[This article is originally published in blog.hubspot.com written by Dharmesh Shah - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Rebecca Jenkins]

If you’re like me, you probably use Google many times a day. But chances are unless you're a technology geek, you probably still use Google in its simplest form.

If your current use of Google is limited to typing in a few words and changing your query until you find what you’re looking for, I am here to tell you that there’s a better way -- and it’s not hard to learn.

On the other hand, even if you are a technology geek and can use Google like the best of them already, I still suggest you bookmark this article of Google advanced search tips. Then, you’ll then have the tips on hand when you're ready to pull your hair out in frustration watching a neophyte repeatedly type in basic queries in a desperate attempt to find something.

The following Google advanced search tips are based on my own experience and things that I actually find useful. I’ve kept the descriptions of the search tips intentionally terse, as you’re likely to grasp most of these simply by looking at the example from Google anyway.

Here's an overview of some of the most useful Google search tricks. You'll be an expert Google searcher in no time.

31 Google Advanced Search Tips

1. Explicit Phrase

Let's say you're searching on Google for content about inbound marketing. Instead of just typing inbound marketing into the Google search box, you will likely be better off searching explicitly for the phrase. To do this, simply enclose the search phrase within double quotes.

Example Search: "inbound marketing"

2. Exclude Words

Let's say you want to search for content about inbound marketing, but you want to exclude any results that contain the term advertising. To do this, simply use the - sign in front of the word you want to exclude.

Example Search: inbound marketing -advertising

3. This OR That

By default, when you conduct a search, Google will include all the terms specified in the search. If you're looking for any one of one or more terms to match, then you can use the OR operator. (Note: The OR has to be capitalized).

Example Search: inbound marketing OR advertising

4. Words in the Text

If you want to find a webpage where all the terms you're searching for appear in the text of that page (but not necessarily beside each other), type in allintext:followed immediately by words or phrases.

Example Search: allintext:vermont ski house lake

5. Words in the Text + Title, URL etc.

If you want to find a webpage where one term appears in the text of that page and another term appears elsewhere on the page, like the title or URL, then type in that first term followed by intext: followed immediately by the other term.

Example Search: neil diamond intext:red sox

6. Words in the Title

Want to find a webpage with certain words contained in the title (but not necessarily beside each other)? Type in allintitle: followed immediately by words or phrases.

Example Search: allintitle:wine club

7. Words in the TItle + Text, URL, etc.

Want to find a webpage where one term appears in the title of that page and another term appears elsewhere on the page, like in the text or the URL? Type in that first term followed by intitle: immediately followed by the other term.

Example Search: flu shot intitle:advice

8. Words in the URL

If you want to find pages with your search query mentioned in the URL, type allinurl: immediately followed by your search query.

Example Search: allinurl:hubspot blog

9. How to Search Within a Website

Often, you want to search a specific website for content that matches a certain phrase. Even if the site doesn’t support a built-in search feature, you can use Google to search the site for your term. Simply use the site:somesite.commodifier. (Read this blog post to learn how to do this in more detail.)

Example Search: site:www.smallbusinesshub.com "inbound marketing"

10. Related Search

If you want to find new websites with similar content to a website you already know of, use the related:somesite.com modifier.

Example Search: related:visual.ly

related-google-search.png

11. A Page That Links to Another Page

Let's say you want to search for every website that cites a BuzzFeed article on their website. To do this, use the link: command, immediately followed by the name of a page. Google will give you all pages that link to BuzzFeed's official website. The more specific the URL is, the fewer, more pointed results you'll get.

Example Search: link:buzzfeed

12. Similar Words and Synonyms

Let’s say you want to include a word in your search, but also want to include results that contain similar words or synonyms. To do this, use the ~ in front of the word.

Example Search: "inbound marketing" ~professional

13. Word Definitions

If you need to quickly look up the definition of a word or phrase, simply use the define: command. You can listen to the word's pronunciation by pressing the megaphone icon.

Search Example: define:plethora

google-word-definitions.png

14. Missing Words

Ever forgotten a word or two from a specific phrase, song lyric, movie quote, or something else? You can use an asterisk* as a wildcard, which can help you find the missing word in a phrase.

Example Search: much * about nothing

15. News in a Specific Location

If you're looking for news related to a specific location, you can use the location: command to search Google News for stories coming from that location.

Search Example: star wars location:london

16. Specific Document Types

If you’re looking to find results that are of a specific type, you can use the modifier filetype:. For example, you might want to find only PowerPoint presentations related to inbound marketing.

Example Search: "inbound marketing" filetype:ppt

17. Translations

Want to translate a simple word or phrase from one language to another? No need to go to a translation website. Just search translate [word] to [language].

Example Search: translate krankenwagen to english

18. Phone Listing

Let’s say someone calls you on your mobile number, and you don’t know who it is. If all you have is a phone number, you can look it up on Google using the phonebook feature.

Example Search: phonebook:617-555-1212

(Note: The number in this example doesn't work. You’ll have to use a real number to get any results.)

19. Area Code Lookup

If all you need to do is to look up the area code for a phone number, just enter the three-digit area code and Google will tell you where it’s from.

Example Search: 617

20. Zip Code Lookup

If you need to look up the zip code for an address, simply search for the rest of the address, including town or city name and state, province, or country. It'll return results with an area code (if applicable),

Example Search: 25 First St., Cambridge, MA

21. Numeric Ranges

This is a rarely used but highly useful tip. Let’s say you want to find results that contain any of a range of numbers. You can do this by using the X..Y modifier (in case this is hard to read, what’s between the X and Y are two periods). This type of search is useful for years (as shown below), prices, or anywhere where you want to provide a series of numbers.

Example Search: president 1940..1950

22. Stock (Ticker Symbol)

Just enter a valid ticker symbol as your search term, and Google will give you the current financials and a quick thumbnail chart for the stock.

Example Search: GOOG

23. Calculator

The next time you need to do a quick calculation, instead of bringing up the Calculator applet, you can just type your expression into Google.

Search Example: 48512 * 1.02

24. Tip Calculator

Along with a normal calculator, Google has a built-in tip calculator. Just search tip calculator and you can adjust the bill, tip %, and number of people splitting it.

Search Example: tip calculator

google-tip-calculator.png

25. Timer

Don't have a timer handy? Google has you covered. Just type in an amount of time + the word "timer," and the countdown will begin automatically

Search Example:

google-timer.png

Search Example: 20 min timer

26. Stopwatch

Search "stopwatch" and it'll bring up a stopwatch for you to start when you're ready.

Search Example: stopwatch

27. Weather

Next time you're looking for quick weather stats or a forecast for a certain area, search for weather followed by a location. Google will give you both before the first search results.

Search Example: weather Cambridge ma

weather-google-search.png

28. Sunrise & Sunset Times

If you're curious when the sun will rise and set that day at a specific location, do a simple Google search with the word sunrise or sunset along with the location name.

Search Example: sunrise acadia

29. Flight Statuses

If you type in the airline and airplane number into Google, it will tell you the flight information, status, and other helpful information.

Search Example: BA 181

google-flight-status.png

30. Sports Scores & Schedules

Want to know the latest sports scores and future schedules of your favorite teams or match-ups? Search a single team name or two team names and Google will use Google Sports to spit out scores and schedules before the first search results.

Search Example: manchester united

31. Comparing Food

Believe it or not, if you're ever curious how two types of (fairly generic) foods compare with one another, you can do a quick Google search to see how they differ in calories, fat, protein, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, and other nutrients.

Categorized in Search Engine

Use Facebook Advanced Search to Find All Kinds of Things

A search for people who like cats on Facebook

Facebook advanced search is more a concept than a function. The world's largest social network had a standalone advanced search feature in the early days of its history but released a new service called Graph Search in early 2013 that essentially replaces the older advanced search features with a powerful new search engine.

To do an advanced search on Facebook, it's best to sign up for the graph search feature if you haven't already activated it and start learning how it works.

Our "Facebook Search Guide - Intro to Graph Search" provides an overview of how it works and the types of content you can look for and find with the so-called Graph Search. This article provides screenshots and explanations of more advanced query types and refinement options.

Reviewing the Basics

To start searching, remember you can just click on the Facebook logo or your name in the upper left corner and type any query. You can search for people, places and things matching all kinds of different traits or criteria, including geography, dates and clicks on the "like" button.

Two general filters you likely will use are "friends" and "like," since those refer to friend connections and use of the "like" button throughout Facebook.

Also remember, it's smart to pay attention to the phrasing suggestions Facebook presents in a drop-down list whenever you start typing a query. OK, that's it for basics, ready to move on?

Query Phrasing Examples

Let's start with a general query not restricted to friends. You might type, "people who live in Chicago, Illinois and are single and like cats."

When I did this, the query turned up more than 1,000 people who matched the search, so Facebook presented two suggested phrasings that sought clarification on whether I meant "cats" as an animal or "cats" as a business. Those suggestions are shown in the image above.

When I specified the "animal" type of cats, Facebook presented a list of matching users, with a vertical stack of profile photos of people who live in Chicago and have clicked the like button on cat photos.

Facebook also asked if I wanted to see people who had liked "Cats & Dogs," the movie. And if I clicked the "see more" button, it offered "West Chicago" as a refinement option.

Click the "NEXT" button below to see the list of additional filters that Facebook typically shows for people searches like this one.

Facebook people search filter

Advanced Search Filters for Chicago Cat Lovers

Running an advanced Facebook search like "people who live in Chicago, Illinois and are single and like cats" can produce so many results that you'll have to refine the query if you want to see any meaningful results.

The image above shows the typical people search filter box that is available on the results page for any query involving people. I've found that using this box is the best way to narrow a Facebook people search.

As you can see, the box allows you to refine Facebook people search results by gender, employer, hometown, employer and so forth.

Each of those filters has additional sub-categories you can choose. For example, under "friends," you can select one of these:

  • My close friends
  • My friends
  • Friends of my friends
  • Not my friends
  • Friends of Joe SixPack (substitute any friend of yours for Joe)

Okay, let's look at a totally different example, this one involving Paula Deen and restaurants. It will allow us to explore the "places" bucket of content and the "like" button.

Click "NEXT" for a new example.

Facebook restaurant search

OK, let's try an advanced Facebook search involving restaurants. Say you're a Paula Deen fan and you start typing a query that says something general: "restaurants liked by people who like Paula Deen..."

Facebook may ask you to be more precise, since there are so many restaurants liked by Paula Deen fans.

It may suggest you look at Savannah, Georgia restaurants, in Deen territory. It also will likely offer suggestions for types of restaurant queries that it can handle, as shown in the image above. It may rank them by popularity, such as Asian, American, Mexican and so forth.

If you typed a more general phrase, leaving out a connector such as "by," and simply said "restaurants like friends Paula Deen," it would offer more precise versions of that query, such as restaurants...

  • liked by my friends who like Paula Deen (public figure)
  • liked by friends OF Paula Deen (person)
  • Cafes liked by my friends who like Paula Deen

You get the idea.

Next, let's explore more general searches for based on geography, religion and political views. click "Next" below to see examples.

Facebook Graph search makes it easy to do a search by city, because one powerful search parameter for people on the social network involves geography.

You can find Facebook friends by city using either the city where they currently live or their hometown. Both are examples of structured data Facebook stores about users, making it easy to search.

You can also do a Facebook search by city for people you don't know, and based on the privacy settings of each individual, see a list of people living in particular cities who use Facebook that you are not friends with.

I started with a general search on "People who live in Los Angeles, California" and it helpfully told me: "Your results include people who've lived in Los Angeles, California at any time. you may want to limit your search to Current Los Angeles, California residents." As I phrased the question different ways, it also asked if I wanted people who live IN L.A. or people who live NEAR L.A.

The "see more" button prompted me to check for "my friends" who live in L.A. I clicked that option, and it spit out a list of my 14 friends who happen to currently live in or near Los Angeles, along with a list below that of friends of friends who live there.

Advanced Facebook People Search Filters

The filter box for refining "people search results" even further is accessible through a small rectangular tab or label on the right, usually overlaid on the visual search results. What the label says varies with the type of search; in this case it said "14 Friends" since that's how many matches I had. But it usually has three tiny stacked, horizontal bars. When you click on that little label, the filter box opens up with many more options for narrowing(or broadening) your search.

The people filter offers all kinds of basic and advanced refinements. They are classified under headings such as "Relationships & Family, Work and Education, Likes and Interest, Photos and Videos," and so forth.

Sort People by Political or Religious Views?

These filters are very granular, and some are potentially controversial. They allow you, for example, to sort people by their age range, religious views (Buddhist? Catholic? Christian? Hindu? Jewish? Muslim? Protestant), and political views (Conservative? Democrat? Green? Liberal? Libertarian? Republican?) You can even specify what languages they speak. Some filters get into highly personal areas and, therefore, have privacy implications that worry many people.

The image above, for example, shows the religious views options in the search filter box. It's similar to the political views box.

The political views filter, along with the ability to search on who "liked" Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, allowed me to easily sort my friends into those favoring the Democratic or Republican party, at least around the time of the 2012 election. That was a new thing for me--I'd never seen anything like that before--a bunch of profile pictures of my friends sorted by political views.

Extend Your Search in Other Ways

In my L.A. people search, the "extend this search" area at the bottom of the filter box suggested that I might want to expand my search to see "photos of these people," or "these people's friends," or "places where they've worked."

A remarkable variety of search options, indeed. Click "Next" to see more search examples, this time involving apps and who uses them.

Finding Facebook Photos Lots of Friends Like or Commented On

Facebook photo search filters

One of my favorite Facebook searches is quite simple: "Photos I have liked."

Despite all the time I've spent on Facebook, I've actually clicked the "Like" button on just under 100 pictures. They obviously moved me, so it was fun going back and looking at them all again.

The "refine this search" button allowed me to also change my query easily to see all the photos that my friends have liked (provided their privacy settings allowed that.) That, of course, turned up the volume on the results, producing more than 1,000 photos.

Facebook's search results counter seems to stop at 1,000; when your results exceed that amount, it won't tell you how many more there are, just that there are more than 1,000. At least, that's what happened in all my trials.

You can do a lot of more specific photo searches similar to the example shown above, in which I searched for photos my friends took at zoos and aquariums. The background imagery shows photos that matched my query, and the filter box popped up on the right after I clicked the little horizontal bars previously mentioned.

I had fun playing around with this one using the filter box (shown on the right), especially using the "commented on" and "liked" filters to see which of my friends had commented and what they said.

(More examples of photo searches are available in our Introduction to Facebook Searching. Also, see our basic Facebook Photos Guide for general info on using pictures on the social network.)

Click "Next" below to see ways you can search for Facebook apps used by your friends.

Facebook Apps Your Friends Use

Facebook apps friends

Another interesting Facebook search you can run is "Apps my friends use."

Facebook's advanced search will spit out a list of apps with their icons in order of popularity with your friends, or which ones are most used by your pals.

Beneath the name of each app, it will list the names of a few friends who use it, along with the total number of your friends who use it.

Beneath the names of your pal, it will show a couple of other links allowing you to run additional, related searches. They are outlined in red in the image above.

Clicking "People" will produce a list of a bunch more people who use that app, not necessarily limited to your friends. This one is kind of creepy, but if you have not restricted the privacy settings for your use of this particular app, you could show up in the search results to anyone running a search like this.

Clicking "similar" is less creepy and more useful; it will show a list of other apps similar to that one.

Also fun is using Graph Search to find Facebook apps friends use. Facebook app search is a powerful capability of the new search engine. Here are a few specific queries Facebook may suggest relating to apps if you type apps and friends into the search bar, besides the most obvious one, "apps my friends use":

  • Apps my friends use that I use
  • Apps used by my friends who joined X (where X is a group you belong to)
  • Sports apps my friends use
  • Books apps my friends use
  • Apps my friends who live nearby use
  • Movies apps my friends use

As always, the suggested searches likely will vary based on your personal connections, likes, and interests on Facebook.

That's it for this tutorial. Now go explore the blue search bar. Have fun, and try not to get too creeped out.

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Leslie Walker

Categorized in Search Engine

Google search is usually used in it’s non-advance form, just putting the keyword in box and hit enter. After that Google does rest of the magic. You might have heard the most polite google user, the sweet Nan who is putting “Thank you” and “please” in every google searches. Google even praises 86-year-old for polite internet searches.

Luckily there is still faster and advance way of getting your search done without being too polite with Google. There are advance tips, tricks and technique in google which can be used to achieve the custom or filtered searches in google.

As in fast moving lifestyle everything need to be done efficiently, this is even true for Google Search.There are many hidden secret in Google search, knowing those tips, tricks and techniques can make you the master at doing Google search, as you will be able to focus on your search by narrowing it down with advanced google operators.

By getting you acquainted with these advanced searches tips and tricks we are making sure that you will be able to find the hidden information rather easily, for instance looking for a specific information or keyword in the website. Also, Searching for a specific word phrase in url or negating some of the keyword while searching will be easier for you. This kind of search is known as Google Advanced Search technique and tricks.

With these right tricks and techniques you can find right results…

Google advanced search is used for specific complex searches, which are not easily accessible through simple Google search. Advance google search option has some requirements about your desired search for a better result rather than simple one.

Example:

  • Medical universities of certain cities.
  • Searching a book with a specific title, heading, description or author.
  • Google advanced search has more accurate and filtered result than normal search. Google advanced search works on special Input queries.

Why we use advanced google search?

Google advanced search option provides more favorable results in less time.
Google advanced search helps you find accurate result.

We are going to give you a lot of google’s advanced search tips and techniques right here. These techniques will help you to find your result more accurately in a very short time.

Google Advanced search options

1. Search in Page Title

Title page tag is an HTML tag for a web page, it defines what page is about. If you are dealing with coffee machine and want to know more about your competitors in the similar domain, you can search in the page title and see what kind of product do they have.

Example

  • allintitle: ‘place your search query here’
  • intitle: ‘place your search query here’

How to use
Searching for “best coffee machine” in title page

2. Search in anchor text

Anchor text is a hyperlink text, which is shown as highlighted in a blog or web page. Like you can hyperlink a productivity technique text in your blog.
User google searches you can even search in the anchor text which is hyperlinked, this is one of the technique for SEO which is used quite heavily to gain more points from google when comes to page ranking.

Here is how you can search in anchor text
Example

  • allinanchor: ‘place your search query here’
  • inanchor: ‘place your search query here’

How to use:

3. Search in URL

If you are writing a blog, it will be good to know what are the existing blogs out there with similar keywords or title, the best to do is to search in the URL of blogs or website, you can use the bellow “allinurl” for this purpose

Example

  • allinurl: ‘place your search query here’
  • inurl: ‘place your search query here’

How to use

4. Search Missing Words

Find missing words in phrases by using star technique. Just place the star signs around the missing words.
How to use

  • better to be *pirate then*
  • What can we gain you *if we are not able to cross the abyss that separates*

5. Search Result By Time

Google “search result by time” technique allows you to find your result in a specific time period. Like if you are a follower of a blog, but you missed last month’s posts then this trick help you to find only previous one month posts.
First, search your query then after result adds “&tbs=qdr:h” at the end of SERP URL.
Example

  • &tbs=qdr:m – Results from past month,

How to use:

  • Search your result first like site: yodiz.com scrum
  • After result appearance add the code (&tbs=qdr:m) in search result url

Some other options

  • &tbs=qdr:s – Results from past sec,
  • &tbs=qdr:n – Results from past minute,
  • &tbs=qdr:h – Results from past hour,
  • &tbs=qdr:d – Results from past day,
  • &tbs=qdr:w – Results from past week,
  • &tbs=qdr:y – Results from past year,

6. Search Result by Date

You can also search your desired result in a specific date range. After searching your result place the operator bellow at the end of url.


Example

  • &tbs=cdr:1,cd_min:(Start Date),cd_max:(End Date)

How to use:

  • &tbs=cdr:1,cd_min:1/01/2010,cd_max:2/06/2012

7. Search using TO or OR

If you want to search result with several keywords then use word “TO” or “OR”.
How to use:

  • football worldcup 2009 to 2016
  • agile or scrum -rugby

8. Translate Quickly

If you need the translation of words then this simple google advanced search trick helps you a lot.
Example

  • translate [word] to [language]

How to use:

  • Translate “how are you” to spanish

9. Looking For Comparison

You can easily find comparison of two different product

How to use:

  • Italy VS Germany
  • EU vs UK

10. Exclude From Search Result

If you are searching for something and don’t want certain information appear in your search then use “-” before the keyword to excluded in search.

Related...

How to use

  • SW development methodologies -waterfall
  • best agile books -site:www.amazon.com

11. Search for Differences

If you are searching difference between two words, then simply put the “ “|”” between two titles.
How to use:

  • Agile “|” waterfall

12. Quick Calculation

If you are in a restaurant and want to know about tip percentage of the bill, then this simple google advanced search calculator will help you a lot.

How to use:

  • Tip calculator

13. Online Timer

Search online timer on google by simply type timer.

14. Search for Title, Text in a Site

To Find Specific Title, Text on Site easy this trick.
Find those pages whose titles are “Agile”, text of the page is scrum and find on yodiz.com site only.

Example

  • intext:(Query) intitle:(Query) site:(Site URL)

How to use

  • intext:scrum intitle:Agile site:yodiz.com
  • intext:coffee intitle:chocolate – site:*.com

15. Search Time

If you want to know about the exact time of your location then type “time” and city name simply in google search box..

How to use
Time Oklahoma

16. Know Your IP Address

Search your IP address by just simply type IP address in google search box.
IP address

Search By Location

If you want to find a specific result like best IT universities in USA the replace this code in your search engine box. Find a specific result on a specific location:

How to use:

  • USA: “Film Schools”

17. Convert Counting

If you want to convert a big amount of counting in english then use this simple easy trick.
Example

  • Counting= Language

How to use

  • 11,200,670,000= Eleven billion two hundred million six hundred seventy thousand

18. Search Related Sites

If you are a chef and want to search other sites for recipes, or you are fond of reading blogs and searching more blogs then use this trick to find more similar sites.

Example

  • Related: ‘place your search query here’

How to use

  • Related: bestbuy.com
  • related: producthunt.com

19. Search Origin Of Word

If you are looking of any words origin then simply type Etymology before the word.

Example

  • Etymology (Word, Name, Place)

How to use

  • Etymology admiral

20. Specific Complex Search

If you want to find a result from a specific site with a specific phrase, and exclude some keywords also, and want to search in a specific time period then alter this given trick to your search.

  • Site:techcrunch.com ”mobile”-apple 2014..2015

21. Search By File Type

Find PDF documents with a specific topic.


How to use

  • filetype:pdf Scrum vs kanban
  • Filetype:doc (Search Query)
  • Filetype:ps (Search Query)
  • Filetype:doc (Search Query)
  • Filetype:xls (Search Query)
  • Filetype:ppt (Search Query)
  • Filetype:rtf (Search Query)

22. Search By Domain Extension

If you are looking a special government, educational or training site then use this technique to get more efficient way.
How to use

  • site:.org OR site:.edu OR site:.gov “cancer research”

23. Search On a Specific Site

If you want to search a specific result from a specific site then use this technique.

How to use

  • site mit.edu admissions

24. Find Recipes

If you are fond of eating or want to search any food item then use the given trick to get more accurate result.
Example
Recipe site: ‘place your search query here’
How to use

  • recipe site: ratatouille

25. Search Site Cache

If you want to search any site cache then simply type cache: now place site address.

26. Search for Exact Phrase

Use quotation marks for an exact phrase search, with same words in the same order.
Place quotation marks (“) around the phrase you’d like to search for.

How to use

  • “31 Most Common Bad SEO Mistakes and Practices To Avoid”

27. Online Stopwatch

Search online stopwatch on google by simply type stopwatch.

Source: This article was published yodiz.com By Yodiz Team

Categorized in Search Techniques

File photo - A Google carpet is seen at the entrance of the new headquarters of Google France before its official inauguration in Paris, France Dec. 6, 2011. (REUTERS/Jacques Brinon/Pool/File Photo)

“Google” has become synonymous with “search for information,” but even mighty Google has its drawbacks — especially if you value your privacy. The world’s most famous search site is also known for saving your search history, reading your Gmail and tracking what you click online.

Tip in a Tip: Did you know that Google also tracks your physical location and when you were there? Click here to see a map showing your detailed location history.

Before you break out the torches and pitchforks, remember that Google is trying to make its services as useful as possible. The company’s goal is to find out what you want before you want it.

But maybe you want a break from the well-intended surveillance. What are your alternatives? Which search engines don’t step on your virtual heels? Here are three ways to search the internet that you may find refreshing.

DuckDuckGo

This search engine is unusual in many ways. First, it wasn’t developed in California, but in Pennsylvania. Second, DuckDuckGo’s mission is to keep users’ information private and to prevent personalized search results.

So what’s wrong with personalized search results? Don’t you want your phone or computer to cater to your interests? The creators of DuckDuckGo say this kind of technology creates a “filter bubble.” Google specializes in sending you only the content it thinks you want, not everything available.

    There’s more to DuckDuckGo than just not being Google. The search engine includes nifty calculators and other tricks you’ve come to expect, and you can customize its interface with search shortcuts and an Instant Answers feature.

    You might be surprised by the quality of Instant Answers, which easily rivals Google’s Knowledge Graph. You can also make DuckDuckGo an extension of your browser and activate more privacy settings to keep your search history as protected as possible.

    Click here to check out DuckDuckGo.

    Ixquick

    Ixquick calls itself the world’s most private search site. That may sound a little grand, but it’s earned its stripes. Ixquick doesn’t record your IP address, browser information or search history.

    The real magic of Ixquick is its “search by proxy” feature, which prevents websites from knowing what IP address you’re using. As you browse their pages, you’re basically invisible. This feature can slow down your searches, but that’s a small price to pay if privacy is your top priority.

    Here’s an example: Suppose you use Ixquick to search for “Komando.” Your result — a list of websites it has found that match your search — will resemble Google’s. But each result has three options:

    • Click the regular link, and you’ll visit the page as you normally would, meaning the website can see you.

    • Choose “Highlight” to see the site’s most basic information. This way, you don’t visit the site. You just see what it’s about.

    • Pick “Proxy” and you will remain anonymous. The site will see Ixquick’s IP address, not yours.

    Click here to use Ixquick.

    Tor

    If you’re looking for something a little more sophisticated, you might consider Tor, which is very popular in computer-savvy circles.

    The Tor Project describes itself as an “anonymity network,” which means privacy is its primary goal. The company’s logo is an onion, and it’s more than just a cute cartoon. Tor, an acronym for “The Onion Router,” uses sophisticated encryption software that behaves like the layers of an onion, making it virtually impossible for someone to track your movements online. Tor bounces your communications through a global network, a real headache for anyone trying to find your physical location.

    You may have heard of Tor because this same technology is used to access the Dark Web. (Click here to learn more about the Dark Web.) That may sound creepy, and it’s true that Tor has been used for illegal activity online, but the software itself is perfectly legal and shouldn’t pose any problems. Remember: It’s not the tool that causes problems. It’s how you use it.

    But before you rush to the Tor website and download the free software, keep in mind that Tor may slow down your searches, and it may also change your web browser’s settings.

    Click here to install and use the Tor Browser.

    How else can you maintain your privacy in this era of rampant data breaches? Be sure to listen to or download my podcasts, or click here to find them on your local radio station. You can listen to the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet or computer. From buying advice to digital life issues, click here for my free podcasts.

    Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

    Copyright 2017, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

    Source: This article was published on foxnews.com by Kim Komando

    Categorized in Search Engine

    Google’s search engine is an always-expandingextremely useful tool that’s packed with tons of different tools. Over on Zapier, they outline tons of different advanced tricks for searching Google as quickly as possible.

    Lifehacker alum Melanie Pinola digs into tons of Google search tips here, including some that are easy to forget, like the mortgage calculator, instant customer service phone numbers (search for the company named followed by “customer service”), and time zone conversions. Head over to the full post on Zapier for tons of detailed info, or check out the infographic below.

    google-search-tips

     

    Source: This article was published on lifehacker.com

    Categorized in Search Engine

    1- Use Quotes

    If you're looking for an exact phrase, put it in quotes. 

    "the ides of march" 

    You can also combine this with many other search tricks, such as: 

    "a wrinkle in time" OR "a wind in the door"

    Using the OR command is also known as a Boolean search.  More »

    2- Find Quick Website Info

    Information from smart phone

    se the Google shortcut info:your_url to find quick information about a website. Do not put a space between info: and the URL, but you can omit the http:// part of the address if you wish. For example:

    info:www.google.com

    Search the world's information, including webpages, images, videos and more. Google has many special features to help you find exactly what you're looking ...


    Not all web pages will return results. More »

    3- Boolean Searches

    George Boole

    There are two basic Boolean search commands supported in Google, AND and OR. AND searches search for all the search terms "summer AND winter," (all documents containing both summer and winter) while OR searches search for one term or the other, "summer OR winter." (all documents containing either summer or winter)

    AND

    Google defaults to AND searches automatically, so you don't need to type "AND" into the search engine to get that result.

    OR

    If you want to find one keyword or another, use the term OR. It's important that you use all caps, or Google will ignore your request.

    To find all documents containing either sausages or biscuits, type: summer OR winter.

    You can also substitute the "pipe" character for OR:  summer | winter More »

    4- Convert Currency

    Money mix of foreign currency notes

    Search for starting currency in desired currency. For example, to find out how much the Canadian dollar is worth in US dollars today, type in:

    canadian dollar in us dollar

    The calculator graphic appears at the top of the screen along with the answer in bold type. Currency conversion is part of Google's hidden calculator, which can convert all sorts of things to other things, including units of measure (gallons into liters, miles per gallon into kilometers per liters, etc.) More »

    5- Definitions

    Dictionary

    CSA Images/Archive / Getty Images

    If you want to quickly find a word's definition, just use define:

    define: loquacious 

    This triggers one of Google's hidden search engines, which will find the definition by comparing several online dictionaries. You'll see the definition and a link to the original information source in case you want to search further.  More »

    6- Synonym Searches

    Creativitiy as Found in the Dictionary

    Can't think of a word? Use Google to search for both your search terms and synonyms. A synonym is a word or phrase that means the same thing or close to the same thing. 

    When you put a tilde ~ in front of your search term, Google will look for both your chosen search term and synonyms. 

    ~dancing

    More »

    7- Numrange Searches

    Mathematical Equation

    Sometimes you may want to narrow your search by finding things within a number range, such as fashion icons from the 1920s to the 1960s, cars that get 30-50 miles per gallon, or computers from $500-$800. Google lets you do just that with "Numrange" searches.

    You can perform a Numrange search on any sequential set of numbers by typing two periods between the numbers without any spaces. For example, you could search with the key phrases: 

    fashion icons 1920..1960
    
    cars 30..50 mpg 
    computer $500..$800 

    Whenever possible, give Google some context for your numbers. Are they miles per gallon, stitches per minute, pounds, or cases? With the exception of dollar signs, you should put a space between your numbers and the keyword that gives those numbers context, just like the car search example.

    You'll probably also be more successful if you use an industry standard abbreviation, such as "mpg" rather than spelling out "miles per gallon." When in doubt, you could search for both terms at once by using a Boolean OR search. That would make our car search: 

    cars 30..50 mpg OR "miles per gallon."

    More »

    8- Filetype Searches

    Multicolored shapes connecting men with targets on opposite ends of arrows pointing in different direction

    Google can let you restrict your searches to only certain file types. This can be very helpful if you're looking specifically for file types, such as PowerPoint, (ppt) Word, (doc) or Adobe PDF.

    To restrict your search to a specific file type, use the filetype: command. For example, try searching for:

    bad hotel filetype:ppt

     To search for that forgotten widget report, try:

    widget report filetype:doc

    If you are searching for videos, try using Google Video search instead.  More »

    9- Exclude or Add Words

    Twins sitting on sofa, smiling

    Use the minus sign to exclude words from your search. Combine it with quotes to make it even more powerful. 

    "pot bellied" -pig

    Put a space before the minus sign but do not put a space between the minus sign and the word or phrase you want to be excluded.

    Use the same trick with a plus sign to automatically include a word in your results. 

    "pot bellied" +pig

    More »

    10- Search within Website Titles

    Definition of Allintitle
    Learn the definition of the allintitle tag and how you use it. Word illustration by Marziah Karch

    Sometimes you may want to find Web pages where one or more words appear in the title of the page rather than just the body. Use intitle:

    Do not put a space between the colon and the word you want to appear in the title.  

    intitle:feeding iguana

    This will find Web pages that are relevant to the keyphrase "feeding iguana," and it will only list results that have the word "feeding" in the title. You can force both words to appear:

    intitle:feeding intitle:iguana

    You can also use the syntax allintitle: which only list results where all the words in the key phrase are in the title.

    allintitle:iguana feeding

    More »

    11- Search within a Website

    3D Rendering, Robot and laptop, stock exchange trading

    You can use Google's site: syntax to restrict your search to find only results within a single website. Make sure there's no space between site: and your desired website.

    Follow your website with a space and then the desired search phrase. 

    You don't need to use the HTTP:// or HTTPS:// portion 

    site:about.com bread pudding recipes

     The second half is the search phrase. It is usually better to use more than one word in your search to help you narrow down your results. 

    This same search can be widened to include all the Web sites within a top level domain.  

    Google used to have a verticle search engine called "Uncle Sam" that only searched within government websites. It has been discontinued, but using this trick gets pretty close to the same results. For example:

    site:gov geographic survey Idaho

    Or try only schools and universities:

    site:edu textbook

    or only or only specific countries

    site:​uk search terms

    More »

    12- Find Cached Websites

    Cached image using Google search syntax
     View a cached images. Screen capture

    If a website has recently changed or is not currently responding, you can search for a term in the last cached page stored in Google by using the Cache: syntax. 

    cache:google.about.com adsense

    This language is case sensitive, so make sure "cache:" is lower case. You also need to make sure there is no space between cache: and your URL. You do need a space between your URL and your search phrase. It's not necessary to put the "HTTP://" part in the URL.

    Note: Use Command/Control F to highlight keywords or jump to the desired spot.More »

    Source: This article was published on lifewire.com

    Categorized in Search Engine

    Google is kind of a big deal, to say the least. The tech giant has blossomed over the course of the past decade, quickly becoming part of the global lexicon, and establishing itself as an official verb in the dictionary. Although the company wears many hats, its most valuable asset has always been its phenomenal search engine.

    Unfortunately, Google isn’t one to automatically recognize punctuation and grammar within search queries. However, the symbols and punctuation listed below are exceptions to the rules, ones that allow you to better refine your search results when used in conjunction with your desired search terms. Just don’t add any spaces between the symbol and your search phrases. Otherwise, Google will ignore your commands.

    Punctuation symbols that help refine your search

    Function Execution
    To search for an exact phrase, with the same words in the same order Place quotation marks (“) around the phrase you’d like to search for Ex: “to be, or not to be”
    To exclude results that include a particular word or site when searching words with multiple meanings Place a dash (-) before the word or site you want to omit  Ex: phoenix -arizona
    To search for Google+ pages or blood types Place an addition sign (+) in front of the Google+ user or after the blood type  Ex: +Chrome and AB+
    To search for social tags Place the at symbol (@) before the social tag you’d like to search  Ex: @digitaltrends
    To search for prices Place a dollar sign ($) before the value  Ex: canon $400
    To search for a phrase with missing words Place an asterisk (*) within the search as a placeholder for any unknown terms  Ex: if you give a * a *
    To search for a range of numbers, usually pertaining to prices and measurements Place two periods between the designated numbers you want to search between  Ex: $75..$200
    To search popular hashtags for trending topics Place a hashtag in front of the desired topicEx: #throwbackthursday

    Search operators that help refine your hunt

    Punctuation and symbols really only get you so far with Google. Search operators, which are additionally available within the Google Advanced Search page, allow you to greatly narrow your search results based on a variety of individual factors when you pair them with your desired search terms.

    Also, omit the spaces as you would with symbols.


    Function Execution
    To search for results from certain sites and domains Place “site:” in front of the site or domain from which you want to pull results  Ex: apple watch site:digitaltrends.com
    To search for pages that link to a certain page Place “link:” in front of the site or domain you want to find pages linking to  Ex: link:digitaltrends.com
    To search for sites that are similar to a designated site or domain Place “related:” in front of the site or domain you want to find similar results of  Ex: related:digitaltrends.com
    To search for pages that just have one of several words Place “OR” between the two words you are searching for  Ex: world series 2013 OR 2014
    To search for designated information about a specific site or domain, including cached pages, and those linking to the site Place “info:” in front of the site or domain you want information about  Ex: info:digitaltrends.com
    To search what a page looked like the last time Google crawled the site Place “cache:” in front of the page housing the cache you’d like to view  Ex: cache:digitaltrends.com
    To search for a specific file type Place “filetype:” in front of the specific file type you’re looking for  Ex: matthew mcconaughey filetype:gif

    Other helpful tips and tricks

    There are a handful of other useful Google search functions that don’t fall under either of the above categories. Google built the engine with several useful tools that allow you to look up information without have to navigate to other sites. For instance, you can instantly check the weather for a city, or look up the definition of “miasma,” among a bevy of other actions. You can even utilize the microphone on your desktop or mobile device to search Google using your own voice, or find the Bacon Number of your favorite celebrity (we’re betting it’s two).


    Function Execution
    To search Google using voice commands Click the microphone icon in the search bar and begin talking
    To search Google for a specific image Click the camera icon in the search bar and paste the image URL
    To set a timer Enter “set timer for” followed by the desired amount of time
    To check the weather for a specific area Enter “weather” followed by a zipcode or city
    To search for the sunrise and sunset times for a specific area Enter “sunrise” or “sunset” followed by a zipcode or city
    To look up the definition for a given word Enter “define” followed by your desired term
    To look up the origins for a given word Enter “etymology” followed by your desired word
    To look up the time for a specific region Enter “time” followed by the particular region
    To look up your IP address Enter “ip address” in the search bar
    To check the status of a flight Enter the flight number in the search bar
    To look up stock quotes Enter the desired stock symbol in the search bar
    To look up the date for a specific holiday Enter the name of the holiday in the search bar
    To track a package Enter the tracking number in the search bar
    To use the calculator Enter the equation in the search bar
    To define a word Enter “define” followed by your desired word
    To convert currency or measurements Enter the first amount and unit, type “to”, and then enter the second unit
    To look up film showings Enter “movies” followed by your zipcode or city
    To look up sports scores Enter the sports team in the search bar
    To look up nutritional facts about an item, or compare nutritional facts Enter the name of the product, or enter “compare” followed by the items you want to compare
    To look up a celebrity’s Bacon Number Enter “bacon number” followed by the name of the celebrity
    To roll a six-sided die Enter [roll a dice] in the search bar

    This article was published in digitaltrends.com by Brandon Widder

    Categorized in Search Engine

    Search engines have evolved to make it easier to find any information you need without having to go through different websites. Google is undoubtedly the more popular search engine that has many cool features, but you should know that it’s not your only good option when it comes to search engines. 

    Tricks that work on DuckDuckGo but not on google (1)

    In days when online privacy is a major concern, here is the upstart search engine ‘DuckDuckGo‘ – a privacy-focussed search engine that offers features which other search engines don’t. Unlike Google, which filters search results based on the sites you have been visiting, DuckDuckGo is a search engine that shows the same results for a search term to all its users. Duck Duck Go also has a policy that users will not be placed into filter bubbles, and the engine automatically diverts users to the encrypted versions of websites to protect them, even when they’re not searching.

    DuckDuckGo, which has earned a loyal fan following has a few unusual features that even Google doesn’t have. Let’s take a look at them!

    1. Search Other Websites from the Address Bar

    DDG Bangs

    You can search the archives of different websites from the address bar in Chrome, Firefox, and other mainstream browsers. But to do that, you’ll need to set up keyword searches first. With Google, you can use the site: modifier to search for results within a particular site, but then you still have to open the link to see the results. With DuckDuckGo’s awesome ‘!bangs feature’, you can jump right in and search many popular websites.

    DDG bangs list

    For example, if you want to search for someone’s details on LinkedIn, you don’t need to open the site. Just type “!LinkedIn” followed by the person’s name, and you will see the LinkedIn search results page. You can do this with a large number of websites; Google with !g, Reddit with !r, YouTube with !yt, Gmail with !gmail, just to name a few. You can see the full list by just typing ‘!’ in the DuckDuckGo search bar.

    2. Check Whether Websites Are Down

    down for me

    If you can’t open a website, you might want to check if it is not opening anywhere or just on your computer. You can simply ask DuckDuckGo for this and get an instant answer. For example, search DuckDuckGo with the keywords like, “is alltechbuzz down for me

    3. Generate passwords

    DDG - Generate passwords

    With the search engine’s Instant Answers feature, you can even generate strong passwords. If you can’t think of a strong password, just head to DuckDuckGo and search for “Password 10” and you will see a strong 10-character password. If you find those random passwords hard to remember, you can make DuckDuckGo generate XKCD-style passwords. These passwords comprise four common words put together, which are easy to remember and hard to crack, and were first suggested in the popular Web comic XKCD. For these passwords, search “Random passphrase”.

     

    That’s not all. DuckDuckGo can even expand shortened URLs and shorten long URLs using ‘expand’ and ‘shorten’ keywords respectively before the URLs.

    4. View Color Codes

    DDG - View Color Codes

    Getting the right color code for a Colour Code is such a hectic task. People working in the Multimedia know this pretty well. DuckDuckGo provides u the complete chart with all the 256 RGB colors with their respective Hex Colour Codes for seamless recognition of hues.

    5. Get Cheatsheets for Popular Apps, Services, and Platforms

    DDG - Cheatsheets

    If you type in the name of a well-known app or even an operating system followed by the word cheatsheet and hit Enter, you’ll get the relevant cheatsheet right there in DuckDuckGo.

    The name of the app/platform that you need to use is a bit tricky, though. For example, typing in windows cheatsheet won’t work; you have to be specific. Use windows 8 cheatsheet to get the list of shortcuts for Windows 8. Using this method, you can able to find cheatsheets for Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Evernote, Ubuntu, Facebook and much more. 

     

    6. Get HTML Codes As a List

    DDG - HTML Codes

    Done with helping the Multimedia people and now this is for the Web Designers / Developers out there. These people usually search for the codes on various websites and then copy from them but DuckDuckGo makes your task easy by providing the entire list of HTML Codes for everything including the Decimals & Hex Codes.

    7. Generate QR Codes

    qr code of alltechbuzz on duckduckgo

    QR Codes have become quite popular these days which are being used by the Corporations, Executives as well as Individuals to provide their Contact Information or Product Information, etc. Anyone can create a QR Code for themselves online and can be shared with their friends or anyone. Many sites help you in providing this service but with DuckDuckGo, it is much easier. Before the name of the website or contact, type ‘QR’ and hit Enter. Doesn’t this seem the best way? Yes, of course.

    8. Find Alternatives to Apps

    DDG - Alternative apps

    If you’re looking for a replacement for, say, Facebook, the quickest way to look up alternatives is via a web search or via AlternativeTo, a crowdsourced platform for app recommendations. You can combine the power of both in DuckDuckGo, like so: search for an alternative to Facebook. This gives you a card-like view of Facebook alternatives sourced from AlternativeTo in DuckDuckGo. It also works for Web services, so you can even search for “Alternative to DuckDuckGo” if you like.

    This feature doesn’t work with very obscure apps, but it can find most of the well-known ones.

    9. Switch Text Case

    DDG - switch text case

    At times, we come across a situation where we need to convert a part of some Text into Lower Case. DuckDuckGo is enough smart to convert it and what you need to do is just prefix the given sentence with the phrase ‘Lowercase’ and hit Enter and the copy back the given output.

    Author: Chaitanya
    Source: https://www.alltechbuzz.net/search-tricks-that-work-on-duckduckgo-but-not-on-google

    Categorized in Search Engine

    If you're job hunting potential employers will Google you, and inappropriate dirt on social media will hurt your chances of getting the gig. Jimmy Rhoades has three tips for finding what's out there and how to clean up the mess.

    1.  Google Yourself

    92 percent of Google users don't look past the first page, so the idea is to push the bad stuff down to Page 2 or later. That can be tough -- companies pay big bucks to get on Page 1 results, but to even have a shot, create positive, new content -- a website, a blog, whatever -- and do whatever free or cheap search engine optimization you can to move it above the bad stuff.

    2.  BrandYourself

    This company offers paid services, but also a free DIY tool. You start by entering your name, then categorizing the search results as positive, negative or not you at all. This generates a reputation score which you can improve using their optimization tools.

    3.  Scrubber

    What kind of embarrassing things might be lurking way back in your social history? Enter Scrubber! Use this tool to find profanity, mentions of drugs or alcohol, even cheek-ins at strip clubs. They focus solely on the social media aspect of your digital history.

    Author: Jimmy Rhoades
    Source: http://www.ktnv.com/entertainment/television/the-list/3-tips-to-clean-up-your-image-on-google-searches

    Categorized in Internet Privacy

    The private search engine Startpage is my search engine of choice. If you are a long-time reader, you know that I made the switch from using Google first to DuckDuckGo, and then to Startpage, back when news about Prism and other government surveillance and privacy-invading activities hit the world.

    Startpage works considerably well out of the box. Open the site, enter your search query, and browse the results. It features web, image, and video searches, and ships with a couple of extras that make the experience even better.

    I mentioned the Startpage proxy in 2014 already that enables you to load results anonymously, and posted a list of ten tips to improve Startpage search back in 2014 as well.

    This guide will focus on tips that are new and have not been mentioned yet.

    Startpage Tips

    startpage tips

    The following tips let you customize your Startpage search experience. All options are accessible on the preferences page.

    Only connect to servers

    startpage servers

    Startpage will connect you to the closest (of their) servers when you connect to the site and run searches on it. This ensures quick response times.

    You can change that default option in the settings. Basically, what it allows you to do is set a server that you want to be connected to.

    So, if you don't want your search queries to be processed by a server in the US for instance, you could set this option to EU or Asian servers instead to avoid that.

    The four options provided are a) closest, b) EU servers, c) US servers, or d) Asian servers.

    Homepage Search Mode

    startpage advanced search

    If you happen to use the advanced search interface regularly, or maybe even exclusively, then you may find this option useful.

    It allows you to switch from the basic search interface to the advanced search interface by default. So, whenever you open Startpage, the advanced search interface is loaded directly.

    Homepage Theme

    startpage theme

    Startpage supports several themes that you can switch between. The default theme is called Air, and it is a light theme. You can switch to night for a darker theme, or white or black, which are like Air and Night, but without the background image for the most part.

    Last but not least, you may also switch to classic themes if you prefer those. The classic themes change link placements on the Startpage homepage though, so keep that in mind.

    The main use here is for users who prefer a dark theme instead of a light one, and for users who prefer a basic design when it comes to search (by removing the background images).

    Search Suggestions

    startpage suggestions

    Startpage displays no search suggestions by default. You can enable those in the preferences. Startpage's suggestions system is different from many others as it puts privacy first and foremost.

    The search engine displays general suggestions and won't display user queries as suggestions. Startpage shows "generally relevant suggestions" for queries only. Suggestions honor family filter settings.

    Switch the "search suggestions" option in the Startpage preferences to "on" to enable suggestions.

    Automatic highlighting

    startpage search highlight

    This is another interesting option. It highlights the search term on the web page that you open when you click on results.

    But that is not the only thing that happens. Startpage opens the result using its proxy as well. If you enable the option, all results are automatically loaded using the proxy.

    So, if you always want to use the proxy, this is one option to automate this.

    Author: Martin Brinkmann
    Source: https://www.ghacks.net/2017/01/03/startpage-tips-search

    Categorized in Online Research
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