On a Google Webmaster Hangout someone asked about the role of H1s on a web page. John Mueller responded that heading tags were good for several reasons but they’re not a critical element.

SEO and H1 Headings

One of the top rules for Search Engine Optimization has long been adding keywords to your H1 heading at the top of the page in order to signal what a page is about and rank well.

It used to be the case, in the early 2000’s. that adding the target keyword phrase in the H1 was mandatory. In the early 2000’s, if the keywords were not in the H1 heading then your site might not be so competitive.

However, Google’s ability to understand the nuances of what a page is about have come a long way since the early 2000’s.

As a consequence, it is important to listen to what Google’s John Mueller says about H1 headings.

Can Multiple H1s be Used?

The context of the question is whether a publisher is restricted to using one H1 or can multiple H1 heading tags be used.

This is the question:

“Is it mandatory to just have one H1 tag on a web page or can it be used multiple times?”

Google’s John Mueller answered that you can use as many H1s as you want. He also said you can omit using the H1 heading tag, too.

John Mueller’s answer about H1 heading tags:

“You can use H1 tags as often as you want on a page. There’s no limit, neither upper or lower bound.”

Then later on, at the end of his answer, he reaffirmed that publishers are free to choose how they want to use the H1 heading tag:

“Your site is going to rank perfectly fine with no H1 tags or with five H1 tags.”

H1 Headings Useful for Communicating Page Structure

John Mueller confirmed that H1 headings are good for outlining the page structure.

What he means is that the heading elements can work together to create a top level outline of what your page is about. That’s a macro overview of what the web page is about.

In my opinion, a properly deployed heading strategy can be useful for communicating what a page is about.

The W3c, the official body that administers HTML guidelines, offers an HTML validator that shows you the “outline” of a web page.

When validating a web page, select the “Show Outline” button. It’s a great way to see a page just by the outline that your heading elements create.

show outline
Choosing the “Show Outline” option in the W3C HTML Validator will show you the overview of what your page looks like as communicated by your heading elements. It’s a great way to get a high level snapshot view of your page structure.

Here are Mueller’s comments about the H1 heading element:

“H1 elements are a great way to give more structure to a page so that users and search engines can understand which parts of a page are kind of under different headings.

So I would use them in the proper way on a page. And especially with HTML5 having multiple H1 elements on a page is completely normal and kind of expected.”

H1 Headings and SEO

John Mueller went on to reaffirm that the lack of a headings or using many H1s was not something to worry about. This is likely due to Google doesn’t need or require H1 headings to rank a web page.

This should be obvious to anyone who works in digital marketing. Google’s search results are full of web pages that do not feature H1 headings or that use them for styling purposes (a misuse of the heading tag!).

There are correlation studies that say that XX percentage of top ranked sites use headings. But those studies ignore that modern web pages, particularly those that use WordPress templates, routinely use Headings for styling navigational elements, which will skew those correlation studies.

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Here’s what Mueller observed:

“So it’s not something you need to worry about.

Some SEO tools flag this as an issue and say like Oh you don’t have any H1 tag or you have two H1 tags… from our point of view that’s not a critical issue.”

H1 Headings Useful for Usability

Mueller’s on a roll in this answer when he begins talking about heading tags in the context of usability.

I have found that, particularly for mobile, heading tags help make a web page easier to read. Properly planned headings help communicate what a web page is about to a user and visually helps break up a daunting page of text, making it easier to read.

Here’s what Mueller said:

“From a usability point of view maybe it makes sense to improve that. So it’s not that I would completely ignore those suggestions but I wouldn’t see it as a critical issue.”

Takeaways about Heading Tags

  1.  Use as many H1 heading elements as you like
  2. They are useful for communicating page structure to users and Google
  3. Heading elements are useful for usability

Updated: About Mueller’s Response

I read some feedback on Facebook that was critical of Mueller’s response. Some felt that he should have addressed more than just H1.

I believe that Mueller’s response should be seen in the context of the question that was asked. He was asked a narrow question about the H1 element and he answered it.

Technically, Mueller’s answer is correct. He answered the question that was put to him.  So I think  John should be given the benefit of that consideration.

However, I understand why some may say he should have addressed the underlying reason for the question. The person asking the question likely does not understand the proper use of heading elements.

If the person knew the basics of the use of heading elements, they wouldn’t have asked if it’s okay to drop H1 elements all over a web page. So that may have needed to be addressed.

Again, not criticizing Mueller, the context of his answer was focused on H1 elements.

The Proper Use of Heading Elements

I would add that the proper use of all the heading elements from (for example) H1 to H4 is useful. Nesting article sub-topics by using H2, H3 and sometimes H4 can be useful for making it clearer what a page is about.

The benefits of properly using H1 through H4 (your choice!) in the proper way will help communicate what the page is about which is good for bots and humans and will increase usability because it’s easier to read on mobile.

One way to do it is to use H1 for the main topic of the page then every subtopic of that main topic can be wrapped in an H2 heading element. That’s what I did on this article.

Should one of the subtopics itself diverge into a subtopic of itself, then I would use an H3.
Screenshot 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heading Elements and Accessibility

The heading elements also play an important role with making a web page accessible to site visitors who use assistive devices to access web content.

ADA Compliance consultant, Kim Krause Berg, offered these insights from the point of view of accessibility:

We use one H1 tag at the top to indicate the start of the content for assistive devices and organize the remainder from(H2-H6)similarly to how an outline would appear.

 The hierarchy of content is important for screen readers because it indicates the relationship of the content to the other parts of content.
Content under headings should relate to the heading. A bad sequence would be starting out with an(H3, then H1) 

Heading Elements are More than a Place for Keywords

Keyword dumping the heading tags can mask the irrelevance of content. When you stop thinking of heading tags as places to dump your keywords and start using them as headings that communicate what that section of the page is about, you’ll begin seeing what your page is really about. If you don’t like what you see you can rewrite it.

If in doubt, run your URL through the W3C HTML Validator to see how your outline looks!

Watch the Webmaster Hangout here:
https://youtu.be/rwpwq8Ynf7s?t=1427

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Roger Montti - Uploaded by the Association Member: Robert Hensonw]

Categorized in Search Engine

The truth is out there but you'll never find it

Something for the Weekend, Sir? You can find anything on the internet apart from the specific thing you're looking for.

No wonder the boffins at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center are bigging up the enormity of the task of decoding data from its recently rediscovered zombie satellite. They probably did a web search for the old system and came up with a blank.

The horror of horrors, this means they'll have to reverse-engineer the whole thing. What a nightmare. I mean, no one programs anymore, they just nick code snippets off Github and for the rest throw in a heap of lard-arsed libraries. Now they'll have to recreate it all from scratch.

Hang on, though. Surely, surely someone somewhere at some point saved references to the necessary source code in a document, and surely these ended up in a digital repository that can be accessed on the internet. Why can't they find it?

I imagine they found references to references. They probably unearthed news stories about the satellite, along with images, timelines, background information and so on. But not the program itself.

I repeat: you can find anything on the internet apart from the specific thing you're looking for. It's Dabbsy's Principal Law of Web Search.

Sure, I can find links generally related to what I'm hunting very quickly. Internet searching has never been so easy or reliable as it is now. However, I always seem to end up wading through stuff that's generally related to the prize I'm after, rather than the prize itself.

Surely the internet is big enough to contain all human intelligence. So why is it so difficult to find precisely the right thing when you need it? Truth or otherwise, as the gender-pay-imbalanced Mulder might say, it must be out there.

Perhaps I'm not searching the internet properly. This might be a reflection on my inadequate search skills. Like the public at large, I have grown lazy with unrefined web searches. Operators? Nah. Tags? Maybe next time. Quote marks? Such a pain. Boolean? Do me a favor.

Of course, another reason for it being so difficult to find exactly what you want could be because the internet is big enough to contain all human unintelligence. This fogs the search results with bollocks created by people who should never have been allowed near a wooden spoon let alone a computer.

It's a far cry from the strange old days when it was possible to draw a representation of the interconnections between principal internet sites on a large sheet of paper. Even at the beginning of the 1990s, the computer magazine I worked on at the time cover-mounted a giant fold-out poster optimistically labeled Map of the Internet. Bless.

In those days, you knew where your WWW search (as we called it) was going and if you couldn't find what you were looking for, it meant it wasn't there.

This was followed by a golden age in which the internet was still regarded as a sparkly wonderland from which all unimaginable things could spring. If you bought a book from the fledgling Amazon or a pair of second-butt snowboarding pants on eBay, you were ranked by friends and neighbours alongside Harry bleeding Potter in conjuring skills. Hell, if you simply managed to get an entire page on the Boo.com casual clothing retail website to fully load into Netscape using your dial-up access in under half an hour, you were Doctor fucking Strange.

There used to be a running gag in the early Noughties episodes of Nickelodeon cartoon series The Fairly Oddparents. Every time the main character Timmy Turner was caught with something weird or magical given to him by his fairy godparents, he'd be asked "Where did you get that?" and he'd respond "Er... internet".

It was a time when you could attribute/blame the internet for anything you wanted and people would believe it.

"Nice designer shades!"

Thank you. I got them off the internet.

"Nasty cold you got there, pal."

Yeah, I got it off the internet.

What we lost in exclusivity in the following years was surely made up for in terms of ease and speed of access. And, of course, search engines got a whole lot better.

That's the official line. I happen to disagree. What got better was search engine optimization. With the aid of clever phrasing by content marketers, this made it possible for only vaguely relevant content to appear to search engines as the exact thing you're looking for even though it isn't – the very opposite, in fact, to what SEO was supposed to achieve in the first place.

Rather than showing what you're searching for, search results show you links that marketers want you to click on instead. The whole point of SEO today is to direct you to content you don't want and didn't ask for.

As a result, I go hunting for a little bit of old zombie satellite code and all I can find are 47,000 links to George A Romero video clips and Walking Dead fan pages. Ho hum, does anyone have any old Fortran manuals?

"Hey, is that a printed software manual? Is it... ring-bound?"

Yup, I got it off the internet.

Source: This article was published theregister.co.uk By Alistair Dabbs

Categorized in Search Engine

OK, Google, why should I be optimizing my website for voice search?

Whether your potential customers are asking Google, Siri, Cortana, or Alexa, trust me—you want to be the answer. Google says that 20% of all searches are voice searches and I’m certain that number will only continue to skyrocket in the coming years.

Are you ready to claim a spot in that 20%? Are you even convinced that you should be doing whatever you can to benefit from that 20% statistic? Or perhaps—even if you’re already convinced of the importance of getting in the voice search game—you don’t even know where to start.

Let’s talk it all out. Let’s talk the what, why, and how of voice search SEO.

What Is Voice Search & How Does It Work?

As far as SEO jargon goes, voice search is probably the easiest to understand. Voice search is simply any search a person performs on the internet using a voice command instead of typing or text.

But you probably knew that. Heck, you probably already do it yourself. Maybe you’ve even performed a voice search today. (“Hey Siri, is it 5:00 yet?”)

Even if you do know what voice search is, I’m guessing that—like most people—you’re not entirely clear on how it works.

I don’t want to get too far into it, but I do think a basic breakdown of how things work will be handy before we dive in. Put simply:

  • A user initiates a voice search by pressing a button or addressing the device’s voice assistant with a pre-programmed voice command (“Hey Siri”, “OK Google”, “Alexa,”, “Hey Cortana”)
  • The user asks a question or gives a command, such as, “When Does SEO The Movie Come Out?” or “SEO Movie Release Date”
  • Depending on what kind of technology the voice search system uses, it’ll pick up on little packets of sound—whether those packets are individual syllables, words, or entire phrases and sentences
  • The voice search system will then translate these units of sound into text (using at least 1 of 4 methods) and then initiate that search just like it would a text search.

Whew! The good news is that we don’t need to worry about that too much. But isn’t it cool to know what goes on behind the scenes?

How Voice Search Affects SEO

Voice search is changing the way we use search engines in huge ways.

In short, voice search makes search inquiries way more conversational in nature. Which makes sense, since so many of the digital assistants who aid in voice searches make it feel like we’re talking to actual people sometimes.

This affects our voice search strategy in a number of ways, but we’ll get more into that below.

By 2020, voice search will account for 50% of searches

But that’s not all—voice searches also tend to change the nature of keywords themselves, including question words like what, how, when, and why.

Oh, and one last thing we should keep in mind: most digital assistants answer voice searches solely with—well, their voices. With the spoken word. Which means—for those of us in industries of a more visual nature like art or fashion—we’ll need to get clever about how we’re creating and describing our content.

Let’s get into it!

Use These Tips For Your Voice Search SEO Strategy

So how do we take advantage of the search landscape that’s resulted from an explosion in voice search? With these 5 tips, of course.

1. Use Microdata

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By using microdata, your site can feature rich snippets/cards like those above and can also help Google better understand what your site/content is all about!

Adding microdata like location, phone number, pricing, menus, and operating hours for search engines was crucial before, but it’s even more crucial now with voice search and SEO. Microdata helps search engines understand what is on any given page which is key for Voice Search.

How do digital assistants find this information from your site? By you having an organized and easily readable sitemap. Include all this information in pages labeled on your sitemap to make sure search engines know exactly where to find your microdata. You can also test your microdata with Google’s handy Structured Data Testing Tool.

Not sure what microdata you should cover or how to implement? Check out this guide from Search Engine Land.

2. Talk Like Your Customers Would

It’s not just about keywords anymore (not that it has been for some time anyway). It’s not just about robots and algorithms anymore, it’s about people and how people actually talk (Natural Language). That’s what Neil Patel recommends when it comes to voice search: “Think like a human.”

People aren’t searching for “Amazon Echo” anymore.

They’re searching for “where to buy Amazon Echo near me”, and “best prices on Amazon Echo”, and “Google Home versus Amazon Echo.”

The trend is shifting from short and stiff keywords to more human, more specific, and longer-tail search terms.

In short: phrases and longtail keywords are the way to go. Keep this in mind when you’re creating content and using keywords on your site pages. We’ll have to be mindful now more than ever to be genuine and specific in our keyword use.

3. Ask The Questions Your Target Customers Would

Again, it’s all about keeping language natural here.

It’s not enough to just figure out what your target keywords are and match them up with their longer-tail counterparts. You’ve got to make sure you know what kinds of questions those keywords will be hidden in, too.

What questions will your customers need to ask to find you? That’s what we need to figure out, and those are the keywords and phrases (or actually, questions) we need to include in our site content. (FAQ pages are great for this.)

How do you figure out what questions your target customers are asking? I recommend by starting with a tool called Answer the Public, in which you can type in short and simple keywords and get back data on how those terms fit in with search queries around the web.

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Let’s say you offer content marketing services. How do you find out what potential customers are asking about content marketing? Answer The Public has a few ideas.

4. Make Sure Your Website Is Mobile Friendly

clip_image010Image SourceWay to go Wikipedia! Isn’t it nice to know that Google really just wants to help you succeed, and at no cost to you? Their free tool will grade your site and even point you in the right direction for how to go about improving your scores.

I mean, you should be doing this already. But the rise of voice search makes having responsive web design more important than ever.

That’s because more voice searches are initiated from mobile devices than from desktop computers, and that’s probably because—well, what do you usually carry with you wherever you go? Right—probably not your laptop.

Your first step is to find out just how mobile friendly your website already is, and you can use Google’s free tool Test My Site for that.

The report you get back will help you be able to hone in on exactly what you need to do to improve your mobile friendliness. If you’re really starting from scratch on the mobile responsiveness front, I recommend tackling the basics first.

5. Dive Deeper With Semantics

Semantics may sound like this big, abstract thing, but all it is is the deeper “why” behind what searchers are saying.

For example, you may just be asking Alexa how much Nike Flyknits cost, but Alexa won’t just answer your question with a price tag and leave it at that. She’ll also probably be thinking about your question and learning things about you, namely that you’re in the market for shoes and you’re willing to pay a premium price for them.

Another way search engines use semantics is by making inferences when you ask questions, which is demonstrated fantastically by Wordstream’s in-depth study on semantics in voice search.

To take an example from their study, using semantics in search is like asking, “What planet is Gamora from?” without first having to let your digital assistant know that you're referring to Zoe Saldana’s character in Guardians of the Galaxy.

What does Google’s focus on semantics mean for you? It means that you should not only be focusing on the literal content of search queries but also on the intent behind the search inquiries.

Why are people searching what they’re searching? It’s not enough to know what questions they’re asking—we also have to ask ourselves why they’re asking the questions they’re asking.

If you can dive deeper into this why and weave it into the fabric of your website, you won’t have to worry as much about keyword use. Because—if you can offer valuable content that’ll answer your readers’ questions with authority and a genuinely helpful attitude—Google will recognize that your site is the answer on the most organic level.

Hey Siri, We’re Ready To Win At Voice Search Now

Do you have enough to add to your SEO to-do list now?

I know it sounds like a lot, but trust me—the dividends you’ll get back over time are totally worth the upfront work. If you can, try adding just one of these 5 tips to your to-do list each week and tackle them one by one, starting with the least advanced and abstract (using microdata) and ending on the more complicated stuff (responsive design and semantics). And then cheers yourself with a drink.

On that note, let me wrap us with one final question—a question not for Siri or Alexa, Google or Cortana, but for you: Hey Reader, how will you make voice search SEO a priority this week?

Source: This article was published searchenginepeople.com By Sam Algate

Categorized in Search Engine

Twenty percent of Google mobile searches now happen via voice, according to the 2017 Internet Trends report by Mary Meeker.

For search engine optimization, the implications of voice search are subtle, but increasingly important. In her 2017 Internet Trends report this week, Mary Meeker, partner at venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, highlights the rise in voice search compared to manually typing queries into a search box on a smartphone.

What Is Voice Search?

Simply speaking commands into your device to receive a resulting answer constitutes a voice search. Many top technology brands offer personified voice search, including Google’s “OK, Google” Assistant, Apple’s Siri, Microsoft’s Cortana, Amazon’s Alexa, and Samsung’s Bixby.

Over half of all Google searches now originate on a smartphone. Of those, 20 percent happen via voice commands — without the searchers touching their screen. Extrapolated out, that means that something like one in every 10 Google searches comes from voice search.

Voice recognition is also becoming more accurate, approaching 95 percent of the English language, which is equivalent to a human’s voice recognition accuracy, according to Google.

Part of the growing voice search use comes from the increase of in-home digital assistants like Amazon Echo’s Alexa and Google’s Home device, which have no manual interface and rely entirely on verbal requests and commands.

The Echo, in particular, has been very successful as a mainstream voice-interface device. Eleven million Amazon Echo devices have been sold in the U.S., enough for 3.5 percent of homes. Amazon’s devices are able to accomplish 12,000 different built-in capabilities such as turning on the living room lights or playing Jeopardy with you. The combination of voice interface and skills that make the Echo both fun and useful lends itself well to humans forming a sort of pet-like attachment to their devices, which only strengthens the tendency to speak to them naturally, as if they were alive.

Amazon’s Echo is now in roughly 11 million homes in the U.S., accomplishing roughly 12,000 tasks. Source: Meeker 2017 Internet Trends Report.

Amazon’s Echo is now in roughly 11 million homes in the U.S., accomplishing roughly 12,000 tasks. Source: Meeker 2017 Internet Trends report.

The rise in conversational search is one of the most important trends for search engine optimization. Google reports that 70 percent of the queries that Google Assistant receives consist of natural language. That means that searchers are speaking to their digital search devices in the same way that they would ask a question of another person.

How Do Google’s Search Results Reflect Voice Search?

Google is making strides in two related areas that stem from voice search and its impact on SEO: conversational search and answering questions. In other words, Google is learning how to interpret the words that humans use. This helps Google ferret out intent, which helps deliver relevant search results.

Google search results for the factual query "Where can I buy shoes?"

Google search results for the factual query “Where can I buy shoes?”

Google search results for the opinion-based query "Where should I buy shoes?"

Google search results for the opinion-based query “Where should I buy shoes?”

Google search results for the neutral query "where to buy shoes."

Google search results for the neutral query “where to buy shoes.”

For example: Google’s search results adjust to three nearly identical search queries regarding the purchase of shoes. Compare the search results for the above three searches.

The top image is a purely factual request: “Where can I buy shoes?” The middle image shows an opinion-based query: “Where should I buy shoes?” In the last image, the search result is a blend of both because the verb that indicates intent is now neutral: “Where to buy shoes?” The differences here highlight the degree to which Google places meaning on slight variations of search phrases, the intent behind each variation, and the ability to serve search results specific to each intent.

In other cases, the answer is more straightforward and Google can answer it directly on the page. Whether the answer is the simple sum of two numbers or instructions for a project, Google’s goal is to be a one-stop shop for surfacing information directly in its search results.

This is not unlike what happens when you ask Siri or Alexa a question; you expect a single answer, not 10 pages to scroll through to find an answer. Google Search is accomplishing the same goal as Google Assistant (for voice search): answer the question with one definitive answer.

Google Answer Cards for the search query “how to grill a frozen pizza.”

Google answer cards for the search query “how to grill a frozen pizza.”

Brands and ecommerce sites tend to bristle at the concept of answer cards, fearing that the traffic that would have been driven to their site is now absorbed by the answer card with searchers not clicking on any result. As true as this may be, the reality is that answer cards are here to stay. You can either compete to win them or you can let your competitors win that strong brand impression and the possibility of the click.

Source: This article was published practicalecommerce.com By JILL KOCHER

Categorized in Search Engine

Want to increase the chances of your videos showing up in YouTube’s search results? Columnist Sherry Bonelli explains how to glean keyword insights from your competitors.

Video marketing is becoming a digital marketing necessity. (It’s not a “nice-to-have” marketing strategy anymore.) People love to watch videos, and videos can help you sell more products or services. In fact, a study done by Cisco last year predicted that by 2020, video will account for over 80 percent of all consumer internet traffic.

As video consumption increases, consequently so does video’s influence on consumer purchases. According to recent research by Brightcove:

  • Almost half (46 percent) of viewers say they’ve actually made a purchase as a result of watching a branded video on social media, and a third (32 percent) say they’ve considered making a purchase as a result of watching a video.
  • 81 percent of consumers say they currently interact with brands on social media, and 43 percent say they’ve done so through watching branded social videos.
  • When asked for their favorite type of branded content on social networks, video was the most popular answer, with 31 percent of respondents listing it as their number one choice.

YouTube is the second most popular social media platform, based on market share. And you’ll find that most YouTubers are die-hard YouTube viewers. They’re constantly watching videos, searching for videos about everything from how to jimmy your locked door to how to create a Facebook ad — and everything in between.

How to optimize for YouTube’s algorithm

YouTube is essentially a search engine for videos. Not surprisingly, it uses a sophisticated ranking algorithm to surface content to viewers.

If you want to gain a following and rank your videos higher in YouTube search, uploading fresh content is extremely important. Users love new videos! And that fresh, newly uploaded content (as well as the latest actions taken by the users) is taken into consideration by YouTube when ranking videos.

Watch time” is a very important ranking factor as well. YouTube wants to surface videos that viewers will find enjoyable, so high user engagement is a great signal for the algorithm in identifying such videos.

In addition to user signals, YouTube also relies on input from the video owner to feed their algorithm. That means YouTube is counting on you to tell it what your video is about.

What you do to optimize your video in the first 48 to 72 hours is critical to the success of your video and how it ranks. If you get it right, your video could shoot to the top when people search for your video topic. Get it wrong, and you’ll sink like a rock.

Metadata is important

According to YouTube, metadata includes information about a video such as the title, description, tags and annotations. Metadata can help your video stand out and get found by the algorithm, so content creators should make an effort to optimize metadata to maximize visibility.

Here are some tips for creating effective metadata that can help your videos get found.

Now, this first tip may sound counterintuitive, but you want to research what types of videos your competitors are doing before you create your video. That’s right — the best time to optimize your video for SEO and get more views is before you even record it.

Once you have a feel for what your competitors are doing — the type of videos they’re producing, how engaging they are, how many views they have, what metadata they’re using and so on — it’ll make it easier for you to create a video that “one-ups” them, both in terms of having better content and being better optimized for YouTube’s algorithm.

After you’ve created your video, it’s time to think about uploading and optimizing. Again, the best time to optimize your metadata is before you upload your video — have your keywords, tags, title, description and custom thumbnail ready to go before you press the upload button.

YouTube tags: Doing the keyword research

When doing keyword research on YouTube, you want to try to find keywords that will drive traffic to your video. The best place to look for keywords is on YouTube, but you should also use more traditional keyword research tools (like Google Search Console, SEMrush, SEOProfiler, Moz or others.)

YouTube allows you to include “tags” to help categorize your video by keyword, but it limits the number of tags you can include. You’ll want to look for multiword tags (i.e., long-tail keywords) that specifically relate to your video’s topic. You should also use single-word tags and broad-term tags that relate to your video’s broader topic. (Note: Do not use trademarks or copyrighted material in your metadata unless you have explicit permission from the owner to use it.)

YouTube is effective at semantically understanding your tags. So here’s an example of some tags for a video about “how to ask a boy out on a date”:

Multiple-word tags

  • How to ask a boy out on a date
  • What to say when you ask a boy out on a date
  • How to ask a boy you like out on a date
  • Asking out a boy you like

Single-word tags:

  • How
  • What
  • Ask
  • Boy
  • You
  • Like
  • Date

Broad-term tags:

  • Dating
  • Dates
  • Flirting
  • Meet boys
  • Meeting boys
  • Talk to boys

One great way to get tag ideas is to look at the top-ranking YouTube videos that directly compete with your video. However, YouTube hides the video tags, which makes it more difficult to “spy” on your competitors and see their keyword/tag secret sauce.

Luckily, there are tools that allow you to get lots of insights into what your competitors are doing — including letting you see the tags competitors are using to get their videos to rank high.

Two of these video software tools are vidIQ and TubeBuddy. Both programs have a free version and several paid versions, depending on your company’s needs. There are pros and cons to each — so if you can afford it, I’d recommend you use them both.

How YouTube tools like vidIQ and TubeBuddy can help you get more eyeballs

Both vidIQ and TubeBuddy give you information on competitors’ YouTube videos. One of the cool things they show is the tags. So in our “how to ask a boy out” example, you can see the tags being used by the highest-ranking videos for your chosen search terms.

vidIQ results

 


 

With TubeBuddy, you can even zero in on the most used tags the channel used when setting up the SEO for their YouTube channel:

TubeBuddy Channel Tags

 


 

You can also find out a whole lot of other valuable information from these tools: the number of Facebook likes, their SEO score, how many words are in the description, average view time duration, number of views and so much more. You can consider these two handy tools to be your YouTube competitor spies!

spy-on-youtube-competitors

TubeBuddy also has a Tag Explorer feature, which is almost like a traditional SEO keyword finder. Enter the keyword that you’d like to rank your video for, and you’ll get some suggested keywords.

tubebuddy-tag-explorer

 


 

As part of the Tag Explorer, TubeBuddy includes a “Summary” section that shows the search volume, competition and the overall competitiveness of a keyword on a scale from 0 to 100 (where 100 is the easiest to rank for).

tubebuddy

 


 

If you have a newer YouTube channel, you’ll want to look for keywords that are easier to rank for. Already have a YouTube channel that’s rockin’ it? You can afford to try to get your video ranked for the more competitive keywords.

When planning your YouTube keywords strategy, you want to come up with 10 to 20 single keyword tags that you want to try to rank for. Remember, since YouTube limits the number of tags you can include, add your most important keyword phrases first and then use specific multi-word tags that are easier to rank for. If you have room, also include the single-word tags and broader-term tags.

You want to try to get as many views from as many different (relevant) search results as possible — which is an easier strategy than trying to rank #1 for a single keyword phrase.

By having a metadata strategy in place, you can increase the chances of your videos showing up in YouTube’s search results. And since video marketing will continue to grow and grow, mastering YouTube’s ranking algorithm starting today is a great way to kick your video marketing efforts into high gear.

Source: This article was published on searchengineland.com by Sherry Bonelli

Categorized in Search Engine

The webmaster and SEO community, along with the automated Google tracking tools, all show strong signs that there was a Google algorithm ranking update.

Since yesterday morning, the SEO industry has been watching an unconfirmed Google ranking update that seems to target more of the link quality aspects of the overall algorithm.

Many are calling this the Fred Update, a name we’re also adopting. That came from Google’s Gary Illyes, who has jokingly suggested that all updates be named “Fred.” It’s sticking with this one.

We’ve seen more chatter and reports of changes from within the “black hat” SEO community, which generally means that this is a spam algorithm update around links. Last time we reported a link spam-related update was in early February, and that update also was unconfirmed by Google.

There was also a large content quality Google update on February 7 that was never confirmed. As you expect, Google is very unlikely to confirm algorithm updates these days — but that won’t stop us from reporting large shifts in the search results that convey an algorithm update has happened.

Many of the automated tracking tools currently show significant volatility and fluctuations, which is an indicator of an update. Plus, with all the industry chatter, and with webmasters both complaining about ranking declines and rejoicing about ranking increases, it’s likely that there was a Google update.

We are waiting to hear from Google if they have any comment. All we have right now are the typical Google lines from John Mueller and Gary Illyes that Google makes updates all the time.

If and when we get an update from Google, we will share it here. For now, you can read about the chatter and ranking speculation over here.

Author : Barry Schwartz

Source : http://searchengineland.com/new-unconfirmed-google-fred-update-shakes-seo-world-270898

Categorized in Search Engine

Many business owners see SEO and content marketing as separate, but columnist Trond Lyngbø argues that solid keyword research can and should be used to inform content marketing strategy.

Imagine that you are in an auditorium, facing a large audience of your best customers. You’re getting ready to speak to them.

You can say whatever you want, but there’s just one condition: As soon as you complete your first sentence, people can decide whether to stay inside and listen to the rest of your speech — or get up and leave.

What will you tell them in those crucial first moments?

This is a dilemma every business owner, blogger and content producer agonizes over every day. A visitor to your website decides within a few seconds if she is going to stick around and explore it or leave for another destination.

Unless your content is carefully planned and masterfully crafted based on a deep and intimate understanding of your target audience’s needs, your SEO initiatives will likely fail or underperform. Keyword research and analysis is one of the most critical elements of your content preparation, planning and production.

Key questions to consider here are:

  • How do you link SEO and keyword analysis to content marketing?
  • How do you produce content that your prospects will find irresistible?
  • How can you expand, grow and consolidate your profitability with an intelligent content strategy?

These are questions we’ll address in this column.

How to tell your story

In one of my most popular posts on content marketing and SEO, I highlight the important element of effective content marketing:

Tell stories that people find interesting.

But how can you know what they will respond to?

You can keep your eyes and ears open and observe what’s happening in your niche — but that takes time, and you’ll only scan a tiny segment of your market.

You can conduct formal surveys of customers and prospects — though there’s always a risk they might mislead you, for various reasons.

Or you can use a very reliable tool: search engines!

People type queries into the search box that are of interest to them. If you can leverage tools like Google Trends, Google Predictive Search, Google Keyword Planner and KeywordTool.io to mine this rich treasure trove of keyword data and identify patterns, you’ll soon have a pretty good idea of what your audience wants.

You can use search engines to find out what worries people, what interests them, which problems they want solved and which desires they dream of having fulfilled.

Know what your people want

Unless you involve keyword research and analysis as a part of your SEO content preparation and planning, you’re spinning your wheels. With strong keyword data, you can communicate better, prioritize your SEO content in accordance with your market’s requirements and engage visitors more deeply to convert them into buyers with less time, effort and expense.

Knowing your customers is the key here. Your keyword research should help illuminate what they want and why they want and need it. From there, you can determine how your product helps them solve their problems and achieve their goals.

This knowledge helps you strategically plan your content marketing and brings several benefits to your business.

1. Better understand your customers

When your content seems to magically answer their unvoiced questions, visitors arriving at your website via search engines will be highly impressed.

Keyword research and analysis helps you to understand your prospective customers. By knowing what search terms they use to find your product or service offerings, you gain insight into their needs and desires — what problems they want solved, what they expect to find on a destination website and so on.

By reviewing the keywords searchers are using — and closely analyzing the search results that surface for those keywords — you can tell, with reasonable accuracy, where a searcher is on the decision-making continuum that ends in closing a sale.

For example, if you run a hotel website, then a visitor arriving at your site from a search on generic or broad terms (like “Norway holiday”) is less likely to book a room than one who is running more specific queries (like “budget hotel in Oslo” or “Oslo hotel vacancy 15th March”).

Thus, if you’re receiving significant traffic from visitors searching on these generic terms, you might want to consider creating and optimizing content that better speaks to their needs and is designed to move them further down the sales funnel.

When your content is designed to match user intent, you will grab attention instantly — and retain it for as long as you meet your visitor’s unspoken needs.

2. Communicate more effectively

Another advantage of keyword research and analysis is that your communication will be more effective, targeted and specific. Your content can be crafted in a manner such that a reader intuitively feels that you are “speaking their language.”

You develop empathy more easily. You connect more deeply. Engage with more sincerity. Convince, educate, inform and guide more meaningfully. And all of this happens because you meet the user where they are at the moment and lead them toward a destination that you know they want to reach.

With keyword research, you can construct content that perfectly targets your message while appealing to visitors who use specific search terms to find you. Each piece of content can be individually designed to speak to a specific, clearly defined segment of your overall market.

When your message is so finely targeted at a particular interest group or niche audience, it becomes very effective at getting prospects to do what you want. Conversion rates are higher. Marketing expenses go down.

3. Plan content more easily

Strong keyword research allows you to correctly prioritize content. It can inform your editorial calendar, as you’ll have a reasonable idea of what content is most in demand and when it is likely to deliver the greatest impact on your business goals.

If you focus on the right keywords and plan accordingly, your content will reach prospective customers right at the moment they are starting to look for it.

4. Go beyond relevant — be memorable

Many SEO and content experts recommend creating “relevant content” for your target keywords. But relevant content is no longer adequate; it isn’t ambitious enough. As search engine algorithms grow more sophisticated and are better able to surface accurate results for a given query, your “relevant” content will just drown in an ocean of other “relevant” pieces.

Instead, you should aim to create amazing content — the kind that makes your website the ultimate destination for your audience. To win at SEO, your content should go above and beyond that of your competitors, anticipating any and all questions a visitor might have (based on the keywords they’re using) and answering those questions fully.

An excellent content strategy will force people to remember you. It is good for branding. Others may even link to your content; if you’re lucky, you’ll receive high-quality backlinks from authority websites in your niche, including newspapers, industry leading sites and thought leaders who will share it on social media. All this improves your SEO and drives more free traffic your way.

5. Combine creativity with data

Many people think working with keyword data cramps creativity in content. It doesn’t have to be an either-or choice. You can be creative while using search data effectively.

The truth is, without data, you run the risk of wasting time and money on content that won’t move you closer to your business goals. Without granular and detailed keyword data, you’re just another person with an opinion, wasting your (or your client’s) money on a risky gamble.

Stop taking chances and secure your business’s future by basing your content marketing on solid search data and knowledge.

Implementing keyword research in your business

Are you beginning to see how great an impact keyword-focused content can have on sales, revenue and profit? If you’ve been ignoring this aspect of SEO for a long time, you are probably damaging your business, limiting its potential and holding yourself back from maximizing revenue.

With the right guidance on keywords and a smart content strategy, you’ll be able to communicate more effectively with customers. When you know your readers’ innermost thoughts and can intuit their intent, it is easy to reverse-engineer this insight so that it is mirrored in your content.

Doing this dramatically improves the level of engagement with your audience. People no longer merely like your content… they love it. They’ll share it with others. And come back for more of it. They’re influenced and informed by it. And this, in turn, improves conversion rates, generating more sales and higher profits.

While content is just a small part of the overall SEO landscape, it’s an important part. Make sure that you get it right!

Author : Trond Lyngbø

Source : http://searchengineland.com/keyword-research-key-element-seo-content-marketing-246418

Marketers have long considered organic search a lost cause on Baidu due to the abundance of ads, but new laws in China are changing the game. Contributor Hermes Ma discusses the state of Baidu SEO and provides recommendations for marketers looking to break into the market.

Recently, I attended Baidu’s annual search conference for agency partners in Beijing. One of the premier search events in China for SEO professionals, the conference was hosted by engineers from Baidu’s core search and Webmaster Tools teams.

The agenda covered Baidu’s eco-empowerment strategy, its Mobile Instant Page (MIP) project and a wrap-up of the 2016 algorithm updates. The event made it clear to me that 2016 was the year Baidu SEO came into its own. If you aren’t already investing in Baidu SEO, 2017 is your year to start.

The eco-empowerment

The concept of eco-empowerment was introduced by Dai Tan, Baidu’s Chief Architect of Search. With search, Baidu wants every practitioner in the internet ecosystem to have better efficiencies in production, execution and monetization. In order to fulfill eco-empowerment, Baidu needs to provide relevant technology and form a mechanism for the ecosystem, supported by two pillars: page load speed and HTTPS.

Every half-second delay in page loading will cost you 3 percent of user visits. This is why Baidu moved quickly to follow Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) feature with the MIP project (Chinese language). At the same time, security is a critical factor to an engine’s reputation in a market where site hijacks, spams and PII data leaks are rampant. In May 2015, Baidu launched Not Set, which is its own version of Not Provided.

The main accomplishment in the mechanism of Baidu Search is in the release of Spider 3.0 (Chinese language), which was launched in early 2016, dramatically increasing the speed of URL discovery and indexing. As a result, crawl speed has increased by 80 percent, and Baidu is now capable of indexing trillions of web pages in real time. The Divine Domain project planned for mid-2017 promises to further boost indexing speed.

The Baidu Mobile Instant Page (MIP) Project

Mobile Instant Page is a bold name. Even Google’s AMP only claims to be “accelerated.” The results speak for themselves. As reported in the Conference, more than 2,800 sites have implemented MIP, reducing load time by 30 to 80 percent and subsequently increasing landing page clicks from 5 to 30 percent.

The technology and structure of MIP are very similar to Google’s AMP; even the page code is virtually identical. And just as AMP has been a controversial idea in the SEO world since its launch, so is Baidu’s MIP within the Great Firewall of China. Convincing webmasters to adopt this new technology has been a challenge, given the sacrifice of page flexibility in favor of improved loading speed and ranking signals.

Baidu has been fighting its way through obstacles, having learned valuable lessons from AMP’s rollout. A channel has been added in Baidu Webmaster Tools for page submissions. An open-source project is now on GitHub. A tutorial provides quick training for programmers. An integrated development environment (IDE) and an online validator are published. Themes are available for popular content management system (CMS) platforms like WordPress. Most importantly, the “Flashy” icon is now attached to all MIP results on the Baidu mobile search engine results page (SERP).

By December 2016, three months after MIP’s release, Baidu had already indexed more than 900 million MIP pages.

mip-result-baiduAn MIP result entry with the MIP icon on the mobile SERP of Baidu
mip project one-year timelineThe anniversary of the MIP Project

You may see Baidu MIP as a copycat of Google AMP. But there are nuances. First, Baidu MIP is using scripts to maintain compatibility with mobile browsers other than Chrome or Safari in China. In addition, MIP pages put JavaScript before the ending </body> tag, while in AMP, you still put scripts between <head> and </head>. Both MIP and AMP only allow asynchronous scripts, but it doesn’t make a big difference, because neither approach will delay the page rendering.

Baidu’s localization and globalization

Since Google retreated from China in 2006, the only two G-products that remain functional in that market are Google Maps and Google Translate. Mobile internet users are unable to access the AMP in mainland China.

Many people believe that if Google hadn’t been expatriated, Baidu would not have its dominant power in the search market. However, even when Google search was still in China, its market share never exceeded Baidu’s. And Bing, which is still in China, isn’t challenging Baidu at all.

When it comes to other players like QQ and MSN Messenger,  only those engines that are customized for local markets (or work with the government) will have the chance to win the battle against Baidu.

A map of the world showing the real-time activity of Baidu search, on a screen in the lobby of Baidu Building in BeijingA map of the world showing the real-time activity of Baidu search, on a screen in the lobby of Baidu Building in Beijing

Baidu’s ambition is not confined to China. Alliances with partners like Merkle in other regions are helping Baidu to learn about other markets and expand business reach. If you still see Google as a threat to Baidu, you may be wrong. A better term, “frenemy,” may better describe their relationship.

Now, through Google’s DoubleClick for Search, you are able to bid for Baidu pay-per-click (PPC) ads. On the other side, Baidu is actively working with Google on the alignment of AMP-MIP and developing standards for Progressive Web Apps. And finally, Baidu intends to adopt the Schema.org data structure in 2017, having already documented the Schema.org markup support in the MIP specification.

The 2016 algorithm updates

Anti-app-fraud, Ice Bucket, Skynet and Blue-sky are the four main algorithm updates made by Baidu in the second half of 2016, and in almost every month, there was a negative update.

While the “Chinternet” environment is getting more complicated, Baidu is investing a significant amount of effort to protect and improve the ecosystem they have defined:

Code NameTargets of Penalty
Green Radish Link spam, link trade, comment spam, hacked web pages
Pomegranate Low-quality pages with pop-ups and massive ads
Anti-app-fraud (this update doesn’t have a codename) Mobile pages that lure/deceive users of downloading marketplace apps (Google Play isn’t accessible in China)
Ice Bucket For mobile pages only; app-gate for contents, app-links, popup ads interrupting UX, ads of adults/porn/gambling
Skynet Malicious mobile pages with PII leak risks
Blue-sky Directories for sale, content spam

In late 2016, there has been a drop in discussions around indexing in the Chinese webmaster communities. This seems to signal that Baidu can now better identify pages with low quality.

From the other angle, it is evident that Baidu has a clear view that the mobile-first web is transitioning into a mobile-only web. Apart from the core project of MIP, three out of four algorithm updates are aiming for mobile pages.

Closing thoughts and recommendations on Baidu SEO in 2017

Historically, SEO strategies and investments were second-tier priorities for brands in China. Too many paid ads appeared on the SERP, where organic links had limited exposure, leaving little opportunity for SEO. Additionally, leadership had no idea of how long they would be in their roles. They wanted quick success and shortcuts, suggesting paid search is the best way out.

Things are changing. Due to regulations and the release of China’s Internet Ad Law, Baidu cut down the number of sponsored results in the main column of the SERP from “up to 10” to “no more than 5.” With some exceptions where larger ad formats are served, users will see a much cleaner SERP with fewer ads.

Obviously, it is a positive change for SEOs because paid traffic and organic traffic play a zero-sum game. Organic results now have more viewability with fewer sponsored links overhead.

As my colleague, Adam Audette, wrote in Merkle’s Dossier, your SEO effort is critical and will account for 30–50 percent of traffic online. As such, I offer the following recommendations for your 2017 SEO strategy in China.

  1. If you haven’t used Baidu Webmaster Tools (aka Baidu Zhanzhang), you should sign up immediately. It provides the only eligible data source for SEO and a set of exclusive features, such as brand/site name protection and site link management. (Unfortunately, the interface is Chinese language only).
  2. Site speed and security are increasingly important for your pages indexing and ranking. Page optimization and load speed should receive more focus and budget allocation. Implementing HTTPS should be considered.
  3. For media and publishers, an aggressive inventory setup will probably lead to penalties from the engines. Development on native ads inventory could be a cure, following the new internet advertising law of China, published in September 2016.
  4. Brands with rich content or a firm content strategy should focus on their mobile site. A responsive site may not be adequate in 2017. Adopting MIP should be a priority.
  5. Technical SEO has returned. The gap of knowledge and technology between engines in and out of the Great Firewall is shrinking. Technologies used for Google and other global engines will be soon adopted by Baidu and other local engines. An early implementation on the leading-edge technologies like the structured data markup, MIP and Progressive Web Apps (PWA) will emerge in next a couple of years.

Author : Hermes Ma

Source : http://searchengineland.com/2016-coming-age-year-baidu-seo-invest-2017-268540

Categorized in Search Engine

In recent years search engines have been optimized around users needs and their search experience. Google has evolved in rewarding content that is valuable and relevant to readers.

Modern-day SEO is all about user intent, and you can improve your online presence by focusing on several key psychological principles to entice your readers, rank well in the search rankings and ultimately, help grow your business.

Let’s take a look at some ways you can understand your audience and the steps needed to create content that gets found in Google.

Customer Personas Should Direct SEO

Online marketers love to get into the heads of their customers. We do this with A/B testing, analytics, and other methods to understand what our audience does when they consume our content. One tool to understand the mind of your target audience is to build customer personas.

You can use customer personas as a sort of blueprint to help articulate details about your audience. Customer personas assist you in identifying areas that you can fill with quality content aimed at addressing and solving their problems.

You can start the process of building customer personas by talking to people you have done business with in the past, or individuals who represent your ideal client.

Some questions you can ask to get more information about how your products and services can solve their problems include:

  • What are their pain points?
  • What products or services have they used in the past?
  • Why do they continue to use those goods and services, or why did they cease using them?
  • What types of solutions will they not use?

Customer personas help you align your content with the qualities of your readers.

For example, your content will look, read, and position itself differently depending on if your target audience is a middle-aged man or a pre-teen female. You need to create content with specific qualities based on your audience if you want that content to resonate and lead to online conversions and sales.

Today’s search engines work to connect relevant content with searchers based on the questions in each search query. While search engines in the past were pretty clunky, modern-day search engines are powered by behavioral learning algorithms and LSI keywords to increase the quality and relevancy of search results.

Each time someone searches for something on Google, searchers are asking a question. You can optimize content for your users once you understand that they are asking questions when they visit Google.

Questions reflect the intent of your users, so you should create content that addresses the core questions of your customers.

Position your content around the needs of your audience from your customer personas. How you do this will look different based on your business and industry, but here are a few examples to get you started:

  • “Restaurant near me” means “I am hungry, don’t want to cook, and want to eat somewhere now.”
  • “Best barber for men” means “I am a man and what is the most trusted barber for me?”
  • “U.S. presidential information” means “I am interested in U.S. politics and what is some information about President nominees?”

The purpose behind a search will vary from person to person even when the same search query is used. This is why you should produce specific content for specific personas. Once you figure out what your customers are after, you can create engaging content that drives them towards a conversion.

User Intent and Keyword Research

If your business wants to grow its online presence and attract new customers, then you need to focus on the intent and needs of your users. The way user intent translates to the digital marketing world is through keywords and search terms used by users who are looking for a particular product or service.

Every search query put into Google is a question.

People go to Google to ask specific issues with the goal of finding specific answers. Through various algorithm changes, Google has shown that their primary interest is to deliver relevant content to users. For Google, this ensures people keep coming back to their service, and their end-users build brand loyalty with Google’s product suite.

Although keyword research remains an essential component of semantic SEO, your business needs to change the way it conducts and implements keywords.

Creating content around keywords will bring your content closer to user intent and its variations. Here are a few points to consider when creating more user-focused keywords for your business content.

Semantic SEO and Search Engines

Semantic search is the newest focus by Google and other search engines that focus on how each word is situated in a search query and the relationship between those words.

Integrating semantic search terms enriches your content and makes your online content more readable for your readers. This approach also helps prevent repeating keywords too many times, and it improves how search engines read your content in several ways, including:

  • Introduces various sets of keywords that are directly related to your original set of keywords.
  • An active secondary set of keywords helps build rich context for search engines to understand your content and deliver better results to your customers.

By focusing on what each user types into the search bar, Google can understand what the user is looking for on a deeper level compared to only looking at keywords. In a sense, semantic SEO takes the entire search query into account and uses past searches by the user and similar searches to intelligently find the meaning and intent of the user’s expectations.

How to Perform Semantic SEO Keyword Research

As your business builds content around semantic keywords, you will want to begin by looking at your customer personas and your target audience. Since semantic SEO is meant to deliver more relevant content to your audience, you need to work on the requirements and desires of your audience.

Once you identify the problems and questions your customers are looking for through Google search queries, you will be able to build valuable content. However, there is some research needed to ensure you create your content efficiently.

Before writing a single blog post or putting together a stellar infographic, you will want to create a simple spreadsheet outlining the topics, concepts, and keywords to cover. Here is an example of the spreadsheet your business can make in about 10 minutes to save you a lot of time and money.

Let’s take a look at the exact steps and tools your business can use to create the above spreadsheet. As you see, the spreadsheet covers essential elements of semantic SEO keywords, including:

  • Topic
  • Concepts
  • Keywords

 

1. Topic

Begin thinking about your content based on your user personas. Figure out what your readers are looking for and how you can tie those searches back to your business. You can start this step by looking through real-world questions your customers are asking. Some places to consider include:

  • Your customer service records and calls
  • Reddit
  • Quora

 

Once you know what your customers are searching for, you will be able to identify the base topics to cover. For this example, I will use the search topic of “Semantic Search” since that is what I am writing about right now.

2. Concepts

The next step is to identify your core set of ideas based around your core topics. These concepts will be the root of all keywords and will be the base of your content.

As you begin to think about what your customers are asking for the topics listed above, you will be able to find key points to create content around. These concepts should be connected to the problems (or questions) your customers ask and connect them back to your business.

SEMRush is the primary tool I use for this stage of semantic SEO keyword research. The free version works fine for me, and here is a screenshot of findings with notes on the important elements to pay attention to.

3. Keywords

Finally, you will build a list of keywords related to the core concepts and topics that your customers are searching for. These keywords, phrases, and search terms should be relevant to your main topic and supporting ideas.

These keywords should be unique from your concepts and main issue but connect based on how the words and ideas work together. The best free tool I use for this stage of semantic SEO keyword research is LSIGraph.com. Below is a screenshot of some keywords I chose based on my research of LSIGraph.com

Conclusion

Since your business is working to acquire market share and retain your customers, you need to make sure that all your content is relevant to your readers and easily found in search engines.

Semantic SEO keyword research makes it possible for you to save time and money when creating content. The future of SEO strategies need to focus on the intent of users and the quality of your content.

You can use the above tools and processes to deliver the content your customers are looking for so you can drive more traffic and close more sales through your online business!

Author: Chris Giarratana
Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/user-intent-future-seo/184217

 

Categorized in Search Engine

Want to kick your site’s search rankings up a notch? Want to do it for free, with tools that don’t require a Ph.D. in SEO?

Who wouldn’t, right? But while pretty much every small business wants more search engine traffic, most small businesses are not stepping up to optimize their sites.

When we surveyed over 1,100 small business owners earlier this year for the WASP State of Small Business Report, we turned up a surprising fact: Only 25 percent of them are doing any search engine optimization.

 

rsz_google

Part of this is a time issue, of course–every hour counts for small businesses. It may also be a lack of knowledge about search engine optimization. Or a belief that it’s hard and time-consuming.

This is unfortunate because there are plenty of simple, effective things you can do for your site that will translate into more traffic. One of them is using Google’s free Search Console, previously called “Google Webmasters.”

Getting to Know Google Search Console

The Search Console is an ideal complement to Google’s more widely-known Analytics tool, but it is a bit different. While Analytics shows how people use your site once they’re on it, Search Console leans more toward showing you how people see your site before they get there–how it looks in the search results and other places.

So what specifically does it show you? Well, stuff like:

  • How many links point to your site, including which pages those links are coming from and which pages they point to.
  • Details about your site’s usability, both for people and for search engines.
  • How your pages are performing in the search results (namely, their click-through rates and rankings).
  • How to optimize your pages with Schema markup, so they show more information in the search results.

There’s more, but I’m getting ahead of myself. So instead of telling you how Search Console is different, let’s just show you. Here are five things you can do with it:

1. See if your website’s meta or title tags need any improvements.

There are two critically important pieces of copy on each page of your site, but the odds are high you’re ignoring them. They’re the meta description and title tags; they hold the text that appears in the search results.

google2

What you put in those tags has a huge influence over whether or not people click through to your site. They also tell Google what your pages are about.

The “HTML Improvements” section of your Search Console account can help you optimize these tags on your site.

Google3

2. Make your site easier for mobile users.

You may have heard of Google’s Mobile-Friendly tool. It’s a fast, free way to see if your site qualifies as mobile-friendly. But while it’s a snap to use, it doesn’t go into a whole lot of detail; in fact, it only provides a “yes” or “no.”

The Search Console Mobile Usability report digs deeper. It’ll show you:

  • If you’ve got any links or buttons that are too close together for mobile users to comfortably click.
  • If the text on your site is too small to read.
  • If your page will correctly resize itself for mobile devices.

Google4

3. Manage inbound links.

Want to find out who’s linking to your site, including exactly which pages are linking to you, and exactly which pages on your site they’re linking to? Search Console can show you. And if you ever did some questionable link building, this is the information you’ll use to disavow any shady links.

rsz_google5

Don’t ignore the “Internal Links” report in this same section. In fact, every time you publish a new page or post on your site, use this tool to add a link to the new content from several old pages on your site. It’s one of the best ways to pass page authority to newly published content.

4. Check if Google is having any trouble accessing your site.

Google gives you several ways to check up on how accessible your site is for the Google bot. If you do only one thing, add a sitemap and make sure there are no crawl errors.

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5. See where your pages rank in the search results, and how often they’re being clicked.

The Search Analytics Report can show you whether or not your pages are delivering on a user’s search intent. There’s a detailed article here for how to get actionable insights from this data.

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So there you have it. Google Analytics is a terrific tool, but it doesn’t tell you everything. You need the data in the Search Console to get the whole story. And because Search Console is used less often than Google Analytics, spending even a little time with it is an easy way to edge out your competition.

Author : Brian Sutter

Source : https://www.allbusiness.com/5-google-search-console-tricks-you-need-to-know-107557-1.html

Categorized in Search Engine
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