and Anonymity that you may not be able to find in a giant search engine like Google. OnionLand is introducing and marketing onionlandsearchengine.com with highly effective strategies and trying to make it default search engine by replacing Google and it seems very effective as onionlandsearchengine.com is really changing the lives of people by giving them suggestion options.

Categorized in Deep Web
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