If your iPhone has been stolen or lost, Apple offers a free tool to help you get it back. And, even if you can't get it back, you can prevent a thief from getting at your personal data.

To do this, you need Find My iPhone, a free service that's part of iCloud, that uses your phone's GPS and Internet connection to help you locate it on a map and take certain actions. No one wants to need this article, but if you do, these instructions will help you use Find My iPhone to locate a lost or stolen iPhone.

What You'll Need

How to Use Find My iPhone to Find or Erase Your Phone

As already mentioned, you MUST have the Find My iPhone service set up on your device before it was stolen. If you did, go to https://www.icloud.com/ in a web browser. 

There's also a Find My iPhone app (link opens iTunes) that you can install on another iOS device to track yours. This article covers using the web-based tool, though using the app is pretty similar. If your iPhone or iPod touch (or iPad or Mac) is missing, follow these steps to try to recover it:

  1. Log in to iCloud using the account you used when setting up Find My iPhone. This is probably your Apple ID/iTunes account.

  1. Click on Find iPhone under the web-based tools offered by iCloud. Find My iPhone immediately begins trying to locate all the devices you have it enabled on. You'll see onscreen messages as it works.

  2. If you have more than one device set up for Find My iPhone, click All Devices at the top of the screen and select the device you're looking for.

  1. If it locates your device, Find My iPhone zooms in on the map and shows the location of the device using a green dot. When this happens, you can zoom in or out of the map, and view it in standard, satellite, and hybrid modes, like in Google Maps. When your device is found, a window appears in the right corner of your web browser. It lets you know how much battery your phone has and offers a few options.

  2. Click Play Sound. This is the first option because sending a sound to the device is best when you think you've lost your device nearby and want help finding it. It can also be helpful if you think someone has your device but is denying it.  

  3. You can also click Lost Mode. This allows you to remotely lock the device's screen and set a passcode (even if you hadn't previously set up a passcode). This prevents a thief from using your device or accessing your personal data.

    Once you click the Lost Mode button, enter the passcode you want to use. If you already have a passcode on the device, that code will be used. You can also enter a phone number where the person who has the device can reach you (this is optional; you may not want to share this information if it's been stolen). You also have the option to write a message that is displayed on the device's screen. 

  1. If you don't think you'll get the phone back, you can delete all data from the device. To do this, click the Erase button. You'll see a warning (basically, don't do this unless you're absolutely sure you want to). Click the box that says you understand what you're doing and click Erase. This will delete all the data on your phone, preventing the thief from accessing it.

    If you get the device back later, you can restore your data from backup.

  2. If you think your device is on the move, click the green dot representing your phone and then click the rounded arrow in the pop-up window. This updates the device's location using the latest GPS data.

    What To Do If Your iPhone Is Offline

    Even if you have set up Find My iPhone, your device may not show up on the map. Reasons for why this may happen include that the device:

    • is turned off or out of battery
    • isn't connected to the Internet
    • has had its Location Services disabled.

    For more on that situation, read Why Is Find My iPhone Not Working?

    If Find My iPhone isn't working for whatever reason, you have a handful of options:

    • ​Check the Notify Me When Found box. Find My iPhone will let you know when your device next connects to the Internet so you can find it
    • The three options – Play Sound, Lost Mode, and Erase – are available. Use whichever you want and the next time the device is connected to the Internet, the option you picked will happen 
    • Choose Remove from Account if you've sold or given away the device and don't want it to show up in Find My iPhone anymore.

    Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Sam Costello

    Categorized in How to

    With nothing more than a standard Web browser, cybercriminals can find personal, private information all over the public Internet. It isn't just legitimate services - from genealogy sites to public records and social media - that can be mined and exploited for nefarious purposes. Openly malicious criminal activities are also happening on the public Internet.

     

    True, much of the cybercrime underground consists of private and established communities that don't appear in a normal search engine and are not accessible by regular users without special authorization.

     

    However, according to the team at identity protection and fraud detection provider CSID, there are different levels of cybercriminal resources - and not all are so tightly protected. The quality and quantity of the more easily accessible forums are still high, say the CSID team, and anyone can access content such as stolen credit cards, cyberattack tools, and even advanced malware, which can be leveraged with minimal technical know-how required.

     

    Adam Tyler, chief innovation officer at CSID, describes how black-market organizations are becoming more like traditional online businesses we visit and buy from every day. “For example," he says, "many sites now have their own Facebook, Twitter and even YouTube pages to advise their member base on new attacks and tools that are available.”

     

     

     

     

    Data sold on criminal marketplaces “age quickly, meaning that once the information is stolen, it has to be used for fraudulent purposes quickly,” says Christopher Doman, consulting analyst at Vectra Networks. “The more times the information is abused for fraud, the more the information will be devalued.”

     

    “Companies should have these marketplaces monitored, looking for trends in data breaches and attacks as well as to see if any of their data has been compromised,” says Carefree Solutions’s CEO Paul San Soucie. “One point that I’m not sure is evident is that there is more public and Dark Web research than any one IT person can handle. Researching and absorbing this information requires significant training and experience. Even large US banks that have dedicated security staff are not able to do some of the research and analysis that specialized reconnaissance teams can perform.”

     

    San Soucie nevertheless suggests treading carefully when doing this research. "While you can get to most of these sites using standard https, I still consider them dark and strongly recommend accessing them via a VPN as both criminal and government sources track access in some cases.”

     

    Read on for a collection of some of the popular sites where private data, credentials, and attack tools are up for sale, or even for free download.

     

    Bonus Source: Novice Cybercrime Communities

Social sites, communities, marketplaces and other places for people new to the cybercrime underground to learn their craft have become increasingly available, easy to find, and easy to use, even for the most novice user.

'The introduction of low cost-domains, the availability of cheap shared web hosting, and the large number of free-to-use open-source community platforms has enabled fraudsters to easily set up and run dark web communities in a matter of a few minutes,' says Tyler. 'This has led to a huge explosion in the number of communities that are accessible and available, even for those hunting for information via a search engine.'

Image Source: CSID

     

    Bonus Source: Novice Cybercrime Communities

     

    Social sites, communities, marketplaces and other places for people new to the cybercrime underground to learn their craft have become increasingly available, easy to find, and easy to use, even for the most novice user.

     

    “The introduction of low cost-domains, the availability of cheap shared web hosting, and the large number of free-to-use open-source community platforms has enabled fraudsters to easily set up and run dark web communities in a matter of a few minutes,” says Tyler. “This has led to a huge explosion in the number of communities that are accessible and available, even for those hunting for information via a search engine.”

     

    AlphaBay Market and Forum

AlphaBay, founded in 2014 by alpha02 (a well-known carder) and DeSnake, has become the most popular cybercrime market in 2016, since some competitive sites have shut down. This market emulates popular e-commerce sites like eBay or Amazon in appearance, navigation, and features, and accept digital currency like Bitcoin. 

Yet, these customers aren't shopping for best-selling books, vintage watches, groceries or diapers; rather they are browsing the selection of tens of thousands of items offered by AlphaBay for items related to drugs, malware, exploits, hacked accounts, stolen credentials, and other illicit goods and services - including hacking services.

AlphaBay is better concealed and harder to access than some of the sites on this list; much of it cannot be found through a Google search. It is located on the unindexed, encrypted segment of Internet, the 'Dark Web,' and therefore must be accessed via the Tor network, which anonymizes all the traffic going to and from the site. 

That isn't so difficult to do, though.

'Thanks to Tor proxies, AlphaBay can be easily accessed through your normal web browser,' says Christopher Doman, consulting analyst at Vectra Networks. The Tor Browser with a pre-configured browser can be run off of a USB flash drive, for example.

'Because the information [on AlphaBay] is personally identifiable,' says Doman, 'it can be used in many ways, which include using the information as 'leads' to enable other scams and activities.'

These 'leads' may be used, for example, by:

- Craigslist sellers - to give themselves high ratings for past service
- Betting agencies - to manipulate audience voting in 'Dancing With the Stars'
- Lobbyists - to support their own causes by posting fake 'citizen' feedback


'Since AlphaBay can be easily accessed by criminals with tools such as the Tor browser, it also means that legitimate companies and researchers can also use the Tor browser to see what is for sale,' says Adam Meyer, chief security officer at SurfWatch Labs. 'Companies should be monitoring the listings for any threats that may impact their organization or those in their supply chain.'

Image Source: Carefree Solutions, SurfWatch Labs, Vectra Networks

     

    AlphaBay Market and Forum

     

    AlphaBay, founded in 2014 by alpha02 (a well-known carder) and DeSnake, has become the most popular cybercrime market in 2016, since some competitive sites have shut down. This market emulates popular e-commerce sites like eBay or Amazon in appearance, navigation, and features, and accept digital currency like Bitcoin.

     

     

     

     

    Yet, these customers aren’t shopping for best-selling books, vintage watches, groceries or diapers; rather they are browsing the selection of tens of thousands of items offered by AlphaBay for items related to drugs, malware, exploits, hacked accounts, stolen credentials, and other illicit goods and services — including hacking services.

     

    AlphaBay is better concealed and harder to access than some of the sites on this list; much of it cannot be found through a Google search. It is located on the unindexed, encrypted segment of Internet, the "Dark Web," and therefore must be accessed via the Tor network, which anonymizes all the traffic going to and from the site.

     

    That isn't so difficult to do, though.

     

    “Thanks to Tor proxies, AlphaBay can be easily accessed through your normal web browser,” says Christopher Doman, consulting analyst at Vectra Networks. The Tor Browser with a pre-configured browser can be run off of a USB flash drive, for example.

     

    “Because the information [on AlphaBay] is personally identifiable," says Doman, "it can be used in many ways, which include using the information as ‘leads’ to enable other scams and activities.”

     

    These "leads" may be used, for example, by:
    • Craigslist sellers – to give themselves high ratings for past service
    • Betting agencies – to manipulate audience voting in “Dancing With the Stars”
    • Lobbyists – to support their own causes by posting fake “citizen” feedback

     

    “Since AlphaBay can be easily accessed by criminals with tools such as the Tor browser, it also means that legitimate companies and researchers can also use the Tor browser to see what is for sale,” says Adam Meyer, chief security officer at SurfWatch Labs. “Companies should be monitoring the listings for any threats that may impact their organization or those in their supply chain.”

     

    Source: CardingMafia.ws

CardingMafia.ws is a carding community that provides tutorials and other information that's quite useful and valuable for fraudsters. According to the CSID team, customers can find tutorials on how to scam users, crack software, and steal credit cards.

'Visitors will also see advertisements and find direct-to-third-party suppliers of illegally obtained data, such as credit card data and PayPal account data,' says Adam Tyler, chief innovation officer at CSID. 'This is a global community that allows for collaboration on illegal tasks, giving the community the power to fully extract monetary value from its targets.'

'Malware and Trojan attacks are no longer an exclusive or technically advanced threat,' adds Tyler. 'The tools used to conduct these attacks are available to anyone with a modicum of knowledge and the ability to search online.'

(Image Source: CSID)

     

    Source: CardingMafia.ws

     

    CardingMafia.ws is a carding community that provides tutorials and other information that’s quite useful and valuable for fraudsters. According to the CSID team, customers can find tutorials on how to scam users, crack software, and steal credit cards.

     

    "Visitors will also see advertisements and find direct-to-third-party suppliers of illegally obtained data, such as credit card data and PayPal account data,” says Adam Tyler, chief innovation officer at CSID. “This is a global community that allows for collaboration on illegal tasks, giving the community the power to fully extract monetary value from its targets.”

     

    “Malware and Trojan attacks are no longer an exclusive or technically advanced threat,” adds Tyler. “The tools used to conduct these attacks are available to anyone with a modicum of knowledge and the ability to search online.”

     

    DeepDotWeb

DeepDotWeb is essentially a central source for news, information, and search engine capabilities for the deep Web and its collection of criminal markets.

'While it is unclear who the owners are for this website, what is clear is that they are a group of people who want to educate people on the issues surrounding the dark Web,' says San Soucie.

The site reports on dark Web and marketplace issues. The information found on this site can be used to keep people safe while surfing or purchasing items on the dark Web. It can also be used for evil by people who are looking for illegal items or sites.

'Business should keep up with the news articles if they have concerns about their reputation or employees on the dark Web,' adds San Soucie.

(Image Source: Carefree Solutions)

     

    DeepDotWeb

     

    DeepDotWeb is essentially a central source for news, information, and search engine capabilities for the deep Web and its collection of criminal markets.

     

    “While it is unclear who the owners are for this website, what is clear is that they are a group of people who want to educate people on the issues surrounding the dark Web,” says San Soucie.

     

     

     

     

    The site reports on dark Web and marketplace issues. The information found on this site can be used to keep people safe while surfing or purchasing items on the dark Web. It can also be used for evil by people who are looking for illegal items or sites.

     

    “Business should keep up with the news articles if they have concerns about their reputation or employees on the dark Web,” adds San Soucie.

     

    freetrojanbotnet.com

Freetrojanbotnet.com is effectively an advanced malware distribution service that gives users access to various malware and other malicious tools for free download and use. The tools range from simple bot/rat Trojans to advanced MitB (man in the browser) variants like Zeus, Citadel, and SpyEye.

'Users can easily and freely download these packages and utilize them to conduct their own attacks,' says Tyler. 'Previously, some of the tools offered on the site were licensed for thousands of dollars every month. Now anyone can download them for free with no initial outlay or cost required.'

(Image Source: CSID)

     

    freetrojanbotnet.com

     

    Freetrojanbotnet.com is effectively an advanced malware distribution service that gives users access to various malware and other malicious tools for free download and use. The tools range from simple bot/rat Trojans to advanced MitB (man in the browser) variants like Zeus, Citadel, and SpyEye.

     

    “Users can easily and freely download these packages and utilize them to conduct their own attacks,” says Tyler. “Previously, some of the tools offered on the site were licensed for thousands of dollars every month. Now anyone can download them for free with no initial outlay or cost required.”

     

    fprvtzone.ws

Fprvtzone.ws provides both public (i.e., free) and private (paid-for) sections, where fraudsters can find tutorials on how to access data without authorization and how to use the stolen information. It is also a marketplace for individuals to sell, buy, and distribute illegally obtained data.

'Visitors can find tutorials on how to scam users, crack software, steal credit cards, and engage in various other illegal services,' says Tyler. 

Sites like fprvtzone confirm that valuable data is easily and freely accessible to nearly anyone who wants it. 'Companies need to be aware of the risks and ensure that they take steps to protect not only their personal information and accounts, but also their personal devices used to store and hold this data,' adds Tyler. 

Image Source: CSID

     

    fprvtzone.ws

     

    Fprvtzone.ws provides both public (i.e., free) and private (paid-for) sections, where fraudsters can find tutorials on how to access data without authorization and how to use the stolen information. It is also a marketplace for individuals to sell, buy, and distribute illegally obtained data.

     

    “Visitors can find tutorials on how to scam users, crack software, steal credit cards, and engage in various other illegal services,” says Tyler.

     

     

     

     

    Sites like fprvtzone confirm that valuable data is easily and freely accessible to nearly anyone who wants it. “Companies need to be aware of the risks and ensure that they take steps to protect not only their personal information and accounts, but also their personal devices used to store and hold this data,” adds Tyler.

     

    HANSA Market

Created in response to the many exit scams cybercriminals have conducted over the past few years - where admins have shut down their sites, taking the hefty escrow accounts with them - HANSA is a Dark Web marketplace focused on the security of its users. 

'HANSA is claiming to side more with users in any dispute which is another attempt to get more 'buyers' to use the site,' says Meyer of SurfWatch Labs.

'The market boasts that its multi-signature escrow payment process ensures that theft from either party is impossible,' says Meyer, 'although they are not the only marketplace to offer those payment options.' 

Although HANSA vendors sell a variety of tools and information, pirated products appear most often. This includes software, video games, movies, books and other media as well as credentials to access related accounts, like online gaming platforms or Netflix.

Image Source: SurfWatch Labs

     

    HANSA Market

     

    Created in response to the many exit scams cybercriminals have conducted over the past few years – where admins have shut down their sites, taking the hefty escrow accounts with them – HANSA is a Dark Web marketplace focused on the security of its users.

     

    “HANSA is claiming to side more with users in any dispute which is another attempt to get more 'buyers' to use the site,” says Meyer of SurfWatch Labs.

     

    “The market boasts that its multi-signature escrow payment process ensures that theft from either party is impossible," says Meyer, "although they are not the only marketplace to offer those payment options."

     

    Although HANSA vendors sell a variety of tools and information, pirated products appear most often. This includes software, video games, movies, books and other media as well as credentials to access related accounts, like online gaming platforms or Netflix.

     

    TheRealDeal Market

TheRealDeal Market, which was launched in early 2015 by four founders, focuses on selling malicious code and exploits.

'Law enforcement operations against the cybercrime forums Hell and Darkode in July 2015 led to arrests that tied up several members of TheRealDeal team,' says Adam Meyer, chief security officer at SurfWatch Labs. 'This caused the site to shut down for a few months last year until it relaunched in December 2015 under the management of the main admin, identified as S.P., and an old vendor.'

According to Meyer, the TheRealDeal recently made headlines for the sale of massive databases of user credentials stolen from LinkedIn, MySpace, and Yahoo, as well as a number of stolen healthcare databases.

'TheRealDeal was my previous go-to site to look for data breaches and zero-day exploits,' says San Soucie. 'I found hacked federal accounts and even a state DMV database for sale.'

'Cybercriminals can also find zero-day vulnerabilities, source code, and other stolen items for sale,' adds Meyer. 'For legitimate companies and researchers, these listings provide insight into the types of information and tools that cybercriminals find valuable.'

(Image Source: SurfWatch Labs)

     

    TheRealDeal Market

     

    TheRealDeal Market, which was launched in early 2015 by four founders, focuses on selling malicious code and exploits.

     

    “Law enforcement operations against the cybercrime forums Hell and Darkode in July 2015 led to arrests that tied up several members of TheRealDeal team,” says Adam Meyer, chief security officer at SurfWatch Labs. “This caused the site to shut down for a few months last year until it relaunched in December 2015 under the management of the main admin, identified as S.P., and an old vendor.”

     

     

     

     

    According to Meyer, the TheRealDeal recently made headlines for the sale of massive databases of user credentials stolen from LinkedIn, MySpace, and Yahoo, as well as a number of stolen healthcare databases.

     

    “TheRealDeal was my previous go-to site to look for data breaches and zero-day exploits,” says San Soucie. “I found hacked federal accounts and even a state DMV database for sale.”

     

    “Cybercriminals can also find zero-day vulnerabilities, source code, and other stolen items for sale,” adds Meyer. “For legitimate companies and researchers, these listings provide insight into the types of information and tools that cybercriminals find valuable.”

     

    Source: Siph0n

Visible on the open Internet to the general public, Siph0n - which is operated by a group that call themselves security researchers - is a source that offers web application exploits, database dumps (from LinkedIn), and malicious tools (botnet source code), among other things.

'While the group touts that it is publishing the data and tools for security awareness, many hackers follow this site to get information and source code to create exploits,' says San Soucie. 'In some cases, databases that were listed here at no cost, end up on Dark Web market places for sale.'

San Soucie suggests that business owners have their security staff or consultants monitor Siph0n closely to ensure their data does not appear. They should also watch for third-party partners' data. 

'While it may be tempting to download some of the data directly to determine if a business or individual account is listed in the data source, keep in mind that malware can be embedded in the files,' warns San Soucie.

Image Source: Carefree Solutions

     

    Source: Siph0n

     

    Visible on the open Internet to the general public, Siph0n – which is operated by a group that call themselves security researchers – is a source that offers web application exploits, database dumps (from LinkedIn), and malicious tools (botnet source code), among other things.

     

    “While the group touts that it is publishing the data and tools for security awareness, many hackers follow this site to get information and source code to create exploits,” says San Soucie. “In some cases, databases that were listed here at no cost, end up on Dark Web market places for sale.”

     

    San Soucie suggests that business owners have their security staff or consultants monitor Siph0n closely to ensure their data does not appear. They should also watch for third-party partners' data.

     

    “While it may be tempting to download some of the data directly to determine if a business or individual account is listed in the data source, keep in mind that malware can be embedded in the files,” warns San Soucie.

     

     

    Author:  Sean Martin

    Source:  http://www.darkreading.com/

    Categorized in News & Politics

    There has been an increase in iOS thefts recently, targeting owners who are simply walking down the street, causing many individuals to fear that their iOS device may be next to disappear. Personal computers are also not out of the woods from this increase in theft; even when you keep your devices at home, the threat of misplacing them is also present. What should we do to ensure that our Mac or iOS device makes it back into our hands? The step-by-step guide we have below is made for new Apple purchasers, current users, and victims of theft who are looking for options.

     

    Ensuring your information is adequately backed up

     

    Whether you just bought your iPhone or Mac, or if you have been a long time user, it is never too early or too late to get yourself prepared for a possible lost or stolen device. The main aspects of preparation includes ensuring that you have adequate tracking, and that your information is adequately backed up. We will cover how to do both in the steps below:

     

     

     

     

    1. You just bought your Mac or iOS device—congratulations! Now it’s time to protect it with AppleCare. Despite not protecting against theft or loss, it can work in your favor in the event that your recovered device turns out to be damaged. For iOS devices, AppleCare+ protects against two damage incidents with a fee. Below is info on how to purchase it.

    • For iPhone Users: Click Here – For iPad Users: Click Here.
    • When purchasing AppleCare+, you are required to have a device checkup to ensure you are not purchasing AppleCare+ for a device that’s already broken.
    • Keep all information handy and in a safe place (i.e. receipts of the device and AppleCare+ purchase).
    • Found your lost iOS device or stolen device and it’s broken? Go to your local Apple Store and pay $49 for a repair.

     

    survivinglostiphone_icloudicon

     

    2. Next step, ensure that you are fully signed up for iCloud. The cloud service allows you to have your contacts, calendar events, recent photos, music, apps, and more backed up. Targeted for increased productivity and easier device upgrading, iCloud is very useful for lost or stolen devices. You still have needed information readily available, and as we will show in the next step, it can even help you find your device. Here’s how to sign up for iCloud:

     

    survivinglostiphone_icloudonMac

    Backing Up Your Data On Mac

    • Ensure that your Mac has the latest update by first clicking the Apple symbol at the top, and then “Software Update”.
    • Click “System Preferences”, then “iCloud”.
    • When asked, enter your Apple credentials. If you’re not asked, you’re done!
    • Check the boxes for the services you want to have iCloud backup.
    • Whenever you sign in to iCloud on any iOS or Mac device, your information is applied if you choose it to be.

     

    survivinglostiphone_icloudoniPhone

    On iOS Devices

    • Go to “Settings”
    • Click on “iCloud”
    • Sign into your Apple ID.
    • Once signed in, select which services you’d like to back up.
    • “Storage and Backup” allows you to view your storage totals.

     

    3. Now that iCloud is activated, it’s time to activate Find My Apple Device. No, it’s not exactly called that—for iOS users it is known as “Find My iPhone“, and for Mac users it’s “Find My Mac”. To activate Find My iPhone on your iOS device, simply download the app from the App Store, and login.

     

     

     

     

    Using the Find My iPhone for iOS app is simple. The first page you are presented with is “My Devices”. Here, you are able to view the current status of all the devices connected to your iCloud account. When the device is on, you will notice a green light activated.

     

    icloudfindmyiphone

     

    When you visit the app, you’ll be able to see the devices under “My Devices”. “All Devices” loads a map showing the relative location of your devices with Find My iPhone active.

     

    survivinglostiphone_icloudfindmyiphonemap

     

    When clicking a specific device, you are able to click the green car to have driving directions to your lost or stolen device. For Mac users, it’s a bit of a different story; Find My Mac is technically already “downloaded” on all Macs with iCloud, so simply ensure that the box is checked in the iCloud settings in System Preferences.

     

    But what happens when you don’t have either device near you to monitor their current location? No problem—simply go to iCloud.com, sign in, and go to Find My iPhone. You can activate an alarm, lock, or activate a remote wipe of your Mac or iOS device.

     

    survivinglostiphone_preyformac

     

    Bonus Tip: If you’re looking for more features in recovery of your Mac, or even your Android device, Prey is a great free service that lets you cover up to three devices.

     

    Your Data: At Risk

     

    The options above aren’t necessarily surefire ways to allow you to become reunited with your iPhone. For example, iCloud features including Find My iPhone are only helpful if your device is on and connected to a cellular/Internet connection. Also, if you don’t have a device discovery service active, it’s nearly impossible to recover your iPhone.

     

     

     

     

    The only option in these situations is to cut off cellular service on the device in question and to purchase a new one. This doesn’t mean that your data isn’t at risk until then: for many users, their iPhone is their life. This means that services like Facebook and emails are connected to the device and easily accessible. Here are a couple of tips on what to do next:

    • Change Your Passwords Immediately

     

    One of the best precautions you can make is to change the passwords of the services connected to your iPhone. This includes email addresses, social media accounts, and in some cases your Apple ID. This can prevent the possibility of compromising information to be posted on your accounts, and even more importantly, to prevent personal information from being stolen.

    • Monitor Account Activity

     

    In the days after your iPhone is officially deemed lost, you should still monitor your accounts for any suspicious activity. Financial accounts are top priority if you made use of apps like Mint or your personal bank’s app. This will allow you to catch unwanted access, allowing you to contact your bank and bring the attention to them.

    • Prepare for the Future

     

    This is also a great opportunity for you to safeguard your accounts from future attacks. If you are a Google user, for example, you may want to look into two-factor login: this works by requiring the individual to bypass two steps of information before gaining access. In return, this tricks systematic hacks and deters individual hackers.

    Current Find My iPhone Users

     

    If you are lucky enough to be a Find My iPhone user, the stressful situation of a lost or stolen iPhone is alleviated just a bit. At least while it is connected to an Internet connection, you are able to see the current status of your device. If you are near a computer, follow the following steps below to protect your information:

     

    survivinglostiphone_icloud.com

     

     

    1. Go to iCloud.com
    2. Sign in with your Apple ID.
    3. Click on “Find My iPhone”
    4. At the top left, click on “Devices”
    5. After clicking on the device in question, on the far right you can do three things: play a sound, Lock, or Remote Wipe. Below, we have a short summary of which route is best for you:
    • Play a Sound: Perfect for a simple misplacement around you.
    • Lock: A simple misplacement when you see that your iPhone isn’t in your immediate vicinity.
    • Remote Wipe: A prolonged misplacement, a verified theft, or a misplacement in a compromising location (theme park, concert, etc).

     

    Activating remote wipe when you just lost your iPhone or Mac under your bed can result in a huge headache, so be careful with that one.

     

    Other Tips

     

    For individuals who didn’t activate Find My iPhone, you still have options. First, call your service provider and inform them of your misplaced or stolen iPhone, which will allow your service provider to be informed in the event of high charges. They can also deactivate your iPhone. Informing the authorities can also be helpful in the event of a theft of any device.

     

    Life After the Theft

     

    Chances are, if you had your iPhone stolen, you will be even more determined to purchase a second iPhone this time around. You shouldn’t allow a theft to prevent you from being an iPhone user, and when you get a new iPhone, Apple makes it seamless to apply your old information onto your new device.

     

    During the setup of your new iPhone, you are then asked if you’d like to Restore from iCloud Backup or Restore from iTunes Backup. When going with the iTunes route, all you have to do is simply connect your iPhone to the Mac that backed up your last iPhone. You can then click the iTunes backup under the options in “Restore from the Backup of: …” From there, click “continue”.

     

    When going down the iCloud route, you can select the latest backup on the “Choose Backup” page. From there, click “Restore” and allow your iPhone to restart on its own.

     

     

    Author:  EMMANUEL BANKS

    Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/

    Categorized in News & Politics

    A responsibility that Facebook has with its users is that it needs to ensure that your account is not easily hackable. This means creating security systems, but there is always a problem: the most vulnerable point of any online system is the user who does not care right to their own information.

    This usually comes in the form of insecure and repeated passwords. Then, no matter if the company built the Fort Knox; if someone has your email address and the password is "123456", your only chance of not being hacked is to have two-step authentication enabled. Face it: if your password really is "123456", you probably also have not activated the second verification step.

    However, Facebook has taken a very unorthodox place to deal with this problem. Alex Stamos, chief security officer in the company, told CNET today the company negotiates directly with cybercrime in the deep web to buy databases with passwords stolen by hackers.

    The fact is that these databases stolen end up revealing enough of human behavior on the Internet. By analyzing a huge amount of passwords, you can see patterns of which are those most recurrent, and therefore more fragile. On a bench 1 million keywords, imagine how many "123456" will not arise. Suddenly, you can see that many people are using the password "kittens", and it became dangerous.

    By purchasing these stolen banks, Facebook can do this analysis and compare it with your own database (encrypted, it is true) passwords. Stamos reveals that to make this work, which is quite heavy for company computers, the social network was able to alert tens of millions of users that their passwords were not safe.

    The executive explains that Facebook has the tools to offer more security to users, such as the aforementioned two-step authentication. It is the person's prerogative to use these tools or not, but the company says it is his responsibility to take care of those who choose not to activate the features.

    Source:  olhardigital.uol.com.br

    Categorized in Science & Tech

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