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Data is marketing's most precious commodity — now marketers need to leverage it.

The pace of doing business in today’s ultraconnected world has changed everything. From the way advertisements are bought, sold and displayed, to the way businesses market to their buyers, we’ve entered an entirely new era.

Although some get a bit weepy and nostalgic wishing for “the good old days,” these are exciting times for today’s leading companies. They’re even more thrilling for today’s disruptors.

In today’s marketing organizations, there’s an ongoing war. While there’s immense pressure on the marketing department — from the board — to completely understand the company's buyers, it has also been tasked with understanding the value of every marketing dollar spent. Now, more than ever, marketers are being challenged to display the impact they make on a business’s success or failure.

To do this, marketers need data.

If only it were that easy. You see, today’s marketing departments are dealing with a tremendous amount of complexity. That’s because of two reasons:

1. All-new marketing source systems are coming online at an alarming rate.

2. If marketers want to really understand their buyers’ behavior and how to better connect with them, it will be necessary to invest in many best-of-breed point solutions. This translates into a company’s marketing technology stack getting significantly larger than what we may have experienced even just a handful of years ago.

 

And if that wasn’t enough of a hurdle to clear, it gets worse. That’s because data isn’t always easy for marketers to get their arms around. Take, for example, the typical marketing campaign for a product launch. Likely an in-house team handles email blasts, search engine optimization and public relations efforts. Creative agencies get tasked with the messaging, collateral, website buildout and event organization. Then, media agencies take care of paid efforts across a variety of channels — TV, radio, digital, etc.

Because of this fractured approach, marketers don't always own all of the data relative to their activities. As you may have expected by now, all of it provides value as businesses try to understand their customers and their respective journeys. Here’s the kicker: When access is granted to data that the marketing department does not directly own, much of the time it’s not at the correct level of detail required to gain actionable insight.

Meanwhile, consumers are exposed to all of these campaign efforts and are, generally speaking, unaware of the idea of channels. In-market buyers simply interact with brands and expect that today’s businesses will engage with them on a segment-of-one basis. And the benchmark on quality and speed continues to rise.

This means that today’s marketers are plagued with a two-headed monster. First, they must figure out how they can do more with the budget and resources they are allocated. Second, they must figure out how to impact the business's bottom line by understanding how their efforts deliver an enriched customer experience, create awareness in a market and more.

It’s not uncommon to think of marketing VPs as MacGyvers, because they must be agile, adaptable and able to creatively work around their less-than-ideal surroundings.

 

There remains one constant in this situation, however. That is data. Without this precious commodity, today’s marketers are going to be left hobbled, unable to drive value for their companies. And they certainly won't have a chance to determine their contribution or return on investment.

It’s as simple as that.

Source : http://www.cio.com/article/3112186/analytics/why-today-s-marketers-need-data.html

Categorized in Market Research

Dubai is in a far corner of the world to set up shop for a business that allows Americans to track their representatives back home.

When you stop and think about it, it’s an equally large feat building an international search engine optimization company after you decide selling scented candles wasn’t showcasing your entire skillset.

Those are just two of the examples of the kinds of things that people who are switching gears and starting new careers online are doing every day.

The Internet isn’t just all about gaming and updating your followers on social media for these forward thinkers; entrepreneurs all across the United States and the world have seen the benefits of panhandling in cyberspace for the online gold that’s waiting there.

They’re making money and satisfying dreams by taking their visions global and many of them have locked the door to a brick-and-mortar store to do it.

A Trend That’s Growing

So the question is, how and why do they do it? First, some numbers that point to the fact those who are moving toward cyberspace to make money belong to a trend that’s growing.

Released last month by the United States Census Bureau, E-Stats 2014: Measuring The Electronic Economy takes an interesting snapshot of all the major sector sales numbers including wholesale trade, manufacturing, and selected service industries. According to these government number crunchers, E-commerce accounted for $3,584.0 billion in 2014, and that’s up 8.1% from the previous year. Statista reports that E-commerce is expected to reach 554.81 billion U.S. in sales this year.

When you consider these same experts say the gross domestic product (GDP) of the USA for 2016 is projected at $18,558.13 billion, it’s easy to see why people like Dana Buchawiecki saw cyberspace as a great platform to start a new business.

 

Tracks Congress

4US.com is a website that tracks and compares users’ votes with their representatives in Congress. The notion is the brainchild of CEO and Founder Buchawiecki, who’s dissatisfaction with his position at FEMA during Hurricane Katrina prompted him to build a website to track congress. He started the business after leaving the United States for a position in Dubai. Buchawiecki underlined his motivations for starting the enterprise which allows users to track their representatives’ activities and the status of bills.

“The command and control system that was in place for Hurricane Katrina lit the fuse for something bigger,” he said. “It was 2005 in the United States and it took weeks to get things going.”

Quite often, the people who make a go of it online are looking for an outlet for a wider vision or bolder enterprise. Still, they need to put a hodgepodge together of the things that made more traditional businesses work and what clicks online.

Eyes Bigger Than Your Stomach


Making sure your eyes aren’t bigger than your stomach means understanding you still need to have a target market to appeal to. Just because finding the right SEO/Internet marketing company will help you to cast the net wide in cyberspace doesn’t mean you want to.

Knowing where to direct your marketing efforts by finding schools of interested buyers online is done with social media and analytics these days, but you’re still trying to accomplish the same goals those radio and newspaper ads strove for. Finding the folks who will buy what you’ve got to sell is still job one.

Tracking using analytics doesn’t need to be complicated but the reports will help to define the folks who are looking at your site and buying your products. Clicking on the links for the Traffic Report, Keyword Analysis Report, and several others can help flesh out your target market.

 

Surveying any paying clients you have works wonders too. Asking them who they are and what problem your product helps them to address fills in some blanks.

When you remember that everyone has access to the same technology as you do, you’ll see some of the differences between the old and new ways of doing business aren’t just about hiring online marketers that can flush out your target market.

Whereas having a solid safe and alarm system back in the day let you sleep soundly at night, the modern version of bars on the windows are good cybersecurity practices. If you think keeping your data safe and secure should take a back seat to other more flashy parts of putting together an online empire like building a website and social media presence, consider:

Deloitte’s CFO Insights just struck an ominous chord by publishing the Seven hidden costs of cyber attacks. Loss of revenue and customer relationships are mentioned prominently and those are the very lynchpins of small businesses.

Even the big names in security are aware of how prominent cyber security issues need to be. The FBI has a whole section of their website detailing what they’re doing to combat this evolving threat. In fact, there’s even a Cyber Division at FBI headquarters.

However, no lowly criminal can throw a real entrepreneur off the scent of commercial success. John King is the CEO at Placement SEO and, like a lot of other folks who have taken the road less traveled, he started his career surrounded by four walls working in marketing in a brick-and-mortar store called Bare Necessities.

As someone who’s brought his ability to learn and adapt quickly to the online world, King understands the importance of battening down the hatches with good cybersecurity practices. Beyond making sure everyone uses the most recent in antivirus software and spyware that’s constantly updated, he knows how important it is to make sure all internet connections are properly encrypted with the proper firewalls. All good practices you should follow too if you’re looking to launch in cyberspace.

Pencil and Paper

A Wi-Fi network is as common as a pencil and paper once were for getting things done today, but these modern tools need to have password protected access to their routers. All of these modern day Henry Fords like King and Buchawiecki understand that at least in some ways, the more things change, the more they stay the same. That’s why , while King strongly suggests multifactor authentication that requires more than a password as another piece of a good cybersecurity package, he knows how to foster real wealth online in other ways too.

 

“I’m a believer that it's important to hire employees smarter than yourself so that you have a continuous stream of new opportunities,” says the SEO guru whose career course has veered abruptly from those early days working to market scented Yankee Candles.

Source : http://www.business.com/careers/changing-gears-how-the-internet-allows-you-to-start-new-careers/ 

Categorized in Others

A new method for searching the web is needed to allow IoT devices to independently and securely discover other “things” in the connected world of the future.

We are all intimately familiar with the experience of “googling” a keyword(s) on a Web browser search engine to find related websites. For example, searching for “best French restaurant” in Google or Yahoo will return a list of many websites that are related to this topic. However, this key feature of the current Web will have to be fundamentally reworked for the new types of devices that are expected to join the Web as part of the Internet of Things (IoT). I mean, just how is it going to work when your fridge needs to do a search for something - and it will before too long?

Traditional web search engines

When thinking about any technology evolution, it is useful to first understand how the current generation of technology works before we try to predict what will happen in the future. So let’s briefly review how search engines work today.

Search engines primarily utilize automated programs called Web crawlers to discover and visit every possible website in the Internet. At each visited website, the Web crawler makes a copy of the website content and records it back in a large database at the search engine. This database is then analyzed off line, and a fast lookup index is created so that a rapid search can be performed every time a human user sends a keyword search request. The result of the lookup will be a ranked list of website addresses (i.e. Uniform Resource Indicators - URIs) that corresponds to the keyword that was searched for. In the current Web all the information transferred between the Web browser, website and the search engine server uses the ubiquitous and well known HTTP protocol.

 

The search engine problem in IoT

The existing Pull model of information exchange where the search engines sends out web crawlers to discover webserver information will unfortunately not work for most IoT cases. There are several reasons for this.

First, many IoT devices will be battery or solar powered and thus will often be “sleeping” in a low power mode when not performing their intended function. For example, a high temperature sensor in a remote industrial application may only be physically activated when its hardware gets heated above a certain temperature. When this happens, the sensor will get activated and send an HTTP message to a central controller to report an alarm. Below this temperature the sensor will be inactive and in sleep mode. So in general this temperature sensor will not be discoverable by web crawlers sent out by a traditional search engine as it will be sleeping most of the time and will not respond.

Secondly, many IoT devices will be located in semi-closed networks that will block traditional search engine web crawlers from discovering them. For example, a fitness center may freely allow web crawlers to discover their treadmills and other exercise equipment. However, the fitness center will definitely block discovery, using a security firewall, of IoT devices like electronic door locks and video cameras for security and privacy reasons.

Emerging solutions

A key solution for the IoT search problem is currently being standardized in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Specifically, a new type of search engine called a Resource Directory (RD) is being defined. This will be a very distributed search engine, with multiple RDs expected for a given geographical area like a city. IoT devices are expected to register their web addresses (URIs) to their local RD in Push model. This will typically be done when the IoT device is first installed and powered up.

Then when a search request is sent to the RD, the RD will first do access control and other security checks to make sure that only authorized parties are allowed to discover the relevant information. For example, suppose the fridge in my house wants to discover my home electricity meter to check the current time-of-use charge rate. The fridge wants to use this information to adjust its internal temperature up or down, within a certain bound, to reduce my electricity costs. In this case, the RD that serves my neighborhood will allow my fridge to discover the electricity meter URI because it knows that they are both part of my home network and are trusted devices. However, if an IoT device from my neighbor’s house made a similar request, the neighborhood RD would return an error message as that foreign device is not authorized to make that search query.

In addition to the IETF, another important body contributing to solving the challenges of IoT web searches is the Hypercat consortium. They are developing specifications that will allow inter-exchange of data between data hubs in different domains. This will allow, for example, exchange of data between a neighborhood RD and Google’s global search engine.

 

A bright future

A major reason for the success of the Web over the last 20 years has been the use of search engines to organize and make a huge amount of web information easily accessible to human users. If we wish to continue this success with the billions of IoT devices that are expected to join the Web over the coming years, then we will have to keep innovating. Fortunately, with next generation solutions like the IETF’s Resource Directory concept, and the Hypercat meta-data specification under development, and very much more on the horizon, it looks like search engine evolution is definitely keeping good pace with all the other parallel innovation going on in the worlds of 5G and IoT.

Source : http://www.networkworld.com/article/3111984/internet-of-things/web-search-engines-for-iot-the-new-frontier.html

Categorized in Internet of Things

 

Google needs to strengthen more of its segments

If you have been reading my articles, then you may have noticed that I have mixed feelings about Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL), the parent company of Google. On the one hand I love the stranglehold Google has on the search engine market, its sheer dominance in the mobile operating system space and, of course, the evergreen YouTube angle. But despite having some of the brightest minds in the world on its payrolls, Google is still a one-trick pony that keeps failing at nearly every other trick it tries to do.

As such, Google is still highly reliant on its advertising revenues from search and partner sites, and this is what I’d like to explore in some depth.

Despite having disrupted the search game early on, the company is continually expanding the touch points surrounding its search engine. Take Chrome for example, the world’s leading browser: This is the conduit through which Google gets a lot of its search traffic.

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Another conduit is Android, the world’s most prolific operating system with over 80% global market share. The majority of non-iOS devices that are sold each year come with Android, with Chrome being the default search engine despite the Chinese attempt to promote UC browser on certain smartphone models that it makes.

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Yet another conduit is Google Maps, which has not only made our lives easier on the road, but is also dominating the GPS mapping world. It is the most-used map application by far, permeating nearly every mobile device in the world. It’s free, but you'll notice a lot of it points back to Google Search. Whether it’s a restaurant you’re looking for or information you need about a particular location, search is right there on the heels of Google Maps.

It’s clear that all of these products have one focal point, and that is Google’s search engine. As a result of that ecosystem, Google now has the wide moat possible protecting its search engine business.

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But can the same be said of its advertising business, which is their main breadwinner?

If Search is Google’s crowd-puller, then the cashier must be advertising. As the crowds spend their precious time on Google search and, through it, its partner sites, the company has the opportunity to serve them ads. The more time users spend on search, the greater the opportunity, and Google has been able to leverage this to create tens of billions of dollars in revenues each year.

 

 

As the world’s internet penetration increases, Google is practically in lockstep with it, pushing its own search and advertising agenda to new users in the far corners of the world. There are several countries around the world where Internet penetration is still low and, as such, there are a lot more potential users for Google to reach out to.

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Though Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) has turned the heat up on Google and is vying to get as many advertising dollars as possible, the online advertising market is expected to grow at 12.7% CAGR (according to Mckinsey) for the next five years, so there is still enough room for both the companies to keep increasing their revenues.

With no credible competitor of size to challenge their mobile operating system Android or the default Chrome browser, the chances of Google search falling out of grace from mobile customers are very slim.

What Google has done is create a legal monopoly on the world’s online quest for information, hosting 1.2 trillion searches per year. Advertising revenue is merely the fruit of that tree, and Google has a pretty strong fence around that tree.

 

 

The one thing I can’t stand to see is Google wasting billions of dollars with no apparent method to the madness. I’m being brutal, but half the time I have no clue what Sundar Pichai is talking about on the earnings call. In stark contrast are the direct and insightful comments made by Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella when quizzed by analysts at the end of the calls. At least with Microsoft you know the direction they’re taking.

With Google you can never be too sure.

Its Other Bets, for example, are so diverse that the units resemble a massive conglomerate of businesses with none of them showing significant top line income. Perhaps that’s why Alphabet is trying to bring more accountability to Other Bets - push them out of the nest and maybe they’ll learn to fly yet.

With potentially powerful lines of business sitting in their line of sight - artificial intelligence, mobile virtual reality, cloud, autonomous cars, social media, paid video streaming - it’s about time Google made a dent in at least one of them to supplement its advertising business.

Source : http://www.gurufocus.com/news/438938/how-strong-is-googles-search-business

 

Categorized in Search Engine

For the casual internet user, a quick Google search is often all it takes to find plenty of information on any particular topic.

But for specialized financial research, analysts often find themselves laboriously searching proprietary databases, regulatory filings, and paywalled sources that aren’t even indexed by the big search engines, says Jack Kokko, the founder and CEO of financial search engine company AlphaSense.

That’s why he and cofounder and CTO Raj Neervannan created AlphaSense, which applies natural language processing and machine learning techniques to let users find relevant information in financial documents.

"It started from my first job out of college as an analyst at Morgan Stanley, where I was, as every analyst, going through these huge piles of paper on my desk and trying to find information very manually—nights and days spent toiling through that information and still fearing that I’m missing a lot," Kokko says.

The San Francisco-based company takes in information from thousands of licensed data sources, as well as public web sources like news reports, and automatically processes them to extract meaning on a sentence-by-sentence level.

"When a company’s talking about building a semiconductor fab in Shenzhen or just production growth in China, those two mean the same thing, even though the words are very different," he says. "We have clustering algorithms that are able to understand that those topics mean the same thing."

That lets corporate customers search for information on esoteric topics and find results substantially faster than they would by looking for the data by hand, or with the individual search engines built into specialized databases. AlphaSense says it counts more than 450 companies as customers, including financial services firms with a total of more than $3 trillion assets under management.

In one case, Kokko says, representatives from a big Wall Street firm receiving a demo from AlphaSense tried searching for information on an obscure corner of the Japanese electric power industry, and happily discovered their firm had already researched the topic.

 

"Our system found a whole bunch of research by that top firm on that topic that even that firm themselves didn’t know about," he says. "You can’t rely on people to know everything about their own internal content or the content they produce, let alone thousands of others that are offering and producing content."

For Kasandra Davis, a senior manager in investor relations at Applied Materials, which supplies tools to computer chip manufacturers, AlphaSense’s tool makes it easy to search for information on the semiconductor industry—and quickly organize information about what the company’s own executives have said at conferences on particular topics without laborious searches through individual transcript files.

"I would have to go into the transcript of each one of those conferences and search for those words," she says. "You can imagine what that would have been like from a time perspective."

And, she says, she recently used the tool to locate information comparing video sizes for ultra-high-definition TV versus virtual reality. That's something that was hard to find through a nonspecialized search engine.

"I did use Google to do that search on VR file size versus HD file size, and I couldn’t find anything to do [with] the comparison," she says.

To ensure the tool continues to find relevant information, AlphaSense uses a mix of completely automated clustering processes and human-supervised machine learning, says Kokko. Company experts can tag sample content to train the search engine to understand, say, when a report is expressing positive or negative sentiment, and when it’s talking about the past or making a prediction about the future.

"We constantly refine and have the algorithms get better by comparing to what humans are doing," he says.

Part of what makes processing all those documents practical is the rise of on-demand cloud computing services, letting AlphaSense activate servers to churn through documents and run those statistical models only as needed, rather than build a huge data center of its own, says Kokko.

 

"Before Amazon [Web Services], we really couldn’t have done this: The processing capabilities would have required a very, very big company’s resources," he says. "Now, we were able to start small with a startup’s resources just focusing, using computing resources for minutes and shutting down, launching and shutting down thousands of machines, and being able to afford it, instead of owning those resources."

And for better or worse, he says the search engine similarly lets its clients do research they couldn’t have previously done without hiring scores of human analysts.

"We’ve got some one-man shops that can do the work of 20 analysts that they don’t have to hire," he says. "Or, they can actually just elevate the level of research that each person can do."

Source : https://www.fastcompany.com/3062489/mind-and-machine/this-ai-startup-wants-to-automate-your-tedious-document-searches

Categorized in Internet Search

Google has announced that it will begin cracking down on “intrusive interstitials” on January 10, 2017, because this type of ad “can be problematic on mobile devices where screens are often smaller.”

Google will be potentially penalizing — i.e., lowering the rankings — of these web pages. Google said “pages where content is not easily accessible to a user on the transition from the mobile search results may not rank as highly.”

Google explained which types of interstitials are going to be problematic, including:

  • Showing a popup that covers the main content, either immediately after the user navigates to a page from the search results, or while they are looking through the page.
  • Displaying a standalone interstitial that the user has to dismiss before accessing the main content.
  • Using a layout where the above-the-fold portion of the page appears similar to a standalone interstitial, but the original content has been inlined underneath the fold.

Here is a diagram from Google to convey the above points:

google-mobile-interstitials-penalty-bad

Google listed three types of interstitials that “would not be affected by the new signal” if “used responsibly.” Those types are:

  • Interstitials that appear to be in response to a legal obligation, such as for cookie usage or for age verification.
  • Login dialogs on sites where content is not publicly indexable. For example, this would include private content such as email or unindexable content that is behind a paywall.
  • Banners that use a reasonable amount of screen space and are easily dismissible. For example, the app install banners provided by Safari and Chrome are examples of banners that use a reasonable amount of screen space.

 

Here is a diagram from Google to convey the above points:

google-mobile-interstitials-penalty-good

In November 2015, Google launched app install interstitial penalty. Google is doing away with that version and somewhat rolling in that penalty with this new interstitial penalty. Google wrote:

We previously explored a signal that checked for interstitials that ask a user to install a mobile app. As we continued our development efforts, we saw the need to broaden our focus to interstitials more generally. Accordingly, to avoid duplication in our signals, we’ve removed the check for app-install interstitials from the mobile-friendly test and have incorporated it into this new signal in Search.

Search Engine Land will stay on top of this rollout when it happens next year.

Source : http://www.huewire.com/technologies/google-warns-it-will-crack-down-on-intrusive-interstitials-in-january-search-engine-land/207291/

Categorized in Search Engine

Chinese search engine Baidu, which opened its India office in Delhi last year, wants to expand its services in India through an ad platform and a localised marketplace.


Josh Fenn of Baidu Inc’s Global Business Unit speaks to BrandWagon’s Ankita Rai on the company’s India strategy, its focus on app developers and building a digital ecosystem.


Baidu has so far launched only niche utility applications in India, while in other markets it is also present in online to offline (O2O) and search spaces. What is the India strategy?


In India, the focus is on mobile and mobile-related products because there is a global shift towards mobile. It was in 2008 that we started bringing our products outside China. India is our newest market.


Between 2008 and 2013, we launched some of our popular products here such as DU Battery Saver, DU Speed Booster, Baidu Browser, MoboMarket, ES File Explorer and input app Simeji.


The marketplace MoboMarket was first launched in Indonesia and shortly afterwards in India. MoboMarket has 4.5 million active monthly users each in India and Indonesia. In India, MoboMarket is available in Hindi, Tamil, Marathi, Bangla, Marathi and Urdu, with Telugu launching soon. Developers can launch their apps on this platform and get more eyeballs in the domestic market and monetise through our DU Ad Platform. There are eight million monthly active users for DU Battery Saver and Du Speed Booster in India, while ES File Explorer has 10 million monthly active users.


In India, we are focussed on building a strong foundation of internet services that will help to build the ecosystem.


The first phase of the India strategy was launched in 2013-2014 aimed at building a user base for our products here.
The second phase was to introduce more developer facing platforms and grow the ecosystem. That’s where MoboMarket comes into play. The marketplace aims to enable local developers find the right audience for their apps and get more downloads. The third phase is aimed at enabling developers make more money out of it. That’s where the DU Ad Platform comes into play.


As Baidu looks to capitalise on opportunities outside China, what kind of markets are you targeting?
If you look at all the countries that we have offices in apart from the US — Brazil, Egypt, India, Thailand, Indonesia and Japan — Japan stands out, being the most developed market. The rest are emerging countries and have similar characteristics such as lower smartphone and internet penetration, but are fast growing. We
observed a similar trend in China a few years ago.


Now China has 52 per cent internet penetration. It has over 700 million internet subscribers across PC and mobile. So yes, we are looking for countries similar to China that are in the early phases of mobile internet. Second, we have a localised strategy for each market instead of rolling out generic products.


We have been operating in China for 16 years. We have developed unique ways to bridge the technology gap. For example, we have made our search more humanised and help people who don’t know how to interact with technology.


For instance in hinterlands, people write long queries when searching something online. We understand how to bridge this gap between rural and urban population and we are planning to bring this expertise in India and other countries too.
A majority of Baidu’s revenues comes from search advertising. But the whole idea of search is changing. Users can now get news, weather updates or even search for flights on platforms like Facebook or even in the Chinese context, on WeChat. Is the market for search saturating with competition coming from non-traditional players?


The search market has evolved quite a bit since 2014. There are different entry ways for people to find information they are looking for, such as Facebook, WeChat, e-commerce portals or through O2O services. In China, we have a very strong position in search due to integration of machine learning technology.


In mobile search, our market share is over 75 per cent. We have 660 million monthly active users on our mobile search platform in China. The search market is not narrowing down but our focus is building foundational services for the internet ecosystem here in India.


Baidu launched a search engine in Brazil in 2014. As you expand globally, do you plan to launch search in other countries? Given Baidu’s experience in the O2O business model in China, do you plan to replicate similar offerings in other markets?
Baidu is present in information, search, app platforms, AI and machine learning technologies. We previously launched search in Brazil, Thailand, Egypt and Japan. But we are now more focussed on mobile products and services. Search is just one way of looking at things. We are integrating machine learning in O2O services. We are diversifying into other entry ways of search.


For example, you can integrate machine learning into group buying platforms. We have 1.6 billion users outside China. In terms of user numbers, the biggest markets are Indonesia, India and the US. In 2014, we acquired Brazil’s biggest deal platform, Peixe Urbano. The company has 70 per cent of the domestic market share. We take a localised approach in each market. In India, we don’t have any plans right now in the O2O space, but it is a possibility.


Baidu launched its ad platform for advertisers and publishers in India this year. How will it help small app developers?
In case of an app ecosystem, it is important to support the small developers. This is what we learnt in China and aim to implement it in other countries such as India.

 

The DU Ad Platform, launched in March, helps small app developers in monetisation. It provides advertisers with intelligent targeted ads and publishers with efficient monetisation solutions. We have 1.6 billion users for all of our apps outside China.

 

Source : http://www.financialexpress.com/industry/companies/face-off-baidu-takes-a-localised-approach-in-each-market-says-baidus-josh-fenn/348219/ 

Categorized in Search Engine

A decade ago Google was just a search engine and advertiser, but now it’s the driving force behind the largest computing platform in the world: Android. Even the slow-to-start Chrome OS has been picking up steam in recent years, dominating the budget laptop market. Both these products are based in part on Linux, but Google is working on something completely new, and you can take a peek at it on Github. It’s an operating system called Fuchsia, which could run on just about anything.

 

Google and many other companies make use of the Linux kernel for a variety of reasons. The robustness of features is certainly part of it, but it’s also freely available under the GPL license. Anyone can use the Linux kernel in a project, provided they make the open source components available to end users and developers. So, what about Fuchsia? According to the GitHub page, “Pink + Purple == Fuchsia (a new Operating System).” Google’s mysterious new Fuchsia OS is based on a completely different kernel known as Magenta. This is a microkernel, which itself is based on a different project called LittleKernel.

 

The intended use for Magenta was as part of an embedded system like you might see on routers or set-top boxes. It seems that Google wants to use it for more than that now. Magenta is designed to be lightweight, but it can scale up to be the basis for more powerful systems. Google’s Fuchsia page notes that the project is targeted at “modern phones and modern personal computers’ that have fast processors and lots of RAM.

 

 

Building something open from scratch gives Google much more freedom to make exactly what it needs. The Linux kernel has been around for about 25 years and is used in all manner of applications. Many developers have contributed code over that time, and as a result it’s a little ungainly. Many of the security exploits found in Android these days are actually faults in the Linux kernel. Google is testing Fuchsia on a variety of devices like Intel NUCs and Acer laptops. There is also support for the Raspberry Pi 3 on the way. Google is currently using a system called Flutter for the interface and Dart as the programming language.

 

But what’s Google going to do with Fuchsia? It’s possible Google management isn’t even sure. This could just become another abandoned project before it has a chance to replace anything. Still, some have speculated that Google could see Fuchsia as the next step for Android, Chrome OS, or both. Migrating to a new platform probably means breaking compatibility with existing software (or emulating it in some way), so this is not something to be done lightly. Perhaps Fuchsia is something completely new for Google — a robust full desktop OS alternative to Chrome OS. Whatever Google has planned for Fuchsia, nothing is changing at the moment.

 

Source : http://www.extremetech.com/computing/233699-google-is-working-on-a-mysterious-new-os-called-fuchsia

Categorized in Search Engine

Microsoft announced last week that the default search engine on Microsoft Edge browser in Windows 10 will be Baidu, not Bing.

The announcement read:

Together, we will make it easy for Baidu customers to upgrade to Windows 10 and we will deliver a custom experience for customers in China, providing local browsing and search experiences. Baidu.com will become the default homepage and search for the Microsoft Edge browser in Windows 10. Baidu’s new Windows 10 distribution channel, Baidu “Windows 10 Express” will make it easy for Chinese Internet users to download an official Windows 10 experience. Additionally, Baidu will deliver Universal Windows Applications for Search, Video, Cloud and Maps for Windows 10.

We remain deeply committed to delivering Bing around the world and we’re also committed to offering locally relevant experiences - like Baidu in China - to provide great Windows 10 experiences.

 

This is a pretty big deal for Microsoft and honestly makes a statement.

The obvious point, as engine said in WebmasterWorld, "there's an interesting fact there that is worth highlighting - Microsoft drops Bing as default search for Baidu in China."

Source : https://www.seroundtable.com/baidu-default-edge-browser-20952.html 

Categorized in Search Engine

Facebook doesn’t have an easy-to-use advanced search engine, so one guy built his own. “Search Is Back” lets you use familiar drop-down menus to find people by city, relationship status, school, first name, and more. Plus you can search for photos, events, posts, and other stuff.

What’s special here is that you don’t need to know Facebook’s complicated Graph Search terms like “Friends of Friends named Sarah who went to Stanford and work at Google”. Search Is Back turns your simple menu selections into the proper URL and sends you to the search results page on Facebook’s official site with no extra login required.

Unfortunately, the product usually only works for people in the US who have received the Graph Search rollout. One thing that helps is adjusting your Facebook language setting to US English if you don’t use that already.

 

Some examples of what you could use Search Is Back to search for include:

screen-shot-2015-12-01-at-3-04-30-pm

  • What people from your home town are single and live in your current city
  • Who your friends of friends are at a company with a job you’re applying for
  • Which friends live in a city you’re visiting
  • Who that person on Tinder is who says their name is Sam/Samantha, lives in San Francisco, and went to UCLA
  • Who that person you met at a party was that was friends with your buddy Dan and works at Google
  • You can also use it to find photos, events, Likes, and posts, such as:
  • All the photos tagged with two particular people (not that you’d stalk your ex)
  • Events happening tonight that your friends are invited to, so you can find something to do
  • Posts from friends about London, so you can get recommendations for a vacation
  • Friends in your city that Like a certain musician, so you can find people to go to the concert with

 

 

Search Is Back was built by Michael Morgenstern, a filmmaker from San Francisco who was fed up with how hard it was to search Facebook.

Facebook declined my request for comment regarding Search Is Back. However, a close reading of its Platform Policies shows Facebook doesn’t technically prohibit how the site works.

The social network made a big deal of its Graph Search feature for finding specific things back in 2013, but using sentences instead of traditional keywords confused people. In fact, Facebook VP of Search Tom Stocky told me in October that “the interaction model for search with these natural language phrases was not right for a mass audience.”

facebook-seacrh

So then Facebook launched full-text post search, but that made Graph Searching even tougher since Facebook would confuse sentences for keywords. Facebook does have some advanced search features, but they’re split up and buried in weird places like the Find Friends tool and the sidebar options of old-school pre-Graph searches.

Morgenstern tells me “it sucked” how Facebook screwed up search. So he “did a lot of poking around” to find out what Facebook URLs did what, and since Search Is Back doesn’t use Facebook’s API, it might be harder to shut down.

Like a true hacker, Morgenstern just wanted to play around with what was possible on the web that won’t work with mobile apps. He says “We’re moving towards an app ecosystem where it’s not possible to build things like Search Is Back because all these apps are walled gardens. So in the dying days of open HTML web, it’s imperative to build these tools and customize what people give us.”

 

 

Facebook might find a way to shut down Search Is Back, but until then, it’s a free and privacy-safe way to find anything on Facebook with a simple set of boxes.

Source : https://techcrunch.com/2015/12/02/facebook-advanced-search/ 

Categorized in Internet Technology

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