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Source: This article was Published forbes.com By Lee Mathews - Contributed by Member: James Gill

The Internet is a very leaky place. Security researchers find new servers spilling private data with alarming regularity. Some incidents have involved well-known, reputable companies. This one does not. It involves a server that helped cyber criminals run a massive SPAM campaign.

While investigating massive spam-producing malware network, security researchers at Vertek Corporation made an unexpected discovery. One of the servers linked to the malware hadn't been properly secured. Anyone who had the IP address of the server could connect at will and download a massive cache of email addresses.

Vertek tallied more than 44 million addresses in total. Of those, more than 43,500,000 were unique. The data was broken down into just over 2,200 files with each one containing more than 20,000 entries.

Bleeping Computer was provided with a list that broke down which email services were the most popular with the spammers. Yahoo addresses were the most common, at nearly 9 million. AOL was a close second at just over 8 million. Comcast addresses were the third most common at around 780,000.

The numbers fall sharply after that, with none breaking half a million. Many of the addresses that appear are provided by ISPs like AT&T, Charter, Cox, and SBC. Curiously enough, very few Gmail accounts were listed. Bleeping Computer thinks that may be because the database Vertek was able to access only contained part of the spam server's address book. It's also possible that these particular domains were chosen to target a specific type of user.

Vertek's researchers have shared their findings with Troy Hunt, who is analyzing the list against the already massive database he maintains at the breach notification service HaveIBeenPwned.

It wouldn't be at all surprising if Hunt discovers that all 43 million addresses were already exposed by other leaks or hacks. Why? Because at least two other leaks from spam-linked servers contained way, way more.

In August of last year, Hunt processed a whopping 711 million addresses from a compromised server. Many of those, he determined, had been dumped before. The biggest leak involving a SPAM service involved twice as many emails. MacKeeper's Chris Vickery discovered a mind-blowing 1.4 billion addresses exposed by a shady server.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

 Source: This article was Published wired.com By IE LAPOWSKY - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

IN LATE JULY, a group of high-ranking Facebook executives organized an emergency conference call with reporters across the country. That morning, Facebook’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, explained, they had shut down 32 fake pages and accounts that appeared to be coordinating disinformation campaigns on Facebook and Instagram. They couldn’t pinpoint who was behind the activity just yet, but said the accounts and pages had loose ties to Russia’s Internet Research Agency, which had spread divisive propaganda like a flesh-eating virus throughout the 2016 US election cycle.

Facebook was only two weeks into its investigation of this new network, and the executives said they expected to have more answers in the days to come. Specifically, they said some of those answers would come from the Atlantic Council's Digital Forensics Research Lab. The group, whose mission is to spot, dissect, and explain the origins of online disinformation, was one of Facebook’s newest partners in the fight against digital assaults on elections around the world. “When they do that analysis, people will be able to understand better what’s at play here,” Facebook’s head of cybersecurity policy, Nathaniel Gleicher, said.

Back in Washington DC, meanwhile, DFRLab was still scrambling to understand just what was going on themselves. Facebook had alerted them to the eight suspicious pages the day before the press call. The lab had no access to the accounts connected to those pages, nor to any information on Facebook’s backend that would have revealed strange patterns of behavior. They could only see the parts of the pages that would have been visible to any other Facebook user before the pages were shut down—and they had less than 24 hours to do it.

“We screenshotted as much as possible,” says Graham Brookie, the group’s 28-year-old director. “But as soon as those accounts are taken down, we don’t have access to them... We had a good head start, but not a full understanding.” DFRLab is preparing to release a longer report on its findings this week.

As a company, Facebook has rarely been one to throw open its doors to outsiders. That started to change after the 2016 election, when it became clear that Facebook and other tech giants missed an active, and arguably incredibly successful, foreign influence campaign going on right under their noses. Faced with a backlash from lawmakers, the media, and their users, the company publicly committed to being more transparent and to work with outside researchers, including at the Atlantic Council.

'[Facebook] is trying to figure out what the rules of the road are, frankly, as are research organizations like ours.'

GRAHAM BROOKIE, DIGITAL FORENSICS RESEARCH LAB

DFRLab is a scrappier, substantially smaller offshoot of the 57-year-old bipartisan think tank based in DC, and its team of 14 is spread around the globe. Using open source tools like Google Earth and public social media data, they analyze suspicious political activity on Facebook, offer guidance to the company, and publish their findings in regular reports on Medium. Sometimes, as with the recent batch of fake accounts and pages, Facebook feeds tips to the DFRLab for further digging. It's an evolving, somewhat delicate relationship between a corporate behemoth that wants to appear transparent without ceding too much control or violating users' privacy, and a young research group that’s ravenous for Intel and eager to establish its reputation.

“This kind of new world of information sharing is just that, it’s new,” Brookie says. “[Facebook] is trying to figure out what the rules of the road are, frankly, as are research organizations like ours.”

The lab got its start almost by accident. In 2014, Brookie was working for the National Security Council under President Obama when the military conflict broke out in eastern Ukraine. At the time, he says, the US intelligence community knew that Russian troops had invaded the region, but given the classified nature of their intel they had no way to prove it to the public. That allowed the Russian government to continue denying their involvement.

What the Russians didn’t know was that proof of their military surge was sitting right out in the open online. A working group within the Atlantic Council was among the groups busy sifting through the selfies and videos that Russian soldiers were uploading to sites like Instagram and YouTube. By comparing the geolocation data on those posts to Google Earth street view images that could reveal precisely where the photos were taken, the researchers were able to track the soldiers as they made their way through Ukraine.

“It was old-school Facebook stalking, but for classified national security interests,” says Brookie.

This experiment formed the basis of DFRLab, which has continued using open source tools to investigate national security issues ever since. After the initial report on eastern Ukraine, for instance, DFRLab followed up with a piece that used satellite images to prove that the Russian government had misled the world about its air strikes on Syria; instead of hitting ISIS territory and oil reserves, as it claimed, it had in fact targeted civilian populations, hospitals, and schools.

But Brookie, who joined DFRLab in 2017, says the 2016 election radically changed the way the team worked. Unlike Syria or Ukraine, where researchers needed to extract the truth in a low-information environment, the election was plagued by another scourge: information overload. Suddenly, there was a flood of myths to be debunked. DFRLab shifted from writing lengthy policy papers to quick hits on Medium. To expand its reach even further, the group also launched a series of live events to train other academics, journalists, and government officials in their research tactics, creating even more so-called “digital Sherlocks.”

'Sometimes a fresh pair of eyes can see something we may have missed.'

KATIE HARBATH, FACEBOOK

This work caught Facebook’s attention in 2017. After it became clear that bad actors, including Russian trolls, had used Facebook to prey on users' political views during the 2016 race, Facebook pledged to better safeguard election integrity around the world. The company has since begun staffing up its security team, developing artificial intelligence to spot fake accounts and coordinated activity, and enacting measures to verify the identities of political advertisers and administrators for large pages on Facebook.

According to Katie Harbath, Facebook’s director of politics, DFRLab's skill at tracking disinformation not just on Facebook but across platforms felt like a valuable addition to this effort. The fact that the Atlantic Council’s board is stacked with foreign policy experts including former secretary of state Madeleine Albright and Stephen Hadley, former national security adviser to President George W. Bush, was an added bonus.

“They bring that unique, global view set of both established foreign policy people, who have had a lot of experience, combined with innovation and looking at problems in new ways, using open source material,” Harbath says.

That combination has helped the Atlantic Council attract as much as $24 million a year in contributions, including from government and corporate sponsors. As the think tank's profile has grown, however, it has also been accused of peddling influence for major corporate donors like FedEx. Now, after committing roughly $1 million in funding to the Atlantic Council, the bulk of which supports the DFRLab’s work, Facebook is among the organization's biggest sponsors.

But for Facebook, giving money away is the easy part. The challenge now is figuring out how best to leverage this new partnership. Facebook is a $500 billion tech juggernaut with 30,000 employees in offices around the world; it's hard to imagine what a 14-person team at a non-profit could tell them that they don't already know. But Facebook's security team and DFRLab staff swap tips daily through a shared Slack channel, and Harbath says that Brookie’s team has already made some valuable discoveries.

During the recent elections in Mexico, for example, DFRLab dissected the behavior of a political consulting group called Victory Lab that was spamming the election with fake news, driven by Twitter bots and Facebook likes that appeared to have been purchased in bulk. The team found that a substantial number of those phony likes came from the same set of Brazilian Facebook users. What's more, they all listed the same company, Frases & Versos, as their employer.

The team dug deeper, looking into the managers of Frases & Versos, and found that they were connected with an entity called PCSD, which maintained a number of pages where Facebook users could buy and sell likes, shares, and even entire pages. With the Brazilian elections on the horizon in October, Brookie says, it was critical to get the information in front of Facebook immediately.

"We flagged it for Facebook, like, 'Holy cow this is interesting,'" Brookie remembers. The Facebook team took on the investigation from there. On Wednesday, the DFRLab published its report on the topic, and Facebook confirmed to WIRED that it had removed a network of 72 groups, 46 accounts, and five pages associated with PCSD.

"We’re in this all day, every day, looking at these things," Harbath says. "Sometimes a fresh pair of eyes can see something we may have missed."

Of course, Facebook has missed a lot in the past few years, and the partnership with the DFRLab is no guarantee it won't miss more. Even as it stumbles toward transparency, the company remains highly selective about which sets of eyes get to search for what they've missed, and what they get to see. After all, Brookie's team can only examine clues that are already publicly accessible. Whatever signals Facebook is studying behind the scenes remain a mystery.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

 Source: This article was Published appuals.com By Bill Wilson - Contributed by Member: Edna Thomas

Safe Search is a built-in security feature that filets out inappropriate web content. Although it used to be quite easy to disable or enable Safe search for Internet Explorer, the default behavior has changed with the launch of Windows 10.

Even though the Edge browser includes a setting that allows users to disable Safe Search, for some users Safe Search refuses to be disabled due to a glitch, child account type or browser setting. Here’s the error message that most affected users see after being unable to disable SafeSearch:

“We’ve set SafeSearch to strict because your browser communicated your preference for a safe web browsing experience”

Some users have been reaching us with questions after being unable to disable Safe Search for Microsoft Edge and/or Internet Explorer. Whenever this issue occurs, the user is unable to disable Safe for multiple search engines including Bing, Google or Yahoo. The restriction also applies to Youtube and a few other content websites.

As per most user reports, this particular issue is either caused by an internal Edge bug or by the fact that the current account is enabled as a child account with limited privileges.

If you’re currently struggling to turn off Safe Search for Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer, this article will give you some basic troubleshooting guides. Please follow the methods below in order until you stumble upon a fix that resolves the Safe Search won’t rurn off issue.

Method 1: Turning Safe Search Off from inside the Search Engine’s Settings

Before we dig into other troubleshooting guides, let’s see if you’re trying to turn off Bing’s SafeSearch setting from the right menu. Since disabling or enabling SafeSearch is no longer done through your browser settings, you’ll need to navigate to the home page of your search engine.

Please follow the guide specific to your preferred search engine to turn Safe Search Off.

Here’s a quick guide on turning Bing SafeSearch on or off for the Bing search engine:

  1. Open Internet Explorer or Edge Browser and navigate Bing.com.
  2. Make sure you are signed in with your user account, then click on the action button (top-right corner) and click on Settings.
  3. In the Settings menu of Bing, go to the Search section and set SafeSearch to Off.
  4. Hit Save button at the bottom of the menu and see if Safe Search is now disabled when using Bing.

Here’s a quick guide on how to disable Safe Search for Google search engine:

  1. Open Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer and access the Google Search Engine.
  2. Make sure you are logged in with your Google account and search for something.
  3. Above the search results, click on Settings and then choose to Turn off SafeSearch.
    In the event that this method wasn’t effective in disabling Safe Search, move down to the next method below.

Method 2: Apply all pending Windows updates

If the first method wasn’t effective, let’s eliminate the possibility of an internal bug. The inability to turn off Safe search is a known Windows 10 bug that Microsoft has already addressed with a couple of hotfixes.

If you’re unable to turn Safe Search off due to Windows 10 glitch, applying all the pending Windows updates will automatically resolve the issue. Here’s a quick guide on applying all the pending Windows updates:

  1. Press Windows key + R to open up a Run box. Next, type “ms-settings:windowsupdate” and hit Enter to open the Windows Update tab from the Settings menu.
  2. In the Windows Update screen, click the Check for updates button and wait until the analysis is complete.
  3. Once Windows figures out which updates need to be applied and their order, start following the on-screen prompts to apply them to your system. Keep in mind that depending on how many pending updates you have, your PC might restart several times.
  4. After every startup, return to the Windows Update screen and install every pending update until there is none left.
  5. Once all updates are installed, perform a final restart. At the next startup, see whether you are able to disable Safe Search. If the feature is still refusing to be turned off, continue down with the next method below.

Method 3: Disabling Safe Search via the InPrivate mode

Some users have managed to disable Safe Search by using the InPrivate mode. In the instance that the Safe Search setting is locked to Strict or Moderate, you can try to modify the setting from an InPrivate mode in the Edge browser.

Here’s a quick guide on disabling Safe Search from an InPrivate window of Microsoft Edge:

  1. Open Microsoft Edge and press Ctrl + Shift + P to open a new InPrivate window.
  2. In the newly opened InPrivate window, navigate to the search engine of your choice, and follow Method 1again to disable Safe Search (while in an InPrivate window).

If disabling Safe Search from an InPrivate window wasn’t effective, move down to the final method.

Method 4: Creating a new Windows user account

Some users have finally managed to resolve the issue and disable Safe Search after creating a new Windows user account. As it turns out, Windows 10 is capable of overriding the Safe Search settings of your search engines if the active account is enabled as a child of another one.

In this case, the solution would be to create a new user account and grant it administrative privileges. Here’s a quick guide on how to do this:

  1. Press Windows key + R to open up a new Run box. Then, type “netplwiz” and hit Enter to open up the User Accounts window.
  2. In the User Accounts window, expand the Users tab and click the Add button.
  3. In the next window, click on Sign in without a Microsoft account to proceed.
  4. Then, click on Local Account and hit the Next button.
  5. Insert your account name and password and hit the Next button again to complete the process.
  6. Sign-in with your newly created user account either by logging out or by restarting your PC and see if the Safe Search won’t Turn Off issue has been resolved.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published icij.org By Spencer Woodman - Contributed by Member: Dorothy Allen

Reporters are navigating a more treacherous environment than at any time in recent memory, and despite a plethora of digital tools to keep them safe – many are failing to adopt new strategies.

It’s a bleak reality: Last year alone, a record number of journalists were killed in Mexico, reporters were imprisoned in Myanmar and journalists in Turkeyfaced criminal charges en masse.

The press’s enemies have been boosted by U.S. President Donald Trump, who has lodged almost daily attacks against journalists, and many have followed his lead. Wealthy private interests have launched their own crusades: a private firm was hired to undermine New Yorker reporter Jane Mayer’s reporting on Koch Industries, and Harvey Weinstein offered big bucks to a military-grade surveillance firm to spy on reporters and their sources breaking the story of his sexual harassment.

“The World Press Freedom map is getting darker,” according to the 2017 World Press Freedom Index compiled by Reporters Without Borders, “and media freedom is under threat now more than ever.”

[Journalists] frequently disregard their sense of insecurity even when they feel unsafe in public or cyberspace.
Canadian Journalists for Free Expression

These threats are compounded by increasingly potent hacking tools falling into the hands of governments around the world and, in some cases, hackers serving government interests. This makes personal cybersecurity an essential first line of defense for reporters everywhere.

Yet many journalists are failing to utilize some of the most basic tools to keep them and their sources safe from digital attack. A recent study by the Canadian Journalists for Free Expression found that some of the most at-risk journalists “frequently disregard their sense of insecurity even when they feel unsafe in public or cyberspace.”

So what can journalists (and citizens) do to better protect themselves online? Here are five security tools that have emerged as among the most commonly recommended for reporters and news organizations as well as their sources.

1. Signal and other end-to-end encrypted apps

Phone calls and digital messaging often comprise the bulk of a journalist’s workday. But conventional lines of communication can leave the contents of conversations vulnerable to hacking. And, even if someone is not able to intercept to the contents of these chats, a hacker can still access extensive archives of related metadata, including who you talked to and when.

But there are an increasing number of options to help you communicate securely with a high degree of confidence.

As we settle into 2018, the app Signal — possibly you’ve already heard of it – is a clear favorite for secure voice calls and messaging between journalists, their editors, and sometimes their civil servant sources.

You can easily use the Signal app on your phone.

“Everyone is really enthusiastic about Signal,” said Harlo Holmes, director of newsroom digital security with the Freedom of the Press Foundation. “Right now it’s the state of the art in terms of encrypted communication.”

To the user, Signal looks and operates like a traditional chat app, and also allows you to avoid expensive international call and text fees. But Signal also offers what’s called end-to-end encryption, meaning communications can only be deciphered on the physical devices of the communicating users. Even if a government tried to compel the group of developers that administers Signal to turn over your communications, it couldn’t provide information: Signal simply has no ability to figure out exactly what you’re doing on its platform.

An increasing number of digital platforms are using end-to-end encryption, but some popular products differ from Signal in one key way: While some of these firms may not be able to access the content of your communications, they can often access valuable metadata that may reveal who you were communicating with and when. These apps also may allow users to inadvertently send messages without end-to-end encryption.

To learn more about Signal, Holmes recommends checking out the foundation’s page on Security Planner, a project of the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab.

2. Secure file storage and encrypted sharing

A large portion of our lives is often stored on our laptops and the messaging platforms, social media sites and work portals they access. For journalists, this can mean a lot of sensitive material, including leaked documents, identities of sources and unpublished story drafts.

Bill Budington a security engineer at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a group dedicated to digital privacy, points to the particularly risky situation of crossing a border and recommends a series of products and measures journalists and others can adopt to keep files safe in the most at-risk circumstances.

His first tip: When most under threat, ditch your primary laptop or smartphone completely. If you have a burner phone or a cheap netbook that doesn’t contain sensitive data, bring this secondary device along instead while traveling.

But when burner devices aren’t an option, Budington says, “the most powerful thing” a person can do to keep devices safe at a border-crossing is to make sure the hard drive is fully encrypted beforehand – helping to ensure that only those with the device’s passphrase will be able to access its files. This step is also among the easiest – for Mac iOS and some Windows users, it can be as simple as clicking a few buttons to activate built-in encryption programs.

Even with an encrypted hard drive, hackers can attempt to “brute-force” a password, potentially gaining access to the encrypted data. (In many jurisdictions, courts and law enforcement agencies can try to compel you to turn over your password under threat of punishment, including incarceration.) An open-source program called VeraCrypt can add an additional layer of encryption, so that, even if hackers get access to your hard drive, they then must enter what amounts to a highly-fortified folder to gain access to your most sensitive information.

Yet even the most highly secured hard drive will provide little help in protecting your data when you inevitably need to transfer a sensitive document to someone else via the internet. Some of the most prominent file-sharing programs, such as Google Drive and Dropbox, do not provide what Budington calls “client-side” encryption by default.

“For cloud storage, the most important feature for secure storage is for the program you’re using to encrypt files locally on your own machine before they are uploaded to the cloud servers,” Budington told the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ). There are some services that provide local encryption prior to upload – Budington recommends SpiderOak, the Keybase filesystemtresoritand Jungle Disk.

You can learn more about device security and document storage by watching a security talk Budington gave in December.

3. Password managers

As hackers become more sophisticated, maintaining strong and up-to-date passwords that aren’t reused across different services is a must. But for reporters who use numerous online services and databases, this can become burdensome: Memorizing a series of complex and ever-changing passwords isn’t feasible and storing them in your computer or email makes them prone to fall into the hands of hackers.

Chris Walker, Digital Security Advisor at the Tactical Technology Collective, a cyber security initiative based in Berlin, recommends solving this problem with an encrypted password manager, which can both generate and store your passwords for you.

“Writing down your passwords and keeping them all in one place might not sound like a good idea at first,” Walker says, but he assures that with the right password manager, users will be more secure with fewer hassles. These apps can both generate stronger passwords and remember them for you.

KeyPass is just one Password manager available.
 
Walker recommends one tool in particular: KeePassXC, a system he describes as highly secure. “It is well maintained, free and open-source software that relies on well understood, standards-based encryption to protect your passwords,” Walker says. “It is also quite simple. It does not try to store your data online or sync between multiple devices. This simplicity helps protect KeePassXC from many potential avenues of attack.”

KeePassXC also has competitors that have been highly rated, including Lastpass, which both Securityplanner.org and online consumer guide Wirecutter recently recommended.

4. Two-factor authentication and its innovations

But Walker is quick to point out that even the most well-managed passwords must be used, when possible, alongside two-factor authentication – an extra layer of security that most often requires users to enter a temporary code that is only accessible from a personal device, usually a cell phone, in addition to their passwords. The idea is that, even if hackers have cracked your password, they still must somehow get their hands on a physical device that only you carry.

This is a basic step that should be used whenever you need to log in to an online service – including email portals, Twitter, Facebook, bank accounts and wherever else you use passwords to protect and to prevent hackers obtaining sensitive information.

One problem with this: The text messages containing these codes can be intercepted. This year may also see a growing adoption of a new sort of two-factor authentication that security engineers believe may be safer than receiving a code on your iPhone: Google is now offering to provide people at high risk of surveillance a program that requires users deploy two physical authenticator keys as a final step for unlocking an account. The devices can fit on a keychain and use USB or bluetooth technology to communicate with your computer and smartphone.

Google’s two-factor authentication requires an extra login step.

Runa Sandvik, the senior director of information security at The New York Times, is a fan of Google’s new initiative, known as the Advanced Protection Program. “I think the Advanced Protection Program (APP) is a great option for at-risk users,” Sandvik told ICIJ. “I have, personally, used APP for a few months and see no reason not to turn it on.”

For more information on Google’s APP and its physical security key, the New York Times has a good article on it and you can also visit the Google’s website. (Unfortunately, this feature isn’t free – each key costs about $20.)

5. Slack alternatives for your office

Over the past several years, new technology known widely by the brand-named Slack has pervaded American office culture. It’s part chat, part email, highly distracting and can archive everything you say and all the documents you upload. Slack has been criticized for its lack of full encryption, and, last year, a web security researcher discovered that a vulnerability in Slack’s code would allow hackers to gain access to millions of users’ private conversations – a particularly sensitive potential exposure for some, given that Slack’s private channels are infamous for encouraging fierce workplace gossip.

Slack does not offer end-to-end encryption, so the contents of your communications may be retrievable if the firm receives an order from, say, an intelligence agency or law enforcement office. Martin Shelton, a data security researcher who works with at-risk groups, says that, although Slack may be the most user-friendly service of its kind, organizations seeking a higher level of security have other options. Semaphor, designed by the tech security firm SpiderOak, is a prominent alternative to Slack. Shelton recommends it as a “nice choice for an end-to-end encrypted chat,” but notes that its “user experience is a little clunky.”

Shelton also points to Mattermost, another potentially appealing chat application for organizations on perhaps the more established side. Like Signal, Mattermost’s code is open source, meaning that anyone can inspect its architecture for vulnerabilities.

“This is great because it’s regularly audited by security researchers,” Shelton says. “You can also host it on your own server, so you know where your data is located,” Shelton notes that this last feature can, however, mean a bit more work. “News institutions will need administrators who know what they’re doing to maintain the server,” Shelton says.

As the Electronic Frontier Foundation reminds us, good data security is a process, not just a series of products. The tools above only offer a start. Some commonly used digital security products that didn’t make the list also include email encryption – which can be a pain to set up but can ensure your encrypted emails are all but impenetrable – as well as secure and private web browsing with Tor and DuckDuckGo.

For more tools and a more detailed explanation of how to use them, take a look at the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Surveillance Self-Defense project and the Citizen Lab’s SecurityPlanner.org. Threats to journalists may be building, but, luckily, so are our defenses against them.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Source: This article was usa.kaspersky.com - Contributed by Member: Barbara Larson

Even though computers have become a constant feature of modern life, many people still don't realize the enormous risks that come from constant interaction with technology. 

Computer viruses are one of the oldest forms of malware — in other words, malicious software designed to do harm — but their ability to avoid detection and replicate themselves means that these programs will always be cause for worry. Understanding just what a virus can do to your computer is the first step to securing your system and protecting your family from attack.

A Computer Virus' Potential

The only real qualification for a piece of software to be labeled a "virus" is that the program has the ability to replicate itself onto other machines. This means that not all viruses pose a direct threat to your computer, but often even latent viruses will allow cyberthieves and hackers to install more damaging programs like worms and Trojans. 
Regardless of the intention of the computer virus, the program will take up some system resources while it runs. This slows down your system, even bringing your computer to an abrupt halt if the virus hogs enough resources or if there are many viruses running at the same time.

More often, the computer virus has some kind of malicious intent, either written into the virus itself or from the other pieces of malware that the virus installs. This software can take a number of harmful actions, like opening up a back door to the computer where hackers can take control of the system, or stealing confidential personal information like online banking credentials or credit card numbers. It could also direct your Web browser to unwanted, often pornographic, sites, or even lock the computer down and ask for a ransom to open it back up again. In the most severe cases, viruses can corrupt important computer files, rendering the system useless. Windows OS products are often targets of these types of vulnerabilities so be sure you're secure whether you are running the newest OS , XP, or Windows 8 - security is essential.

How to be a Savvy Computer-User

So with all the damage that a virus can do, you're sure to wonder how you can protect yourself and your family from these threats. The first step is the most obvious, and it all comes down to using your computer in a smart way. 
Ensure all your programs have the latest version of antivirus software installed. This is especially true for things like your operating system, security software and Web browser, but also holds true for just about any program that you frequently use. Viruses often take advantages of bugs or exploits in the code of these programs to propagate to new machines, and while the companies that make the programs are usually quick to fix the holes, those fixes only work if they have been downloaded to your computer. 


It's also important to avoid taking actions that could put your computer at risk. These include opening unsolicited email attachments, visiting unknown websites or downloading software from untrustworthy websites or peer-to-peer file transfer networks. To ensure that the entire family understands the risks, these procedures should be taught to everyone, and children should have their Internet use monitored to ensure they aren't visiting suspect websites or downloading random programs or files.

How to Install Virus Prevention and Detection Software

The next important step in protecting your computer and your family is to install trusted computer security software that can actively scan your system and provide virus protection. You should be warned, however, that not all security solutions are the same. 
Free antivirus software abounds on the Internet, but much of it isn't robust enough to offer complete protection or updated frequently enough to be of much use. Horrifyingly, some of this free software doesn't do anything at all and instead installs viruses, adware, spyware or Trojans when you try to download and install the program. 
If the price is a factor, the best option is to find a competitively priced Internet security solution that offers a free antivirus trial, so that you can see the software in action, and how your computer responds after being cleaned, before you make a purchasing decision. 
The hardest part about all of this is that while each day many threats are neutralized, more are then created in their place. This means that as long as there's an Internet, computer viruses will continue to be a problem. Ignoring the issue or thinking that it won't affect you is a sure way to get your computer compromised, and put your family's information or peace of mind at risk.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Searching for a different perspective

Unless we specifically disable them, trackers are constantly watching us move around the web, building up a picture of our interests and biases. Then, algorithms reflect these opinions back at us, presenting us with news, articles, and answers that support what we already think.

We're more likely to click things that fit our existing thoughts and interests – but wouldn't objectivity be better?

Jordi Ribas, corporate vice president of AI products at Bing, thinks so Ribas manages Microsoft's search engine from its headquarters in the US, but lived in the UK for three and a half years while he established the Bing team in Europe.

"Obviously as a search engine, our mission is the provide results that are as comprehensive, as objective and as trustworthy as possible," Ribas told TechRadar. "If anything, in a world of fake news and misinformation on the web, I think objectivity in search couldn’t be more important."

Identifying multi-perspective questions

To that end, Bing has launched a new feature called Intelligent Answers. When you enter a question with several valid answers, the search engine summarizes them all in a carousel to give a balanced overview.

Intelligent Answer result in Bing
 
Ask it whether coffee is good for you and Bing will realize there are two main sentiments – both expressed by authoritative sources – and present them both as Intelligent Answers

"Sometimes there's a single answer for a query, but sometimes we’re able to understand and identify that there are multiple perspectives," said Ribas. "We use advanced AI techniques based on deep learning that essentially read the entire web, then try to find which passage or set of passages are most relevant to that question. With machine reading comprehension or MRC, we are sometimes able to identify multiple perspectives, where multiple sources converge into the same answer."

Identifying questions with multiple answers involves several techniques, including sentiment analysis, which identifies the opinions expressed in a piece of text – positive, negative or neutral.

Our mission is the provide results that are as comprehensive, as objective and as trustworthy as possible

Jordi Ribas

"Take a simple query like ‘Is coffee good for you?’" said Ribas. "There are plenty of reputable sources that tell you that there are good reasons for drinking coffee, but there are also some very reputable ones that say the opposite. Deep learning allows us to project multiple queries in the passages to what we call the semantic space and find the matches.

"Then we find that there are documents that cluster separately when you apply the sentiment analysis technique. There’s a set of documents that cluster towards positive reasons for coffee and some that cluster around negative reasons for coffee. If we find that there are authoritative sources on both, then we realise that this question really deserves a multi-perspective answer. And that’s what we call it."

Bursting the bubble

Although the Intelligent Answers might challenge our expectations, Ribas says the response so far has been very positive.

"I think what’s happening today – because of a lot of the personalized feeds on the web, social media, trying to reinforce some of the same articles and the same information that users click on, people end up living in a bit of a bubble.

I feel like search engines have a responsibility to be more objective

Jordi Ribas

And so if you have certain political views, or you have certain biases, you interact with technology in a certain way, and then the algorithms learn that, and they end up reinforcing the same biases that you have. That’s what’s making society a little bit further apart these days, and it’s helping polarize society. I feel like search engines have a responsibility to be more objective, and ultimately our goal is to provide as trustworthy and objective information as we can."

Ribas says industry professionals are pleased with the results as well. "A lot of the feedback we got from analysts in the US was ‘Aha, finally someone is taking responsibility and taking a step forward, and not just saying the answer is negative because that’s what the algorithm tells us.’

"No, we need to work harder and invest in these more advanced algorithms that help us understand that a given question has multiple perspectives. We do feel that it is our responsibility to provide those perspectives, and kind of get people out of their bubble."

Intelligent Answers aren't influenced by your browsing history either, and don't contain any ads or 'sponsored' articles.

"The ads follow a different process," Ribas said. "In fact, even our ads team is separate from what we call the algorithmic team, and we have a specific location for ads. Usually it’s at the top of the page, as you can see, sometimes on the right rail, and we label them as ads. This part has no signal from ads whatsoever."

Feedback and the future

Intelligent Answers only form a small percentage of search results at the moment, but Ribas and his team are plans to build it up – though not too fast.

The danger of any algorithm that uses AI is that it will make mistakes sometimes.

Jordi Ribas

"We’re still learning a lot, and we’re still trying to improve it, and we also want to be cautious not to go overboard," he said. "We want to make sure that precision is high, because the danger of any algorithm that uses AI, since it’s a machine learning algorithm, is that it will make mistakes sometimes.

"We want to make sure that users have a quick way to tell us. We can take a look at what happened and how we can improve the algorithm. And so that’s why we started small, but you will see more coverage as time goes on."

You can offer feedback on Intelligent Answers (and any other aspect of Bing) using the link at the bottom of the results page, and the option might be made more prominent in future, appearing up alongside the answers themselves.

Intelligent Answers feedback

Bing is soliciting feedback on Intelligent Answers, and you can give your thoughts via a link at the bottom of the results page. The option might be made more prominent as IA rolls out more widely

You might soon see Intelligent Answers in other places too – including Cortana. "If you ask Cortana whether coffee is good for you, I think today Cortana probably doesn’t have an answer because there isn’t just one," Ribas said. "But every time you have a single answer at the top in Bing, that actually flows through Cortana, and so we’re working now so that Cortana would say ‘Actually, there are different perspectives on this. According to this source there a few things that coffee is good for, but according to this other source, if you drink too much coffee it can be harmful for you.’ And so that is definitely is in the works."

Hopefully the slow-but-steady approach means the team won't need too much caffeine to see them through late shifts.

 Source: This article was published techradar.com By Cat Ellis

Categorized in Search Engine

A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is one of the most effective and cheapest ways of protecting communications, as well as identity, on the internet. A VPN will effectively hide all the details of communications from being visible to anyone.

After connecting to the VPN, the only information visible to others is that a user is connected to a VPN server and nothing else. All other information, such as your IP address and sites you visited, is encrypted by the VPN’s security protocols. Not only this but VPNs also protect your data and communications.

VPNs are becoming increasingly popular. From the simplest to the most user-friendly and most functional, VPNs can save you from a world of troubles and help internet users to browse the internet without being tracked. It can also unlock many doors to give you access to geo-restricted content.

And that is exactly why I thought it’s high time to write about the best VPNs for complete internet security and privacy. So, without any further ado, here is a list of top 10 VPNs:

1. Ivacy

ivacy vpn

Ivacy gives you everything you want in a VPN and more - advanced data encryption for that added layer of online security and privacy, optimized servers for quicker download and buffer-free streaming!

With more than 200 optimized servers in 50+ countries, it gives you unrestricted access to geo-locked content anywhere in the world. It also boasts compatibility with a wide range of devices and operating systems and often gets cited as the best VPN, especially for Kodi by users across the globe.

It also has a whole arsenal of user-friendly features like internet kill switch, multi-login, split-tunneling and much more. At roughly half the price of any other industry-leading VPN for its recent 1+1 year plan, Ivacy isn’t just a good deal, it’s literally a steal!

2. Private Internet Access

IPVanish Logo

When concerned about your online security and privacy, IPVanish is often the first name that a lot of internet users around the world recall. Besides giving you foolproof security, this VPN also gives you unrestricted access to geo-restricted, region-locked or censored content anywhere in the world. It’s fast too, making streaming a positively buffer-free experience.

What ranks IPVanish as one of the leading VPNs in the world is its immaculate service and outstanding features which give you little (if at all) to complain about. Add the typical functional benefits with a ton of user-friendly features and you have your knight in shining armor prepared to protect you from all evil.

3. PureVPN

purevpn

This brand has established a strong and loyal clientele of customers by delivering outstanding service quality over the years. It gives advanced online protection and has a strict zero log policy on customer data.

It has nearly 800 servers that are spread across 141 countries and give you instant access to your favorite content from anywhere in the world with unlimited server-switching. It does not have a free trial but does offer a three-day VPN trial.

It is one of the few VPNs to actually have a browser plug-in for Chrome and Firefox. Although the service is impressive, it isn’t the first choice for people who want the best value for less money.

4. ExpressVPN

express VPN logo

ExpressVPN has a wide server spread with optimized servers located in more than 145 cities in 94 countries. This gives its users instant access to content from anywhere in the world.

Like many other industry-leading VPNs, Express is also known to provide unbreakable security with its advanced encryption protocols that make online threats like hacking and surveillance virtually impossible. Express is often cited as one of the leading VPNs for Netflix streaming. However, given that all leading VPN brands offer the same array of features for all subscription plans, Express may seem a bit on the higher side.

5. Private Internet Access

PIA VPN logo

A lot of internet users prefer Private Internet Access (PIA) because of its multi-gigabit VPN tunnel gateways. PIA is fast and reliable, offering impressive online security and privacy with equally impressive connection speed. So you get quick access to any content anywhere in the world at the click of a button.

It also happens to be one of the few VPNs that is modestly priced at below $40 ($39.95) for the yearly subscription plan.

6. NordVPN

NordVPN logo

Nord is a trusted name in cybersecurity and has been around for quite some time. With servers spread across the globe, Nord gives you instant access to your favorite content from all around the world. So accessing region-locked content is not something you should worry about if you have Nord VPN.

Often praised for its zero-logs policy, Nord is relatively cheap compared to other industry-leading VPNs like Express but its features and service are competitive, giving it an edge among many other brands.

7. VyprVPN

Vypr VPN

Besides boasting impressive speed as well as security, VyprVPN boasts an array of extra features that are packed into a highly intuitive and user-friendly app.

No matter which subscription plan you opt for, Vypr will give you the whole package with features like multi-login, unlimited server switching, and split tunneling. With more than 700 servers strategically spread across the globe, you don’t have to worry about accessing your favorite region-locked content ever again. However, Vypr does restrict certain security features on the basis of the subscription plan you opt for, which might or might not be a deal breaker, depending upon the mindset and the subscription plan in question.

8. TorGuard VPN

TorGuard VPN

Just like Tor Browser, TorGuard is a hack that gives you instant access to region-locked content anywhere in the world. However, since TorGuard is a VPN, it uses advanced encryption to protect your online privacy and identity.

With more than 3,000 servers spread across 55 countries, TorGuard really does make sure that you get instant access to content from around the world no matter where you do it from.

9. TunnelBear VPN

TunnelBear VPN

There’s little to worry about when you have an eight-foot-tall 500lb grizzly bear watching over you. TunnelBear has all the makings of a good VPN but perhaps it’s the cut-throat competition around it that has hindered its climb to the top.

It gives you foolproof online security and privacy with impressive connection and data transfer speeds. The subscriptions plans are moderately priced, keeping in mind the sensibilities of price-sensitive customers. All in all, TunnelBear is a good buy at the current price!

10. VPN Unlimited

vpn unlimited 

VPNUnlimited acts just like a DNS firewall, giving you total online security and privacy with lightning-fast unlimited access to region-locked content.

Although VPN Unlimited offers the same array of features and services as other brands operating in the industry such as multi-login and ISP-throttling, the price is a bit steep with the monthly subscription plan costing $8.99! So VPN Unlimited isn’t the “go to” brand of choice for many. However, for those who can afford the brand, VPN Unlimited is a safe bet.

Which VPN Is Right for You?

Your choice of VPN is going to come down to the features you need within your budget. That being said, you should now find it easier to determine which VPN best suits your purpose. Rest assured, each VPN listed above will meet and exceed your expectations and that is a fact.

If you are still wondering which VPN to get, visit this article which reviews VPN services based on the latest data, information, and customer reviews.

 Source: This article was published globalsign.com By Anas Baig

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Written By Bram Jansen

A lot more people are concerned about privacy today than used to be the case a few years ago. The efforts of whistleblowers like Edward Snowden have a lot to do with this. Things have changed now that people realize just how vulnerable they are when browsing the web. When we say things have changed we mean people are starting to take their online privacy more seriously. It does not mean that the threats that you face while browsing has reduced. If anything, they have increased in number. If you still don’t look after your online privacy, there’s no time to think about it anymore. You have to take action now.

5 reasons to protect online privacy

1- Hide from government surveillance

Almost all countries of the world monitor the online activity of their citizens to some degree. It doesn’t matter how big or developed the country is. If you think that your government doesn’t look into your online privacy at all, you’re deluding yourself. The only thing that varies is the extent to which your internet activity is monitored and the information that is recorded.

2- Bypass government censorship

There are large parts of the world where internet is not a free place. Governments censor the internet and control what their citizens can and cannot access and do on the internet. While most people know about The Great Firewall of China and the way middle-eastern countries block access to social networking and news websites, the problem is there are a lot more countries.

3- Protect your personal data

You use the internet to share a lot of personal data. This includes your private conversations, pictures, bank details, social security numbers, etc. If you are sharing this without hiding it, then it is visible to everyone. Malicious users can intercept this data and make you a victim of identity theft quite easily. While HTTPS might protect you against them, not all websites use it.

4- Hiding P2P activity is important

P2P or torrenting is a huge part of everyone’s internet usage today. You can download all sorts of files from P2P websites. However, many of this content is copyrighted and protected by copyright laws. While downloading copyrighted content for personal usage is legal, sharing it is illegal. The way P2P works you are constantly sharing the files as you download them. If someone notices you downloading copyrighted content, you might be in trouble. There is a lot of vagueness when it comes to copyright laws, so it’s best to hide your torrent activity. Even those in Canada have to use P2P carefully. The country provides some of the fastest connections but is strengthening its stronghold on P2P users.

5- Stream content peacefully without ISP throttling

When you stream or download content, your ISP might throttle your bandwidth to balance the network load. This is only possible because your ISP can see your activity. You are robbed of a quality streaming experience because of this. The solution is to hide your online activity.

Online privacy is fast becoming a myth, and users have to make efforts to have some privacy on the internet. The best way to do this is to use a VPN, for they encrypt your connection and hide your true IP address. But be careful when you choose a VPN. If you don’t know how to choose the best VPN, visit VPNAlert for the detailed solution. Or choose a VPN that does not record activity logs and does not hand over data to the authorities, otherwise all your efforts will be for naught.  

Categorized in Internet Privacy

It’s powerful, it’s shiny, and everyone wants one, including thieves and hackers. Your MacBook holds your world: work files, music, photos, videos, and a lot of other stuff you care about, but is your MacBook safe and protected from harm?  Let’s take a look at 5 MacBook Security Tips you use to make your MacBook an impenetrable and unstealable mobile data fortress:

1. LoJack Your Mac Now So You Can Recover it After it’s Been Stolen

We’ve all heard about the iPhone and the Find My iPhone app, where users of Apple’s MobileMe service can track down their lost or stolen iPhone via a website by leveraging the iPhone’s location awareness capabilities.

 That’s great for iPhones, but what about your MacBook? Is there an app for that? Yes, there is! 

For a yearly subscription fee, Absolute Software’s LoJack for Laptops software will provide both data security and theft recovery services for your MacBook.  The software starts at $35.99 and is available in 1-3 year subscription plans.  LoJack integrates at the BIOS firmware level, so a thief who thinks that just wiping the hard drive of your stolen computer will make it untraceable is in for a real surprise when he connects to the net and LoJack starts broadcasting the location of your MacBook, without him even knowing it.  Knock, knock!  Who’s there?  It’s not housekeeping!

There is no guarantee that you will get your shiny MacBook back, but the odds are greatly improved if you have LoJack installed versus if you don’t.  According to their website, Absolute Software’s Theft Recovery Team averages about 90 laptop recoveries per week.

2. Enable your MacBook’s OS X Security Features (Because Apple Didn’t)

The Mac operating system, known as OS X, has some great security features that are available to the user. The main problem is that while the features are installed, they are not usually enabled by default. Users must enable these security features on their own.

 Here are the basic settings that you should configure to make your MacBook more secure:

Disable Automatic Login and Set a System Password

While it’s convenient not to have to enter your password every time you boot up your computer, or when the screensaver kicks in, you might as well leave the front door to your house wide open because your MacBook is now an all-you-can-eat data buffet for the guy who just stole it. With one click of a checkbox and the creation of a strong password, you can enable this feature and put another roadblock in the hacker or thief’s path.

Enable OS X’s FileVault Encryption

Your MacBook just got stolen but you put a password on your account so your data is safe, right? Wrong!

Most hackers and data thieves will just pull the hard drive out of your MacBook and hook it to another computer using an IDE/SATA to USB cable. Their computer will read your MacBook’s drive just like any other DVD or USB drive plugged into it. They won’t need an account or password to access your data because they have bypassed the operating system’s built-in file security. They now have direct access to your files regardless of who is logged in. 

The easiest way to prevent this is to enable file encryption using OSX’s built-in FileVault tool.

FileVault encrypts and decrypts files associated with your profile on the fly using a password that you set. It sounds complicated, but everything happens in the background so you don’t even know anything is going on. Meanwhile, your data is being protected so unless they have the password the data is unreadable and useless to thieves even if they take the drive out and hook it to another computer.

For stronger, whole disk encryption with advanced features, check out TrueCrypt, a free, open source file, and disk encryption tool.

Turn on Your Mac’s Built-in Firewall

The built-in OS X Firewall will thwart most hacker’s attempts to break into your MacBook from the Internet.

It’s very easy to setup. Once enabled, the Firewall will block malicious inbound network connections and regulates outbound traffic as well. Applications must ask permission from you (via a pop-up box) before they attempt an outbound connection. You can grant or deny access on a temporary or permanent basis as you see fit.  

We have detailed, step--by-step guidance on how to Enable OS X's Security Features

All of the security features mentioned here can be accessed by clicking on the Security icon in the OS X System Preferences window

3. Install Patches? We Don’t Need no Stinking Patches! (yes we do)

The exploit/patch cat and mouse game are alive and well. Hackers find a weakness in an application and develop an exploit. The application’s developer addresses the vulnerability and releases a patch to fix it.  Users install the patch and the circle of life continues.

Mac OS X will automatically check for Apple-branded software updates on a regular basis and will often prompt you to download and install them. Many 3rd party software packages such as Microsoft Office have their own software update app that will periodically check to see if there are any patches available. Other applications have a manual “Check for Updates” feature often located in the Help menu. It is a good idea to perform or schedule an update check on at least a weekly basis for your most used applications so that you aren’t as vulnerable to software-based exploits.

4. Lock it Down. Literally. 

If someone wants to steal your computer bad enough they are going to, no matter how many layers of defense you put up.

 Your goal should be to make it as difficult as possible for a thief to steal your MacBook.  You want them to become discouraged enough to move on to easier targets. 

The Kensington Lock, which has been around for decades, is a security device for physically connecting your laptop with a steel cable loop to a large piece of furniture or some other object that is not easily moved.  Every MacBook has a Kensington Security Slot, also know as a K-Slot.  The K-Slot will accept a Kensington-type lock. On newer MacBooks, the K-Slot is located to the right of the headphone jack on the left side of the device.  

Can these locks be picked?  Yes.  Can the cable be cut with the right tools?  Yes. The important thing is that the lock will deter the casual theft of opportunity.  A would-be thief who breaks out his lock picking kit and Jaws of Life wire cutters in the Library to steal your MacBook will likely arouse more suspicion than if he just walked away with the laptop sitting next to yours that wasn’t tethered to a magazine rack. 

The basic Kensington Lock comes in many varieties, costs about $25, and is widely available at most office supply stores.

5. Protect Your Mac’s Gooey Center With a Hard-shell Configuration

If you are really serious about security and want to delve way down deep into your settings to make sure your Mac’s security is as bulletproof as possible, then surf on over to the Apple support website and download the OS X security configuration guides. These well put together documents detail all the settings that are available to lock down every aspect of the OS to make it as secure as possible.

Just be careful that you balance security with usability. You don’t want to lock your MacBook up so tight that you can’t get into it yourself.

Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Andy O'Donnell

Categorized in Internet Privacy

FILE - CIA Director Mike Pompeo testifies before a Senate Intelligence hearing during his nomination process, in Washington, Jan. 12, 2017.

WASHINGTON — If this week’s WikiLeaks document dump is genuine, it includes a CIA list of the many and varied ways the electronic device in your hand, in your car, and in your home can be used to hack your life.

It’s simply more proof that, “it’s not a matter of if you’ll get hacked, but when you’ll get hacked.” That may be every security expert’s favorite quote, and unfortunately, they say it’s true. The WikiLeaks releases include confidential documents the group says exposes “the entire hacking capacity of the CIA.”

The CIA has refused to confirm the authenticity of the documents, which allege the agency has the tools to hack into smartphones and some televisions, allowing it to remotely spy on people through microphones on the devices.

Watch: New Generation of Hackable Internet Devices May Always Be Listening

Screenshot 1

WikiLeaks also claimed the CIA managed to compromise both Apple and Android smartphones, allowing their officers to bypass the encryption on popular services such as Signal, WhatsApp and Telegram.

For some of the regular tech users, news of the leaks and the hacking techniques just confirms what they already knew. When we’re wired 24-7, we are vulnerable.

“The expectation for privacy has been reduced, I think,” Chris Coletta said, “... in society, with things like WikiLeaks, the Snowden revelations ... I don’t know, maybe I’m cynical and just consider it to be inevitable, but that’s really the direction things are going.”

The internet of things

The problem is becoming even more dangerous as new, wired gadgets find their way into our homes, equipped with microphones and cameras that may always be listening and watching.

One of the WikiLeaks documents suggests the microphones in Samsung smart TV’s can be hacked and used to listen in on conversations, even when the TV is turned off.

Security experts say it is important to understand that in many cases, the growing number of wired devices in your home may be listening to all the time.

“We have sensors in our phones, in our televisions, in Amazon Echo devices, in our vehicles,” said Clifford Neuman, the director of the Center for Computer Systems Security, at the University of Southern California. “And really almost all of these attacks are things that are modifying the software that has access to those sensors so that the information is directed to other locations. Security practitioners have known that this is a problem for a long time.”

Neuman says hackers are using the things that make our tech so convenient against us.

“Certain pieces of software and certain pieces of hardware have been criticized because, for example, microphones might be always on,” he said. “But it is the kind of thing that we’re demanding as consumers, and we just need to be more aware that the information that is collected for one purpose can very easily be redirected for others.”

Tools of the espionage trade

The WikiLeaks release is especially damaging because it may have laid bare a number of U.S. surveillance techniques. The New York Times says the documents it examined layout programs called “Wrecking Crew” for instance, which “explains how to crash a targeted computer, and another tells how to steal passwords using the autocomplete function on Internet Explorer.”

Steve Grobman, chief of the Intel Security Group, says that’s bad not only because it can be done, but also because so-called “bad actors” now know it can be done. Soon enough, he warns, we could find our own espionage tools being used against us.

“We also do need to recognize the precedents we set, so, as offensive cyber capabilities are used ... they do give the blueprint for how that attack took place. And bad actors can then learn from that,” he said.

So how can tech-savvy consumers remain safe? Security experts say they can’t, and to remember the “it’s not if, but when” rule of hacking.

The best bet is to always be aware that if you’re online, you’re vulnerable.

Source: This article was published voanews.com By Kevin Enochs

Categorized in Online Research
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