[Source: This article was published in cnbc.com By Karen Gilchrist - Uploaded by the Association Member: Edna Thomas]

What are the most useful skills to have in today’s shifting work environment?

It’s a question that’s on the minds of employers and employees alike, but LinkedIn claims to have the answer.

In a new “Future of Skills” report, the professional networking site has drawn on data from a regional subset of its more than 600 million members to identify what it sees as the “rising skills” of the workforce.

Focusing specifically on the Asia Pacific region, the report highlights 10 skills that have experienced “exponential growth” over the past 5 years. That refers to both a surge in listings of those skills on members’ profiles and also an increase in demand from employers.

Typically, demand for those “rising skills” was three times higher than for other areas of expertise in the past 12 months, LinkedIn said. That’s a figure the company expects will rise further over the coming years, it added.

“These skills may be nascent now but will potentially see wide-scale adoption in the future,” the report noted.

Indeed, 42 percent of the core skills required for common occupations are expected to change by 2020, according to 2018 research from the World Economic Forum cited by the report.

Here are LinkedIn’s 10 rising skills in Asia Pacific and the jobs to which they are best applied:

Artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is an area of computer science that uses machines to perform human-like tasks. As companies become more dependent on data, AI is playing an increasing role in their decision-making processes. Airbnb, for example, now uses visual recognition and machine learning to understand what photos are most attractive to potential guests.

Occupational applications:

  • Business analyst
  • Data scientist
  • Software engineer

Blockchain

Blockchain refers to a decentralized public ledger which stores a growing list of records, known as blocks. Blockchain has risen to prominence over recent years as the underlying technology behind cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, but it’s applications are wide-reaching. Today, the technology is used in sectors such as the law, security and even education.

Occupational applications:

  • Blockchain developer
  • Chief technology officer
  • Consultant

Compliance

In an increasingly globalized world, businesses need to make sure they comply with the various regulatory and legal frameworks of each of the countries in which they operate. That has spawned a growing demand for compliance experts.

Occupational applications:

  • Chief data officer
  • Compliance officer
  • Risk management officer

Continuous integration

In software engineering, continuous integration refers to the regular merging of all developers’ work onto one shared platform. The aim of the role is to help detect problems early on in the development process.

Occupational applications:

  • DevOps engineer
  • Full-stack engineer
  • Software engineer
Continuous integration
A young female Asian employee writes notes on a glass window in the meeting room.
Kelvin Murray | Taxi | Getty Images

Frontend web development

Frontend web development is the process of converting data into the graphical interface, or web pages, seen by internet users. In today’s increasingly digital world, that process is required by businesses across most industries. However, LinkedIn highlighted opportunities in Asia Pacific’s retail sector, where e-commerce sales are expected to reach $3.5 trillion by 2021.

Occupational applications:

  • Frontend developer
  • Full-stack engineer
  • Web developer

Gesture recognition technology

Gesture recognition technology aims to close the gap between humans and devices by teaching computers to read human movements. The global gesture recognition market is expected to be worth $30.6 billion by 2025, and the banking, higher education and advertising sectors are jumping aboard.

Occupational applications:

  • Mobile engineer
  • Researcher
  • Software engineer

Human-centered design

The human-centered design aims to put user experience at the forefront of all design decisions. It is an approach for which Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was famed, and one that will be increasingly in demand in the Asia Pacific as product development ramps up, according to LinkedIn.

Occupational applications:

  • Graphics designer
  • Product designer
  • User experience designer
Human centered design
skynesher | E+ | Getty Images

Robotic process automation (RPA)

Robotic process automation is an emerging form of business process automation. Using robotics or artificial intelligence, the process aims to automate high volume, repetitive tasks. Examples of its use are in banking and telecoms, where transactions and customer complaint procedures can be automated.

Occupational applications:

  • Business analyst
  • Consultant
  • Robotics engineer

Social media marketing

Social media marketing is the use of social media to promote product and services. With social media adoption continuing to grow rapidly in Asia Pacific, businesses are increasingly using it to reach new and existing customers. Indeed, 74 percent say they believe social media marketing contributes to their bottom lines.

Occupational applications:

  • Digital marketing specialist
  • Marketing manager
  • Social media marketing manager

Workflow automation

Workflow automation is the process of automating manual processes based on pre-defined business rules. By automating repetitive, low skilled processes, businesses say they can free up employees’ time for more creative and higher skilled tasks.

Occupational applications:

  • Consultant
  • Project manager
  • Software engineer

Categorized in Online Research

[This article is originally published in popsci.com written by David Nield - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Issac Avila]

 

Your phone is logging your activity.

Every time you grab your phone to participate in a group chat, watch a YouTube video, or search the internet, you leave a digital trail of activity. This footprint can compromise your privacy the next time a friend borrows your device. It also puts your personal information at risk should your phone fall into really unscrupulous hands.

In this guide, we'll explain how you can prevent your device from logging and storing data where other people can easily stumble across it. We will focus on cleaning up your phone's local storage, as opposed to limiting the information that apps send to the cloud.

Go incognito

The web browser on your phone, like the one on your computer, offers a data-limiting incognito or private mode. When you open a session in this mode, the app will forget the pages you visit and the keywords you search as soon as you close the window.

However, private browsing doesn't make you invisible. For instance, if you log into Facebook's web portal in incognito mode, the social network will record your activity. Your internet service provider (ISP), will also see your browsing, and it may log your online behavior as well. To hide your browsing from your ISP, you'll need to rely on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) (more on that in this roundup of security gadgets and apps). But if you simply aim to clean up the record left on your phone's local storage, then this mode tidies up after itself very effectively.

The process for using this mode will depend on the browser app you prefer. For example, to launch incognito mode with Chrome, tap the Menu button (three dots) on the top right of the page and choose New incognito tab. If you forget to browse incognito, you can still clear your saved data. Just hit Menu > Settings > Privacy > Clear browsing data.

For iPhone users who rely on Safari, tap the Show pages icon (two squares) on the bottom right of the screen and choose Private. Now, when you tap the Plus button to open a new window, it will be an incognito one. To erase data collected outside of private mode, open the Settings app and select Safari > Clear History and Website Data.

Erase messages

Unless you use a chat app with self-destructing messages, it will keep records of your conversations. Of course, most people like to check back on their old communications, but you don't need to preserve every moment of a years-long thread. You can delete these old conversations manually, or try a less time-consuming option: Automatically erase chat history after a set period of time has elapsed.

On iOS, open the Settings app, go to Messages > Keep Messages, and set messages to automatically disappear after 30 days. Within the app itself, you can manually erase conversations from the front screen: Swipe left on the thread and then tap the Delete button.

Unfortunately, not all chat apps offer this auto-expunge function. To leave no trace of conversations on your phone, you may have to turn to manual deletion. This may be time-consuming, but it isn't difficult. For example, in Android's default SMS app, Messages, you delete a conversation by long-pressing on it and then tapping the Trash icon on the top right of the screen.

Some apps make it easier to purge your entire history all at once. In the case of WhatsApp, open the app and head to Settings > Chats > Chat history > Delete all chats. Then make a note to regularly check back and re-erase your latest messages.

Another solution is to only send the aforementioned self-destructing messages. Apps with this option include Telegram MessengerFacebook Messenger, and Snapchat. For more information, check out our guide to self-destructing message apps.

Limit app logging

Each of the apps on your phone will take a slightly different approach to log your activities. Some of them let you avoid their gaze by using incognito mode, while others will stop tracking you if you ask.

For example, the Android version of YouTube (this is not yet available in the iOS version) just added an incognito mode, which doesn't track the videos you watch. To activate this mode, open the app, tap your avatar on the top right of the screen, and pick Turn on Incognito.

On the other hand, Google Maps will track your location by default, which lets it accumulate a lot of data about your real-world movements. To stop it, head to the settings: Launch the app, tap the Menu button (three lines) on the top left of the screen, and hit Settings (on Android) or the cog icon (on iOS). Within the settings, select Personal content and turn off the location history feature.

There are millions of apps on the market, with no hard and fast rules about how to keep them from recording your behavior. But in general, a good first step is to check for the aforementioned settings—incognito mode and stopping tracking.

If you don't find these options, you'll have to clear your activity manually. This process will vary depending on your operating system.

In Android, open Settings > Apps & notifications, pick an app from the list and hit Storage > Clear storage. This wipes all the data that the app has stored locally. Afterward, the app will behave as if you've installed it from scratch, so you'll need to log in again, set up your preferences, and so on.

On iOS, you won't find an identical option, but you can achieve the same effect by uninstalling and reinstalling an app. Open the Settings app, tap General > iPhone Storage, and select one of your apps. Then choose Delete App to wipe all of its data. Finally, re-install the program from the App Store.

It's not very practical to do this for all of your apps every day. But you might choose to run a manual clean-up at set intervals (say once a month), before you go traveling, or whenever you want to make a fresh start.

Delete search history

Many mobile apps store data locally and in the cloud, so they can sync your information to other devices. That means, to clear search logs from your phone, you'll have to wipe the records across multiple platforms.

For example, your Google account will store the history of searches you've run from your Android phone. To wipe these records, you actually have to access them from the web. Open your browser and head to your Google activity history page. Click the Menu button (three lines) on the top left, then Delete activity by. Set the time span and content type—to erase everything, those should be All time and Search, respectively—and click Delete. This will wipe your search history across all the Google-linked products you use, including Android and the Google search engine.

Categorized in Science & Tech

 Source: This article was published cyberblogindia.in By Abhay Singh Sengar - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

When we talk about “ethics” we refer to attitude, values, beliefs, and habits possessed by a person or a group. The sense of the word is directly related to the term “morality” as Ethics is the study of morality.

Meaning of Computer Ethics

It is not a very old term. Until 1960s there was nothing known as “computer ethics”. Walter Manerin the mid-70s introduced the term ‘computer ethics’ which means “ethical problems aggravated, transformed or created by computer technology”. Wiener and Moor have also discussed about this in their book, “computer ethics identifies and analyses the impacts of information technology upon human values like health, wealth, opportunity, freedom, democracy, knowledge, privacy, security, self-fulfillment, and so on…“. Since the 1990s the importance of this term has increased. In simple words, Computer ethics is a set of moral principles that govern the usage of Computers.

Issues

As we all know, that Computer is an effective technology and it raises ethical issues like Personal Intrusion, Deception, Breach of Privacy, Cyber-bullying, Cyber-stalking, Defamation, Evasion Technology or social responsibility and Intellectual Property Rights i.e. copyrighted electronic content. In a Computer or Internet (Cyberspace) domain of Information security, understanding and maintaining ethics is very important at this stage. A typical problem related to ethics arises mainly because of the absence of policies or rules about how computer technology should be used. It is high time, there is some strict legislation regarding the same in the country.

Internet Ethics for everyone

  1. Acceptance- We should accept that the Internet is a primary component of our society only and not something apart from it.
  2. We should understand the sensitivity of Information before writing it on the Internet as there are no national or cultural barriers.
  3. As we do not provide our personal information to any stranger, similarly it should not be uploaded to a public network because it might be misused.
  4. Avoid the use of rude or bad language while using e-mail, chatting, blogging, social networking. Respect the person on another side.
  5. No copyrighted material should be copied, downloaded or shared with others.

Computer Ethics

Following are the 10 commandments as created by The Computer Ethics Institute which is a nonprofit working in this area:

  1. Thou shall not use a computer to harm other people;
  2. Thou shall not interfere with other people’s computer work;
  3. Thou shall not snoop around in other people’s computer files;
  4. Thou shall not use a computer to steal;
  5. Thou shall not use a computer to bear false witness;
  6. Thou shall not copy or use proprietary software for which you have not paid;
  7. Thou shall not use other people’s computer resources without authorization or proper compensation;
  8. Thou shall not appropriate other people’s intellectual output;
  9. Thou shall think about the social consequences of the program you are writing or the system you are designing;
  10. Thou shall always use a computer in ways that insure consideration and respect for your fellow humans.

Computer and Internet both are time-efficient tools for everyone. It can enlarge the possibilities for your curriculum growth. There is a lot of information on the Internet that can help you in learning. Explore that Information instead of exploiting others.

Computer Internet Ethics

Categorized in Internet Ethics
The internet is one of the most important inventions of the modern era. However, current estimates say that only 40 percent of people around the globe have access. As internet connectivity becomes ever more important, new technologies are emerging to connect the entire globe with better, faster service. On several continents, research and development projects are underway to provide internet connectivity via high-altitude balloons -- not unlike those used to capture weather data, unmanned solar-powered drones and next-generation wireless routers. Each offers higher speeds and more reliability than current modes, plus the obvious benefit: getting the world online, all at the same time.

Facebook aims for solar-powered internet-beaming drone

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is famous for expressing a desire to connect the entire globe to the internet, and the company wants to launch giant soaring drones to beam out internet access around the world. Facebook's own Connectivity Lab has developed a solar-powered drone with a wingspan as large as that of a Boeing 747. Dubbed Aquila, the drone took its first test flight in June 2016 and, while not equipped with internet technology at the time, the flight was a huge success. The actual flight lasted a whopping 96 minutes (66 minutes longer than planned), and helped the research team tackle the next phase of innovation. Someday, Facebook hopes the highly energy-efficient drones will fly in a 60-mile radius while simultaneously beaming out internet access wherever needed.

MIT's 330 percent faster WiFi

Just a few months ago, researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) announced a breakthrough in new wireless internet that is 330 percent faster and twice the bandwidth of existing technology. Dubbed MegaMIMO 2.0, the technology uses multiple transmitters and receivers to relay data simultaneously, increasing the amount of data in a given bandwidth. This development could someday lead to better, faster internet in public spaces and large gatherings like concerts and sporting events. The new technology could also address the issue of spectrum crunch by distributing data differently so that backups and congestion on the network simply don't occur.

Li-Fi leaves WiFi in the dark?

Last year a French startup developed a wireless internet technology based on LEDs that they claim is 100 times faster than existing WiFi. The so-called "Li-Fi" exploits the flicker rate of LED lamps, which is typically imperceptible to the naked eye. That frequency is much higher than the radio waves conventional wireless internet employs. Li-Fi requires light to work, so it can't pass through walls like WiFi, but it can be used to specifically target a specific user. What's more, its secure nature makes it a potential fit in places like hospitals or schools where speed and privacy are high priorities.

Project Loon floats balloon-based internet access

Long before Facebook launched its own drone to beam internet through the sky, Google began Project Loon, a similar initiative that relies on balloons. The high-altitude internet-equipped balloons are designed to spread connectivity in rural parts of Africa and Southeast Asia, plus anywhere else that access is spotty. The project gained traction in 2013 when Google tapped residents of California's Central Valley to volunteer to let the team install an antenna on their home in order to test the beaming balloons. Three years and many tests later on several continents, Project Loon (now operating under X, formerly Google X) continues to perfect its internet-beaming technology in the hopes of someday filling in the empty spots in the data coverage map.

NASA gears up to beam internet into deep space

During his 340-day mission aboard the International Space Station, American astronaut Scott Kelly became somewhat of an Instagram star, posting jaw-dropping views of the Earth (and beyond) from his outpost in the stars. So, people probably take for granted the notion that astronauts have internet access. In reality, sending data through space is nearly as complicated as space travel itself, but NASA deployed new tech to the ISSin 2016 that could eventually be used to relay internet service even farther into deep space. If Elon Musk and Richard Branson ever find themselves living on Mars, they'll surely be grateful to the good folks at NASA for making sure they can still tweet from their new homes on the Red Planet.

Samsung's satellite idea

Consumer electronics company Samsung has a big idea for stretching the interwebs around the globe -- using satellites. In 2015, the company proposed a global network of 4,600 satellites floating in low-Earth orbit that could beam up to 1 zettabyte (1 trillion gigabytes) a month. The plan would fly satellites closer to Earth than previous schemes to provide access at speeds internet users are already accustomed to at home. Will Samsung's satellite web ever actually happen? It's not likely, but wild ideas like this keep the conversation going.
Source: This article was published engadget.com By Cat DiStasio
Categorized in Science & Tech

The last couple months have seen a welcome change in the wireless industry. Instead of massively confusing bills and data caps, we’ve had prices slashed across the board and unlimited data plans for all. But thanks to the unending drive for consolidation and profits, the good times aren’t going to last.

During the recent 600MHz spectrum auction, which ran from the end of 2016 all the way to last week, the government imposed a “quiet rule” on carriers. They couldn’t talk about the auction, their plans with any spectrum, and they couldn’t talk with anyone about merging. But now that quiet time is over, it’s just a matter of time until some blockbuster deals happen.

Rumors suggest that T-Mobile, Sprint, and Dish are all in talks for partnerships, acquisitions, or mergers. For Sprint, it’s a fight for survival: recent financial results have been dire, and since the company didn’t buy any new spectrum in the FCC’s auction, the network won’t see substantial improvements in the near future. SoftBank, the Japanese company that owns Sprint, has been looking for a chance to unload Sprint for years.

The most-talked-about target is Deutsche Telekom, the majority owner of T-Mobile. The idea would be to merge T-Mobile and Sprint, the third-largest and fourth-largest networks in America, to form one super-network.

Although that might lead to slightly improved coverage, it would be terrible for consumers in general. The fight between T-Mobile and Sprint for customers has led to lower prices, the ending of multi-year-contracts, and a host of other consumer-friendly moves in recent years. Losing Sprint, which offers the cheapest contracts of any of the big networks, would mean losing the one company that applies downwards pressure to prices.

The alternatives aren’t much better. One of the few other companies with the money and desire to build out a US-wide cell network could be Amazon. Owning a wireless network would give Amazon direct control over delivering some of its services, like Prime Video, straight to consumers without having to go through an existing internet service provider. A wireless network could also be invaluable in the future for Amazon’s drone delivery service, which would need some kind of national command-and-control network.

It’s not just T-Mobile and Sprint that are rumored in merger deals, either. Dish Network, the satellite TV provider that also owns Sling TV, bought up $6 billion of spectrum at the FCC’s recent auction, and now sits on one of the largest spectrum holdings in the US. It’s possible that it could be bought out by a company like Comcast to build out a brand-new wireless network, or merge with an existing wireless network for further expansion. Any of those options would involve losing the country’s biggest independent TV provider to a major cable company, which would be more bad news for consumers.

Analyst Tim Farrar sees a combination of all these scenarios being the logical option: a three-way deal between T-Mobile, Amazon and Dish to build out a new network, using T-Mobile’s new spectrum and Dish’s spectrum holdings. Using Amazon’s capital, they could quickly build out a fast and wide-reaching network with brand-new technology, which could be used by T-Mobile for cell service, by Dish for internet TV, and by Amazon for world domination/any of Jeff Bezos’s pet projects.

The bottom line is that the status quo isn’t here to stay. Between Sprint’s financial woes, T-Mobile’s desire to build a giant new network at speed, and Dish’s unused spectrum, it seems that a deal is likely. The only questions are when, and how badly it will affect wireless customers.

Author: Chris Mills
Source: bgr.com

Categorized in Science & Tech

For anyone who is really concerned about keeping their thoughts private there is only one piece of reliable technology: write with a pen on paper, and burn what you’ve written when you’re done. For the rest of us, who want to get things done, there is an inevitable trade-off which we still don’t entirely understand. We now carry with us everywhere devices that give us access to all the world’s information, but they can also offer almost all the world vast quantities of information about us. The sense of personal integrity and boundaries that seems self-evident is actually the product of particular social arrangements which are profoundly affected by technology even though it doesn’t determine them. Technological change could move us towards our better selves or our worse ones, but things can’t stay as they are.

To go online is to descend into a world as transparent as an aquarium – and this aquarium is full of sharks. The newly discovered vulnerability in WhatsApp’s procedures is only the latest in an apparently unending succession of moments of unintended transparency.

It would be a mistake to see these problems as primarily technological because that would suggest that their solutions would be technological, too. In fact, the preservation of personal privacy and collective security online is a political and social task as much as it is one for the very few experts who understand the ramifications of mathematical magics like public key cryptography. Technological solutions will only work within a legal and political context, and the real threats to privacy come not from vulnerable widgets but weak laws, careless users and feeble oversight. The WhatsApp encryption scheme is proof against anyone who does not control or threaten the company’s own networks, which is something only a government could do. But sufficiently ruthless governments would not hesitate to do so if they had the opportunity. And against sufficient ruthlessness and physical power, technology is ultimately no defence. Although we can use schemes of encryption that are mathematically impossible to crack, so long as the password is known to anyone it can be tricked or even tortured from its holder.

Adding to this problem is the increasingly permeable border between state and non-state actors. When the FBI could not crack the iPhone used in the San Bernadino shootings, it turned to a private firm in Israel, which could. But that company has in turn now been hacked, and meanwhile many of the devices designed for use by law enforcement, which can suck all the information out of a captured mobile phone, can now be bought freely over the internet by any private company – or mafia outfit.

These threats can seem very distant. It’s easy to suppose that you will never come to the attention of a hostile state apparatus. On the other hand, the commercially motivated attacks on privacy pervade the whole of the internet, and in fact fund most of it today. Websites routinely collect as much information as they can about the users and then sell it on to data brokers for use in personally targeted advertising campaigns. Facebook (which, incidentally, owns WhatsApp) has built its entire titanic empire on this trade. Even when this data is anonymised, the protection is leaky, and in any case, someone who knows everything about you except your name is in a much stronger position than one who knows your name but nothing else.

But the real danger comes when these two kinds of loss of privacy combine so that the knowledge gained for commercial ends is used for political manipulation too. It is in the interests of advertisers to short-circuit rational thought and careful consideration, but it is even more in the interests of demagogues to do so. Against this we must rely on moral and intellectual defences much more than the supposed magic of advanced technology.

Source: theguardian.com

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Jim Yong Kim said rising broadband access had created a world where "keeping up with the Jones's" meant those in the developing world were comparing their lives with those in advanced economies.

Technology and the internet could fuel a fresh migration surge from developing countries as robots and automation destroy millions of low-skilled jobs, according to the president of the World Bank.Jim Yong Kim said rising broadband access had created a world where "keeping up with the Jones's" meant those in the developing world were comparing their lives with those in advanced economies.While these rising aspirations had led to "dynamism" and "inclusive, sustainable growth" when accompanied by local opportunities, Mr Kim said it also risked creating a generation of "frustrated" workers.

"The evidence is very good that if you get access to broadband, overall satisfaction goes up, but the likelihood of wanting to migrate also goes up, and it goes up pretty dramatically. So seeing how other people live directly makes you want to migrate more," said Mr Kim."

It used to be that keeping up with the Jones's used to be about keeping up with your neighbours, but now the Jones's can be everywhere in the world."

Mr Kim said income growth expectations tended to increase as people realised the opportunities open to them.

"Aspirations linked to opportunity leads to dynamism and growth in the economy, but aspirations linked to lack of opportunity lead to frustration and there's some very suggestive research that makes us extremely worried."

As aspirations rise, more and more people get frustrated because the kinds of jobs that are available - certainly low skilled ones are going to be gone," he said.

average

 

"The traditional path to economic development, where you go from agriculture to light manufacturing to industrialisation, the path that Korea followed, that China followed, that so many countries followed, is not going to be open to huge numbers of low income countries today.

"So you're seeing the possibility that if broadband access becomes global quickly, then you can see reference incomes go up pretty dramatically which means that it makes our development task much much more urgent."Mr Kim stressed that technological developments had benefited the global economy, including those in developing countries.

labour share of income

He said organisations like the World Bank could use their ability to borrow at low interest rates on financial markets to help private sector companies to invest and create jobs.

Overseas development aid has fallen in many developing countries, particularly in Africa, as countries such as Germany use foreign aid money to cope with an influx of refugees from Syria, said Mr Kim.

He said that, with the exception of the UK, many countries had not increased their overseas development aid to countries he believed were most vulnerable to globalisation.

"Those of us in the development field have to have a much greater sense of urgency - we have to wake up to rising aspirations, we have to do something differently [and] let the private sector take on the things that are commercially viable."

Growth strengthening

Mr Kim said global growth was likely to strengthen over the next two years amid a brighter outlook in advanced and emerging economies.

He said there were “bright signs” appearing around the world as emerging markets recover from a commodity slump and growth in Europe shows signs of gathering momentum.


The World Bank chief also said he was “encouraged” by his conversations with President Donald Trump, despite signs that support for international financial institutions like the the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank are waning under the new administration.


Mr Kim added that “question marks” remained over the direction of the US economy under Mr Trump, even though world growth, which is forecast at 2.7pc this year, was likely to “go up again in 2018”.


The World Bank predicted growth of 2.9pc next year at its most recent forecast in January.


Mr Kim said the outlook would be influenced by tax and spending decisions made by Mr Trump, noting that the “exuberance” displayed by markets and economic surveys in the wake of his election victory has been tempered in recent weeks.


“With US growth there’s still a question mark. There was a lot of exuberance at first and it’s a bit tempered now. But if Mr Trump is serious about investments in infrastructure - I know they’re having very in depth discussions about just how to do that - you can see the US continuing to perform.”


He said the European Union was also “doing better”, even as Brexit was likely to pose a downside risk to the bloc.


In a separate speech at the London School of Economics last night, Mr Kim said organisations like the World Bank had to do more to encourage private sector investment and not “crowd out” finance from businesses and individuals.


He said large organisations had to steer away from “low hanging fruit” and help to foster ambitious goals to create more jobs, boost growth and ensure low income countries were protected as technological developments destroy millions of jobs.


While the World Bank is perceived as a lender to developing countries, he said it needed to play the role of an investor.


“This is a no brainer, and the only way we’re going to get the resources we need to support the aspirations out there.”


Mr Trump’s nomination of Adam Lerrick as the next Treasury assistant secretary for international finance signalled that bodies like the World Bank will be scrutinised more carefully.


However, Mr Kim, who has met with Mr Trump as well as his advisers, including Gary Cohn, the former Goldman Sachs chief, said: “They’re very interested in the possibility of working with us on issues that they care about.


“We’ve been really encouraged by our conversations with the Trump administration, so we’ll see what happens. I don’t think you really know what they’re going to come out with on any single issue yet because they’re just voraciously learning how government works.”

Author: Szu Ping Chan
Source: telegraph.co.uk

Categorized in Science & Tech

There have been moments that have changed the way we think, that have stunned humanity, that have changed the very civilization in history. Late twentieth century and the beginning of twenty first century have brought to life the realization of fantastic dreams of scientists, researchers and technological gurus, changing the life of man, making him see and experience things he never believed in the past. Man has crossed the frontiers of unknown spheres, enjoying the benefits of multitude advancement, and even finding cures for many diseases which were once incurable.

We have seen tremendous transformations in every field of human existence. Artificial intelligence, Nanotechnology and Genetic Engineering have made new headways. Robots are matching human intelligence to perform many tasks. In military operations they are doing the dangerous work of locating mine fields and diffuse them. Robots may as well be a shield against possible attacks from the enemy.

Animal cloning has been done. DNA strands are merged from two different kinds of animals to produce a new kind of animal, but man is still unable to create a perfect clone. All efforts to clone a human being have failed, proving that you can’t play God.

Computers, internet devises, wireless communications and other gadgets have taken a giant step to provide all the information needed. More and more extra-efficient chips are being made. Ultra-dense seven nanometer chips, designed by IBM are more powerful than any other in existence.

In the field of energy, all efforts are being made to harness cost-efficient sources of energy, like solar, wind, clean coal, geo thermal, biomass and nuclear, making it possible to provide electricity to even the remotest villages

On the roads we see a multitude of modern cars that do not need gas – or even electrical back-up in some cases. Soon Hydrogen-powered vehicles would be coming out of factories.

Details and challenges of life in space have come to light. The planet Mars looms within reach. The discovery of ‘Mega Earth' named Kepler-110, a planet double the size and seventeen times heavier than earth, has been of keen interest to Space explorers. Much information about Pluto has been revealed. The planet has no crest on the outside, but there are a number of Ice Mountains which shows the possibility of water there, and perhaps life.

Glaciers in Antarctica and Greenland are fast melting to accelerate global warming. In spite of tremendous efforts, we are still unable to counter the effects of global warming. Zero-emission vehicles, low emissions factories and industrial units, environmental regulations devised to sharply cut planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions from power plants help combating weather effects to a certain extent only.

This technological age boasts of some amazing inventions; some already in use and some in the pipeline.

Cell Transplantation grows new organs, enabling even a paralyzed person to walk again. Robots contribute in the field of medicine, making a doctor’s job easier. Da Vinci Surgery Robots are now common in most hospitals and facilitate complex surgeries, using minimally invasive approach.3-D Printers, Abicor (fully functional artificial heart), Exacto (self-guided bullet that can change direction mid-flight to seek a target) are a few examples.

Amidst all this, where does a common man of the yester-age stand? He may have a bachelor’s or a master’s degree, but if he is not well-versed in the use of computers, he is simply wondering in a maze, feeling himself incompetent and uneducated in today’s world.

For most of us, all this vast technological advancement has, no doubt, proved a boon, making life easier, providing more comforts and helping people to even live longer, continuously changing business landscapes and redefining humanity. But with all the advantages, a common man’s mind is disturbed. Trying to cope with the plethora of new information, inventions and constant developments and changes, man in general remains distracted, disrupted and detached from the reality of human bondage. This technological age has diverted human minds to machines, to their computers, iPad, smart phones and other newly-developed electronic devises.

The most relevant adverse effect on humanity is that the man’s finer feelings are greatly replaced with instincts to wonder in the mechanics of ever-changing technology. He hardly has enough time or inclination to spend quality time with his family. The children are on their own, not receiving proper guidance, love and attention from parents. They attend schools and universities, mingle with other children, get mechanical instructions and education from teachers, bury themselves in computers, visit different websites, occasionally unhealthy and adult ones, and put a lot of stress on their nascent minds which they seldom use, because computers provide them with all the answers they need.

Children and even adults watch movies which have robotic characters, demonic figures, violent and unbelievable actions and loud sounds. Hence, some of the children, having grown up develop abnormal and violent mental traits. We have seen so many incidents where young persons commit violent crimes, like shooting and killing innocent people without any relevant motive, except to satisfy their need for violence. The age has shaken the human mind. No wonder there are more and more psychiatrists and psychotherapists with a thriving rush of patients.

Someone pointed out:

“Relationships these days are harder because conversations become texting, arguments become phone calls and feelings become status updates.”

Someone also said:

“I am stuck in a generation where loyalty is just a tattoo, love is just a quote, happiness is a myth, lying is the new truth and being fake is a lifestyle.”

Maybe in the years to come, all efforts would be made to curtail violent material on electronic and social media and modify human thinking, instill finer feelings among the family members and friends. Perhaps they may slow down constant technological strides and concentrate more on the welfare of human psyche.

Author: Rafiq Ebrahim
Source: http://nation.com.pk/blogs/14-Jul-2016/technological-strides-and-the-effect-on-human-psyche

 

Categorized in Science & Tech

The internet is a pool of information and knowledge openly available to all. The possibilities are endless. This information is aided by a platform wherein you input your keywords to be able to get what you are searching for. Google is a multinational, publicly-traded organization built around the company’s hugely popular search engine. One of the top search engines in the world, Google today is quite a popular brand as it serves many functions over the internet. Their search engine aids with gaining information, either literary or graphic. For searches made about images, Google has innovated a new technology for a super-resolution image named “zoom and enhance”. This is developed by Google Brain and DeepMind, two of Alphabet’s deep learning research arms.The new technology essentially uses a pair of neural networks, which are fed an 8 x 8-pixel image and are then able to create an approximation of what it thinks the original image would look like.

This neural network does not magically enhance the image, just to be clear. These are only predictions of what the image may best look like. There are two neural networks involved. These are named the conditioning network and the prior network. The conditioning network is the rough skeleton of the process where it  basically maps out the pixels of the 8 x 8-pixel image into a similar looking but higher resolution image. Here, the Google software downsizes high resolution photos to match the 8×8 source image. The second part of the process is the “prior network,” which takes the image and adds more details by using other, already existing images that have similar pixel maps. They use the implementation of PixelCNN in processing the image. When these parts have done their parts, the two of them combine forming a better resolute image. The transformation is quite amazing actually as the rendered images are quite close to the original. These, however, are not reliable sources for legal cases as these can give false findings. 

Video Courtesy of Youtube:

 

These processed images called “hallucinations” are just best guesses. These can be used in surveillance and forensics but should not be regarded as real evidence as this can only give us a lead. This new advancement is Google’s way of advancing their services to the public. Google has gone a long way in the information technology timeline. They have emerged competitively, able to address the needs of their audience. The many platforms they created, the many innovations they have added to better their service is a goal for the company to continue to achieve. The internet has a wide database readily available for exploration. Almost all of the answer to your concerns and uncertainties can be found on the web. As social media has opened the doors to information sharing via social sites and the like, there is vulnerability to the information shared. It would still be best to think twice on what you plan to put out in the open for you can never get it back. Once data is sent, it is broadcasted around the world and you no longer have control over it.

Author : KC Curay

Source : https://www.mobilemag.com/2017/02/20/google-brain-has-upgraded-their-image-processing-with-the-zoom-and-enhance-feature-giving-better-quality-images-than-ever-before/

Categorized in Science & Tech

Canadian scientists have set a new world record by succeeding in teleporting a particle of light over a distance of 6km (3.7 miles) via fibre optics, which is a big step towards one day building a super-fast quantum internet.

It's not really teleportation in the sense of the Star Trek transporter but researchers from the University of Calgary have succeeded in teleporting a photon (light particle) from one location to another on the city's fibre-optic cable infrastructure. In doing so, it will be the most impressive distance ever achieved for transferring a quantum state by teleportation.

 

It means one day it will be possible to set up networks that are super secure – whereby communications cannot be eavesdropped on – and quantum computers can be connected to each other even when located across vast distances.

The paper, entitled 'Quantum teleportation across a metropolitan fibre network' is published in the journal Nature Photonics.

Quantum entanglement

The teleportation was made possible due to quantum entanglement, a phenomenon so mysterious that even Einstein couldn't understand it. This is the process where seemingly counterintuitive matter instantly affects each each other, for example, the measurement of one particle on Earth instantly affecting another particle at the opposite end of the universe.

"Being entangled means that the two photons that form an entangled pair have properties that are linked regardless of how far the two are separated," said Dr Wolfgang Tittel, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Calgary, who led the research.

"When one of the photons was sent over to City Hall, it remained entangled with the photon that stayed at the University of Calgary."

Quantum code is indeed possibleA pair of entangled photons Tony Melov / UNSW

The next part of the experiment involved taking the photon at the University of Calgary and teleporting it to yet another location in the city along the fibre optics network. When it got there, the photon then teleported to join the other photon in the entangled pair, which was stationed at City Hall.

Experiment made use of dark fibre

The experiment was made possible due to a technology called dark fibre, which is a single optical cable that has no electronics or network equipment on the alignment. Dark fibre is typically network infrastructure that is not in use because there is already more than enough data capacity on the network.

Because these fibre-optic cables are not needed, owners of the network infrastructure typically lease dark fibre to clients who use it to make privately-operated optical fibre networks.

As changes in outdoor temperature cause transmission time of photons to lengthen and vary, the researchers found the teleportation only worked if they were able to get the photons to arrive and meet each other within 10 pico-seconds (one trillionth of a second).

Fibre optics cableBy using quantum entanglement to teleport a light particle over fibre optics, the possibility of a super-fast, super secure quantum internet could be feasibleReuters

Making super-fast quantum internet possible

The demonstration of teleporting light particles is both a key way to demonstrate quantum mechanics, and the researchers see it as yet another step towards making quantum internet a reality.

There is currently a great deal of interest in developing super-fast internet networks whereby data is stored in light particles rather than chips or bits by manipulating light into optical networking, however the technology is currently very complicated.

Nevertheless, researchers from University of Bristol believe that an open source internet where light travels at the speed of light is possible and could open up the global network infrastructure industry.

Author : Mary-Ann Russon

Source : http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/scientists-leap-one-step-closer-future-internet-by-teleporting-light-across-6km-1583031

Categorized in Science & Tech
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