fbpx

Google's John Mueller downplays author bios for all sites. But says author pages can be helpful for certain kinds of content.

In a Google Webmaster Central hangout, Google’s John Mueller answered whether it was worth spending time creating author pages.

Mueller downplayed the importance of author pages for ranking. He said that you can’t say author pages really matter.

Then he explained where it can matter.

Author Pages on News Sites and YMYL

Some people believe that author pages and “expert authors” are important for ranking.

But that’s not anything that Google has said.

I’ve had numerous companies come to me for help after an update. Many had tried adding author pages but that didn’t solve their problems because author pages are not a ranking factor.

Mueller’s answer confirms that it’s not something you really must do.

Are Author Pages Necessary?

This is the the question asked of John Mueller:

“Question about E-A-T and YMYL.

We’re working with news websites. What tips can you give us about indication of content authors?

Is it really necessary to make pages for each author, provide big info with photo, bio links to social networks?

…Does this really matter that there are lots of work to do elsewhere.”

John Mueller Comments on Content Author Pages

John’s answer begins by noting that E-A-T and YMYL are terms from the Quality Raters Guidelines (QRG).

“So, E-A-T is Expertise, Authority, Trustworthiness. And YMYL is You Money or Your Life content.

These are terms from the Google Raters Guidelines that we put out.”

The QRG is a guide for third-party raters to use. The intent of the guide is to help the raters use a consistent standard for rating search results. That’s important because otherwise the raters would use their own subjective opinions.

Google has recommended the use of the QRG to publishers as a way for them to judge their own sites for quality.

Google never said that the QRG reflected Google’s ranking algorithms. The QRG is just a standard for rating websites.

Mueller next downplays the importance of author pages as an absolute necessity:

“I think like with all kinds of content it’s not the case that you can say this really matters and you absolutely must do it.”

Mueller next explains that if you want to build trust with your readers, then using an author page is a good way to do that.

The context of his statement is not about ranking. The context is about building trust with readers.

Mueller’s explanation:

“I do think with a lot of news websites, especially if you’re providing information that you want people to trust, then this certainly makes sense.”

Mueller downplays the use of author pages as an SEO factor:

“So it’s not something that where I’d say it’s the same as removing a no-index meta tag on a page because that’s like really and on-and-off switch.”

Mueller then remarks on improving content and prioritizing content improvement and adding author bios.

“But if you’re improving the content of your site, that works well for users, that works well for Google.

So it seems like something that could be done.

How to prioritize that versus other things on the website that’s really hard to do. That’s where you almost need to kind of use your experience and figure out what works well on your side.”

Are Author Bios Important?

It’s clear that author bios are not ranking factors. The idea that author bios are important comes from the QRG encouragement that the quality raters look for them.

But the reason the QRG says that is to give the raters a common standard for verifying the quality of a site. It’s not because an author's bio is a part of Google’s algorithm.

Author bios can be important within the context of building trust with users.

If the author is an expert then it makes sense to make a statement about their expertise. As John Mueller stated, it’s a way to build trust with users.

Can it help your rankings? Only in an indirect way.

Site visitors who trust your site are more likely to recommend your web page, to trust it, and to return to it if the author bio builds credibility for the content.

It’s time for publishers and the SEO community to view author bios outside of the context of ranking. It’s more realistic to consider author bios from the context of what it might mean for users.

Watch the Google Office Hours Hangout here:

 [Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Roger Montti - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google gives a detailed explanation of what causes algorithm to rewrite meta descriptions.

In a Webmaster Central hangout, a publisher asked Google’s John Mueller why their meta description was being rewritten. Mueller’s answer offered a peek into how Google’s algorithm chooses when to rewrite meta descriptions.

The question was specifically about a meta description on the home page being rewritten on the Google search results pages (SERPs) for branded search queries. The publisher used the example of using the modifier “UK” with the brand name.

There are no specifics mentioned in the question so there is no way to address the publisher’s issue directly.

But because Mueller’s answer is general, it provided an answer that gave some insight into why Google rewrites meta descriptions.

Here’s the question

“We have an issue with the meta description that is being displayed for hour home page.

So, even though we have a meta description that is being implemented on that particular page, somehow in Google when our website appears, the meta description is completely different.

And in some cases, if we search for our company name plus the word “UK,” the meta description makes no sense whatsoever. It’s just a bunch of words put together from various parts of the page.

I know sometimes Google goes hunting for various things on the page if it cannot find relevant content for that particular region.

So I guess my question is, because we have a lot of traffic that is coming up from branded searches… it is important for us to have the correct meta description showing up.”

What do we do to rectify the situation?”

 

John Mueller Explains What Causes Meta Description Rewrites

Before answering why Google rewrites meta descriptions, John Mueller stated he hasn’t seen the publishers specific search result and could not answer why it was specifically happening for a query he hasn’t seen.

“It’s hard to say without looking at the search results. So that’s kind of the one part.”

Then he offered explanations of what causes Google to rewrite meta descriptions.

First he states that you have to have a meta keyword:

“Usually what happens is we need to have the description meta tag on the page. That’s kind of the first step.

It sounds like you already have that set up.”

Reason 1: Poor Use of Meta Description

Now the explanation of what triggers Google’s algorithm to rewrite the meta description tag:

“The other thing there is that we need to be able to, I guess, trust the meta description on the page so that it looks kind of reasonable.

In particular, sometimes when we see a bunch of keywords that are just kind of collected in the meta description.

Then that’s something that our systems might look at and say well, this doesn’t look that useful for users.

So they’ll try to rewrite something else.”

Mueller is saying that one of the reasons why the meta description may be rewritten is because it’s focused more on keywords and less on what the page is about.

But more importantly, what makes that meta description a target for rewriting is that he said that it “doesn’t look that useful for users.”

Reason 2: Content and Query Matching Can Trigger Meta Description Rewrite

That “less useful” part, in the context of the above publisher, is relative to the search query. T

he publisher said that branded queries with the “UK modifier were being rewritten.

That “UK” search query modifier may be what’s causing Google to rewrite the meta description.

If the web page itself isn’t specifically sending UK related content signals then Google might choose to modify the meta description.

Adding modifiers to search queries can cause Google to rewrite the meta descriptions (and title tags too). This is especially going to happen when the keyword modifiers (like UK or Home Page) don’t exist in the written content of the page.

Suffering from fewer conversions for the same ad spend on your Google Ads?
Your ads might be getting click fraud. Check if you need to protect your ads from competitors & bots. Simple setup. Start your free checkup today.

Example of Query and Content Matching Causing Meta Description Rewrite

Compare the search query “Walmart” to the query, “Walmart Home Page” and you will see that the search query “Walmart Home Page” has a rewritten meta description.

example-google-rewriting-me-5ecd365921828.gif

Google is trying to show a relevant meta description for the term Walmart Home Page. But the words “Home Page” do not exist on the Walmart home page.

But those words do exist on the yellow star icon that has this alt tag: “Icon for spark” and if you hover over the Walmart and “spark icon” logo, the words, “Walmart Homepage” show up in an alt tag tooltip.

So what’s happening is that Google’s algorithm is trying to make the meta description relevant for the search query, “Walmart Home Page.”

The algorithm is trying to do that by rewriting the meta description. But as you can see above in the case of the search query Walmart Home Page, Google isn’t doing that so well.

John Mueller confirms what I wrote above:

“And most of the time when it tries to rewrite something, it’s based on the content on the page itself.”

What happened in the Walmart Home Page search query that caused Google to rewrite the meta description is that the words Home Page or Homepage do not exist anywhere on the Walmart home page except for in the alt tag for the home page button.

So Google grabbed some alt tag text associated with the Walmart Home button, selected the wrong alt tag, and displayed the phrase, “Icon for spark” in the rewritten meta description.

Reason 3: Search Query Influences Meta Description Rewrite

As I illustrated above, and John Mueller will say below, the meta description rewriting depends on the search query. And I would expand that to say that it depends on the search query and the content on the web page.

Here’s what Mueller said:

“And the other thing… you noticed, is the description can vary depending on the query that is used.

So the first thing that I would do is just take the normal branded query that you use and double check that the description that you provide in the meta description is actually pretty useful and not too… spammy or overdone.

And then go from there, essentially, to figure out… is this something where Google always gets it wrong?

Or is it something where sometimes Google’s algorithms pick up something else on the page and get it wrong?”

Google Meta Description Rewriting Explained

John Mueller gave a great explanation of the reason why Google rewrites search queries.

I know some people are going to react and say that Google’s rewriting is arbitrary. But it’s not arbitrary.

This article has described specific situations that cause Google’s algorithm to rewrite meta description tags.

Google’s algorithm rewrites meta descriptions based on the relationship between the search query and the web page content.

So if you have an issue with Google rewriting the meta tags, take a closer look at how the search query relates to the on-page content.

Watch Google’s Webmaster Central here:

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Roger Montti - Uploaded by the Association Member: Robert Hensonw]

Categorized in Search Engine

YouTube is constantly growing. This is not only a website with funny videos, but a huge platform on which we can find everything – from clips with kittens to scientific materials and entertainment in the broad sense. With each subsequent month, Google announces new solutions that the company believes are expected to affect the convenience of using the website. This time, an internal search engine will arrive, helping to find interesting videos. Only, soon, in addition to video, it will also display search results from the traditional text search engine Google.

According to one of the Reddit users, the Android version of YouTube has started displaying search results from the traditional Google search engine in the search section. After entering a specific phrase in the search bar, under the video suggestions, the most accurate Google search result is presented along with the option to go to the full list in an external Google browser or application.

Google is combining its search engine with YouTube. This time they serve us a search engine displaying traditional results that point to external sites.

GOOGLE PREPARES TO DISPLAY ITS SEARCH ENGINE RESULTS IN YOUTUBEsearch result.jpg

This change was met with quite critical feedback from commentators. They think the company wants to litter YouTube even more with sponsored material. It is also possible to say that the first search result does not always meet the expectations, and in the case of the YouTube application users are looking primarily for video materials, not a textual answer to the query.

The only question is whether Google plans to implement this functionality on a large scale. Or whether it is only testing new solutions on a fairly narrow group of users. Would you like to see results from Google in YouTube search engine? I honestly admit that it is an unnecessary function for me. If I’m looking for something on a video site, I don’t need suggestions to get out of the YouTube app. If I wanted to look for something different, I would use the existing solutions.

I don’t see the point in displaying results from a traditional search engine. So combining videos with search results does not quite appeal to me. So I hope that these are only tests and ultimately this solution will not be introduced for everyone.

[Source: This article was published in gizchina.com By ABDULLAH - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

The search engine giant's popular Maps app has gotten a new location-sharing interface as of recently, first noticed by Android Police. Location sharing has now adopted a material, modern look that also allows for more information to be immediately available.

Sharing your location is now also easier, by tapping your avatar and going to Location Sharing, after which a new button "New share" is available on the bottom right corner of the screen, as shown below.

gmaps2.jpg

Left - Old interface. Center - New interface. Right - New location sharing information section. Source - Android Police.

The seemingly minute change is actually a step towards a more unified look for Google Maps, as other areas of the app have already previously adopted this interface design.

In addition, an updated section at the bottom of Location sharing explains in better detail how the feature works, and clarifies what personal information gets shared along with your location to people whom you're sharing with. That includes not only where you are, but where you've just been and whether you're driving or walking, along with your places, such as home and work.

Earlier last month, Google also added new features to Search and Maps in an effort to help users connect to healthcare options. Notably, a new "get online care" link now appears when searching for doctor's offices or hospitals, guiding users, though this is currently available only in the United States.

In related news, Apple Maps added coronavirus testing locations across the US, now shown as red medical dots where available, in the Cupertino company's own efforts to help its users.

[Source: This article was published in phonearena.com By Radoslav Minkov - Uploaded by the Association Member: Anthony Frank]

Categorized in Search Engine

The scientific community worldwide has mobilized with unprecedented speed to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic, and the emerging research output is staggering. Every day, hundreds of scientific papers about COVID-19 come out, in both traditional journals and non-peer-reviewed preprints. There's already far more than any human could possibly keep up with, and more research is constantly emerging.

And it's not just new research. We estimate that there are as many as 500,000 papers relevant to COVID-19 that were published before the outbreak, including papers related to the outbreaks of SARS in 2002 and MERS in 2012. Any one of these might contain the key information that leads to  or a vaccine for COVID-19.

Traditional methods of searching through the research literature just don't cut it anymore. This is why we and our colleagues at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab are using the latest artificial intelligence techniques to build COVIDScholar, a  dedicated to COVID-19. COVIDScholar includes tools that pick up subtle clues like similar drugs or research methodologies to recommend relevant research to scientists. AI can't replace scientists, but it can help them gain new insights from more papers than they could read in a lifetime.

Why it matters

When it comes to finding effective treatments for COVID-19, time is of the essence. Scientists spend 23% of their time searching for and reading papers. Every second our  can save them is more time to spend making discoveries in the lab and analyzing data.

AI can do more than just save scientists time. Our group's previous work showed that AI can capture latent scientific knowledge from text, making connections that humans missed. There, we showed that AI was able to suggest new, cutting-edge functional materials years before their discovery by humans. The information was there all along, but it took combining information from hundreds of thousands of papers to find it.

We are now applying the same techniques to COVID-19, to find existing drugs that could be repurposed, genetic links that might help develop a vaccine or effective treatment regimens. We're also starting to build in new innovations, like using molecular structures to help find which drugs are similar to each other, including those that are similar in unexpected ways.


1-aitoolsearch.jpg

How we do this work

The most important part of our work is the data. We've built web scrapers that collect new papers as they're published from a wide variety of sources, making them available on our website within 15 minutes of their appearance online. We also clean the data, fixing mistakes in formatting and comparing the same paper from multiple sources to find the best version. Our machine learning algorithms then go to work on the paper, tagging it with subject categories and marking work important to COVID-19.

We're also continuously seeking out experts in new areas. Their input and annotation of data is what allows us to train new AI models.

What's next

So far, we have assembled a collection of over 60,000 papers on COVID-19, and we're expanding the collection daily. We've also built search tools that group research into categories, suggest related research and allow users to find papers that connect different concepts, such as papers that connect a specific drug to the diseases it's been used to treat in the past. We're now building AI algorithms that allow researchers to plug  into quantitative models for studying topics like protein interactions. We're also starting to dig through the past literature to find hidden gems.

We hope that very soon, researchers using COVIDScholar will start to identify relationships that they might never have imagined, bringing us closer to treatments and a remedy for COVID-19.

[Source: This article was published in medicalxpress.com By Amalie Trewartha and John Dagdelen - Uploaded by the Association Member: Barbara larson]

Categorized in Online Research

LinkedIn Events and LinkedIn Live are coming together to create a new virtual event solution.

LinkedIn Pages are being updated with the ability to create virtual events, in response to the rapid shift from in-person to online conferences.

Virtual events are made possible by combining two existing features: LinkedIn Events and LinkedIn Live.

The two features can now work together, allowing marketers to stream live video content directly to LinkedIn Events attendees.linkedin.png

We’re in the midst of a social media live video boom right now, and LinkedIn is included in that.

According to LinkedIn’s data, live video is driving significantly more engagement than other types of videos.

Live video on LinkedIn is seeing 23X more comments per post and 6X more reactions per post than native video.

It’s the most effective solution for generating real-time engagement between a LinkedIn page and its followers.

linkedin1.png

Why Host a Virtual Event on LinkedIn?

In an announcement, LinkedIn emphasizes the following benefits of hosting a virtual event on its platform:

  • A safe and trusted environment: Using LinkedIn Live, you can choose to live stream to your Page followers or Event attendees, so you can meet audiences where they are.
  • Attract the right professional audiences: Make your event open to Page followers only and send direct invitations to your first-degree profile connections.
  • Additional buzz and engagement: Build buzz for your event or live broadcast by posting an update to your Page or Event feed.
  • Greater longevity: Live broadcasts will be saved in the page’s Video tab for later viewing.

While on the topic of benefits, it’s also worth mentioning that virtual events are free and easy to set up.

How to Host a Virtual Event on LinkedIn

In order to create virtual events, your Page will first have to apply for access to LinkedIn Live and get approved.

To get approved for LinkedIn Live your page must have at least 1,000 followers.

LinkedIn also notes it only approves pages that actively engage with their communities by responding to comments and creating back-and-forth dialogue.

For those approved for LinkedIn Live, the process of creating a virtual event is as follows:

  • Create a LinkedIn Event
  • During the creation process indicate that it is “online-only.”
  • On the day of the event, open your third party broadcast tool and select the event as the stream destination, rather than your organization’s Page.

Currently, third-party broadcast tools that integrate LinkedIn Live and LinkedIn Events include Streamyard, Restream, Wirecast and Socialive. Wowza is coming soon.

As soon as the stream starts all event attendees will be notified.

Deciding on the Right Time to Go Live

Not sure when to go live?

Here’s a pro tip!

You can figure out the optimal time to go live by reviewing the “Followers” tab under Analytics.

Using the data in this tab you can see where most of your audience is located.

Then, go live at a time that allows the largest segment of your audience to join (e.g. during the word day or right after).

This new functionality is available now as part of a regular quarterly update to LinkedIn pages.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dana W. Jimenez] 

Categorized in Social

GOOGLE is the most popular search engine on the internet, with Microsoft's Bing a distant second. But which is better, and which is safer to use?

People can actually choose from more than 20 different search engines. Most, however, stick with the most popular search engines, particularly  (92 percent) and Bing (2.5 percent). Both Google and  Bing take online safety extremely seriously, making it very it very difficult to choose between them.

Google's sheer pervasiveness into the fabric of our everyday lives makes it very difficult to argue any other search is a credible challenger to its crown.

Google can help users narrow down what exactly they are looking for with specialised searches.

Users can browse through different categories pertaining to keywords, including: Images, Maps, News articles, Products or services you can purchase online, Videos and scholarly papers.

Like all search engines, Google uses a special algorithm to determine its search results.

And while Google shares some facts about its algorithm, the specifics are a company secret.

google-vs-bing-which-search-engine-better-is-google-or-bing-safer-2461895.jpg

Google vs Bing: The overwhelming majority of people stick with the most popular search engines - Google and Bing (Image: Getty)

This helps Google remain competitive with other search engines and reduces the chance of hackers discovering how to abuse the system.

Google uses automated programs called spiders or crawlers to help generate its search results.

What differentiates Google is how it ranks its results, which determines the order Google displays results on its search engine results pages.

The world-leading search engine uses the PageRank algorithm to assign each Web page a relevancy score.

A web page's PageRank depends on three main factors:

google-vs-bing-which-search-engine-better-is-google-or-bing-safer-2461896.jpg

Google vs Bing: Google can help users narrow down what exactly they are looking for with specialised searches (Image: Getty)

The most important factor is the number of other Web pages linking to the page in question.

Also, if the keyword appears only once within the body of a page, it will receive a low score for that keyword.

And the length of time a web page has existed ensures Google places more value on those with an established history.

Although Microsoft's Bing is also a search engine, it differs slightly to Google in the way it works.

But the way Bing works is relatively simple in comparison to Google.

Bing will scan all documents for the frequency of root words, meaning "running" will be shortened to "run" and will cut out the irrelevant words.

These frequencies are then given a hash value or an ID number.

So, when a term is typed into the search bar, the roots of the words are found, a hash value is calculated and found in a frequency table.

The outcomes that contain this result are called essential pages and only the highest-scoring pages will be chosen.

These pages then go through a second process called Click Distance.

Bing combines a page’s relevancy in addition to Click Distance – the number of mouse clicks it takes to find the content.

This is then analysed using URL depth property, with lengthier URLs considered less important due to their distance from the homepage.

So if a URL has numerous backslashes, Bing will not rank it, even if it is linked to from the homepage.

And although relevancy and click distance are important factors, Bing also factors a user’s search history when displaying search results.

Is Google or Bing safer?

Google Safe Browsing helps protect over four billion devices every day by showing warnings to users when they attempt to navigate to dangerous sites or download dangerous files.

Safe Browsing also notifies webmasters when their websites are compromised by malicious actors and helps them diagnose and resolve the problem so that their visitors stay safer.

Safe Browsing protections work across Google products and power safer browsing experiences across the Internet.

Google Chrome and other browsers use Safe Browsing to show users a warning message before they visit a dangerous site or download a harmful app.

Bing's SafeSearch helps keep adult content out of your search results.

There are three different ways you can turn on SafeSearch.

For individual accounts, choose SafeSearch options on the Settings page.

At a network level, map www.bing.com to strict.bing.com.

For an individual PC, map www.bing.com to strict.bing.com.

[Source: This article was published in express.co.uk By TOM FISH - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore] 

Categorized in Search Engine

Google‘s AI team has released a new tool to help researchers traverse through a trove of coronavirus papers, journals, and articles. The COVID-19 research explorer tool is a semantic search interface that sits on top of the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). 

The team says that traditional search engines are sufficient at answering queries such as “What are the symptoms of coronavirus?” or “Where can I get tested in my country?”. However, when it comes to more pointed questions from researchers, these search engines and their keyword-based approach fail to deliver accurate results.

Google‘s new tool helps researchers solve that problem. The CORD-19 database has over 50,000 journal articles and research papers related to coronavirus. However, a simple keyword search wouldn’t yield reliable results. So, Google uses Natural Language Understanding (NLU) based semantic search to answer those queries. 

NLU is a subset of Natural Language Processing (NLP) that focuses on a smaller context while trying to derive the meaning of the question and draw distinct insights.

The COVID-19 research explorer tool not only returns related papers to the query, but it also highlights parts of papers that might provide relevant answers to the question. You can also ask follow-up questions to further narrow down results.

The semantic search is powered by Google’s popular BERT language model. In addition to that, the AI has been trained on BioASQ, a biomedical semantical search model to enhance results.

The team built a hybrid term-neural retrieval model for better results. While the term-based model provides accuracy with search results, the neural model helps with understanding the meaning and context of the query.

You can read more technical details about the model here and try out the search explorer here.

[Source: This article was published in sup.news By Ivan Mehta - Uploaded by the Association Member: Wushe Zhiyang]

Categorized in Online Research

Despite their seemingly simple goals, search engines like Google are actually very complex beasts, and the results they deliver up to users on a silver platter are the result of very complex algorithms. In very basic terms, when you type a keyword into a search engine like Bing or Google, its sole goal is to find you the best possible result for your needs. The problem in this case is what these search engines consider the best result when you consider there are hundreds of thousands of pages that may contain some kind of relevance to your search term on the internet. In this article, we take a look at how Google brings users such accurate results (most of the time, anyway).

What goes into bringing you the right results

Every SEO agency in Melbourne knows that there are a few things that Google will rely on to deliver you what you need. The first of these is search intent. This is basically to say that Google wants to leave you satisfied with the result you’re given, so to basically satisfy your intent and search goals. This is actually a very difficult ask, as the search terms a user may put in could be very open to interpretation. For example, a question could be related to a need to find very basic information, very detailed information, methods (such as recipes), or to buy a product. What Google delivers when you search for something is usually what most users want to see when they type in that search term. For this reason, this is something quite important to keep in mind if you’re planning on implementing keywords into your own website. Next up we have relevancy: although you’ll be linked to a page that Google finds relevant, the search engine also takes into consideration the relevance of the entire website. Consistency is something that Google values very highly, so if the rest of the website provides information that isn’t all over the place, it will rank it higher. This is because if the content isn’t consistent, Google can’t determine what it’s actually about, so it can hardly recommend it!

Other things Google factors into your search results

It’s not just relevancy to your core enquiry that Google is interested in. It wants the results it brings to you to be of a high quality, which is why content quality is factored into the search results as well. Although what determines quality can be highly subjective, there are a few things that Google keeps in mind when it delivers you those juicy results. The first thing it keeps in mind is the length of the content – large pieces can often be determined as being detailed, which is exactly what many people want when searching for information. Detailed shouldn’t mean that the piece isn’t easy to read, so breaking up the content with small paragraphs, relevant headings and images are also very valuable, as these elements are generally very useful for people looking for informative content. Finally, Google will take into consideration the authority of the website. For Google, authority translates as trustworthiness – if Google has knowledge that the website is reliable, it will be much happier sharing the content. The primary way that Google processes trustworthiness is through backlinks, which involves sites linking to other sites in order to vouch for their quality. When Google sees this linking, it attaches authority to the linked site.

Figuring Google out

Although we have a basic understanding of how the Google algorithms work, a lot goes into what pops up into your search. For this reason, if you’re searching for something – or even trying to elevate your site through the rankings – keeping the above information in mind will give you a pretty hefty head start!

[Source: This article was published in hometownstation.com By KHTS - Uploaded by the Association Member: Clara Johnson] 

Categorized in Search Engine

GOOGLE CHROME users have been put on alert after thousands of people were tricked into download a dangerous download posing as a browser update.

Google Chrome fans are being warned about a fake download which has already tricked thousands users of the market leading browser. Google Chrome is the most popular browser in the world by a country mile, and it's not in danger of losing that illustrious crown anytime soon. Latest stats from NetMarketShare put Google Chrome as holding onto a 68.50 per cent share of the internet browser marketplace.

That's over two thirds of the market, and is far ahead of its nearest challengers Microsoft Edge and Mozzila Firefox.

These rival internet browsers hold 7.59 per cent and 7.19 per cent of the marketplace respectively.

And the huge Google Chrome user base have been put on alert about a fake download that has already tricked thousands of people.

Doctor Web in a post online revealed the existence of the dangerous Google Chrome download which poses as an update to the browser.

In total more than 2,000 people have downloaded the fake Google Chrome update.

Doctor Web said hackers had specifically been targeting Chrome users in the UK, US, Canada, Australia, Israel and Turkey.

The security experts said: "According to the Doctor Web virus laboratory, the hacker group behind this attack was previously involved in spreading a fake installer of the popular VSDC video editor through its official website and the CNET software platform.

"This time the cybercrooks managed to gain administrative access to several websites that began to be used in the infection chain.

"They embedded a malicious JavaScript code inside the compromised pages that redirects users to a phishing site, which is presented as legitimate Google service.

"Target selection is based on geolocation and browser detection. The target audience are users from the USA, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Israel and Turkey, using the Google Chrome browser.

"It is worth noting that the downloaded file has a valid digital signature identical to the signature of the fake NordVPN installer distributed by the same criminal group."

As always a good anti-virus programme can help you detect any such threats and remove malicious software that does end up on your machines.

While you should always be wary if you randomly get redirected to a website asking you to download anything or input sensitive information.

This is not how companies alert users to important software updates, with Chrome in particular offering an auto-download feature for patches.

The news comes as in the past few days Google has released the latest version of Chrome, update 81.

However the search engine giant has opted to skip the planned-for version 82 of Chrome due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The Chrome development team revealed the news on Twitter saying: "Due to adjusted work schedules, we’re pausing upcoming Chrome & Chrome OS releases.

"Our goal is to ensure they continue to be stable, secure, and reliable for anyone who depends on them.

"We’ll prioritise updates related to security, which will be included in Chrome 80. Stay tuned."

[Source: This article was published in express.co.uk By DION DASSANAYAKE - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore]

Categorized in Search Engine
Page 1 of 61

airs logo

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.

Follow Us on Social Media