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Have spent more than half an hour searching for a PDF document online, only to find that the document you have found is not in PDF format you need. As I have mentioned you can open the PDF before you download it in the web browser. However, you have to find the PDF files first. To make sure the file you get is exactly PDF format, you need to use PDF search engine. If you want to edit and manage the PDF documents you have collected, you might want to check the part 2 in which an efficient PDF tool will be introduced.

Top 5 PDF Search Engine Sites to Get Free PDF eBooks

1. Ebook3000

Ebook3000 is a nice PDF search engine for PDF files (ebooks, documents & forms). And it is a library of free ebook downloads with over 17 categories available. You can also type in the keywords in the search box, then all the related PDF files are displayed here. I like it very much because of its magazines. You could always find a lot of PDF and ePub documents there.

free PDF search

2. Search PDF

Search PDF is another great PDF search engine which able to help you find and download PDF files (eBooks, tutorials, forms, etc.). You just go to its website, search for the PDF files you need. If you want to save the time, you can have the plug-in added to your Firefox search bar. Whenever you need a PDF file, you just type in the Firefox search bar to get it.

pdf search engine

3. PDF Search Engine

PDF Search Engine likes an online library whose services are available to the people without any time limit and charges. It is a book search engine search on sites, forums, message boards for pdf files. You can find and download a tons of e-books by searching it or browsing through the full directory. You can also the last 20 PDFs which was downloaded by the other users lately.

free PDF search engine

4. Book Gold Mine

Book Gold Mine serves a large collection of quality e-books, lectures, notes, and other kinds of documents at no cost to the user. It has the catogeries like biology, business, computer science, math, and physics, if you want to search PDF files like those, it is a useful PDF search engine for you.

free PDF search

5. Google

Now comes to the end of the list. But I have to say do not ignore Google. In Google search engine, you could get everything you need, including PDF files. Whenever you need a PDF file, you can type in keywords, then with "filetype: pdf" in Google search engine. Without the doubt, you can get what you want.

free PDF search engine

More Solutions to Handle Your PDF Files

Getting PDF files online is often the primary step to work on them. More often than not, you would want to manage those files you have collected for future use, or make some modifications to certain PDF content, like inserting some sentences or leaving notes for certain parts to make them indicative to readers. Or you might want to read on e-Readers, like iPad, Sony Reader, Barnes & Nobles Nook, or Kindle after you get some interesting PDF eBooks.

PDFelement is the all-in-one PDF solution which is embedded in all those functions you can imagine for PDF. It is capable of converting PDF to dozens of documents format, including Word, Excel, PPT, EPUB, TIFF, RTF, image and more. A complete series of comment tools are available for making PDF illuminous to readers, such as inserting the note, highlight PDF content or drawing markups as you need.

pdf editor

Moreover, you are able to manage the PDF files as you need. For example, you can combine batch files into a single PDF or just split a single one into several pages, or crop certain parts of PDF pages to make them accessible for reuse. Another amazing feature is the OCR function which can turn scanned PDF into editable and searchable.

Step 1. Convert PDF to e-Readers Friendly Format

After you get some interesting PDF eBooks, you might want to read on e-Readers, like iPad, Sony Reader, Barnes & Nobles Nook, or Kindle, etc. To enhance your reading experience, you should convert PDF to EPUB, because PDF is too large to read on portable devices, while EPUB is suitable to read on any e-Readers.

All you need to do is to import the PDF files into PDFelement, move to the "Home" tab and hit the "To Others" button, select the "Convert to EPUB" from the drop-down menu. Seconds later, you will see the EPUB files ready for use.

convert pdf to epub

Step 2. Combine PDF Files as You Want

If you are working on research papers, collecting PDF files from website won’t do much good to the writing process. You still should organize those documents and make them easy to retrieve and look up.

To combine multiple PDF files, go to the homepage and click the "Combine PDF" button, add all the files you need to merge. One click and you will have all those documents combined into one in seconds.

combine pdf files

Step 3. Edit Scanned PDF (Optional)

You would need the OCR function if the PDF documents you found are image-based. You are unable to make changes to scanned PDFs if you don’t recognize them to editable PDF. Before you try to work on scanned PDF, you should perform OCR first.

Import the scanned PDF documents into PDFelement, and you will see a notice to inform you of performing OCR. Hit on the "Perform OCR" button and all you have to do is to wait for just several seconds, and the PDF can be modified as you want. Click on the "Edit" button on the upper left to start the editing process. You can edit text and images by clicking the "Edit" button.

edit scanned pdf

 Source: This article was published pdf.wondershare.com

Published in Search Engine

Google is the most widely used search engine on the Web. They offer a variety of different vertical or highly targeted, searches, including News, Maps, and Images. In this article, we're going to look at how you can find images with Google using a variety of advanced search tactics to find the exact image you're really looking for. 

Basic Image Search

For most Web searchers, using Google Image Search is easy: just enter your query into the search box and click the Search Images button.

Simple!

However, more advanced searchers will find that they can also use any of Google's specific search operators within their search query. There are two ways that searchers can utilize Google Images' more advanced features: either by the convenient drop-down menus or by entering in an actual search operator (for example, using the filetype operator will bring back only certain types of images, i.e., .jpg or .gif).

Advanced Searching

If you really want to fine-tune your image searching, the best way to do it is to use the Google advanced search drop-down menus found on your Google Image search results page, or, click on the Advanced Search menu found under the Settings icon on the far right-hand corner. From both of these places you can tweak your image search in a number of ways:

  • Color: Search only for black and white, grayscale, or full-color images (you can pick what color you'd like to highlight, too).
  • Safe Search: Don't want explicit results? This is where you can specify that preference.
  • Domain: Find images only within a specific domain or website.
  • File types: Look for specific image file formats.
  • Size: Especially useful when you're looking for a specific size! Search for small, medium, or large images.
  • Keywords: Just like you can with Google's regular web search, you can filter your results by looking for all the words in a phrase, any of the words, even for images that are not related to the words.

The Advanced Image Search page really comes in handy if you're looking for images that of a particular file type; for example, say you are working on a project that requires images that are in a .JPG format only. It's also useful if you're looking for a larger/high-resolution image for printing, or a smaller resolution image that will work fine for using on the Web (note: always check copyright before using any of the images you find on Google. Commercial use of copyrighted images is prohibited and is considered bad manners on the Web).

Viewing Your Images

Once you click on the Search Images button, Google returns a tapestry of paginated results, displayed in a grid, organized by relevance to your original search term(s).

For each image displayed in your search results, Google also lists the size of the image, type of file, and the originating host's URL. When you click on an image, the original page is displayed via a URL in the middle of the page, along with the Google Images frame around the image thumbnail, the image's full display, and information about the image.

You can click on the image to view it larger than a thumbnail (this will take you to the originating site from which the image was originally found), or go directly to the site itself by clicking on the "Visit Page" link, or, if you just want to see the image without any context, click on the "View Original Image" link.

Some images found via Google Image Search will not be able to be viewed after clicking; this is because some website owners use special code and search engine instructions to keep non-authorized users from downloading images without permission.

Filtering Your Image Results

It's (nearly) inevitable: sometime in your Web search travels you're probably going to come across something offensive.

Thankfully, Google gives us many options for keeping searches safe. By default, a moderate SafeSearch content filter is activated when you use Google Images; this filtering blocks the display of potentially offensive images only, and not text.

You can toggle this SafeSearch filter in any search results page by clicking on the SafeSearch drop-down menu and clicking "Filter Explicit Results". Again, this does not filter text; it only filters offensive images that are considered to be explicit and/or not family-friendly.

Google Image Search: a useful tool

No matter how you use Google's Image Search, it's easy to use and returns accurate, relevant results. Filters - especially the ability to narrow down images by size, color, and file type - are especially useful.

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Published in Search Engine

Search engines are an intrinsic part of the array of commonly used “open source” research tools. Together with social media, domain name look-ups and more traditional solutions such as newspapers and telephone directories, effective web searching will help you find vital information to support your investigation.

Many people find that search engines often bring up disappointing results from dubious sources. A few tricks, however, can ensure that you corner the pages you are looking for, from sites you can trust. The same goes for searching social networks and other sources to locate people: A bit of strategy and an understanding of how to extract what you need will improve results.

This chapter focuses on three areas of online investigation:

  1. Effective web searching.
  2. Finding people online.
  3. Identifying domain ownership.

1. Effective web searching

Search engines like Google don’t actually know what web pages are about. They do, however, know the words that are on the pages. So to get a search engine to behave itself, you need to work out which words are on your target pages.

First off, choose your search terms wisely. Each word you add to the search focuses the results by eliminating results that don’t include your chosen keywords.

Some words are on every page you are after. Other words might or might not be on the target page. Try to avoid those subjective keywords, as they can eliminate useful pages from the results.

Use advanced search syntax.

Most search engines have useful so-called hidden features that are essential to helping focus your search and improve results.

Optional keywords

If you don’t have definite keywords, you can still build in other possible keywords without damaging the results. For example, pages discussing heroin use in Texas might not include the word “Texas”; they may just mention the names of different cities. You can build these into your search as optional keywords by separating them with the word OR (in capital letters).

You can use the same technique to search for different spellings of the name of an individual, company or organization.

Search by domain

You can focus your search on a particular site by using the search syntax “site:” followed by the domain name.

For example, to restrict your search to results from Twitter:

To add Facebook to the search, simply use “OR” again:

You can use this technique to focus on a particular company’s website, for example. Google will then return results only from that site.

You can also use it to focus your search on municipal and academic sources, too. This is particularly effective when researching countries that use unique domain types for government and university sites.

Note: When searching academic websites, be sure to check whether the page you find is written or maintained by the university, one of its professors or one of the students. As always, the specific source matters.

Searching for file types

Some information comes in certain types of file formats. For instance, statistics, figures and data often appear in Excel spreadsheets. Professionally produced reports can often be found in PDF documents. You can specify a format in your search by using “filetype:” followed by the desired data file extension (xls for spreadsheet, docx for Word documents, etc.).

2. Finding people

Groups can be easy to find online, but it’s often trickier to find an individual person. Start by building a dossier on the person you’re trying to locate or learn more about. This can include the following:

  • The person’s name, bearing in mind:

    • Different variations (does James call himself “James,” “Jim,” “Jimmy” or “Jamie”?).
    • The spelling of foreign names in Roman letters (is Yusef spelled “Yousef” or “Yusuf”?).
    • Did the names change when a person married?
    • Do you know a middle name or initial?
  • The town the person lives in and or was born in.

  • The person’s job and company.

  • Their friends and family members’ names, as these may appear in friends and follower lists.

  • The person’s phone number, which is now searchable in Facebook and may appear on web pages found in Google searches.

  • Any of the person’s usernames, as these are often constant across various social networks.

  • The person’s email address, as these may be entered into Facebook to reveal linked accounts. If you don’t know an email address, but have an idea of the domain the person uses, sites such as email-format can help you guess it.

  • A photograph, as this can help you find the right person, if the name is common.

Advanced social media searches: Facebook

Facebook’s newly launched search tool is amazing. Unlike previous Facebook searches, it will let you find people by different criteria including, for the first time, the pages someone has Liked. It also enables you to perform keyword searches on Facebook pages.

This keyword search, the most recent feature, sadly does not incorporate any advanced search filters (yet). It also seems to restrict its search to posts from your social circle, their favorite pages and from some high-profile accounts.

Aside from keywords in posts, the search can be directed at people, pages, photos, events, places, groups and apps. The search results for each are available in clickable tabs.

For example, a simple search for Chelsea will find bring up related pages and posts in the Posts tab:

The People tab brings up people named Chelsea. As with the other tabs, the order of results is weighted in favor of connections to your friends and favorite pages.

The Photos tab will bring up photos posted publicly, or posted by friends that are related to the word Chelsea (such as Chelsea Clinton, Chelsea Football Club or your friends on a night out in the Chelsea district of London).

The real investigative value of Facebook’s search becomes apparent when you start focusing a search on what you really want.

For example, if you are investigating links between extremist groups and football, you might want to search for people who like The English Defence League and Chelsea Football Club. To reveal the results, remember to click on the “People” tab.

This search tool is new and Facebook are still ironing out the creases, so you may need a few attempts at wording your search. That said, it is worth your patience.

Facebook also allows you to add all sorts of modifiers and filters to your search. For example, you can specify marital status, sexuality, religion, political views, pages people like, groups they have joined and areas they live or grew up in. You can specify where they studied, what job they do and which company they work for. You can even find the comments that someone has added to uploaded photos. You can find someone by name or find photos someone has been tagged in. You can list people who have participated in events and visited named locations. Moreover, you can combine all these factors into elaborate, imaginative, sophisticated searches and find results you never knew possible. That said, you may find still better results searching the site via search engines like Google (add “site:facebook.com” to the search box).

Advanced social media searches: Twitter

Many of the other social networks allow advanced searches that often go far beyond the simple “keyword on page” search offered by sites such as Google. Twitter’s advanced search, for example, allows you to trace conversations between users and add a date range to your search.

Twitter allows third-party sites to use its data and create their own exciting searches.
Followerwonk, for example, lets you search Twitter bios and compare different users. Topsy has a great archive of tweets, along with other unique functionality.

Advanced social media searches: LinkedIn

LinkedIn will let you search various fields including location, university attended, current company, past company or seniority.

You have to log in to LinkedIn in order to use the advanced search, so remember to check your privacy settings. You wouldn’t want to leave traceable footprints on the profile of someone you are investigating!

You can get into LinkedIn’s advanced search by clicking on the link next to the search box. Be sure, also, to select “3rd + Everyone Else” under relationship. Otherwise , your search will include your friends and colleagues and their friends.

LinkedIn was primarily designed for business networking. Its advanced search seems to have been designed primarily for recruiters, but it is still very useful for investigators and journalists. Personal data exists in clearly defined subject fields, so it is easy to specify each element of your search.

You can enter normal keywords, first and last names, locations, current and previous employers, universities and other factors. Subscribers to their premium service can specify company size and job role.

LinkedIn will let you search various fields including location, university attended, current company, past company and seniority.

Other options

Sites like Geofeedia and Echosec allow you to find tweets, Facebook posts, YouTube videos, Flickr and Instagram photos that were sent from defined locations. Draw a box over a region or a building and reveal the social media activity. Geosocialfootprint.com will plot a Twitter user’s activity onto a map (all assuming the users have enabled location for their accounts).

Additionally, specialist “people research” tools like Pipl and Spokeo can do a lot of the hard legwork for your investigation by searching for the subject on multiple databases, social networks and even dating websites. Just enter a name, email address or username and let the search do the rest. Another option is to use the multisearch tool from Storyful. It’s a browser plugin for Chrome that enables you to enter a single search term, such as a username, and get results from Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr and Spokeo. Each site opens in a new browser tab with the relevant results.

Searching by profile pic

People often use the same photo as a profile picture for different social networks. This being the case, a reverse image search on sites like TinEye and Google Images, will help you identify linked accounts.

3. Identifying domain ownership

Many journalists have been fooled by malicious websites. Since it’s easy for anyone to buy an unclaimed .com, .net or .org site, we should not go on face value. A site that looks well produced and has authentic-sounding domain name may still be a political hoax, false company or satirical prank.

Some degree of quality control can be achieved by examining the domain name itself. Google it and see what other people are saying about the site. A “whois” search is also essential. DomainTools.com is one of many sites that offers the ability to perform a whois search. It will bring up the registration details given by the site owner the domain name was purchased.

For example, the World Trade Organization was preceded by the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades (GATT). There are, apparently, two sites representing the WTO. There’s wto.org (genuine) and gatt.org (a hoax). A mere look at the site hosted at gatt.org should tell most researchers that something is wrong, but journalists have been fooled before.

A whois search dispels any doubt by revealing the domain name registration information. Wto.org is registered to the International Computing Centre of the United Nations. Gatt.org, however, is registered to “Andy Bichlbaum” from the notorious pranksters the Yes Men.

Whois is not a panacea for verification. People can often get away with lying on a domain registration form. Some people will use an anonymizing service like Domains by Proxy, but combining a whois search with other domain name and IP address tools forms a valuable weapon in the battle to provide useful material from authentic sources.

 Source: This article was published verificationhandbook.com By Paul Myers

Published in Investigative Research

Conducting academic research is a critical process. You cannot rely solely on the information you get on the web because some of the search results are non-relevant or not related to your topic. To ensure that you only gather genuine facts and credible data for your academic papers, check out only the most trusted and incredibly useful resources for your research.

Here's a list of gratuitous and best academic search engines that can help you in your research journey.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a customized search engine specifically designed for students, educators and anyone related to academics. It allows users to find credible information, search journals, and save sources to their personal library. If you need help for your best essays, citations for your thesis and other researches, this easy-to-use resource can easily find citation-worthy materials for your academic writing.

iSEEK- Education

iSeek education is a go-to search engine for students, scholars and educators. It is one of the widely used search tools for academic research online. iSeek offers safe, smart, and reliable resources for your paper writing. Using this tool will help you save time, effort and energy in getting your written work done quickly.

Educational Resources Information Center - ERIC

ERIC is a comprehensive online digital library funded by Institute of Education Sciences of the U.S. Department of Education. It provides a database of education research and information for students, educators, librarians and the public. ERIC contains around 1.3 million articles and users can search for anything education-related such as journals, books, research papers, various reports, dissertations, policy papers, and other academic materials.

Virtual Learning Resources Center - VLRC

If you're looking for high quality educational sites to explore? You must check out VLRC. This learning resource center is the best place to go when you're in search for useful research materials and accurate information for your academic requirement. It has a collection of more than 10,000 indexed webpages for all subject areas.

Internet Archive

Internet Archive, a non-profit digital library, enables users to get free access to cultural artifacts and historical collections in digital format. It contains millions of free books, music, software, texts, audio, and moving images. Capturing, managing and searching different contents without any technical expertise or hosting facilities made easier for you through this search engine.

Infotopia

Infotopia is Google alternative safe search engine that gives information and reference sites on the following subjects: art, social sciences, history, languages, literature, science and technology and many more.

Source: This article was published hastac.org By Amber Stanley

Published in Search Engine

Need to find a job? These are the best job search engines on the web

If you're in the market for a new job, you'll want to check out this list of the best eight job search engines on the web. All of these job search tools offer unique features and can streamline your employment search efforts so your efforts are more productive. Each one is an incredibly useful tool that will help you localize your search, find interesting new positions that correlate to your experience and interests, and help you to find employment in a wide variety of genres. 

1- Monster.com

Monster Logo
Monster

Newly redesigned Monster.com is one of the oldest job search engines on the Web. While some of its usefulness has been diminished in recent years due to a lack of good filtering and too many posts by spammy recruiters, it's still an important site on which to conduct a job search. You can narrow your search by location, keywords, and employer; plus, Monster has plenty of job search extras: networking boards, job search alerts, and online resume posting.

Employers can also use Monster.com to find employees for a nominal fee, a useful tool for those looking to expand their hiring repertoire, find a new full-time or contract employee, or gather a pool of potential applicants for an upcoming position.  More »

Indeed logo
Indeed

Indeed.com is a very solid job search engine, with the ability to compile a resume and submit it onsite for employer searches of keywords, jobs, niches, and more. Indeed uncovers a wide variety of jobs and fields that you wouldn't normally find on most job search sites, and they do a good job of making their job search features as easy to use as possible. You can subscribe to job alerts via email; you can set these up for a certain keyword, geolocation, salary, and much more. 

In addition, Indeed makes it as simple as possible to keep track of jobs you've applied for; all you need to do is create a login (free) and every job you've applied for from within Indeed.com or that you've just expressed interest in will be saved to your profile. 

Daily and weekly alerts can be created with notifications going to your inbox; criteria include job title, location, salary requirements, and skill sets.  More »

USAJobs
USA Jobs

Think of USAjobs as your gateway into the huge world of US government jobs. Navigate to the USAjobs.gov home page, and you'll be able to narrow your search by keyword, job title, control number, agency skills, or location. One particularly interesting feature is the ability to search worldwide within any country that currently is advertising a vacancy. 

Just like many other job search engines on this list, you can create a user account (free) on USAjobs.gov, making the application process for government jobs extremely streamlined and easy.  More »

CareerBuilder Logo
Career Builder

CareerBuilder offers job searchers the ability to find a job, post a resume, create job alerts, get job advice and job resources, look up job fairs, and much more. This is a truly massive job search engine that offers a lot of good resources to the job searcher; I especially appreciate the list of job search communities. 

According to the CareerBuilder website, more than 24 million unique visitors a month visit CareerBuilder to find new jobs and obtain career advice, and offers job searches in over 60 different countries worldwide.  More »

5- Dice

DiceLogo
Dice

Dice.com is a job search engine dedicated to only finding technology jobs. It offers a targeted niche space for finding exactly the technology position you might be looking for.

One of the most appealing features that Dice offers is the ability to drill down to extremely specialized tech positions, giving job seekers the opportunity to find the niche tech jobs that are sometimes elusive on other job search engines.  More »

6- SimplyHired

SimplyHired Screenshot
Simply Hired

SimplyHired also offers a unique job search experience; the user trains the job search engine by rating jobs he or she is interested in. SimplyHired also gives you the ability to research salaries, add jobs to a job map, and view pretty detailed profiles of various companies.

If you're looking for a good job search engine that focuses on local job listings, SimplyHired can be a good choice. You can browse by town, by zip code, or by state to find the job that might be right for you.   More »

7- LinkedIn

linked in logo
LinkedIN

LinkedIn.com combines the best of two worlds: the ability to scour the Internet for jobs with its job search engine, and the opportunity to network with like-minded friends and individuals to deepen your job search.

LinkedIn's job postings are of the highest quality, and if you are connected to someone who already knows about that particular job, you've got a way in before you even hand in your resume.  More »

8- Craigslist

Craigslist logo
Craigslist

There are all sorts of interesting jobs on Craigslist. Just find your city, look under Jobs, then look under your job category. Non-profit, systems, government, writing, etc. jobs are all represented here.

You can also set up various RSS feeds that pertain to whatever job you might be looking for, in whatever location.

Caution: Craigslist this is a free marketplace and some of the jobs posted at on this site could be scams. Use caution and common sense when replying to job listings on Craigslist.  More »

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Published in Search Engine

Keyword research is important when you want to find new areas of growth and increase traffic to your site, but deciding which terms to focus your efforts on can be a complicated task. Before you start to target a new keyword, it’s crucial to estimate how much time and effort it will take to achieve high rankings for each search term, along with how much value each keyword has.  Knowing this will help you prioritize your list and only go after terms that will yield the best possible outcome.

You can accomplish this by looking at two things, competition (difficulty to rank), and potential value (search volume).  Potential value is easy to measure using the Google Keyword Planner tool, but difficulty to rank is more complex to calculate.

The easiest way to measure difficulty to rank is to perform a Google search and see how many pages are indexed for each of your keywords:

Google Search Keywords - Education

But this is extremely broad and usually returns several millions results, making it next to impossible to truly assess keyword difficulty. In order to get a more realistic idea of the competition, you want to focus only on pages that have been optimized for the search engines.

To get a more accurate number you can use two of Google’s advanced search operators to return more targeted results:

Google Search Operator - allintitle: education

allintitle:keyword – returns only pages where the keyword is used in the title tag

Google Search Operator - allinurl: Education

allinurl:keyword – returns only pages where the keyword is used in the URL

This information is much more useful than a basic Google search because it removes the noise and lets you see only websites that have optimized their titles & urls, giving us a clearer picture of the competition.

Now that you’ve focused on a keyword’s competition based on title & url, the next step is to prioritize your list of keywords and target the ones that have a combination of high search volume and low competition. I started with a list of 20 keywords and narrowed the list down to the top 5.

Keyword Research - 20 top education keywords - nursing

Avg. Monthly Searches = Keyword’s search volume from Google Keyword Planner

URL Competition = Number of results returned for an allinurl: search

Title Tag Competition = Number of results returned for an allintitle: search

In order to find the keywords that have the highest search volume and the lowest competition calculate the “opportunity” for both title & url. Keywords with the highest “opportunity” have the greatest chance of getting on page one of Google, relative to search volume. Opportunity provides a balance between search volume and competitiveness.

Keyword Competition - 20 top education keywords opportunity - nursing

URL Opportunity = Avg. Monthly Searches divided by URL Competition

Title Tag Opportunity = Avg. Monthly Searches divided by Title Tag Competition

As an added step, you can add extra weight to either URL or Title Tag Opportunity by multiplying by a given percentage, if you think one gives off a stronger ranking signal than the other.

Once you have URL Opportunity & Title Tag Opportunity, calculate the Full Opportunity by adding the two together.

20 top education keywords full opportunity - nursing

Full Opportunity = URL Opportunity + Title Tag Opportunity

Full Opportunity shows the big picture in regard to difficulty to rank for a term based on title tag & url optimization, while maximizing the potential for traffic based on monthly search volume.

To prioritize your list and select the top 5 keywords, just sort Full Opportunity from High to Low.

Top 5 education keywords ranked - nursing

Please keep in mind this is just one method for determining keyword difficulty; there are several other factors to consider when trying to assess the competition for a given term, such as:

  • Quality of the page content
  • Moz Page Authority
  • Moz Domain Authority
  • Number of external links pointing to each ranking page
  • Number of domains linking to each ranking page
  • Social metrics (Facebook & Twitter shares)

Using this method, I provide clients with keywords to develop new content around, whether blog posts or new pages within their websites. I also use this method when suggesting reoptimization for existing pages that are performing poorly.

Source: This article was published leverinteractive.com By Kevin DalPorto

Published in Search Engine

I love YouTube. I use it for inspiration or to kill an idle hour (which I normally don’t have). I love the variety of user-generated content: different styles, topics and perspectives. I love it that YouTube is huge.

But with the resource being enormous comes one issue: it is almost impossible to search it efficiently. And there are no official guides on how to search YouTube to actually find something.

However, not many people know how flexible YouTube’s search function actually is.

About 2 years ago (maybe more) Google started operating YouTube search — if you haven’t noticed Google Video Search and YouTube search have even identical (advanced) search options. And with Google coming into play, there turns out to be some really tricky and smart ways to search YouTube using Google search operators.

The Issue

YouTube (like Google Video Search) has some handy sorting options that allow you to find videos by:

  • Relevancy (based on your search query);
  • Upload date (to find most recent videos);
  • View count (to find the most viewed videos);
  • Rating (to find the highest rated videos).

I love using the latter two options to look through the most popular YouTube videos on any topic.

The only issue is that when you sort by anything other than relevancy, the results are likely to be highly irrelevant.

Let’s compare:

youtube search

Sorting makes results absolutely off-topic. Luckily, we do have an option to sort YouTube search results while still getting relevant results: YouTube advanced search operators.

YouTube Advanced Search Operators

I don’t think the search operators I am listing here are anywhere to be found in YouTube’s documentation. All that is listed on the official “Advanced YouTube search” page is the set of the usual search options you see below the search field:

You can filter results by:

  • Type of results, such as Videos, Channels, or Playlists
  • Subject category
  • Video length
  • Video quality
  • Features, such as Closed captions, Partner videos, or Rentals

However, as we have seen above, filtering and sorting seldom triggers relevant results.

To bypass this issue, you need to use advanced operators which were inherited from Google search and are really very helpful:

1. Use quotes to force the exact match

This operator may come particularly in handy when you are sure which exact key phrases you want to be included into the search results, for example, the name of a movie or a music clip.

youtube video search

2. Use plus (+) sign to force a word in the results

If one of your words gets dropped out from search results, this operator may save a lot of your time. Similarly, you can use the minus (-) sign to force YouTube search to exclude any irrelevant but persistent words from the search results.

youtube video search

3. Force any word to appear in the video title with help of INTITLE: operator

This trick turns out to be very useful if you, for example, keep getting irrelevant results (video pages that only mention your search term in comments or loosely in description).

youtube search tips

Any more YouTube search tricks to force relevant results even when using sorting options?

Source: This article was published makeuseof.com By Ann Smarty

Published in Search Engine

Remember when it was considered weird to use a Bluetooth device in public? Back then, the last thing people wanted was for others to think they were ranting to themselves on the street. Today, using voice search on a mobile phone in public can still have some of the same stigma attached to it, especially in certain settings (like the restroom—more on that later), but that stigma is disappearing rapidly.

At Stone Temple Consulting, we recently surveyed more than 900 mobile phone users to find out how they use voice search, and the results give us insight into the way that digital marketing and SEO are changing.

Google Ramps Up for Voice Search

Google has been preparing for voice search for quite some time. The rise in mobile usage and voice commands, in fact, have led to some pretty significant changes in how Google’s search engine interprets queries.

In 2016, Google officially stated that 20 percent of mobile queries had become voice searches, and in an interview, we did here at Stone Temple Consulting with Google’s Gary Illyes the same year, he mentioned the search engine gets “30 times as many actions queries by voice as by typing.”

The percentage of voice search queries is expected to rise, especially as the younger generations continue to adopt voice search.

How People Use Voice Search

Until mass adoption, trying to understand why people do and don’t use voice search can enlighten our marketing strategies and help us understand how voice commands impact how search engines work to produce the most relevant results. We recently conducted a study of more than 900 users to see how they use voice search. You can see a video on the results from this survey here:

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The results were fascinating. For example, did you know that more than two-thirds of people feel comfortable using voice search at home alone? That number drops to 54 percent when using it at home with people they know.

This is in line with findings of the 2016 Internet Trends Report by KPCB, where most of the voice searches were occurring in the home.

Then there are the pioneers of public voice search adoption—those who felt comfortable conducting voice searches no matter who was around. More than one-fifth of those surveyed were fine using voice commands in more public situations, like amongst coworkers, in a restaurant, on public transportation, or at a party.

A smaller amount of people were okay using voice commands in places like the gym or in the bathroom (which, understandably, could be awkward, to be muttering commands from the toilet), where 13 percent of people seem comfortable with speaking searches to their phone.

Men were much more willing than women to take risks in places like the bathroom, with men twice as likely to use the phone for a voice search in the restroom than women! Men were also three times as likely to use voice search in a theater than women.

Age plays a factor in public voice search adoption, too. Our survey found that folks in the Generation Z category (under age 24) were 33 percent more likely to use voice commands in some of those more “taboo” public settings than those older than 24.

Voice Search Will Grow Even More

Because we see comfort levels using voice commands on mobile devices are significantly higher among the younger generation, it’s reasonable to expect that voice command usage will increase over time. Other reasons for growing adoption will likely include improved technology, as outlined in the Internet Trends Report:

Different folks prefer different technologies when performing their voice searches. If you have an iPhone and know that Siri can take care of what you need, then you’ll likely ask Siri and not bother opening up a dedicated app or browser.

In fact, the Internet Trends Report showed Siri processed more than one billion voice commands per week by June 2015.

Also of interest in that data are the forecasts for continued growth of voice search. For example, Baidu chief scientist Andrew Ng believes that at least 50 percent of search queries by 2020 will be performed as a voice or image search.

How to Prepare

Search boxes and browsers will remain with us for the foreseeable future, but their importance is going to decline significantly over the next decade. In fact, a forecast from Strategy Analytics shows that by the year 2020, less than 25 percent of internet-connected devices will be a PC, tablet, or smartphone.


What will those other devices be? They’ll be watches, thermostats, TVs, refrigerators, cars, game consoles, and many other types of devices. Most of these will not have a browser, and the main interface will be via voice.

Digital personal assistants may be the main connecting tissue that binds all these things together. Those are tools like Google Assistant, Cortana, Amazon Alexa, and Siri. This then will become the new key focus of your optimization efforts. When someone tells a personal assistant, “Find an Italian restaurant near me,” you’ll need to have taken the right steps to be included in those results.

Some of these new steps will have a lot in common with those needed to show up in today’s search results, but not all will be that simple. For example, if the query is, “How do I change a tire?”, the personal assistant may only return one single response. This may come from what Google calls a   “featured snippet,” the direct answer the search engine gives to queries above the regular search results. It’s the first of three ideas I have for you on how to prepare for this new world:

  1. Learn how to get featured snippets for your site.  The great thing about this is that it both prepares you for the future, and it also will help you drive a traffic increase to your site right now.
  2. Learn the most common questions prospective customers have about products and services like yours. Get out there and learn what they want to know, and then start building content to answer those questions proactively. Being one of the best information sources in your market space will be critical to surviving and thriving.
  3. Start experimenting with conversational interfaces. These are different than traditional web interfaces. For example, on a website, users often navigate to what they want in a step-by-step process. If I want a running shoe, I might navigate in steps like this:
  • Pick sneakers in the menu
  • Pick running sneakers on the menu
  • Pick a brand
  • Pick a size and color
  • Pick a specific product

Imagine a world where I simply say what I want, starting with, “Give me a list of Nike Air running shoes for men, size 10.” In this world, I skip many steps in the process and get to what I want much faster. We won’t get to this world overnight, but we will get there, and the time to start learning is now. You can do this by experimenting with the Amazon Echo (learn how to build an Amazon Skill here) and Google Home (learn how to build an Action on Google here).

The world is changing fast, and we’re approaching a point of major disruption in our industry once again. While this can be frightening, it can also be exciting. One thing is for sure: It’s a time of great opportunity. Start exploring the right ways to set yourself up for success now, and you’ll be in a much better position to do well as the events of the next year unfold.

 Source: This article was published convinceandconvert.com By Chris Stobing

Published in How to

Google has been the top search engine for years given its powerful reach across the world. This is mostly due to the massive database of indexed websites, relevancy of search result and the convenience it offers in terms of using the platform. 

Moreover, it is undeniable that the Google search engine provides relevant results before you can blink your eyes. 
Apart from the fact that you can find out almost anything about everyone through the Google search engine, it also offers advanced users variety of tools and options to further fine tune search result. Most powerful option among these is advanced search operators, that you can apply on the search query to narrow down result set. 

By using advanced search operators, you will be able to obtain more refined results. If you are new to using this advanced Google feature, you definitely need a user-friendly cheat sheet, unlike SEO specialists who consider the search operators their bread and butter. Basically, the search operators can be found in symbols, characters, or a unique combination of both. 

Here is a comprehensive list of advanced search operators to master Google search and get best from Google search results. 
Search for the exact phrase with "example"
This is the simplest search operator. You can use this search operator if you want to search for exact phrase. For instance, if you type in "backlink building tools,"your search result will only include links to pages that have exact text phrase backlink building tools in title, meta description, and body content. 

The search operator is also useful if you want to search for people by name, book titles, products, quotes. 

Search within the particular website using site:example.com
This is another basic operator to query pages from the specific domain. For example, to find everything related to keyword research on serpstart.com, you can use query site:serpstat.com keyword research. 

You can also search within a folder of a website using query site:example.com/folder 

For example to search for growth hacking articles blog on Serpstat blog, use query site:serpstat.com/blog growth hacking.

Find the desired keyword in title tag with intitle:
A simple and useful Google search operator that will provide you with a list of web pages with the keyword you specified in their tag. This operator is used for single term or phrase. 

For example, search query seo audit intitle:tools will return pages that contain term tools in page title and contain seo and audit terms anywhere in the web page content. 
Search for the desired keywords only within title tag with allintitle: operator
As the name suggests, you can add this search operator to your search query to restrict the results having all the query terms in page title. For instance, if you search Google using "allintitle: competitor analysis tool" query, results will show web pages that contain all the terms "competitor", "analysis" and "tool" in page title. These terms can be anywhere in the title. To search for exact phrase, use intitle operator. 

Alternatively you can use intitle operator multiple times. For example, allintitle:seo tool is same as intitle:seo intitle:tool

Find the pages that have the desired keyword in the page's URL with inurl:
This search operator displays web pages with search keyword (single word) found within their URL. For example, to find out all the pages on serpstat.com website that have term ppc in URL, you can use query site:serpstat.com inurl:ppc. 

This is suffix operator meaning if you should place it at the end of your search query. 

Search for several keywords within pages' URLs with help of allinurl: operator
This search operator is good for searching multiple terms in URL. This is equivalent to using multiple inurl operator. 

For instance, if you search using the term allinurl:content analysis tool, Google search result will show web pages that have the terms content, analysis and toolin their URL. Terms in URL can appear anywhere. 

Note, that this is also suffix operator. 
Use intext: to find the pages that include the desired keyword in the body tag
Use this operator to find all the pages that contain term or exact phrase in the body content of web page. 

For example, intext:marketing search query will return all the pages that have keyword marketing in their body content. This operator is different from " "operator. While " " operator searches for exact phrase in the whole page content, this operator searches only body content. 

Search query intext:keyword analysis tips is different from intext:"keyword analysis tips". Former query will show results from pages that have term keyword in body content and terms analysis and tips anywhere web page content. Later query will return list of web pages that have exact phrase keyword analysis tips in body content. 
Find the pages with multiple keywords in the body tag with the help of allintext:
You can use this search operator in order to limit the results based on the keywords following the term. For example, search query allintext:keyword analysis tips will provide you with a list of pages that have terms keyword, analysis and tips in the document content section. 
Use OR operator to see the results that meet one of the specified queries
This is logical OR search operator. The search result will meet one of the search query criteria defined using OR operator. 

For instance, intitle:"keyword analysis" OR allinurl:keyword tool query will return all the web pages that either have keyword analysis phrase in page title or keyword and tool term in page URL. You can also use pipe (|) symbol for OR operator. 
Expand the search results with AND operator
This operator functions the way a logical and operator works. When used in search, Google search result will show pages that satisfy all the search queries. 

For instance, search query site:serpstat.com AND intitle:seo AND intext:link building, will show all the pages from website serpstat.com that have term seo in page title and terms link and building in page body content. 

Always remember to use capital letters for OR and AND operator. 
Find just the desired file formats with filetype:
This operator is used for searching content of files (pdf file, word file, excel file, ppt file etc) available on the internet. 

For instance, if you perform search with query link building tips filetype:docx, Google search result will include links to all the docx files that are related to link building tips. 

If you do not specify file format in search query, search result will show links to all the documents related to query term. 
Check when your page was last cached using cache: operator
A popular Google search operator to see latest cached version of a web page. Google will directly display cached version of web page. 

For instance, if your search query is cache:https://serpstat.com/blog/why-and-how-to-advertise-on-facebook/, Google will show the cached version of this page as stored by Google. It is quite useful in checking articles that websites delete immediately after publishing due to various reasons. In a rare case, it is also helpful in recovering your website content if you do not have proper backup data or you lose control of website backup data.
Find similar websites with related:operator
This operator is used for finding websites and web pages that Google think are similar to a target domain. This operator works best with large domains. 

The related operator will not work if you combine it with other operators. 
Narrow the search results with the help of minus(-) operator
This operator is used for removing pages from search result set that are related to term or keyword specified with operator. Quite useful in narrowing down search result. 

Let's say you are searching for java and you definitely do not want any pages that are related to beans or coffee. You can query using java -beans -coffee. 

You can use this operator with other operators, for example: 
  • To remove pages from example.com domain, use -site:example.com;
  • If you do not want any specific term in page title, use -intitle:keyword;
  • If you do not want any specific term in URL, use -inurl:keyword.

Let Google fill in the missing word(s) in your search query using * (wildcard operator)
This is a placeholder operator. It is used in order to fill in a missing word or words in keyword or phrase. 

This is helpful if you want to search for a generic phrase with slight variation. 

Let's say you are searching for search engine marketing tool and search engine optimization tool. You can make a generic query for both these terms using (*) operator like "search engine * tool". 
Define the number of keywords with AROUND (X)
The wildcard operator we discussed above is placeholder for one for more words. What if you want to use placeholder but you also want to restrict number of words for placeholder. That is where AROUND(X) is useful. AROUND operator finds terms and phrases in proximity and X defines the maximum words between two search query terms or phrases. 

You can reconstruct search engine tool query we used above, using AROUND(X) operator to search engine AROUND(3) tool. 

This operator is quite helpful when you have vague idea of something and you do not remember exact phrase to search for. 
Search for synonyms to the requested keyword with ~ (tilde or synonym operator)
This operator tells Google to search query term mentioned after operator and also search for query term synonyms. 

For example, if you search using query seo ~guide, Google will show result for SEO guide, SEO tutorial, and SEO tips. It is up to Google to decide what is good synonym for a term. If you are not happy with Google suggestion, you can always use OR operator. 
Use .. (range operator) to search for the numbers in a range
An operator to specify that search result contains numbers in a range. Can be used for price range or date range. 

For example, to search for Lenovo laptop with price between $900 to $1100, use query lenovo laptop $900..$1100. 

You can also use this query to find listicle articles. To find out article like Top (5,6.....50) Content Marketing Tips, use query Top 5..50 Content Marketing Tips. Or you can use this operator to define date range like 2011..2012. 
Use several complex search operators together with the help of ()
Use this operator to club together operators and control order of operations. 

For example to search for iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 plus in refurbished or second-hand condition, you can use query ("iPhone 7" OR "iPhone 7 plus") AND (intext: refurbished OR intext:second-hand).

Search for the results within the specific location with location: operator
Use this operator find content that is from a given place. 

For example, to find SEO agency in San Francisco, use query seo agency location:san francisco.

Learn the meaning of the desired word with the help of define: operator
Google can help you find out definition of a term or phrase using this operator. Search for define:content marketing, and Google will tell you what content marketing means. 

Search within the specific website usingsource:
It is a Google news search operator to find out content from a specific news source. If you are looking for news related to hurricane Irma from CNN, just use query Irma source:cnn. 
Find more info about any website with info:
This operator provides information about a website. This includes the cached version of website, sites that are similar to website, web pages from website and web pages that have matching term for domain name. Earlier Google used to reveal links to queried website but it does not provide that information now. 

Specify the date with daterange:
This operator provides result that are within date and time range. It is bit cumbersome to use as you need to enter dates in Julian format. You can use online conversion tool to get dates in Julian format. 
Search for prices using $ sign
Search for content with price. For example, a search for logitech keyboard $99will try to find out Logitech keyboards that are priced at $99. You can also use (.) for detailed price like $49.95. It is advisable to use range operator to get better result. 

Find out the stock price with stock:
To quickly find out price of a stock and other details. For example to check Amazon's stock price use stock:amazon.
Summing up
These are the most common search operators currently available. As Google gets better at understanding natural language and improving its search capability, it keeps on removing support for operators.

These operators are boon for any person working in SEO field. You can analyse your competitor, find backlink opportunities, find out about guest posting blogs etc.

It takes practice to get more from these operators, and a little bit of creativity will provide you great advantage over your competitor ;)
I'll be glad to answer your question, leave them in comments!

 

Published in Search Engine

Google is rolling out a new report in Analytics which analyzes a website’s custom audiences.

This appears to be a quiet rollout with no official announcement, though Google is notifying users upon logging into Analytics.

Here is the notification that comes up for those who have access to the new report:

Clicking on “see report” will, of course, bring you to the report. It also triggers another notification with links to learn more about it.

The report can be accessed manually by opening “Reports,” expanding the “Audience” tab and clicking on “Audiences.” It’s clearly marked as “NEW” so you can’t miss it.

In order to collect any data in this report, you must first have audiences configured in your Google Analytics account. Otherwise, the report will appear blank.

A custom audience is a group of visitors that have met a pre-defined condition. For example, audiences can be created for new visitors, returning visitors, past purchasers, users who have visited a specific section of a site, and so on.

Once audiences have been created and published to Google Analytics, the Audiences report will begin to display the following metrics:

  • Acquisition: The volume of users an audience is sending you, and how well the audience works to generate potential new business.
  • Behavior: How well a site engages a particular audience based on bounce rate, pages per session, and time on site.
  • Conversions: How well an audience is performing in terms of goal completions and transactions.

Knowing how an audience is performing, or not performing, can help site owners determine how much of their time and budget should be spent marketing towards that specific segment of visitors.

Aside from a small amount of forum chatter I haven’t seen much information going around about this new report. That leads me to believe it could be rolling out on a limited basis. So if you don’t see this report in your Google Analytics, chances are it will be coming eventually.

Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern

Published in Search Engine
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