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Any document type that the publishing-API knows about can be added to our internal search. By default, all document types in internal search also get included in the GOV.UK sitemap, which tells external search engines about our content.

The app responsible for search is Rummager. Rummager listens to RabbitMQ messages about published documents to know when to index documents. For the new document type to be indexed, you need to add it to a whitelist.

Rummager has its own concept of document type, which represents the schema used to store documents in Elasticsearch (the search engine).

Normally, you’ll map your document type an existing rummager document type. If in doubt, use “edition” - this is used for most documents.

Then, modify mapped_document_types.yml with the mapping from the publishing API document type.

If you want a search to be able to use metadata that isn’t defined in any rummager document type, then you’ll need to add new fields to rummager.

Rummager knows how to handle most of the core fields from the publishing platform, like title, description, and public_updated_at. It looks at the body or parts fields to work out what text to make searchable. If your schema uses different fields to render the text of the page, update the IndexableContentPresenter as well.

The part of rummager that translates between publishing API fields and search fields are elasticsearch_presenter.rb. Modify this if there is anything special you want a search to do with your documents (for example: appending additional information to the title).

2. Add the document type to migrated_formats.yaml

Add the document_type name to the migrated list in rummager.

3. Reindex

Reindex the govuk index following the instructions in Reindex an Elasticsearch index

4. Republish all the documents

Republish all the documents. If they have been published already, you can republish them with the publishing-api represent_downstream rake task:

rake represent_downstream:document_type[new_document_type]

You can test that the documents appear in search through the API using a query such as:

Source: This article was published docs.publishing.service.gov.uk 

Published in Search Engine

When you’re writing a paper or conducting a research-intensive project, you might turn to Wikipedia for a quick examination of the material. As informative and entertaining as this “collaborative online encyclopedia” can be, Wikipedia is generally not considered a credible source to cite in your college-level research papers. Even Wikipedia itself encourages readers to carefully evaluate the information because “anyone can edit the information given at any time.”

Popular search engines, such as Google and Yahoo, are often loaded with advertisements and can really hamper your effectiveness, sending you down one research rabbit hole after another. You need a list of search engines that are reliable, reputable, and free.

However, some search engines only have a citation, or index info, on articles – not the full-text.

“I recommend students search in the library databases for any articles that are not in full text in these engines, or reach out to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if they need extra help to find sources,” said Tracy Ralston, Post University Library Director. “For instance, we have access to Lexis-Nexis Academic, which has more access to statutes, law journal articles, etc. than Lexis Web. Plus, we have a huge variety of sources (journal articles, newspapers, online videos, etc.) that go way beyond these search engines.”

So, as stated on Wikipedia, “Remember that any encyclopedia is a starting point for research, not an ending point.”

With that in mind, here are … 7 of the Best Educational Search Engines for Students:

1) Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC)

One of the best deeper web search engines designed for academic research, ERIC is maintained by the U.S. Department of Education. You’ll find more than 1.3 million bibliographic records of articles and online materials just a click away. The extensive body of education-related literature includes technical reports, policy papers, conference papers, research syntheses, journal articles, and books.

2) Lexis Web

Indispensable for law students and research projects that require legal citations, Lexis Web populates this search engine with validated legal sites. It’s easy to narrow your search by site type (blog, news, commercial, government) and filter by jurisdiction, practice area, source, and file format.

3) Google Scholar

This must-have search engine for research lets you easily find relevant scholarly literature, such as books, theses, abstracts, and articles, across many disciplines and sources. Google Scholar ranks documents by taking into account the full text, where the document was published, who authored it, and how often and how recently it has been cited in other scholarly literature. Find literature from academic publishers, professional societies, universities, court opinions, and other credible organizations.

4) Microsoft Academic (MA)

Enjoy fast access to “continually refreshed and extensive academic content” from more than 120 million publications including journals, scientific papers, and conferences. Because MA is a semantic search engine, not a keyword-based one, it uses natural language processing to understand and remember the information contained in each document. It then applies “semantic inference” to glean the intent of your search and delivers rich, knowledgeable results that are relevant to your needs. MA 2.0 debuted in July 2017 and gives users even more personalized and improved search capabilities.

5) Wolfram Alpha

Find dozens of ways to put this “computational knowledge engine” to work for you. Need to compute the frequency of a musical note or better understand your brain’s anatomy? No problem. Just type in your question, and your answer immediately pops up. Not only a go-to education search engine, this fun tool is great for your downtime because it includes categories like Sports and Games and Surprises, in which you can search for jokes, tongue twisters, and famous lines.

6) iSeek Education

This targeted search engine was created for students, teachers, administrators, and caregivers, and all content is editor-reviewed. You have access to hundreds of thousands of trusted scholastic resources provided by universities, government, and reputable noncommercial sites. Numerous filters in the sidebar make it easy to quickly target your results and refine your search by topic, subject, resource type, place, and people. Instantly identify lesson plans, school subjects, activities, and grade levels.

7) ResearchGate

Science majors love this dynamic social networking site for scientists and researchers that not only provides access to the work of 13 million researchers, it lets users ask them questions. ResearchGate’s collection of publications and the frequently updated “news from our members” blog provide a vast array of works that cover timely topics including culture, the environment, politics, health, science, and space.

Source: This article was published blog.post.edu

Published in Search Engine

Illegal Search Engines is what you’re here for, and let me start by saying that they aren’t as bad as they sound.

Here, the concept of “illegal” doesn’t imply that using these search engines is illegal, what it does imply is that these search engines may help you stumble upon websites and link which may be illegal in some countries.

Or, these may be search engines which do not track you or invade your privacy and quite frankly do not care if you use them to get to the other side of the law (although I’ll strictly advise against it).

In simpler terms these are just better Search Engine than Google, better in the sense that they may display better, hidden, or exclusive results such as .onion links or they may grant you the privacy and anonymity that Google strips you off.

11 Best Illegal Search Engines to Browse the DarkNet.

Note that, using these Search Engines isn’t “illegal” by itself, although using the search engine, landing on an illegal deep web marketplace and then buying something or getting involved with anything illegal totally is illegal, even on the deep web!

Let’s teleport you to the land of Illegal Search Engines then?

Note: If you are first-time deep web user and you don’t know how to access the deep web links and how you can make secure you while at the deep web access then check out below-given guide.

First time user must read: How to access the deep web secure and anonymous.

1. Ahmia

Website: http://msydqstlz2kzerdg.onion/

It can in a sense be termed as one of the hidden search engines on the clearnet I suppose, for the reason that it is a search engine for .onion links, which are hidden on the Clearnet and can be browsed only on the Tor network!

Although Ahmia in itself is completely legal, and actually pretty trustworthy, backed by Tor2Web and Global Leaks projects!

The primary reason why I consider it better than Google is because of its display of hidden sites on the Tor network (.onion) which Google completely avoids.

So, if you know not where to start on the Deep web, this can be a pretty good place to do so!

2. The Uncensored Hidden Wiki

Website: http://zqktlwi4fecvo6ri.onion/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Talking of “Starting points” for the Deep web, this quite literally is the answer. What does a search engine mean?

A place where you can find links to other important websites and places you can visit, something like that isn’t that right?

The Uncensored Hidden Wiki is exactly that, it lists most of the important, most visited and popular sites both legal and illegal (primarily, and mostly illegal) without discrimination for you to visit.

It’s more like an illegal search engines list in itself, or more like illegal websites list or a directory basically “illegal” being the key-word here.

Even though not every link over there works, 60-70% of them do, although you may want to visit our list of 30 Tor most popular Tor websites which has a 100% working link collection to Tor websites! (Illegal ones too, yeah!)

3. Parazite

Website: http://kpynyvym6xqi7wz2.onion

This is one of the hidden search engines I visit when I’m feeling bored, yeah it can totally turn your mood around with its “I’m feeling lucky” kind of feature.

Meaning, it can be used to land on random, unknown websites on the Deep web, which quite often turn out to be “not so legal” such as a Bitcoin money launderer maybe, or a porn website.

But, it does have that feeling you get when opening a door and not knowing what lies on the other side of it.

As a Search Engine, it not only brings “links” to you but a collection of hidden files and data caches as well, which include some of the most weird things such as real-life cannibalism documentaries or shocking photos/theories etc.

You should feel free to use Parazite as using it isn’t illegal, neither is landing on almost any page on the Deep web as long as you don’t “use” the page for your personal gains.

4. Tor Links

Website: http://torlinkbgs6aabns.onion/

It again is a link directory, something identical to the Uncensored Hidden Wiki, but obviously, it has its differences.

It has a better user-interface and is slightly graphic rich for starters, the links too differ although its categories section on top helps you narrow things down.

As it’s similar to the Hidden Wiki, it too is a great place for you to start if you just ventured on the Deep web and aren’t sure of your destinations.

Although it terms itself as “a moderated replacement for the Hidden Wiki”, pertaining to the fact that quite a few of the Hidden Wiki links are dead, and I found more of those “working” links here when compared to the Hidden Wiki.

Note that it does list illegal sites, and browsing them isn’t illegal, but try not to order something for yourselves over there.

It’s here on this list of Illegal search engines because it has links, a lot of them which are illegal pure and simple.

5. Torch

Website: http://xmh57jrzrnw6insl.onion/

TOR(CH) stands for TOR+ Search. Well, they also have a clearnet URL but I’m sure you wouldn’t want to use it for obvious reasons.

It’s one of the oldest search engines in the industry and claims to have an index of over a million pages which is plausible.

As for “Onion” pages, the number is 479613 to be exact, just short of half a million which we can live with.

The only aspect I’m not a fan of when it comes to Torch is its massive ad-spamming! There are ads on the homepage, on the search results and everywhere else.

It does totally fit the bill when it comes to illegal search engines because its onion version fearlessly displays not only search results, but even ads which clearly are on the other side of the law.

6. Not Evil

Website: http://hss3uro2hsxfogfq.onion/

Be fooled not by the simplicity that you witness in the above screenshot! Literally almost every website and article on the web about unconventional search engine has mentioned “Not Evil”.

Why? Well, when it has spent the better part of its existence indexing over 28056215 hidden links on the search engine, that’s something it deserves, don’t you agree?

Obviously, the number of hidden links is more, way more when compared to that of Torch.

You can filter if you wish to see only the “Title” of the result, or the complete “URL” hence putting you in the driver’s chair for your searches.

It also lets you chat with humans, or bots, instantly, with a single click without any kind of signup or registration so that’s a nice addition in case you wish to verify the authenticity of the deep web links or just talk about what to have for dinner.

7. Gibiru

Website: http://gibiru.com/

Gibiru markets itself as “Uncensored Anonymous Search”; so even though it doesn’t display .onion links, it still is better search engine than Google for the simple reason that it respects your privacy.

Some of its advanced privacy features include user agent spoofing, a free list of IP addresses to choose from, cookie deletion etc.

So basically, it not only “doesn’t” track you or your searches, but also provides you with some of the best ways to protect you further just in case.

I believe it’s the right fit for this illegal search engines list as it helps you keep your anonymity and privacy airtight just in case you have ulterior motives, or unconsciously land at a site, or do something which you shouldn’t do.

8. Duck Duck Go

Website: http://3g2upl4pq6kufc4m.onion/

Duck Duck Go doesn’t need an introduction, it not only is a popular clearnet search engine but also on the Tor network.

In fact, it’s the default search engine for the Tor browser as well.

It’s not one of those illegal search engines by any definition, and is almost the same thing as Google, with just a lot more privacy and anonymity than what Google offers.

It doesn’t track “any” information about its users (us), not history, nor cookies neither web activities. Because of this, the search results are exactly the same for everyone using the search engine because there’s no personalization.

But well I’ll trade my “personalized results” any day of the week for 100% privacy and “no-tracking” thing which is exactly what the browser offers.

9. HayStack

Website: http://haystakvxad7wbk5.onion/

Haystack has a tagline that reads – The Darknet search engine. I believe the Darknet does qualify as something illegal, or illicit in the least, so obviously yeah the Haystack deserves a seat at this illegal search engines table, don’t you agree?

And not just the tagline, it also has proved itself by indexing over 1.5billion pages! Now that’s a lot! Even though it includes historical onion links which may be dead at the moment, it still counts as an achievement.

They also claim to be the Darknet’s largest search engine although that’s something I haven’t personally verified so wouldn’t vouch for.

There seem to be no ads, none at all which is a good sign, and they do display illegal results directly from deep web marketplaces or individual sellers for drugsguns and everything else so I guess I was right to include this one here, isn’t that so?

10. Candle

Website: http://gjobqjj7wyczbqie.onion/

The candle is another one of those illegal search engines which don’t really care a lot about what you search for and is happy to serve.

For e.g. I searched for “drugs” and it got me quite a few links which redirected to some marketplaces for the same. It also showed “8793” results, which I’d say is a good indexation number for a term such as this, especially on the onion network.

Again, it only “displays” results which may be illegal, using Candle, or clicking on any of those isn’t illegal in most cases.

The logo seems to be a Google knockoff; although unlike Google there are no ads, no sidebars, basically nothing except Green and Blue text over a Black background.

Anyway, it displays onion results so I guess that satisfies what you came here for, search engine which searches and displays illegal search results, that about right?

11. WWW Virtual Library

Website: http://vlib.org

Finally, would you trust a search engine which is free, not regulated by the government, and was created by the same person who created “THE INTERNET”?

If you answered yes, well you just got your wish! WWW Virtual Library was created by Tim Berners Lee, and even though it’s not exactly a secret search engine cause it’s on the clearnet, it still is quite literally a virtual library.

Now, it also is the oldest data achieve on the internet, and even though it’s not as user-friendly or graphic-rich as the Billion dollar Google.com; it’s known to provide much better, research-oriented and data-rich information on just about any topic including Law, Agriculture, Fashion, Drama ah you name it.

It’s run by a group of volunteers across the globe, and they even accept new members if you’re an expert in something or a specific field and would like to contribute; unlike the centralized Google.

Bottomline, you may stumble upon some golden nuggets over here which Google or other clearnet search engines might be devoid of.

Conclusion

So, that’s a wrap folk as far as this piece on Illegal search engines goes. Now, considering you came here for these, here’s some friendly advise.

Never use any of these illegal search engines without Tor or a good VPN! Why? I said these weren’t illegal, right?

Well, yeah using these sites simply to “browse” isn’t illegal, but what if you land on a website showcasing child porn? Or get caught in something else which actually is illegal? You never know what lies on the other end of a .onion link.

So, it’s a good precaution to be cautious, using Tor along with a VPN will grant you the extra privacy and security you need to keep yourselves out of trouble even if something does happen, either intentionally or unintentionally.

Anyway, do let me know what you think of these illegal search engines, and what you think of this post as well. How? Just connect to us on our Facebook page!

 Source: This article was published deepwebsiteslinks.com

Published in Search Engine

This is the age of influence and networking. The success of a brand or an individual highly depends on the amount of influence earned as well as the level of networks created in the meantime. Today, the best place to power up influence and build network is social media and just like web search engines, there are number of cool social media search engines that can help you or your brand to find real people, build networks, and share or gain useful information required to raise influence within your niche market.

Yes, you heard it right. There are many specific social media search engines out there designed to help you find real people and user profiles across major social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and many others.

The more people you can manage to add to your network from the same industry, your influence resultantly improves in the industry. And, there’s no better way to find people on the web other than looking for them via social media search engines.

Today, we bring you a cool list of top social media search engines that can help you find people within your industry nearby to grow your influence, reach, as well as network within the industry.

Best Social Media Search Engines to Find Real People across Top Social Networks

There is no doubt that Google is the most popular search engine on the web to find almost anything on the internet. However, even Google fails or is not up to the mark when finding people or profiles on popular social media channels.

Today, we will share some of the best social media search engines that would help you find real people as follows:

Social Mention

The first on our list is Social Mention. This web tool is systematically designed for people looking for social media contents that include blogs, microblogs, comments, bookmarks, videos, and more. With Social Mention, you can also set alerts and receive emails based on your searches for specific brands, celebrities, or company related updates. The tool is quite helpful for bloggers, who can install its real-time buzz widget on their blogs for maximum benefits.

WhosTalkin

WhosTalkin is another social media search engine that lets you explore conversations relevant to the topics that interest you. You can find updates about your favorite sport, favorite food, celebrity, or a company. With WhosTalkin, you can engage in conversations that are most relevant to the topics you like. This internet-based social media search engine tool is able to search through a number of social media networks and blogs for your favorite trending topics and conversations related your favorite celebrity, sports, food, places, videos, etc.

YoName

As the name of the search engine suggests, YoName lets you find people across different social media platforms by name. With YoName, you can search people on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, Blogger blogs, and several others using the search form. Simply enter people’s name, email address, or phone number and then hit “Yo” to get the results. Besides social media search, YoName also supports web search, business search as well as public records search.

Anoox

Well, Anoox is not exactly a social media search engine but it allows you to get information via multiple social media websites as well as find answers to your queries from real people. At Anoox, you can share & discuss with real people for the best answer, truth, and in turn more traffic to your website or profile.

BoardReader

Unlike other social media search engines, BoardReader is a search tool for community forums and boards. With BoredReader, you can easily explore popular content spread across the internet including news, articles, videos, press releases, etc.

Bing Social

After Google, Bing is the 2nd most popular search engine on the web and its social arm known as Bing Social is designed to find the latest news and trending topics shared across popular social networking channels like Facebook, Twitter, and other social media networks.

Addictomatic

Addictomatic is yet another social search tool to explore the latest news, trending topics, attractive blog posts, viral videos, and interesting pictures. This tool searches the best live sites on the internet to find the latest news, blog posts, videos, and images for you. With this tool, you can easily keep up with the latest updates on the hot trending topics, and keep up to date with the latest social media sensation on the web.

Twazzup

Twitter is a strong social media platform with lots of viral and trending news surfacing on this microblogging tool every single second as you are reading this article. Twazzup lets you search these trending news and topics across Twitter and lets you keep up with the social media buzz around the globe.

Snitch Name

Snitch Name is a white pages service for social networks. This amazing search tool is designed to search people’s profile over popular social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, and other networks.

Blinkx

Videos are now an integral part of the social media world and Blinkx is a social media search engine dedicated to videos medium. One of the best social media search engines on the web, Blinkx is a search engine for videos with over million hours of regularly indexed online videos. This video search engine enables you to watch videos ranging from a wide variety of different categories including but not limited to news & politics, celebrity, technology, business, gaming, food, sports, and more assorted from all the major news portals and video sharing platforms.

Flickr Advanced Search

Flickr, as everyone knows, is one of the largest photo and video sharing platforms on the internet. While it lets you upload and view photos and videos on it, Flickr also lets you search for images or videos based on your topic using its advanced search tool embed with smart filters and variety of options designed to deliver accurate and effective results.

Source: This article was published geekdashboard.com By Rajeesh Nair

Published in Search Engine

As Google Scholar approaches its 10th anniversary, Nature spoke to its co-creator Anurag Acharya

Google Scholar, the free search engine for scholarly literature, turns ten years old on November 18. By 'crawling' over the text of millions of academic papers, including those behind publishers' paywalls, it has transformed the way that researchers consult the literature online. In a Nature survey this year, some 60% of scientists said that they use the service regularly. Nature spoke with Anurag Acharya, who co-created the service and still runs it, about Google Scholar's history and what he sees for its future.

How do you know what literature to index?

'Scholarly' is what everybody else in the scholarly field considers scholarly. It sounds like a recursive definition but it does settle down. We crawl the whole web, and for a new blog, for example, you see what the connections are to the rest of scholarship that you already know about. If many people cite it, or if it cites many people, it is probably scholarly. There is no one magic formula: you bring evidence to bear from many features.

Where did the idea for Google Scholar come from?

I came to Google in 2000, as a year off from my academic job at the University of California, Santa Barbara. It was pretty clear that I was unlikely to have a larger impact [in academia] than at Google — making it possible for people everywhere to be able to find information. So I gave up on academia and ran Google’s web-indexing team for four years. It was a very hectic time, and basically, I burnt out.

Alex Verstak [Acharya’s colleague on the web-indexing team] and I decided to take a six-month sabbatical to try to make finding scholarly articles easier and faster. The idea wasn’t to produce Google Scholar, it was to improve our ranking of scholarly documents in web search. But the problem with trying to do that is figuring out the intent of the searcher. Do they want scholarly results or are they a layperson? We said, “Suppose you didn’t have to solve that hard a problem; suppose you knew the searcher had a scholarly intent.” We built an internal prototype, and people said: “Hey, this is good by itself. You don’t have to solve another problem — let’s go!” Then Scholar clearly seemed to be very useful and very important, so I ended up staying with it.

Was it an instant success?

It was very popular. Once we launched it, usage grew exponentially. One big difference was that we were relevance-ranking [sorting results by relevance to the user’s request], which scholarly search services had not done previously. They were reverse-chronological [providing the newest results first]. And we crawled the full text of research articles, though we did not include the full text from all the publishers when we started.

It took years in some cases to convince publishers to let you crawl their full text. Was that hard?

It depends. You have to think back to a decade ago, when web search was considered lightweight — what people would use to find pictures of Britney Spears, not scholarly articles. But we knew people were sending us purely academic queries. We just had to persuade publishers that our service would be used and would bring them more traffic. We were working with many of them already before Google Scholar launched, of course.

In 2012 Google Scholar was removed from the drop-down menu of search options on Google’s home page. Do you worry that Google Scholar might be downgraded or killed?

No. Our team is continually growing, from two people at the start to nine now. People may have treated that menu removal as a demotion, but it wasn’t really. Those menu links are to help users get from the home page to another service, so they emphasize the most-used transitions. If users already know to start with Google Scholar, they don’t need that transition. That’s all it was.

How does Google Scholar make money?

Google Scholar does not currently make money. There are many Google services that do not make a significant amount of money. The primary role of Scholar is to give back to the research community, and we are able to do so because it is not very expensive, from Google’s point of view. In terms of volume of queries, Google Scholar is small compared to many Google services, so opportunities for advertisement monetization are relatively small. There’s not been pressure to monetize. The benefits that Scholar provides, given the number of people who are working on it, are very significant. People like it internally — we are all, in part, ex-academics.

How many queries does Google Scholar get every day, and how much literature does the service track? (Estimates place it anywhere from 100 million to 160 million scholarly items).
I’m unable to tell you, beyond a very, very large number. The same answer for the literature, except that the number of items indexed has grown about an order of magnitude since we launched. A lot of people wonder about the size. But this kind of discussion is not useful — it’s just 'bike-shedding'. Our challenge is to see how often people are able to find the articles they need. The index size might be a concern here if it was too small. But we are clearly large enough.

Google Scholar has introduced extra services: author profile pages and a recommendations engine, for instance. Is this changing it from a search engine to something closer to a bibliometrics tool?

Yes and no. A significant purpose of profiles is to help you to find the articles you need. Often you don’t remember exactly how to find an article, but you might pivot from a paper you do remember to an author and to their other papers. And you can follow other people’s work — another crucial way of finding articles. Profiles have other uses, of course. Once we know your papers, we can track how your discipline has evolved over time, the other people in the scholarly world that you are linked to, and can even recommend other topics that people in your field are interested in. This helps the recommendations engine, which is a step beyond [a search engine].

Are you worried about the practice known as gaming — people creating fake papers, getting them indexed by Google, and gaining fake citations?

Not really. Yes, you can add any papers you want. But everything is completely visible — articles in your profiles, articles citing yours, where they are hosted, and so on. Anyone in the world can call you on it, basically killing your career. We don’t see spam for that very reason. I have a lot of experience dealing with spam because I used to work on web search. Spam is easier when people are anonymous. If I am trying to build a publication history for my public reputation, I will be relatively cautious. 

What features would you like to see in the future?

We are very good at helping people to find the articles they are looking for and can describe. But the next big thing we would like to do is to get you the articles that you need, but that you don’t know to search for. Can we make serendipity easier? How can we help everyone to operate at the research frontier without them having to scan over hundreds of papers — a very inefficient way of finding things — and do nothing else all day long?

I don’t know how we will make this happen. We have some initial efforts on this (such as the recommendations engine), but it is far from what it needs to be. There is an inherent problem to giving you information that you weren’t actively searching for. It has to be relevant — so that we are not wasting your time — but not too relevant, because you already know about those articles. And it has to avoid short-term interests that come and go: you look up something but you don’t want to get spammed about it for the rest of your life. I don’t think getting our users to ‘train’ a recommendations model will work — that is too much effort.

(For more on recommendation services, see 'How to tame the flood of literature', in Nature's Toolbox section.)

What about helping people search directly for scientific data, not papers?

That is an interesting idea. It is feasible to crawl over data buried inside paywalled papers, as we do with full text. But then if we link the user to the paywalled article, they don’t see this data — just the paper’s abstract. For indexing full-text articles, we depend on that abstract to let users estimate the probable utility of the article. For data we don't have anything similar. So as a field of scholarly communication, we haven’t yet developed a model that would allow for a useful data-search service.

Many people would like to have an API (Application Programming Interface) in Google Scholar, so that they could write programs that automatically make searches or retrieve profile information, and build services on top of the tool. Is that possible?

I can’t do that. Our indexing arrangements with publishers preclude it. We are allowed to scan all the articles, but not to distribute this information to others in bulk. It is important to be able to work with publishers so we can continue to build a comprehensive search service that is free to everybody. That is our primary function, and everything else is in addition to this.

Do you see yourself working at Google Scholar for the next decade?

I didn’t expect to work on Google Scholar for ten years in the first place! My wife reminds me it was supposed to be five, then seven years — and now I’m still not leaving. But this is the most important thing I know I can do. We are basically making the smartest people on the planet more effective. That’s a very attractive proposition, and I don’t foresee moving away from Google Scholar any time soon, or any time easily.

Does your desire for a free, effective search engine go back to your time as a student at the Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur?
It influenced the problems that appealed to me. For example, there is no other service that indexes the full texts of papers even when the user can see only the abstract. The reason I thought this was an important direction to go in was that I realised users needed to know the information was there. If you know the information is in a paywalled paper, and it is important to you, you will find a way in: you can write to the author, for instance. I did that in Kharagpur — it was really ineffective and slow! So my experiences informed the approach I took. But at this point, Google Scholar has a life of its own. 

Should people who use Google Scholar have concerns about data privacy?

We use the standard Google data-collection policies — there is nothing different for Scholar. My role at Google is focused on Google Scholar. So I am not going to be able to say more about broader issues.

Source: This article was published scientificamerican.com By Richard Van Noorden

Published in Search Engine

After hours spent scrolling through Google and pulling up endless clickbait results, you’re frustrated with the internet. You have a paper to write, homework to do and things to learn. You know you won’t get away with citing Wikipedia or Buzzfeed in your research paper. Even the big news engines aren’t scholarly enough. You need reputable sources for your homework, and you need them now.

With so many resources online, it’s hard to narrow it down and find ones that are not only reliable and useful, but also free for students. We’ve saved you the time and picked out our 15 best free search engines for research.

15 scholarly search engines every student should bookmark

1. Google Scholar

Google Scholar was created as a tool to congregate scholarly literature on the web. From one place, students have the ability to hunt for peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles from academic publishers, professional societies, preprint repositories, universities and other scholarly organizations.

2. Google Books

Google Books allows web users to browse an index of thousands of books, from popular titles to old, to find pages that include your search terms. Once you find the book you are looking for, you can look through pages, find online reviews and learn where you can get a hard copy.

3. Microsoft Academic

Operated by the company that brings you Word, PowerPoint and Excel, Microsoft Academic is a reliable, comprehensive research tool. The search engine pulls content from over 120 million publications, including scientific papers, conferences and journals. You can search directly by topic, or you can search by an extensive list of fields of study. For example, if you’re interested in computer science, you can filter through topics such as artificial intelligence, computer security, data science, programming languages and more.

4. WorldWideScience

WorldWideScience, which refers to itself as “The Global Science Gateway,” is operated by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information—a branch of the Office of Science within the U.S. Department of Energy. The site utilizes databases from over 70 countries. When users type a query, it hits databases from all over the world and will display both English and translated results from related journals and academic resources.

5. Science.gov

Science.gov is operated and maintained by the Office of Science and Technical Information, the same department that collaborates on WorldWideScience.org. This search engine pulls from over 60 databases, over 2,200 websites and 200 million pages of journals, documents and scientific data. Search results can be filtered by author, date, topic and format (text or multimedia).

6. Wolfram Alpha

A self-described “computational knowledge engine,” Wolfram Alpha does not so much provide search results as it does search answers. Simply type in a topic or question you may be interested in, such as, “What is the function of the pancreas?” and the answer will show up without making you scroll through pages of results. This is especially handy for those in need of math help.

7. Refseek

With its minimalist design, Refseek doesn’t look like much. However, the engine pulls from over one billion web pages, encyclopedias, journals and books. It is similar to Google in its functionality, except that it focuses more on scientific and academic results—meaning more results will come from .edu or .org sites, as well as online encyclopedias. It also has an option to search documents directly—providing easy access to PDFs of academic papers.

8. Educational Resources Information Center

Populated by the U.S. Department of Education, the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) is a great tool for academic research with more than 1.3 million bibliographic records of articles and online materials. ERIC provides access to an extensive body of education-related literature including journal articles, books, research syntheses, conference papers, technical reports, policy papers and more. With more than eight million searches each month, it’s no wonder why this search engine is a great web source for education.

9. Virtual Learning Resources Center

The Virtual Learning Resources Center (VLRC) is an online index hosting thousands of scholarly websites, all of which are selected by teachers and librarians from around the globe. The site provides students and teachers with current, valid information for school and university academic projects using an index gathered from research portals, universities and library internet subject guides recommended by teachers and librarians.

10. iSeek

iSeek is a great search engine for students, teachers and administrators alike. Simply ask a question or enter search topics or tools, and iSeek will pull from scholastic sources to find exactly what you are looking for. The search engine is safe, intelligent and timesaving—and it draws from trusted resources from universities, government and established non-commercial sites.

11. ResearchGate

ResearchGate is a unique social networking site for scientists and researchers. Over 11 million researchers submit their work, which totals more than 100 million publications, on the site for anyone to access. You can search by publication, data and author, or you can even ask the researchers questions. Though it’s not a search engine that pulls from external sources, ResearchGate’s own collection of publications provides a hearty selection for any inquisitive scholar.

12. BASE

The Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE) prides itself as being “one of the world’s most voluminous search engines especially for academic web resources.” Utilizing 4,000 sources, the site contains results from over 100 million documents. The advanced search option allows users to narrow their research—so whether you’re looking for a book, review, lecture, video or thesis, BASE can provide the specific format you need.

13. Infotopia

Infotopia describes itself as a “Google-alternative safe search engine.” The academic search engine pulls from results that have been curated by librarians, teachers and other educational workers. A unique search feature allows users to select a category, which ranges from art to health to science and technology, and then see a list of internal and external resources pertaining to the topic. So if you don’t find what you’re looking for within the pages of Infotopia, you will probably find it in one of its many suggested sites.

14. PubMed Central

This site is perfect for those studying anything related to healthcare or science. PubMed Central is operated by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, a division of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. The database contains more than 3 million full-text journal articles. It’s similar to PubMed Health, which is specifically for health-related research and studies, and includes citations and abstracts to more than 26 million articles.

15. Lexis Web

Researching legal topics? Lexis Web is your go-to for any law-related inquiries you may have. The results are drawn from legal sites, which can be filtered by criteria such as news, blog, government and commercial. Users can also filter results by jurisdiction, practice area, source and file format.

Start searching

Pulling up an Internet search might be second nature to you by now. But a little forethought into where you begin your hunt can make your life much easier. Save yourself the time wading through basic Google search results and utilize some of these tools to ensure your results will be up to par with academic standards.

Do you know of any useful educational search engines that aren’t on this list? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: This article was published rasmussen.edu By Anna Heinrich

Published in Search Engine

If you need to do a little bit of sleuthing about someone, the Web can be a fantastic resource. Track down an address or a phone number, find a long-lost school friend, or simply verify information with this list of the best six people search engines on the Web. All of these search engines are hyper-focused on finding only people-related information.

These resources are free to use, at least for initial searches. Some sites will charge for detailed searches. Should you pay to find someone online? It really depends on the kind of information you're seeking.

1-Pipl

Pipl

Pipl is a people search engine that scours the Invisible Web for information; basically, what that means is that you're going to get more than just the usual search engine results for whatever name you might be searching for.

Pipl searches across social networking services, search engines, databases, etc. to find tidbits you might not usually find on a rudimentary search using a more generalized search engine.

One interesting thing sets Pipl apart: It offers special services for nonprofits at a steep discount in order to create more ways for these organizations to help their clients. 

2-Wink

Wink searches across what you would find using a regular search engine as well as across social communities, online profiles, etc. You can also use Wink to manage your online presence by creating a profile with it.

You can claim and add various places where you might be active online, and manage them all in one convenient place. If you're looking for small tidbits of information across many different sources, Wink is a good choice to continue to put the clues together about whatever you might be looking for. 

3-Facebook

Facebook

As one of the world's largest social networks with hundreds of millions of people accessing it daily, it makes sense to use Facebook as an incredibly useful tool to find people online. You can use the social media platform to search for people you went to high school and college with, as well as work colleagues, friends from elementary school, and non-profit organizations.

Facebook is also great for finding people in specific geographic locations living in your local area that you might not know about, as well as any kind of association, club, or group. 

While many people keep their Facebook profiles private and only give information to those visible in their immediate circles of friends and family, others do not. When a profile is public, it allows anyone who finds it immediate access to a person's posts, photos, check-in statuses and other personal details.

4-PeekYou

PeekYou adds an interesting twist to the world of free people search engines; it allows you to search for usernames across a variety of social networking communities.

For instance, if you want to learn more about the person who uses the handle "I-Love-Kittens"; PeekYou will show you anything else that username might be doing on the Web. There is an astonishing amount of information you can dig up on someone using only their username

5-LinkedIn

linkedin.jpg

Use LinkedIn to search for professional networks that other people are involved in. When you add your business profile to the network, you can pick up quite a few details about people. 

By signing up for your own profile, you can view other LinkedIn users' profiles. This lets you can see where someone works, who they work with, their former positions, current or former supervisors, any kind of recommendations they might have received, and much more.

Depending on privacy settings, you might not be able to see everything that someone on LinkedIn has provided in their profile. In addition, if you are a registered user on LinkedIn, the fact that you looked at someone's profile typically will be made known to them. 

6-Zabasearch

Zabasearch is a free people search engine that scours freely accessible public information and records. Everything found at Zabasearch is culled from public domain information, such as databases, court records, and phone directories. It's a smart place to start a search because of all the public information it retrieves and shows in one place.

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Published in Search Engine

Google might be the biggest but there are other search engines, too

Most people don't want three dozen search engines, especially people who are not trained internet users. Most people want a single search engine that delivers three key features:

  1. Relevant results (results you are actually interested in)
  2. Uncluttered, easy to read interface
  3. Helpful options to broaden or tighten a search

With this criteria, several of our reader favorites come to mind. These search sites should meet 99 percent of the searching needs of a regular everyday user.

Google Search

Google Search Google Search. screenshot

Google is the reigning king of 'spartan searching', and is the single most used search engine in the world. While it doesn't offer all the shopping center features of Yahoo! or the human curation of Mahalo, Google is fast, relevant, and the largest single catalogue of web pages available today. The search giant also tracks an incredible amount of information that many people don't even know they are giving out.

Make sure you try the Google 'images', 'maps' and 'news' features... they are outstanding services for locating photos, geographic directions, and news headlines. P.S. If you don't want Google to spy on you, protect yourself.

Duck Duck Go Search

DuckDuckGo search results DuckDuckGo search results. DuckDuckGo

At first, DuckDuckGo.com looks like Google. However, there are many subtleties that make this spartan search engine different.

DuckDuckGo has some slick features, like 'zero-click' information (all your answers are found on the first results page). DuckDuckgo offers disambiguation prompts (helps to clarify what question you are really asking). Plus, the ad spam is much less than Google.

Give DuckDuckGo.com a try... you might really like this clean and simple search engine.

Bing Search

Bing Search
 Bing Search. screenshot

Bing is Microsoft's attempt at unseating Google, and arguably the second-most-popular search engine today. Bing used to be MSN search until it was updated in summer of 2009.

Touted as a decision engine, Bing tries to support your researching by offering suggestions in the leftmost column, while also giving you various search options across the top of the screen. Things like 'wiki' suggestions, 'visual search', and 'related searches' might be very useful to you. Bing is not dethroning Google in the near future, no, but it is definitely worth trying.  

Dogpile Search

Dogpile Search Dogpile Search. screenshot

Years ago, Dogpile preceded Google as the fast and efficient choice for web searching. Things changed in the late 1990's, Dogpile faded into obscurity, and Google became king.

Today, however, Dogpile is coming back, with a growing index and a clean and quick presentation that is a testimony to its halcyon days. If you want to try a search tool with pleasant presentation and helpful crosslink results, definitely try Dogpile!

Yippy Search

Yippy Search Results
 Yippy Search Results. Yippy

Yippy is a Deep Web engine that searches other search engines for you. Unlike the regular Web, which is indexed by robot spider programs, Deep Web pages are usually harder to locate by conventional search.

That's where Yippy becomes very useful. If you are searching for obscure hobby interest blogs, obscure government information, tough-to-find obscure news, academic research and otherwise-obscure content, then Yippy is your tool. 

Google Scholar Search

Google Scholar SearchGoogle Scholar Search. screenshot

Google Scholar is a special version of Google. This search engine will help you win debates.

Google Scholar focuses on scientific and hard-research academic material that has been subjected to scrutiny by scientists and scholars. Example content includes graduate theses, legal and court opinions, academic publications, medical research reports, physics research papers, and economics and world politics explanations.

If you are looking for serious information that can stand up in a heated debate with educated people, then forget regular Google... Google Scholar is where you want to go to arm yourself with high powered sources!

Webopedia Search

Webopedia Search
 Webopedia Search. screenshot

Webopedia is one of the most useful websites on the web. Webopedia is an encyclopedic resource dedicated to searching technology terminology and computer definitions.

Teach yourself what 'domain name system' is, or what 'DDRAM' means on your computer. Webopedia is absolutely a perfect resource for non-technical people to make more sense of the computers around them.

Yahoo! Search (and More)

Yahoo! Search
 Yahoo! Search. screenshot

Yahoo! is several things: it is a search engine, a news aggregator, a shopping center, an email box, a travel directory, a horoscope and games center, and more.

This 'web portal' breadth of choice makes this a very helpful site for Internet beginners. Searching the Web should also be about discovery and exploration, and Yahoo! delivers that in wholesale quantities. (By the way, here's what happened to Yahoo! avatars and Yahoo! 360 in case you were wondering.)

The Internet Archive Search

The Internet Archive SearchInternet Archive Search. screenshot

The Internet Archive is a favorite destination for longtime Web lovers. The Archive has been taking snapshots of the entire World Wide Web for years now, allowing you and me to travel back in time to see what a web page looked like in 1999, or what the news was like around Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

You won't visit the Archive daily like you would Google or Yahoo or Bing, but when you do have a need to travel back in time, use this search site.

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Paul Gil

Published in Search Engine

Mozilla rolled out a major update to its Firefox web browser on Tuesday with a bevy of new features, and one old frenemy: Google.

In a blog post, Mozilla said Firefox’s default search engine will be Google in the U.S., Canada, Hong Kong and Taiwan. The agreement recalls a similar, older deal that was scuttled when Firefox and Google’s Chrome web browser became bitter rivals. Three years ago, Mozilla switched from Google to Yahoo as the default Firefox search provider in the U.S. after Yahoo agreed to pay more than $300 million a year over five years — more than Google was willing to pay.

The new Firefox deal could boost Google’s already massive share of the web-search market. When people use Firefox, Google’s search box will be on the launch page, prompting users to type in valuable queries that Google can sell ads against. But the agreement also adds another payment that Alphabet’s Google must make to partners that send online traffic to its search engine, a worrisome cost for shareholders.

 

 

It’s unclear how much Google paid to reclaim this prized digital spot. A Google spokeswoman confirmed the deal but declined to comment further, and Mozilla didn’t disclose financial details.

As Google’s ad sales keep rising, so too has the amount it must dole out to browsers, mobile device makers and other distribution channels to ensure that Google’s search, video service and digital ads are seen. Those sums, called Traffic Acquisition Costs or TAC, rose to $5.5 billion during the third quarter, or 23 percent of ad revenue.

Last quarter, the increase in TAC was primarily due to “changes in partner agreements,” Google Chief Financial Officer Ruth Porat said on the earnings call. She declined to disclose specific partners. A lot of these payments go to Apple, which runs Google search as the default on its Safari browser. In September, Apple added Google search as the default provider for questions people ask Apple’s voice-based assistant Siri, replacing Microsoft’s Bing. In the third quarter, the TAC Google paid to distribution partners, like Apple, jumped 54 percent to $2.4 billion.

Google is likely paying Mozilla less than Apple for search rights. In 2014, Yahoo’s then-Chief Executive Officer, Marissa Mayer, lobbied heavily for the Firefox deal by agreeing to pay $375 million a year, according to regulatory filings. Google paid $1 billion to Apple in 2014 to keep its search bar on iPhones, according to court records.

Firefox once commanded roughly a fourth of the web browser market, but its share has slid in recent years. It now controls 6 percent of the global market, according to research firm Statcounter. Apple’s Safari holds 15 percent followed by Alibaba’s UC Browser with 8 percent. Google’s Chrome browser has 55 percent of the market.

Source: This article was published siliconvalley.com By Mark Bergen

Published in Search Engine

Search engines are a sourcers best friend, but how do you know when to use what search engine and what type of search to perform? A search will pull up almost anything you ask it to do as long as you know how to ask the right questions. The key to a successful search query is knowing what’s available and knowing exactly what you want without having to pour over pages and pages of useless results. Using search engines to find your ideal candidate will help cut out all of the noise by using them correctly.

Using search engines to find your ideal candidate

Not all searches or search engines are made equal. Understanding the fundamentals of search engines and when to use which one is critical when it comes to finding candidates in the most efficient way possible.  

Understanding the power of a Google Search

We all probably use this search engine several times a day, but do you know how to leverage a search to pinpoint what you’re looking for? There are two popular types of search strings that most sourcers are using when it comes to using Google. Both Boolean and X-ray searches will give you a boost in your searching endeavors.

Boolean involves using terms like AND OR NOT in your Google search to limit or broaden what you’re looking for. So, searching for “copy editors” -jobs -Nashville would exclude the term jobs and the results of candidates who live in Nashville, while (“copy editors” OR writers) would give you candidates with editing skills as well as those who may only have writing skills.

Check out some helpful hints from Google:

Common search techniques

Search social media

Put @ in front of a word to search social media. For example: @twitter.

Search for a price

Put in front of a number. For example: camera $400.

Search hashtags

Put in front of a word. For example: #throwbackthursday

Exclude words from your search

Put - in front of a word you want to leave out. For example, jaguar speed -car

Search for an exact match

Put a word or phrase inside quotes. For example, "tallest building".

Search for wildcards or unknown words

Put a * in your word or phrase where you want to leave a placeholder. For example, "largest * in the world".

Search within a range of numbers

Put .. between two numbers. For example, camera $50..$100.

Combine searches

Put “OR” between each search query. For example,  marathon OR race.

Search for a specific site

Put “site:” in front of a site or domain. For example, site:youtube.com or site:.gov.

Search for related sites

Put “related:” in front of a web address you already know. For example, related:time.com.

X-ray allows you to utilize a more powerful search engine (like Google) to search a website (like LinkedIn) whose search function may not be as thorough. You can give it a Google to see how to format your X-ray search. site:linkedin.com/in

search.png

Custom Search Engines

Another benefit to using Google over other search engines is their ability to provide a custom search engine. If you’re tired of writing out the same string of criteria time and time again, Google has provided this type of search engine that allows you to set up and refine your search in one easy location.

{youtube}Qd9z48Bo8ZA{/youtube}

Bing Matters!

Google may be the most popular choice when choosing a search engine, but it’s important also to give others a chance as well. Results from each of these sources will be displayed differently and can bring up different results that allow you to see what another may have failed to show you. Make sure you check out the Boolean and X-ray functions of whatever search engine you are using as they may need to be formatted differently.

The reason we pick out Bing as a contender is that all of your popular platforms such as Yahoo, Altavista, and MSN all run off Bing’s search engine (Fun Fact circa 2010). There are some nuances to understand when working with Bing that doesn’t necessarily work when it comes to Google. For instance:

inurl: is something that works well in Google, but doesn’t work in Bing search engine because it was deemed as a “mass data mining tool” back in 2007. It’s long since been retired in Bing and never seen again. Instead, you’ll want to use a more friendly search string such as intitle:recruitment. This type of search string is going to look for the letters “recruitment” in either the title a web page. It also works in Google and most other search engines. This allows you to search for specific titles within a certain website using Bing’s search engine.

Take a look at the X-ray Search in Bing (PRO TIP – In Bing, you have to use the parentheses):

bing.png

Others

DuckDuckGo – The key feature of DuckDuckGo is that it’s a private search engine and doesn’t track your search history, like Google.

Dogpile – Dogpile has been around for decades and is still an excellent metasearch engine that all sourcers should consider.

Yandex – From Russia, with tons of love, this is one of the most popular and widely used search engines in the world!

Search engines are beautiful things. But learning to use them beyond looking up a single term is imperative if you want to remain a productive and efficient sourcer. Let the search engine do the brunt of the work for you, so you can focus on honing in on finding that perfect fit for the job. We know which is your favorite, but humor us anyway, Google or Bing? Go!

Source: This article was published sourcecon.com By Shannon Pritchett

Published in Search Engine
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