Now more than ever, marketing experts are improving their marketing strategy with fewer resources, and they are shifting marketing budgets from traditional to digital tactics like search engine optimization and social media. Companies, too often, omit their social media marketing strategy from their SEO strategy, which is a grave mistake. A study conducted by Ascend2 indicates that companies with the strongest SEO via social media strategies now produce the best results, and vice-versa. Companies that consider themselves “very successful” at search engine optimization are integrating social media into their strategy, whereas, companies that are “not successful” at search engine optimization are not integrating social media into their strategy.

See the graph below:

SEOSocialIntegration

In the above graph, companies with successful SEO are in blue while those companies with an inferior SEO strategy are in amber. You can see 38% of those doing very well with search engine optimization was also extensively integrating social media. A full 50% of those doing poorly at search engine optimization was not integrating social media at all in their strategy. This graph signifies that companies that are succeeding in search engine optimization today are including social in their strategy.

SEO is much more than just high ranking in Google. It is a multi-disciplinary, comprehensive approach to website optimization that ensures potential customers, who come to your website, will have an excellent experience, easily find what they are looking for, and have an easy time sharing your optimum-quality content. The combination of SEO and social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest can be overwhelming for big as well as small business marketers. Until recently, search engine optimization and social media marketing were thought of as two very different things, but actually, these are two sides of the same coin. Consider the below mentioned social network growth statistics:

  • YouTube hosts nearly 14 billion videos. Source: comScore
  • Google sites handle about 100 billion searches each month. Source: SEL
  • Facebook is now over 1 billion users. Source: Mark Zuckerberg
  • Twitter has over 550 million accounts. Source: Statistics Brain
  • Google+ has over 500 million users. Source: Google
  • LinkedIn is at 225 million users. Source: LinkedIn
  • Pinterest grew 4,377% in 2012 and continues to expand to 25 million users. Source: TechCrunch
  • Following statistics shows how social media is quite helpful in effective search engine optimization:
  • 94% increase in CTR (Click-Thru-Rate) when searching and social media are used together. Source: eMarketer
  • 50% of consumers use a combination of search and social media to make purchase decisions. Source: Inc
  • Consumers who use social media (vs. people who don’t) are 50% more likely to use search. Source: srcibd
  • Websites with a Google+ business page yield a 15% rise in search rank. Source: Open Forum

With these statistics, we can say that social media can be a primary engine for promoting new content and can take your website from zero visibility to a strong performing position almost overnight. For enhancing SEO through social media platform two factors play a vital role, which are social signals and natural link building. I have explained these two factors in an elaborative manner:

What’s Your Social Signal?

Social Signals are signals to various search engines that your content or information is valuable. Every time someone likes, shares, tweets or +1′s content about your brand, especially a link, they are sending a social signal and the more social signals means you have better chances to rank high on search engine result pages. Many researchers have found that social shares are quite valuable when it comes to building your website authority. Here is the latest research from Searchmetrics, highlighting which social signals correlate to rankings on Google:

socialsignals2

Note that 7 out of the top 9 factors are social signals. Now, it’s clear that social signals can have a huge impact on your search rankings, especially social signals from Google+. If you do not have time to leverage all of the social networking sites, then make sure that Google+ is one of the few you do use because it will play the biggest part in increasing your rankings on search engines. Top social signals that Google is tracking on your website are mentioned below:

Google+

Google+ is a fledgling community when it is compared to social networking giants like Facebook and Twitter, but its social signals have the most impact on search ranking results. Some factors that you should look at are:

Amount of +1s- You need to start distinguishing +1 to your website in general and +1 to each piece of your content. You should increase +1s to your brand/your authorship profile. This also applies to +1s on Local+ pages.

Authority of +1s- If your profile or brand gets more +1, then you will get to rank higher and easier for the future content you produce.

Growth rate of +1s- You should strategize a plan that will increase your +1 steadily over an extended period of time.

Amount of Adds and Shares- How many people are following and sharing your content tells about how authoritative you are.

Authority of Adds and Shares- Who is following you is also important. A network with people with great profiles helps you to establish a voice.

Facebook

The king of social networking sites, Facebook has an active community of over 900 million. Millions of active users make it a perfect platform for generating social signals. Various research has shown that Facebook influences more search rankings as compared to Google+ or Twitter. Some factors that you should look at are:

Amount of Shares and Likes- You should remember that “shares” carry more weight than “likes”.

Amount of Comments- The collective amount of likes, shares, and comments correlate the closest with search ranking.

Twitter

Twitter is second only to Facebook and boasts 500 million users that are constantly “tweeting”, status updates and events in real time. Twitter users, known as “tweeps”, put more premium on a tweet’s authority rather than sheer amount; though the overall social signals generated by it lags just a little behind Facebook. On Twitter, you should look at some factors like:

  • Authority of followers, mentions, and retweets
  • Number of followers, mentions, and retweets
  • Speed and intensity of tweets and RT over time

Other social websites like Pinterest, Reddit, Digg, StumbleUpon, and FourSquare

The big three, i.e. Facebook, Twitter, and Google+, play quite important role when it comes to social ranking factors, but you should not ignore the potential of other user-driven social websites like Pinterest, Reddit, Digg, StumbleUpon, and FourSquare. On these social networking sites you should look at following factors:

  • Amount of Pins and re-pins on Pinterest
  • Comments on Pinterest
  • Growth rate of Pins and Re-pins
  • Check-ins on Foursquare
  • Spread rate of check-ins at FourSquare
  • Upvotes on Reddit, Digg, StumbleUpon
  • Comments on Reddit, Digg, StumbleUpon

Link Development through Social Media

The traditional way of link building like en-masse link directories, spammy comments, forum-posts for the sake of links, and anchor text sculpting are over now. In the modern era, the powerful way to build link is an effective content marketing strategy. People love informative and quality content, and they love sharing content. Social media sites are one of the best platforms for content marketing, in this way these are quite important for natural link development.

How to build natural and quality links through Social Media Platforms

There are two tactics that will help you immensely in earning quality and natural links through Social Media Platforms are:

Link-building through interaction and community engagement

If you’re link-building but never building relationships or never interacting with people, you’re not really link building: you are spamming. If you interact with people who might care about your brand, you can gain a cutting edge over other competitors. Meaningful interactions with the audience in your niche prove your credibility and will lead to more authority links. 

You can also get links through interaction from a popular site or a popular brand, when they post to their Facebook page, make a Google+ post, launch a new blog post, or put up a new video on YouTube. In this case, I also recommend you to interact early and often. Early because a lot of times, being in the first five or ten comments, interactions, or engagements really helps you to be seen by the editors who are almost always watching. When you do such interaction, make sure you are adding value, by doing this you make yourself stand out in the comments. You can add value by doing a little bit of detailed research and by making the conversation more interesting. By posting great comments, you will create interest in target customers and they often click your profile that will latently earn you some links. In addition to this, you can also offer help to other people and you can help people without being asked. This is a great way to drive links back to your own site and you can do this, not just on blog posts, but on Google+ posts, Facebook pages, and YouTube comments.

Link building through quality content

In addition to gaining links from popular sites, you can also earn links by posting qualitative and linkable content on social media platforms. If you create content that people find valuable and informative, they are more likely to want to share it. What people find valuable can vary, but optimum quality blog posts and infographics that provide well-researched information, statistics, and new angles on a subject are all good starting points. A good and informative video that attracts viewers’ attention is eminently shareable, which is one reason nearly 87% of agency and brand marketers now creating a video for content marketing. When someone reads your quality and informative content on social media sites and finds it of value, it is more likely that they will want to link to it.

Article-Effective-Content

In order to give your informative content the best chance of reaching a wide audience, you should identify the key influencers or target audience in your field. In this way, you will be able to target your efforts effectively. Facebook and Twitter are the two go-to social media platforms for most people but you should also seek out targets on other platforms such as Pinterest, YouTube, and Tumblr. In addition to this, if you are marketing within specific regions, you might want to channel your efforts to the most popular websites in each market. For example, VK is the preferred social media website in Russia, while Orkut can help extend your reach within Brazil and India.

You can also use various tools and services that can help you find the best targets. For example, Followerwonk offers a Twitter analytics service and it can help you to compare and sort followers by looking at data such as social authority scores and the percentage of URLs. Furthermore, you can also gauge reactions to your own tweets by monitoring your activity alongside current follower numbers. Apart from this, Fresh Web Explorer is a handy tool, as it searches for mentions of your brand, company or other keyword and automatically matches this with ‘feed authority’. In this way, you can sort key influencers from those with less perceived authority that will allow you to target your efforts more effectively.

Now, it is clear that social media is an essential part of search engine optimization. Following diagram explains you a blueprint of how social media supports SEO: 

seo-social-media

Quality Content gets published- One of the best ways to increase quality traffic to your website is to publish shareable, useful and relevant content on social media sites.

Content gets Shares, Links, & Likes- As you start publishing your company’s blog posts or research work on a regular basis and spreading it across the social networking sites, your content will start generating shares, links, and “likes”.

Sites Gain Subscriptions while Social Profiles get Fans & Followers- As a result, your site’s blog will gain more subscribers and your social media channels will gain more followers, fans, and connections.

Thriving Community Supporting the Website & Social Networks Grows- A thriving community of people who are interested in your user-focused content develops and starts to thrive.

Reputation Reinforced through Social Media & SEO as Authoritative Brand for the Niche- Signals are sent to various search engines about your activity on social media platforms and your keyword-rich and informative content. Your website starts being viewed as reputable, relevant, and authoritative.

Sites Gain Authority in Search Engines- As a result, your website and its informative and quality content starts appearing higher and more frequently in the top rankings and listings of search engines for your keyword phrases and targeted keywords.

Sustainable Stream of Users Discover the Site organically- A consistently growing stream of users will begin discovering the website via the social media sites, search engines, and your email marketing efforts.

I have explained how aligning SEO and social media efforts can really enhance your SEO performance. In order to execute this task effectively, you might even like to hire experienced SEO experts. You should make sure that your social media and SEO teams are working together in order to create a unified digital marketing strategy.

Source: This article was published problogger.com By Guest Blogger

Categorized in How to

 

Private messages that can disappear are being trialled by Facebook as it experiments with a new option for those using its Messenger app.

They become hidden after a certain period of time chosen by the author, the firm said.
It is part of a new "secret message" service having a limited trial, Facebook announced.
Senders must choose one device to use it on, as messages sent this way are stored on the device itself.
Those flagged to "disappear" will be deleted from the device as well.

"Starting a secret conversation with someone is optional," it said.
"Secret conversations can only be read on one device and we recognise that experience may not be right for everyone."

Facebook secret message screenshots

 

Facebook listed health and financial issues as examples of messages that people may wish to keep more private - while others have mentioned love affairs.The idea is being trialled on a "limited basis", Facebook said, but added that it would be more widely available over the summer.Video and GIFs cannot be shared secretly at the moment.

The service will also have extra features for reporting abuse - and once this is introduced, there will be a delay in the deletion of messages to enable flagging.

"Facebook will never have access to plain text messages unless one participant in a secret conversation voluntarily reports the conversation," it explained in a technical document.

Tech spec

The service is built on the Signal protocol by Open Whisper Systems, which is widely used by messaging apps, said cybersecurity expert Professor Alan Woodward from Surrey University.

"Signal is well tested and those who developed it are well regarded in the cryptography community," he said.

"But the problem with something effectively becoming an open standard in this way is that if ever a problem were found it could have widespread impact."

Prof Woodward added that the technical report released by Facebook was "not as complete as many would like" in terms of assessing the service's security.

"If I were to choose any messaging system I would look for it to be based on Signal at present.
"However, I'd like to know more about exactly how it is implemented, or at least know that those who can analyse such systems have scrutinised the code."

Source:  http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36744470

 

 

Categorized in Others

Earlier this week, Twitter announced a new feature called ‘Stickers’. Essentially, theses are a mash-up of hashtags, emoticons, and Snapchat filters all in one easy-to-use photo features.

Like hashtags, stickers are also searchable. After you use one you can then click on the sticker to view a newsfeed of other users who have used the same sticker. Because of the search feature, Twitter stickers could be more useful to brands than Snapchat’s filters.

Similar to Snapchat filters, Twitter’s stickers are a fun way to personalize pictures.

Connect your photos to the world with a visual spin on hashtags: tap #Stickers to peel back a fun new way to search. pic.twitter.com/YVy7r53Nja

— Twitter (@twitter) June 27, 2016

How Could Brands Use Twitter Stickers?

While they might seem like nothing more than another silly way to personalize photos, the search feature makes Twitter stickers extremely interesting for brands, particularly if Twitter offers sponsored stickers, similar to Snapchats sponsored filters.

Image if Finding Dory sponsored a fish or aquarium sticker. Pixar could then easily engage with users who use the sticker by retweeting and sharing GIF collections of their favorites. They could then retarget those users with ads to purchase a DVD of the movie or collectibles. They could even add a photo backdrop that interacts with the sticker in the theater to encourage users to share what are essentially branded photos.

Currently, Stickers are rolling out to a limited number of users. Sadly, I am not one of them. This tweet from Linda Jiang, Strategy and Operations Program Manager at Twitter, shows how much fun we could be having:

Tuesday Mornings at SF Media! pic.twitter.com/2NUwmKzXQf

— Linda Jiang (@lindaj) June 28, 2016

Source:  https://www.searchenginejournal.com/twitter-announces-stickers-emoticons-snapchat-filters/167117/

Categorized in Social

As marketers, writers and crafters, we spend hours on bringing our content ideas to life and after all that effort, want our content to be seen.

Writing powerful social media copy to grab people’s eyes and win their hearts is a challenge, though. And often, when our content isn’t breaking through the noise we can fix it with a few slight edits and tweaks.

Editing content and copy is a key part of the creative process but is often overlooked. In this post, I’d love to share 11 editing tips and tricks to help you take your social media content to the next level.

Ready to jump in?

Here we go…

These 11 powerful, uber-specific editing actions will help you make your social media copy more addictive, engaging, and compelling.

1. Focus on the Reader

When you’re creating social media content, you face stiff competition for attention. Friends, family, celebrities, other brands and more are all vying for your reader’s attention on social networks. If you’d like to stand out and be seen, it’s important to create your content with the reader in mind.

Instead of focusing on ‘you’, try putting emphasis on the reader. For example, in a post about launching a new product we could say:We’ve just launched our new product, Buffer for Video.

But the focus of this copy feels a little off. We haven’t shown why the reader why they should care or how this post may be helpful to them. Something like the below copy could be better.You can now upload, share, and schedule video from Buffer to all your social media networks. Upload once, share everywhere!

11 Simple Edits to Improve Your Social Media Content | SEJ

2. Build Curiosity

Building curiosity is an incredibly powerful technique to help improve your copy (especially if you’re trying to get people to click on and engage your social media posts).

In its simplest terms, curiosity is triggered when people feel there is a gap between what they know and what they want to know. Professor of Economics and Psychology, George Loewenstein, is an expert in curiosity. He conducted a study into what triggers high levels of curiosity and discovered that it peaks when:

something violates our expectations (often curiosity is triggered by challenging common beliefs)teases a gap in our knowledge (AKA, the “information gap”)
it’s not overdone (curiosity can get someone to click a headline, but it won’t keep them on your site forever)

Here at Buffer we understand our audience tends to be interested in becoming better marketers and figuring out how they can use social media to attract more traffic, links, and customers to their business. We could run a Facebook post with copy like:

Why Facebook Reach is Dipping For Everyone

It might grab some attention but I have a slight hunch most people will probably feel they can live without clicking on this post.

However a headline like:

Facebook Reach is Declining: Here’s What to Do About it in Just 15 Minutes Per Day

Could be more effective for a few reasons:

The reader may feel there’s an information gap around how they can combat declining reach on Facebook
there’s a promise to solve a problem (increasing your Facebook reach)
it may go against common beliefs (you won’t need to spend all day implementing these tips)

Another example could be:

Check out these great Facebook marketing tips

This is cool, but there’s no hook and nothing to spark curiosity. As a reader, I may think: “Maybe I already know these tips…” 0r “I probably don’t need to click this…”

I feel like this one could work a little better:

11 Facebook tips and tricks you probably don’t already know (and how they work for real-life businesses)

The wording above feels like it opens up a much bigger information gap, “you probably don’t already know” indicates that the content may be new or a little different to what the reader already understands about Facebook. And using “real-life” also shows that these tips and tricks are working for other business, so by not clicking you could be missing out.

Here’s a real-world example from Shopify:

11 Simple Edits to Improve Your Social Media Content | SEJ

3. Treat Each Post as a Story

Stories are an extremely good way to connect with people. Stories draw readers in and engage them. And when it comes to writing social media copy, a good trick is to treat each post as a story with characters who carry out actions.

Let’s say you’re experiencing a little downtime on your website, you may share a Tweet or Facebook post along the lines of: Apologies for the disruptions – our website is experiencing some technical difficulties right now.

When you break down this sentence there are three characters in play: ‘we’, ‘our website’ and ‘you’. However, each character’s actions aren’t really covered. A better option could be:

Apologies, you may experience a few issues getting onto our website at the moment, as we’re having some technical issues. We’re working on a fix and will let you know when we’re back up and running.

This version makes the story and how it affects each character a little easier to digest:

Our website: is experiencing technical issues

You: won’t be able to access for a little while

We: are fixing it and will let you know when normal service is resumed

4. Focus on Value

Before you share anything to social channels, stop to think about value and ask yourself: Why are you sharing this? Why will people care? What’s the value in this for our fans?

People like to be able to justify their actions and have an underlying reason for them as Dr. Robert Cialdini, explained in his book, Influence: “A well-known principle of human behavior says that when we ask someone to do us a favor we will be more successful if we provide a reason. People simply like to have reasons for what they do.” And social media is no different. Every click, Like or Retweet will be triggered by some kind of value or reason.

In your social media copy, try to focus on the value for the reader and make it clear why they should care about your post. It’s also worth focusing on value with any calls-to-action within your social media content. For example, instead of ‘click now to read more,’ you could try something that promises a little more value, like ‘discover more insights.’

The below post from Evernote clearly displays the value for the reader:

11 Simple Edits to Improve Your Social Media Content | SEJ

5. Keep a Consistent Voice

Customers get to know a company’s personality through social media and across every social media post, it’s important for the company’s personality or voice to be consistent.

Mailchimp is a great example of a brand who keeps their voice consistent across all channels. They even have a website dedicated to explaining how they speak with customers.

We were hugely inspired by MailChimp’s voice-and-tone guide and have published a tone guide for how we write for our customers in emails, on twitter, with product messages, on our blog, and everywhere else we might interact. Our tone guide explains:

We are grateful for our customers. We have great respect for them. We listen. We are open for the next communication. We are here for them.In all customer communications, they’re doing us the favor. (Not the other way around. :))

To the customer, our language and tone say: I am grateful for you. I have great respect for you. I am listening. I am open. I am here.This guide helps us whenever we communicate with customers and can be great for helping us create copy for social media posts.

6. Write in Second Person

Brilliant social media copy speaks to readers on an intimate level. And second person is the most engaging narrative mode because it feels personal. Pronouns like “you,” “your,” and “yours” help us to connect with our audience through words.

Crafting engaging, intimate copy that entices readers to take action is extremely difficult to do, but thinking about things in second person is a great starting point. For example, instead of:

Here’s the lowdown in Instagram’s new features

You could say:

Want to master the latest Instagram features? We’ve got just the thing for you…

Here’s a great example from Shopify:

11 Simple Edits to Improve Your Social Media Content | SEJ

7. Use a Copy Formula

Writing catchy, captivating social copy is hard work, especially if you’re trying to share multiple posts across different platforms every day or putting together a content calendar.

Finding a great copywriting formula that works for you—whether it’s a storytelling formula, a headline formula, or any other—can be a big-time productivity boost and help you nail down some amazing, eye-catching posts.

One of my personal favorite formulas is the Before – After – Bridge (one we use frequently here on the blog). Here’s how it works:

Before – Here’s your world …

After – Imagine what it’d be like, having Problem A solved …

Bridge – Here’s how to get there.

First, you describe a problem, followed by a world where that problem doesn’t exist, then explain how to get there. I love its simplicity and versatility, at Buffer we use it for blog post titles, social media updates, email subjects and much more.

For example:

11 Simple Edits to Improve Your Social Media Content | SEJ

8. Keep it Simple

Social media posts don’t need to be a work of literary art. People have incredibly short attention spans online and often it’s more effective to be short and concise with your copy. Try to lean towards short, simple words, for example:

show instead of indicate

get instead of secure

best instead of terrific

When it comes to social media content, simple is beautiful. Sometimes all you may need is a one or two-word caption to inspire action from your audience. Here’s a great example from The Next Web:

11 Simple Edits to Improve Your Social Media Content | SEJ

9. Add an Emoji (or Two)

It’s no longer just teenagers or younger people who are using emoji’s – they’ve reached the mainstream.Over 6 billion emojis are sent every single day and according to Swyft Media, 74 percent of people in the U.S. regularly use stickers, emoticons or emojis in their online communication, sending an average of 96 emojis or stickers per day.

When it comes to social media posts, emoji’s can make a huge difference to your post performance as an Amex Open Forum study on Facebook engagement discovered:

Posts with emoticons receive a 33% higher share rate.

Posts with emoticons receive a 33% higher comment rate.

Posts with emoticons receive a 57% higher like rate.

When you’re editing your next post or putting together your content calendar, it could be worth playing around with some emoji’s to see how they fit in with your copy.

11 Simple Edits to Improve Your Social Media Content | SEJ

10. Ask a Question

You know that amazing feeling where you’re having a great conversation with a good friend? They’re listening to you, taking it all in and sharing thoughtful replies and questions. Great social media posts can provide that exact feeling, too.

To truly engage with your audience and build genuine connections, try to see social media as an opportunity to start a conversation. Every single social media post you share can make a lasting impression with someone if you use the right copy and really connect with them.

Questions are a great way to bring your reader into the conversation and increase replies and comments on your content. For example, instead of posting:Here are the most popular 360 videos on Facebook

You could try something like:

Have you watched any 360 videos on Facebook yet? Here are the most popular

11. Play With Punctuation

The rules around punctuation can get extremely complicated. But the truth is, you don’t need to know the difference between a serial comma and an Oxford comma to write a great social media post.

Feel free to experiment with punctuation a little in your content and don’t worry about being 100% correct with every comma or exclamation mark. As long as it feels good and reads nicely, you’ll be fine and including a few extra marks could even increase your engagement as Hubspot discovered:

Posts with exclamation mark (!) see 2.7% more interactions on average
Posts that ask questions (?) garner 23% more engagement on average

Over to You

It isn’t easy to edit content and make it stand out. But hopefully, the extra time and effort put into refining each post you share will be worth it.

Sometimes you’ll have to be a little ruthless and chop some copy away. Other times all it may take is one exclamation mark (!), or an emoji...

Categorized in Social

Providing your future buyers with easy and varied ways to get in touch with you is the most obvious way to improve your conversion rate.

So how to improve your contact page?

Here are a few ideas…

Add your full business address and a phone number

This is just the matter of being trustworthy, especially if you are into an ecommerce, medical or financial business where customers entrust you with their personal data (like credit card details).

Having this information visible is a clear sign to Google of trustworthiness of a site. But even more importantly, it eliminates anxiety in buyers as well.

It makes sense to markup this information properly:

Use click-to-call for the phone number for customers to easily call (especially from mobile phone). Here’s a code to use for that.

Use Schema.org to point search engines to your business official address (especially for local business. Here’s schema code for that (scroll down to the actual examples) or you can use this free online generator.

Add a call back widget

Call Back Widget

Probably my favorite little trick, a callback button can make all the difference in the world.

A callback button allows your customers to request a callback from your representative. It’s an easy lead as many clients click the button just out of curiosity.

Ringostat provides this widget as part of their overall call tracking and lead generation functionality. A nice thing about this solution is that it’s integrated, so together with the widget you get in-depth reports, multi-channel funnel analysis and your customer support team stats (enabling you to optimize the efficiency).My favorite part of the report is the ability to see the exact path that led the customer to the call:

Ringostat

Expand beyond your site

Social media is becoming such a huge part of customer engagement that you probably communicate with your audience more there than anywhere else. Using these platforms as a place to encourage contact is a great way to take things off site and into a more open sphere.

You can integrate the two methods pretty simply, as well. Just put buttons to your social media pages on your contact page, and vice versa.

Many people would argue that making your social media sites visible will expose your business to unhappy customers taking their irritation into public, but the truth is, they will discuss your business online anyway: You’d better be there to control the sentiment.

Provide a live chat option

Having someone on hand to ask general questions is a good way to connect with someone who maybe doesn’t want to call, but would like answers immediately.You can have set hours where they can contact you or a customer service agent, either with or without account access.

This also has the benefit of freeing up phone lines for calls that can’t be handled over a chat box. Like an interactive FAQ that also improves your engagement.I’ve listed some of the great live chat options in this article.

You can also follow the footsteps of bigger companies and try using a smart chatbot! Here’s a solid insight into current solutions put together by Tej Kohli:

"China has successfully used WeChat for a while now to enable customers to complete basic tasks such as ordering food, paying restaurant bills… Shopify recently acquired Kit, an all-round marketing masterpiece that can do everything from email customers to help you set discounts and handle 404 errors. Facebook recently announced that their new messenger platform is open to Chatbots, which could be a marketing game-changer.”

Curious to see where it goes!

Make it easy to email

ZenDesk

Trying to find an email address to email support or sales when you don’t have the time to chat or talk can be really annoying. For some reason, companies are starting to cut out email support lately.

But that only removes one option that they would have otherwise had, and no one likes having their choices reduced. Make it easy to find your email on your contact page. And consider putting it on the front page as well, next to your number.Most email forms are impersonal, annoying, and make it feel as though your message will never be seen. It is like shouting into the wind. Make it short and sweet.

ZenDesk is the simplest solution: It doesn’t force your customers to register in a ticket system, yet it provides your team with nice scaling and tracking options.

Source:  https://searchenginewatch.com/2016/06/15/how-to-optimize-your-contact-page-for-better-conversions/

Categorized in Market Research

In this post, I’ll look at how brands are making the most of data visualization and data-informed product design to bring out data’s creative side.Prompted by the agenda of a conference I recently attended, I asked myself a random question: is big data actually still a thing?

My conclusion was that it is, and is likely to remain so in the near future, though in a slightly different way. My view is that we will be seeing a lot more of data’s creative side.

So what it is data’s creative side?

The developed area in this regard is probably data-informed user experience (UX) design. But this is just the tip of the iceberg.There are (at least) two further areas of data-centric creativity that are growing rapidly and worth a closer look.

1. Data visualization – the communication of data in an easy to digest way

All the data in the world doesn’t mean anything if it cannot be understood clearly. For it to be understood, it should be communicated in an easy to digest manner. And that’s where data visualization comes in.

The visualization of data is often overlooked, especially here in Asia. If you’re guilty of doing so, here are two consumer-facing campaign examples that should put the presentation of data back on your radar.

Netflix: #Cokenomics

In order to promote the TV show Narcos, which tells the story of Pablo Escobar, Netflix created infographics that brought the economy of the Columbian cocaine trade to life in a socially engaging way.

Netflix built a whole campaign around the Columbian cartel’s cocaine data under the hashtag #Cokenomics.

pablo

The Twitter account @NarcosNetflix has almost 67,000 followers and posts regular tweets such as this one:

Here’s an example of content for Instagram:

Data Visualization_Netflix_Cokenomics_Mistress campaign_Instagram_600

The agency behind the campaign – Mistress – says its initial campaign drove more than 100,000 engagements.

Spotify: Found Them First

Spotify’s Found Them First gave music fans a way to prove that they were really into certain bands and singers before they actually became famous, for the bragging rights.Users’ listening data was used to show users all the artists they had discovered ahead of other Spotify listeners.

Within weeks of the launch in October 2014, the campaign had received more than a million visits and 100 million social media impressions, all without any media spend.

Data Visualization_Spotify_Found them first_600

Data tools

Data doesn’t actually need to be communicated to customers directly in most cases, but it’s important to get this across to internal stakeholders.

For such circumstances, there are several tools that can help you avoid the all-too-common walls of text with stock charts presentations, and substitute them with something a little more engaging and inspiring.

For example, if you are looking to beautify your charts, graphs, maps and timelines, check out the likes of RAW, Datawrapper, and Timeline JS.Should you have a little more time on your hands, and you also know how to code, have a look at D3.js, which comes highly recommended by my own team’s creative technologist.

If you really want to up your data visualization game, you can take some inspiration from Hans Rosling, known for his unconventional ways of bringing subjects such as population growth and income equalities to life in a more tangible way.

2. Data-informed product design

Another space to watch is data-informed product design. Now I’m not talking here about your typical research-initiated product innovation cycle. I’m talking about an evolution of data visualization that quite literally and directly translates data into an actual product.

Here are three of my favorite projects within this space. I can’t wait to see more like this.

Flowing Data: Multivariate Beer

Nathan Yau from Flowingdata took U.S. demographics to brew four different types of beer.

For example, he mapped population density to the total amount of hops, and ethnicity to the type of hops used.

See Flowingdata’s website for a more detailed description of the process and other ways it transforms data.

Data Visualization_Flowingdata_05-Bottles_600

Tempescope

This was invented by Japanese software engineer Ken Kawamoto. It’s a device which displays either current weather conditions or forecasts them physically.

Meshu

This is a concept which takes important life locations such as cities or even specific street addresses, maps the paths between them, and finally transforms them into a piece of jewelry.

Data Visualization_meshu_600

The examples above demonstrate that there are no boundaries to data’s creativity, though a lot of it is still driven by artists, entrepreneurs and scientists. I hope that, in future, the marketing and advertising industry will recognise more strongly the beauty that lies within data and the compelling stories it can tell.

Storytelling is after all, a major part of our jobs.

source:  https://searchenginewatch.com/2016/06/17/how-brands-are-using-data-visualisation-in-social-campaigns/

Categorized in Market Research

The early 2000s saw the advent of platforms on the web: somewhere that bloggers and publishers could host their content without having to worry about the back end, while still maintaining control over their own outlets and what they posted.

More than a decade later, and many of the social media platforms of today are starting to suspiciously resemble blogging platforms, becoming a place for users to publish content instead of just share links and brief updates. At the same time, huge companies like Facebook and Google have developed native publishing platforms aimed at providing a superior user experience for an increasingly mobile audience.

We have a wider choice of platforms to publish to than ever before, and each is promising the fastest, shiniest interfaces that will put our content directly in front of huge audiences we can’t reach through other means.

But how can we manage to spread ourselves between so many different outlets, and what are the drawbacks of these platforms? Veteran digital journalist and university lecturer Adam Tinworth gave a presentation at CMA’s most recent Digital Breakfast on ‘playing the platform game’ which looked at what this plethora of new tools – and gatekeepers – means for online content.

Social publishers and walled gardens

In 2015, we reached a watershed moment: in June, Facebook surpassed Google as the top referring site to publishers, according to Parse.ly. Clearly, we are now living in a very different internet age, in which social publishers dominate over search engines as a means of distribution and referral.

Tinworth remarked in a panel discussion later in the Digital Breakfast that social networks have taken over from search engines in the role of “finding something to read” online, leaving search engines to fill more of an “answer engine” role. This has huge ramifications for both SEO and social publishing, some of which are already being felt, and others which will make themselves known further down the line.

A graph by Parse.ly showing referral traffic for Google's various properties (including search engines and Google News) versus Facebook between April 2012 and October 2015. The Facebook line starts off much lower at around 10% of referred traffic, with Google between 30 and 40%. It climbs steadily upwards while Google declines slightly, briefly overtaking it in October 2014, before overtaking it for good in June 2015.

The other huge trend affecting the way that traffic reaches sites online is of course mobile. An Ofcom report from August 2015 declared that the UK is “now a smartphone society”, with 2/3 of Britons owning a smartphone and 33% seeing it as the most important device for going online, above laptops at 30%.

The trend towards mobile has affected the types of platforms springing up that we can publish to. Take Snapchat, the ultimate mobile-native social app, whose Discover publishing platform was just revamped to become much more visual, allowing users to more easily browse content at a glance.

Although Discover is only available to a select few publishers, many more brands and businesses use Snapchat for content marketing, and the redesign shows that Snapchat is serious about pushing further into the publishing space.

Two side-by-side screenshots showing the new, more visual, Snapchat Discover, with large picture thumbnails of Discover stories overlaid with text.

Meanwhile, publishing platforms like Facebook Instant Articles and Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) have come about with the goal of providing users the best possible experience in mobile. They aim to load fast and look sleek, getting rid of the distracting artefacts which clutter the desktop web to deliver a streamlined product.

Instant Articles and AMP, while they are often mentioned in the same breath, take fundamentally different approaches to providing a better mobile experience. AMP is an open-source project aimed at reinventing the code on which the mobile web runs (from HTML to AMP-HTML), and can be used by anyone to build a faster mobile site. Instant Articles is more selective and restrictive, requiring publishers to have a Facebook page, and allowing them to begin publishing subject to having a sample of their content reviewed by Facebook.

A screenshot of guidelines for Facebook Instant Articles, stipulating that publishers must create at least 10 articles in their Production library before submitting for review, and the Facebook team will review the articles and provide feedback within 3-5 business days. Below this, a notice states "Your review is currently pending. Article reviews are usually completed within 3-5 business days."

But both companies ultimately have the same goal with their platforms, which is to keep users within the spaces they own, their walled gardens, for as long as possible. Readers who click on Sponsored links in Facebook Instant Articles find themselves redirected to other Instant Articles, still within Facebook; and Accelerated Mobile Pages allow you to swipe between news stories without leaving Google.

Other new publication platforms like Apple News have the same basic aim. Even Medium, which appears at first brush to just be another, more social-oriented take on the blogging platform, forces writers who publish with it to give up much of the editorial control they would normally enjoy over how they offer their work, in order to produce content (and revenue) for someone else’s branded platform.

As Tinworth put it in his presentation, “There’s a whole new set of gatekeepers between us and audiences.” But if you can connect with much bigger audiences than you would be able to reach without them, then it’s worth it, right?

The danger of sites as gatekeepers

As we’ve established, publication platforms like Facebook Instant Articles and Medium can provide excellent user experiences, but at the cost of giving over control of your content to the brand whose platform you use.

There’s another, more general, drawback to this proliferation of platforms, which is that suddenly publishers are having to publish to a whole range of different formats. Publishers who are serious about social media, said Tinworth, have known for some time that you need to insert certain metadata in order to do well on those sites, making sure that your social posts look clean and carry the right information.

A slide from Adam Tinworth's presentation entitled "Existing Metadata" with two screenshots of social posts, one on Twitter and one on Facebook. Both have a short comment by the poster above, followed by a card showing a picture, headline and two-line content preview.

Multi-platform publishing takes this to the next level, requiring publishers and content creators to cater to wildly different formats: the requirements for Facebook Instant Articles are different to AMP, which is different to Apple News, which is very different to Snapchat, and so on. But if you want to get engagement on these platforms, this is the game you have to play.

“It’s complicating what was a fairly simple and opening publishing format,” said Adam Tinworth.

The danger of putting these different companies (Google, Facebook, Apple) in front of our content as gatekeepers is that they start to call the shots and tell us exactly how we ought to publish.

So, away with platforms, then? Should we all stick doggedly to hosting all of our content on domains and websites that we have complete ownership and control over? Well, not necessarily. There’s still a lot to be gained from publishing to platforms, and ignoring them means missing out on a great deal of opportunities to connect with the audiences who use them.

What’s good about publishing to platforms?

As Tinworth pointed out, we can’t afford to ignore platforms: they’re incredibly valuable for finding audiences and getting our content out there. And there are other good things about publishing to them.

Platforms are rich experiences where people hang out online, and deliver good traffic and interaction. Posting content there can provide a huge visibility boost, especially if the platform features it in some way; and it reduces the need to drag people, by hook or by crook, over to your own website when they’d rather not go.

A presentation slide detailing the good aspects of publishing to platforms. The bullet points are as follows: Rich experiences where people hang out online; Deliver good traffic and interaction; Often favoured by the platforms; Reduce the need to drag people to your own site.

Mike Burgess, another speaker at the Digital Breakfast, also advised that you can have success by being early onto platforms even when they’re not that successful overall, like Apple News.

Of course, there’s also the bad, which I’ve given plenty of attention to in this article: publishing to multiple platforms means more APIs and feed formats to support, and that extra bit of distance between you and your readers. It’s harder to get access to meaningful analytics, which can be issued at the discretion of the platform, and we’re at the mercy of the platform in other ways – including if they decide to charge.

A presentation slide detailing the bad aspects of publishing to platforms. The bullet points are as follows: Lots of APIs and feed formats to support; Distancing relationship with readers; Analytics can be tricky; We're at the mercy of the platforms; And they do like charging... 

Where does that leave publishers who want to get the greatest returns out of the platform game, however that might mean playing it? Ultimately, said Adam Tinworth, the trick is to play it strategically. It’s inevitable that publishers will have to play the platform game, and the key is finding the platforms that the audience you want to target are using.

Mike Burgess gave an excellent example of this in his own presentation when he talked about travel brands on Instagram. Instagram is home to an absolute wealth of travel-related content, with 353 million travel-related hashtags on the app.

People turn to Instagram in droves for inspiration on where to go for their travels, spending an average of 21 minutes per day perusing the app; and yet the travel industry has been the second-slowest (after financial services) at adopting and making use of Instagram.

Businesses can’t afford to be too high-minded about platforms and social publishing, for fear of missing out on golden opportunities like these. At the same time, it’s also worth being aware of the risks and drawbacks, and keeping an eye on them so that you know if they ever start to outweigh the benefits.

Source:https://searchenginewatch.com/2016/06/17/should-publishers-and-content-marketers-be-playing-the-platform-game/

One of the functions of your website is to help alleviate many of the fears visitors may have about doing business with you.

You have to make them confident and comfortable with making the purchase. Failure to earn their trust is a failure to earn their business.

All things being equal, web users will make purchases from sites they feel confident about. All things not being equal, this confidence often trumps other “important” factors, such as pricing.

It is often difficult for small business owners to see their websites objectively. A handful of people throw a few compliments their way, and they assume everyone else feels the same. This then prevents them from making important and necessary changes because they “get compliments on that a lot.”

However, when a more objective viewpoint is applied, you can get past the few compliments and finally see the glaring omissions that may be preventing them from earning even more customers.

Below I have outlined five trust symbols you can use to build confidence in your brand and increase your ability to close the deal.

1. Risk-Free Guarantees

risk free guarantee

There is very little difference between an absolute guarantee and a risk-free guarantee, but I think one feels more genuine than the other. An absolute guarantee says, “This won’t break,” where a risk-free guarantee says, “If it breaks within three years, we’ll replace it.” The two guarantees may offer the same solution, but one implies something we know isn’t true (this won’t break), while the other recognizes the possibilities (this will break, but hopefully not within the next three years) and immediately moves to a solution.

Web marketing offers a good real-world example of the two. Someone who says “Guaranteed top search engine rankings or your money back” is likely up to something sketchy. But the web marketer who says, “If you’re not satisfied with the results, this is how we’ll remedy it,” is acknowledging that 1) they don’t control rankings and 2) you know they don’t control rankings. It is a more credible guarantee.

SimplifiedSolar provides a good example. They don’t say their products will never break, but they promise “If it breaks, we’ll fix it free.” Notice the down-to-earth language. Many guarantees are fraught with legalese and big words, but not Simplified Solar’s. People want to do business with real people, and this sounds like it was written by a human, adding another layer of security to the guarantee.

Guarantee example

Offering risk-free guarantees helps ease your shopper’s worries about what happens if the product isn’t what they expected. Providing options for returning products (or getting refunded for services) for whatever reason closes the confidence gap just in case something goes wrong.

2. Helpful Content

Content is critical to the sales process. You have to hit all the touch points that entice, compel and propel the visitor to take action. But there is more to content than selling.

Using content to sell often keeps the focus on all the positive aspects of the product or service. That’s important, but it all too frequently neglects to address the potential downsides or the questions customers might have. Part of giving your visitors confidence in what you do means addressing potential negatives.

If you’re familiar with the grocery chain Aldi, you know there are trade-offs for their low prices. Their website does not shy away from what could be perceived as possible negatives, such as their limited selection and hours. Instead, it tackles those issues head-on and explains why the chain operates the way they do.Negative info screenshot

Negative info screenshot

Content should make the shopper feel the warmth, smell the aroma, taste the sweetness, experience the rush and enjoy the peace and comfort a product will bring them. But it should also address the nagging ‘what if’s’. What if the product arrives damaged? What if it’s the wrong size? What if it doesn’t work? That’s more than just guarantee talk; it is an opportunity to ease concerns preventing them from moving forward.

3. Testimonials and Product Reviews

Customer reviews

Testimonials and reviews provide shoppers with valuable insight into the company they are contemplating doing business with. Studies show 90% of purchasing decisions are influenced by reviews. Looking at this from the other side, it means you only have a 10% chance of making a sale if you don’t have good reviews.

Seeking out testimonials and product reviews from satisfied customers is an important part of effective marketing. Not only do these reviews influence decisions, but they can also influence your ability to get into the search results.

Even negative reviews and testimonials can be valuable. These are powerful opportunities to show other potential customers how you solve known problems and you’re willing to go the extra mile for customer satisfaction. It also lends credibility to the reviews. Reviews look fake when they are all 5-star glowing references.

4. Company Info and Security Assurances

Company information is essential. Most shoppers care a great deal about who they are doing business with and how their personal information will be handled.

Company About Us pages are frequently visited by those who want to know more about the background of the company, its owners, and the people they’ll be working with. Contact pages assure customers you are reachable and able to assist when needed.

I, unfortunately, learned how important it is to have multiple ways to contact a company when I left my iPad on a Southwest flight recently (DOPE!). Fortunately, through both its app and its website, Southwest offers plenty of ways to keep in touch…and I took advantage of as many as possible in my frantic attempts to retrieve my device, including the main phone line, their baggage office, and their website form. As you can see, there are plenty of other options I could have tried, but fortunately, they got back to me by the next day, so I didn’t have to blow up all their contact avenues!

Contact options

Privacy policies are also important because they let visitors know they won’t end up on a spam list somewhere because they submitted a phone or email address on one of your site forms.

These are things that put the visitor at ease. It gives them an opportunity to get to know you and have a better understanding of how they’ll be treated.

social engagement

Shoppers are 67% more likely to make purchases from companies they follow, and 71% more likely to purchase based on social media referrals. If you’re not active in social media, you are missing out on a huge amount of potential

Using social media to engage your customers–not just promote yourself–is the new expectation for companies who are serious about building their online presence and authority. Not only does it increase brand awareness, but it also takes the “about us” assurances to the next level. Customers aren’t just reading about you; they are building a relationship with your company.

Familiarity breeds confidence. Every interaction you have with a potential customer allows that customer to establish a deeper connection with you and your company.

Build Confident Shoppers

Building a successful business is more than just selling your product or service. It’s about establishing confidence. Lack of confidence leads to lack of sales. The more confident each shopper is that your company offers the best opportunity to get their needs met, the more likely you are to get and maintain that customer.

But remember, the sale is just the beginning of the relationship. You not only have to prove their confidence wasn’t in vain, but you also have to continue to demonstrate your worthiness to maintain their business.

How do you build your visitors’ trust in your company?

sources:  https://www.searchenginejournal.com/absolutely-irrefutably-unequivocally-important-thing-website-must/165328/?ver=165328X2

Social media has overtaken television as young people's main source of news, according to a report.Of the 18-to-24-year-olds surveyed, 28% cited social media as their main news source, compared with 24% for TV.

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism research also suggests 51% of people with online access use social media as a news source.

This trend and the rising use of mobile phones to access news are undermining traditional business models.

Chart showing that more people now access news from social media in the US, but most use news apps in the UK

The report, now in its fifth year, is based on a YouGov survey of about 50,000 people across 26 countries, including 2,000 Britons.

In its introduction, the report says "a second wave of disruption" has hit news organisations around the world, with "potentially profound consequences both for publishers and the future of news production".

Analysis: Rory Cellan-Jones, BBC Technology correspondent

For older media organisations struggling to find a profitable path in the online era, there is little comfort to be found in this report.Under 10% of readers in English-speaking countries have paid anything for online news in the past year - so advertising looks the only sustainable business model.

No wonder, then, that the march of the ad-blockers is seen by some news businesses as a threat to their very survival.And while there still seems to be a big appetite for news, it is to social-media platforms that users are increasingly turning to find it.

This means Facebook is the most powerful force in global news, potentially offering publishers access to vast audiences but leaving them dependent on the whims of its algorithm.

The good news for the old media is it is still producing far more of the heavyweight news stories read by the online audience, with readers turning to the newcomers for softer fare.

The bad news is that making money out of the expensive business of serious journalism is getting ever harder.

Chart showing that Facebook is the top social network for news out of 26 countries surveyed.

Facebook and other social media outlets have moved beyond being "places of news discovery" to become the place people consume their news, it suggests.

And news via social media is particularly popular among women and young people.
Meanwhile, sales of printed newspapers continue to fall, while consumers remain reluctant to pay much for online news content.

The study found Facebook was the most common source - used by 44% of all those surveyed - to watch, share and comment on news.

Next came YouTube on 19% , with Twitter on 10%.
Apple News accounted for 4% in the US and 3% in the UK, while messaging app Snapchat was used by just 1% or less in most countries.

Facebook has recently been embroiled in a row over whether its trending topics section - which is edited by humans and designed to highlight the subjects being discussed by users around the world - was suppressing stories that supported conservative political viewpoints.

The social media giant strenuously denied the accusations, and an internal investigation found no evidence of bias - but it did make a number of changes, including:

updating terminology in its guidelines to human reviewers
giving more oversight to the review team no longer relying on lists of external websites and news outlets to assess the importance of topics in stories

News by algorithm

According to the survey, consumers are happy to have their news selected by algorithms, with 36% saying they would like news chosen based on what they had read before and 22% happy for their news agenda to be based on what their friends had read.

But 30% still wanted the human oversight of editors and other journalists in picking the news agenda and many had fears about algorithms creating news "bubbles" where people only see news from like-minded viewpoints.

"People like the convenience of algorithms choosing their news but are worried about whether that would mean they were missing out on key points or challenging viewpoints," said lead author Nic Newman.

Percentage who have paid for online news in last year

Norway 27%

Poland 20%

Sweden 20%

Italy 16%

Denmark 15%

Finland 15%

Japan 12%

Netherlands 12%

Belgium 12%

France 11%

Switzerland 10%

Australia 10%

Spain 10%

USA 9%

Ireland 9%

Portugal 9%

Canada 9%

Germany 8%

Hungary 8%

Czech Republic 7%

Austria 7%

Greece 7%

UK 7%

The other big change noted by the research was the continued rise of smartphones to access news.

Most of those surveyed said they used a smartphone to access news, with the highest levels in Sweden (69%), Korea (66%) and Switzerland (61%), and they were more likely to use social media rather than going directly to a news website or app.

Chart showing that more people surveyed in the UK now access news via mobile rather than desktop

The report also suggests users are noticing the original news brand behind social media content less than half of the time, something that is likely to worry traditional media outlets.

Such outlets "cannot afford to ignore social media, especially if they want to reach young people and women", said Mr Newman, but he admitted that created a dilemma.

"In doing so, they risk losing control of content and that relationship with the reader which can drive them to other content, so they have to balance using social media platforms with building up a loyal user base of their own," he said.

The report is supported by BBC News, Google and Ofcom, among other partners.

Source:  http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-36528256

Categorized in Social

People are spending less time on social media apps, in some cases substantially less, a new study from marketing intelligence firm SimilarWeb found.

The company compared Android users' daily time spent on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat from January to March 2016 with the same period in 2015. The firm looked at data from the U.S, UK, Germany, Spain, Australia, India, South Africa, Brazil and Spain.

Facebook's Instagram saw the biggest year-over-year drop — usage was down 23.7 percent this year, closely followed by Twitter (down 23.4 percent), Snapchat (down 15.7 percent) and Facebook (down 8 percent), the study found.

Twitter's stock is trading down around 34 percent, and Facebook's stock is up almost 14 percent so far this year.

In the U.S. — typically social media's most lucrative market — Instagram use was down 36.2 percent, Twitter was down 27.9 percent, Snapchat was down 19.2 percent and Facebook fell 6.7 percent. Despite this drop, Facebook users in the U.S. continued to spend the most time using the app: 45 minutes and 29 seconds every day on average. Facebook users in India used the app the least, spending 22 minutes and 59 seconds daily, on average.

Americans are also the biggest Snapchatters, spending 18 minutes and 43 seconds using the app daily, followed by the French (16 minutes and 7 seconds), and then the British (15 minutes and 27 seconds).

Across all four apps, users spent the least time using Twitter. Spanish users spent the most time using the app (13 minutes and 31 seconds daily), closely followed by Americans (13 minutes and 30 seconds) and the French (13 minutes and 7 seconds). This was despite overall declines in usage across these geographies.

Current installs — the number of apps installed on devices — for the big four social media apps among Android users in the countries studied were down nine percent year over year. Meanwhile, Facebook's messaging apps — WhatsApp and Messenger — increased installs, up 15 percent and two percent respectively. Both Snapchat and Instagram saw a rise in installs in certain countries. Snapchat installs increased in Germany, Spain, India and Brazil, where the increase was most pronounced at 22 percent year over year. Instagram installs rose in France, Germany and the U.S.

Source:  http://www.cnbc.com/2016/06/06/people-are-spending-much-less-time-on-social-media-apps-said-report.html

Categorized in Science & Tech

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