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The photo suggests website selling IT products "on consignment" for international joint ventures.

A North Korean agency has launched an updated search engine for the country’s intranet, equipped with an online store selling specialized goods for scientists and technicians, state-run outlet DPRK Today reported on Tuesday.

The Central Information Agency for Science and Technology reportedly developed the “information retrieval and management system ‘Kwangmyong’” — which can be translated into light or bright future — to meet the demands of the country’s growing knowledge economy.

“Kwangmyong is greatly favorably received from scientists and technicians due to the abundance of data, speed of search, and accuracy rate of searching literature,” the DPRK Today reported.

“The project of providing technical information for science research institutes, factories, and industrial establishments through Kwangmyong substantially.”

The website features “hundreds of millions” of scientific and technological articles translated from various languages, according to the report, in fields including basic and applied science, biotechnology, and medical science.

A photo of the homepage provided by DPRK Today suggested that membership is required to use the website

The navigation bars are comprised of eight sections: homepage, new technology news, periodicals, “distribution of science and technology,” a database, the online shop, and the Kwangmyong card.

A photo obtained by NK News in September 2017, which appears to be taken before the website redesign, suggested that visitors can purchase IT products on the website.

The photo particularly suggested that website could be selling IT products on behalf of international joint ventures and other companies.

“We inform about the sale of the information technology by an agent and on consignment,” one notice, published on July 13, 2016, read.

Joint ventures — which included the Korea Kwangmyong Joint Venture (JV) Company and the Achim Computer JV Company  — were listed in the section “introducing new products.”

Products from an “agent branch” of the company from Hong Kong were also on sale at the website, thought the name of the corporation was unclear.

New IT goods developed by the Central Information Agency for Science and Technology are also promoted in the same section, with another part of the website suggesting that customers could purchase products online using the “Kwangmyong” card.

Photo of Kwangmyong website before redesign

Among the IT products visible in the photo is software including a “handbook of healthy food, picture encyclopedia on science and technology,” a Chinese – Korean language translation program, and various sports games.

It also provides “new tech news” including updates on “techniques for cultivating papaya tree… in a greenhouse.”

Information on scientific techniques such as “development trends in recent machine manufacturing technology” and “techniques for breeding mudfish” is also offered to users.

The DPRK Today reported on Tuesday that a scientific institute was able to complete the research on the protection and proliferation of forest resources “within a short period of time without using a large amount of reagent and expensive equipment” thanks to the resources.

The photo was taken at an e-library in Chongjin city last year, with a North Korean who used the library “at least twice a week” telling the photographer that it features “books from all over the world.”

The source reported being unable to find any publications by Indian authors, however. 

The two-story library —  used by both students and military personnel —  is open to the public during on weekdays between 10 am and 5 pm.

“I was told that it is connected via the intranet to Pyongyang, so what is available there is also available in this library,” the photographer, who asked to remain anonymous, told NK News.

“Long distance learning opportunities with Pyongyang is also available,” they added. “In one classroom, students attended a CAD / Photoshop course.”

They also said there are “approximately 300 computers in the library” using the Windows platform, adding some computers are manufactured by the U.S. corporation Dell and others were produced by the AOC  headquartered in Taipei.

North Korea’s e-commerce industry has visibly grown in the past year. December saw the Arirang-Mearireport on the online store “Abnal” (앞날), which can reportedly deliver goods within 24 hours.

The Manmulsang website also provides the platform for the North’s businesspersons so that they can promote their products online to customers.

Source: This article was published nknews.org By Dagyum Ji

Published in Search Engine

Networking can feel like a bit of a minefield, especially online. Thankfully, Hays’ Jane McNeill is here to share her top tips.

Not so long ago, networking used to be fairly straightforward. It simply involved navigating a crowded room, business card in hand, while scoping out the best people to speak to and then attempting to start a meaningful conversation.

Of course, this face-to-face networking is still important, and always will be, but there’s also a new kid in town.

The rise of online networks has created real, focused, commercial opportunities to network – but there are rules to this new world, particularly when it comes to leveraging your online connections.

Maximise your presence on LinkedIn

While networking events remain important, most networks are grown today on LinkedIn. But, before you start to network online, start with the basics: optimise your LinkedIn profile.

Add keywords to your headline, summary and experience sections as they are searchable by others; add your LinkedIn URL to your email signature; review LinkedIn’s suggested connections regularly, and join relevant LinkedIn groups. Be proactive in writing recommendations and endorsing skills where appropriate.

If you’re wondering if it matters how many relevant first-degree connections you have, the answer is yes because second- and third-degree connections mean you can be one connection away from potentially millions of people. The key is to make sure your connections are relevant – quality not quantity is vital when building your network.

Get an introduction

This doesn’t mean you can automatically interact with your second- and third-degree connections. If you’d like to touch base with a second-degree connection on LinkedIn, email your first-degree contact to ask for an introduction.

Do not reach out to the second-degree contact independently; not only is it considered poor form, but people are far more likely to respond when being introduced by a mutual connection.

It’s also good etiquette to say thank you to every person who makes an introduction or helps you in some way. A brief InMail, email or phone call takes one minute.

Timing

So, you’ve just met someone who would be a great addition to your network, but you aren’t sure when to send a connection request.

How soon is too soon? Rest assured, it’s perfectly acceptable to send a request once you are back in the office after meeting the person, or immediately following a telephone or email exchange. Be sure to always personalize your connection requests, too.

Just don’t wait too long – it is standard etiquette to follow up within two days. Similarly, if you make a commitment to someone, such as sending a link or making an introduction, delivered within two days. Remember to also accept invitations in a timely manner, and send a follow-up thank you.

It’s not all one-way

Don’t pitch to new contacts as soon as you connect, though. Offer something of value first, such as a link to a relevant article.

When it comes to networking, the general rule is that you should give more than you take. As my colleague, Yvonne Smyth wrote: “Before you need them, help others get what they want first.”

Be active

Effective networking involves staying in touch, so share relevant and engaging content, like and share updates from your connections, and join and contribute to industry groups. If you have a lot of expertise in certain areas, start your own LinkedIn blog.

Be genuine, insightful and authentic; show interest in others; ask questions, and be respectful of people’s time. But don’t over-post, otherwise, your communications could be too diluted.

Finally, introductions via technology can be a good starting point, but professional relationships are usually cemented in person. Take the time to get to know people by attending industry events and joining an association or professional group.

With these online networking etiquette tips, you’re ready to build and leverage your connections in a thoughtful, effective and professional manner.

Jane McNeill is managing director of both New South Wales and Western Australia at Hays Recruitment.

A version of this article previously appeared on Hays’ Viewpoint blogBy Jane McNeill

Published in Others

Searching video surveillance streaming for relevant information is a time-consuming mission that does not always convey accurate results. A new cloud-based deep-learning search engine augments surveillance systems with natural language search capabilities across recorded video footage.

The Ella search engine, developed by IC Realtime, uses both algorithmic and deep learning tools to give any surveillance or security camera the ability to recognize objects, colors, people, vehicles, animals and more.

It was designed with the technology backbone of Camio, a startup founded by ex-Googlers who realized there could be a way to apply search to streaming video feeds. Ella makes every nanosecond of video searchable instantly, letting users type in queries like “white truck” to find every relevant clip instead of searching through hours of footage. Ella quite simply creates a Google for video.

Traditional systems only allow the user to search for events by date, time, and camera type and to return very broad results that still require sifting, according to businesswire.com. The average surveillance camera sees less than two minutes of interesting video each day despite streaming and recording 24/7.

Ella instead does the work for users to highlight the interesting events and to enable fast searches of their surveillance and security footage. From the moment Ella comes online and is connected, it begins learning and tagging objects the cameras see.

The deep learning engine lives in the cloud and comes preloaded with recognition of thousands of objects like makes and models of cars; within the first minute of being online, users can start to search their footage.

Hardware agnostic, the technology also solves the issue of limited bandwidth for any HD streaming camera or NVR. Rather than push every second of recorded video to the cloud, Ella features interest-based video compression. Based on machine learning algorithms that recognize patterns of motion in each camera scene to recognize what is interesting within each scene, Ella will only record in HD when it recognizes something important. The uninteresting events are still stored in a low-resolution time-lapse format, so they provide 24×7 continuous security coverage without using up valuable bandwidth.

Ella works with both existing DIY and professionally installed surveillance and security cameras and is comprised of an on-premise video gateway device and the cloud platform subscription.

Source: This article was published i-hls.com

Published in Search Engine

After decades of unbridled enthusiasm — bordering on addiction — about all things digital, the public may be losing trust in technologyOnline information isn’t reliable, whether it appears in the form of news, search results or user reviews. Social media, in particular, is vulnerable to manipulation by hackers or foreign powers. Personal data isn’t necessarily private. And people are increasingly worried about automation and artificial intelligence taking humans’ jobs.

Yet, around the world, people are both increasingly dependent on, and distrustful of, digital technology. They don’t behave as if they mistrust technology. Instead, people are using technological tools more intensively in all aspects of daily life. In recent research on digital trust in 42 countries (a collaboration between Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, where I work, and Mastercard), my colleagues and I found that this paradox is a global phenomenon.

If today’s technology giants don’t do anything to address this unease in an environment of growing dependence, people might start looking for more trustworthy companies and systems to use. Then Silicon Valley’s powerhouses could see their business boom go bust.

Economic power

Some of the concerns have to do with how big a role the technology companies and their products play in people’s lives. U.S. residents already spend 10 hours a day in front of a screen of some kind. One in 5 Americans says they are online “almost constantly.” The tech companies have enormous reach and power. More than 2 billion people use Facebook every month.

Ninety percent of search queries worldwide go through Google. Chinese e-retailer, Alibaba, organizes the biggest shopping event worldwide every year on Nov. 11, which this year brought in US$25.3 billion in revenue, more than twice what U.S. retailers sold between Thanksgiving and Cyber Monday last year.

This results in enormous wealth. All six companies in the world worth more than $500 billion are tech firms. The top six most sought-after companies to work for are also in tech. Tech stocks are booming, in ways reminiscent of the giddy days of the dot-com bubble of 1997 to 2001. With emerging technologies, including the “internet of things,” self-driving carsblockchain systems and artificial intelligence, tempting investors and entrepreneurs, the reach and power of the industry is only likely to grow.

This is particularly true because half the world’s population is still not online. But networking giant Cisco projects that 58 percent of the world will be online by 2021, and the volume of internet traffic per month per user will grow 150 percent from 2016 to 2021.

All these users will be deciding on how much to trust digital technologies.

Data, democracy, and the day job

Even now, the reasons for collective unease about technology are piling up. Consumers are learning to be worried about the security of their personal information: News about a data breach involving 57 million Uber accounts follows on top of reports of a breach of the 145.5 million consumer data records on Equifax and every Yahoo account — 3 billion in all.

Russia was able to meddle with Facebook, Google, and Twitter during the 2016 election campaign. That has raised concerns about whether the openness and reach of digital media is a threat to the functioning of democracies.

Another technological threat to society comes from workplace automation. The management consulting firm, McKinsey, estimates that it could displace one-third of the U.S. workforce by 2030, even if a different set of technologies create new “gig” opportunities.

The challenge for tech companies is that they operate in global markets and the extent to which these concerns affect behaviors online varies significantly around the world.

Mature markets differ from emerging ones

Our research uncovers some interesting differences in behaviors across geographies. In areas of the world with smaller digital economies and where technology use is still growing rapidly, users tend to exhibit more trusting behaviors online. These users are more likely to stick with a website even if it loads slowly, is hard to use or requires many steps for making an online purchase. This could be because the experience is still novel and there are fewer convenient alternatives either online or offline.

In the mature digital markets of Western Europe, North America, Japan and South Korea, however, people have been using the internet, mobile phones, social media and smartphone apps for many years. Users in those locations are less trusting, prone to switching away from sites that don’t load rapidly or are hard to use, and abandoning online shopping carts if the purchase process is too complex.

Because people in more mature markets have less trust, I would expect tech companies to invest in trust-building in more mature digital markets. For instance, they might speed up and streamline the processing of e-commerce transactions and payments, or more clearly label the sources of information presented on social media sites, as the Trust Project is doing, helping to identify authenticated and reliable news sources.

Consider Facebook’s situation. In response to criticism for allowing fake Russian accounts to distribute fake news on its site, CEO Mark Zuckerberg boldly declared that “Protecting our community is more important than maximizing our profits.” However, according to the company’s chief financial officer, Facebook’s 2018 operating expenses could increase by 45 to 60 percent if it were to invest significantly in building trust, such as hiring more humans to review posts and developing artificial intelligence systems to help them. Those costs would lower Facebook’s profits.

To strike a balance between profitability and trustworthiness, Facebook will have to set priorities and deploy advanced trust-building technologies (e.g. vetting locally generated news and ads) in only some geographic markets.

The future of digital distrust

As the boundaries of the digital world expand, and more people become familiar with internet technologies and systems, their distrust will grow. As a result, companies seeking to enjoy consumer trust will need to invest in becoming more trustworthy more widely around the globe. Those that do will likely see a competitive advantage, winning more loyalty from customers.

This risks creating a new type of digital divide. Even as one global inequality disappears — more people have an opportunity to go online — some countries or regions may have significantly more trustworthy online communities than others. Especially in the less-trustworthy regions, users will need governments to enact strong digital policies to protect people from fake news and fraudulent scams, as well as regulatory oversight to protect consumers’ data privacy and human rights.

All consumers will need to remain on guard against overreach by heavy-handed authorities or autocratic governments, particularly in parts of the world where consumers are new to using technology and, therefore, more trusting. And they’ll need to keep an eye on companies, to make sure they invest in trust-building more evenly around the world, even in less mature markets. Fortunately, digital technology makes watchdogs’ work easier, and also can serve as a megaphone — such as on social media — to issue alerts, warnings or praise.

Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean, International Business & Finance, Tufts University

Source: This article was published salon.com By BHASKAR CHAKRAVORTI,

Published in Online Research

Today, blockchain technology is still at an early stage of its development and will be used in new interesting projects in the future, according to cryptocurrency expert Bogdan Shelygin.

"It’s difficult to predict what will happen to Bitcoin in the future, but I can say with full confidence that Bitcoin is more than just super profits. It has introduced to the world a new technology which is as revolutionary as the Internet," Bogdan Shelygin, an analyst with DeCenter, Russia’s largest blockchain, and cryptocurrency-related community, told Sputnik.

Bitcoin, the world’s most popular cryptocurrency, has shown a meteoric rise in the outgoing year. Its value grew from below $1,000 in the beginning of the year and hit the historic milestone of $20,000 earlier in December. For some financial experts and economists, however, Bitcoin is a reason for concern as another possible bubble.

According to Shelygin, despite the fact that there are those predicting an imminent collapse of Bitcoin, it is impossible to say whether it is a bubble or not.

"Let’s get to the facts. Once the price of Bitcoin already fell, but it remains valuable for the global community as an alternative to the traditional financial system," the analyst pointed out, adding that the main feature of Bitcoin is its decentralized nature.

Shelygin also said that the phenomenon of Bitcoin is that it is the first cryptocurrency the global community has believed in for already 10 years.

"This means that the most interesting things are yet to come. A similar situation was with the Internet. Google was founded in 1998, but today the company is a pioneer in web and other technologies," he said.

Commenting further, Shelygin also suggested that even if Bitcoin collapses the entire cryptocurrencies market will not fall.

"Bitcoin is only the most popular example of the use of the blockchain technology, but it’s not the most outstanding one. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies will contribute to the future improvement of the blockchain. Today, the industry is still too young," the analyst said, adding that there a number of other interesting blockchain-based projects to watch in 2018, including Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash, and Ripple.

Source: This article was published sputniknews.com

Published in Science & Tech

A “CATASTROPHIC” collision between space debris which could irradiate satellite-reliant technology on Earth is now extremely probable.

There is now believed to be an astonishing 170 million pieces of space debris floating in Earth’s upper atmosphere, but only 22,000 are being tracked.

The problem now appears to be out of control, and experts fear that a catastrophic collision could be on the way.

Technologies such as mobile phones, television, GPS and weather related services rely on satellites, so a cataclysmic series of crashes could pose a threat to our already over-reliant need for satellites.

Ben Greene, chief executive of Canberra’s Space Environment Research Centre (SERC) said: “There is so much debris that it is colliding with itself, and creating more debris.

debris 1
Earth's atmosphere is littered with debris

“A catastrophic avalanche of collisions which could quickly destroy all orbiting satellites is now possible.”

Professor Moribah Jah, an expert on space debris from the University of Texas, likened the lack of information on space debris to the meteoric rise of drones.

debris
NASA's map of known space debris

He said: "The availability of drones in people's hands has outpaced the Government's ability to really regulate these things — I think we are facing the possibility of that with space.”

Professor Jah added that if action is not taken swiftly, a devastating collision is “inevitable”.

junk
Experts hope to use lasers to push debris outwards

One potential solution that has been offered would be to gently shove satellite debris into outer space using laser technology.

Australian National University professor Matthew Colless said: “If we increase the power of the lasers that we have to actually gently push small bits of space junk, that makes them fall back to Earth more rapidly and burn up harmlessly in the atmosphere.”

Source: This article was published express.co.uk By SEAN MARTIN

Published in Science & Tech

Following Mirai, the Persirai botnet is the latest to take over connected devices and use them to launch denial-of-service attacks

Researchers have uncovered a new botnet that takes over Internet-connected cameras in order to launch denial-of-service attacks, following in the footsteps of the notorious Mirai botnet.

The new malware, called Persirai, appears to be controlled by Iranian nationals, since the addresses of its command servers use the controlled .ir domain and special Persian characters were used in its code, according to Trend Micro.

120,000 vulnerable devices

Persirai targets more than 1,000 models of IP cameras and Trend found more than 120,000 vulnerable devices listed on the Shodan Internet of Things (IoT) search engine.

“Many of these vulnerable users are unaware that their IP Cameras are exposed to the internet,” Trend said in an advisory. “This makes it significantly easier for the perpetrators behind the malware to gain access to the IP Camera web interface via TCP Port 81.”ENISA botnet report, Mirai


The IP cameras use a connection standard called Universal Plug and Play (UPnP), which allows them to open a port on the network’s router and connect to the external Internet as a server without any action on the user’s part, making them vulnerable to malware.

Persirai attacks cameras using a security bug made public several months ago, and installs code that causes the device to automatically begin attacking other cameras using the same vulnerability.

While running the malware code blocks other attacks that make use of the same bug.Since it runs in memory only, the malware is disabled when the device is rebooted – but the device then also becomes vulnerable to attacks once again.

Infected cameras receive commands from the attacker’s servers that can direct distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against other systems, Trend said.

The company said the manufacturer of the device it tested said it had released a firmware update fixing the vulnerability used by Persirai, but Trend wasn’t able to find a more recent firmware version.

Botnet disruption

The security firm advised users to change the default passwords on their Internet-connected devices, if they haven’t already done so.

“Users should also disable UPnP on their routers to prevent devices within the network from opening ports to the external Internet without any warning,” Trend advised.

HSBC, security


DDoS attacks by Mirai and other IoT botnets prompted a similar warning from the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in October of last year.

In March, researchers said a Mirai variant had been used to carry out a 54-hour-long attack on a US college, and in April IBM uncovered another variant that used devices’ processing power to mine Bitcoins.

Mirai uses open source code that has been released to the public, making it simpler for attackers to create their own customised versions.

Last month the developer of BrickerBot, which aims to render vulnerable gadgets inoperable so that they can’t be used by botnets, said the tool had disabled two million devices to date.

Source: This article was published on silicon.co.uk by Matthew Broersma

Published in Science & Tech

An artist's concept of Made In Space's Archinaut spacecraft 3D-printing and assembling satellite reflectors in space.Archinauts 3D-Printing Satellite Reflectors

The nascent off-Earth manufacturing industry is getting set to take its next big steps.

Made In Space, the California-based company that owns and operates the commercial 3-D printer aboard the International Space Station (ISS), is developing new technology, called Archinaut, that's designed to enable the assembly of large structures in the final frontier.

"The real difference maker for this technology is in the area of being able to put stuff up that you can't origami fold up [for launch], or that would be really, really difficult to do with a traditional deployable" system, Made In Space CEO Andrew Rush told Space.com last month.

Building structures off Earth would also allow them "to be space-optimized," Rush said, "rather than engineered to survive launch."

The Archinaut concept integrates a 3-D-printer and flexible robotic arms into a single spacecraft capable of manufacturing parts and putting them together in space. In addition to building structures anew, Archinaut could help repair or upgrade existing satellites, Rush said.

Made In Space has been working on the project for about six months. NASA selected the idea for funding in November 2015 via a "tipping point technologies" solicitation, and the company (along with partners Northrop Grumman and Oceaneering Space Systems) got on the $20 million contract roughly a year later, Rush said.

Made In Space's work on Archinaut currently focuses on figuring out how best to manufacture "extended structures" in the space environment, Rush said. This research involves testing at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California — Made In Space's next-door neighbor — and analyzing samples created by the ISS commercial 3-D printer, which is called the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF).

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The next step will involve adding the robotic-arms component into the mix, Rush said. All of this is part of the project's first phase, which will last a total of 18 months.

After such work is complete, Made In Space and its partners aim to launch an Archinaut demonstration mission to Earth orbit. That flight had been pegged for 2018, but the timeline might end up being pushed back a bit, Rush said.

"For the Archinaut development program through NASA, that's kind of dependent on Phase 2, which is to be announced," he said.

The demonstration mission will likely build a space structure a few meters across, Rush added. There should be bigger things to come, however.

"Where this gets really interesting is, tens [of meters] to 100 meters plus," he said. "And that's what we're angling toward."

For example, Archinaut could potentially enable the construction of gigantic space telescopes, Rush said: The technology could manufacture some parts in orbit and integrate them with others, such as mirror segments, that were launched from the ground. (At the moment, entire space telescopes must be folded up to fit inside a rocket's nose cone, limiting their maximum size.)

"That's what we think is the attainable future that Archinaut enables," Rush said.

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NASA isn't the only organization interested in Archinaut. Rush said that Made In Space is also working with a commercial customer on an application for the technology and will turn over some hardware to this customer (which he declined to name) at the end of this summer.

Made In Space is also negotiating with a half-dozen other potential customers — some of them government entities, others in the private sector — on the possible use of Archinaut tech, Rush said.

Made In Space partnered with NASA to build the first-ever 3-D printer aboard the ISS, which reached the orbiting lab in September 2014. NASA owns that printer. But Made In Space owns and operates the AMF, a second-generation machine that arrived at the ISS in March 2016 and prints out parts for a variety of customers.

The company plans to develop Archinaut tech on a similar path, from demonstration mission to a series of increasingly capable, commercially operating machines, Rush said.

"Visions of what this could do have been with us for a long time," he said. "We want to do good work, and we want to learn from it."

Source: This article was published nbcnews.com By MIKE WALL,

Published in Science & Tech

The Galaxy S8 may not be able to beat the iPhone 7 and iPhone 6s in speed tests, but it still delivers remarkable performance. The phone is the first one to offer users new 10nm chips from Qualcomm and Samsung, the same kind of chip technology that will be found in various other flagship handsets this year, including the iPhone 8. But chip manufacturing process is only part of the story. Sure the smaller chips get the more efficient and the faster they become, but these mobile chips are all based on ARM designs. So whenever ARM releases new chip designs, it’s good news for smartphone lovers.

ARM did exactly that at Computex — it announced a couple of new processors that are likely going to power next year’s phones, including the Galaxy S9 that Samsung is already working on.

These chips are the ARM Cortex-A75 that will likely be used by Qualcomm, Samsung, TSMC, and others to create flagship mobile chips, and the Cortex-A55 that will power many of the future mid-range handsets. Finally, there’s also a new Mali-G72 graphics processor for next year’s phones.

As expected, all these chips are more efficient and faster than previous iterations. But ARM’s new silicon is getting ready to embrace the future. That means the company optimized its new chips for machine learning (ML), artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality (AR), and virtual reality (VR), which are going to become core technologies for smartphone makers, if they don’t already are.

One interesting evolution of ARM’s chip designs is the new Dynamiq CPU that affects big.Little technology going forward. In the past, device makers would have to pair a similar number of big cores with small cores. That’s how you end up with eight-core designs such as the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 in the Galaxy S8.

Going forward, Dynamiq will let companies mix and match the big and little cores as they see fit. Future eight-core chips may feature one big core and seven small ones, a design that could offer increased efficiency and reduce costs.

The Cortex-A75 chip offers double-figure performance across the board, according to The Verge. That means 22% better than the A73, 16% higher memory throughput, and a 34% bump in Geekbench scores. The chip is 20% faster in single-core use, and it’s optimized for future Windows-based laptops that will be built on ARM devices.

The A55 will also be faster than its predecessor, with ARM expecting a 10-30% improvement, up to 15% better power efficiency, and up to 18% faster single-thread performance.

Finally, the Mali-G72 is supposed to be 17% better than the G71 in ML benchmarks. The GPU is 25% more energy efficient than its predecessor, and offers 20% better performance density.

The first chip designs based on ARM’s latests innovations are expected to hit the market next year, and we definitely expect the Galaxy S9 to be one of the devices that will make use of ARM’s new chips.

Source: This article was published on bgr.com by Chris Smith

Published in Science & Tech

Visitors embrace the online retailer’s move into the physical world – even if the brick-and-mortar store serves in large part as an ad for Amazon Prime

Drop in for a book. Walk out with a smart watch.

Shopping in one of Amazon’s brand-new, three-dimensional bookstores affords visitors the opportunity to buy many things that aren’t books. A hands-free sous vide, for example. Or a tablet computer. Or a smart speaker equipped with Amazon’s “Alexa” virtual butler app.

At a grand opening Thursday for Amazon’s first bookstore in New York City, the mystery in the air was why a company that had changed the world by taking retail sales online would reverse direction and move into brick-and-mortar. The New York location is the seventh Amazon bookstore to open nationally since 2015, with six additional stores planned to open by the end of the year.

It’s clearly a bookstore chain. The question is: what are they selling? And what greater strategy may be afoot?

Setting aside for a moment those questions (spoiler alert: Amazondeclined to directly comment), the Guardian encountered the new retail space, inside the Time Warner Center mall at Columbus Circle, on its own terms, through customers’ eyes.

It looks like a modern bookstore, with a table of featured titles up front (The Oxford Companion to Wine, Trevor Noah: Born a Crime, etc) and ranks of shelves organized by the usual categories (fiction top sellers, travel, ages 3-7, etc).

‘I think it’s so ironic that so many wonderful bookstores were put out of business because of them, and now they’re opening up a bookstore,’ said one customer.

 ‘I think it’s so ironic that so many wonderful bookstores were put out of business because of them, and now they’re opening up a bookstore,’ said one customer. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

There are some distinctly Amazon – and passing strange – features, such as technology stands where customers can scan books to see what kind of a discount they might get as members of Amazon Prime, the subscriptions program.

Also unique here: the section called “Page turners: books Kindle readers finish in three days or less”. Amazon can track how quickly people who purchase books on Kindle read them, a company spokesperson explained, without explaining how.

Matt Lantin, 21, an economics major shopping for self-help books, admired how every book at the store was displayed so that its full cover, and not just its spine, was visible. At Amazon Books, every title is a featured title.

“They say you can’t judge a book by its cover, but in this case, not only can you see the cover, but you can also see the review below it,” Lantin said, after requesting a moment to compose his comment.

Displaying books face-out, however, eats up shelf space fast. At 4,000 square feet, the Columbus Circle store features 3,000 titles at any time, according to the company. Further gobbling shelf space: about one-quarter of the retail floor is given over to sales of non-books. That includes things like Bose speakers, French presses and instant cameras, but also a lot of Amazon hardware: Kindles, hard drives, the aforementioned smart speakers and the Amazon Fire, the company’s bestselling answer to the iPad.

Yvonne Reid, 54, who works elsewhere in the Time Warner complex and had stopped in to see whether she could pick up a copy of Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life ... And Maybe the World, judged the bookstore to be “beautiful”, but lacking in hangout space.

“I’m sorry that they don’t have more space where kids can come and sit and read,” said Reid, who reminisced about spending hours at Barnes & Noble when her kids were younger. “This does seem like more of a take-your-book-and-run kind of a thing.”

The arrival of Amazon bookstores, Reid noted, was part of a bigger picture.

“I think it’s so ironic that so many wonderful bookstores were put out of business because of them, and now they’re opening up a bookstore,” Reid said. “But I think it’s nice.”

An Amazon spokesperson declined to comment on that observation.

Dan Simon, the founder and publisher of the New York City-based Seven Stories Press, said Reid’s comment was accurate.

“They really did drive bookstores out of business,” said Simon, noting that Amazon added on to damage previously inflicted by big chains such as Borders and Barnes & Noble.

“But the upside of that was after 30 years, what we have now is a culture of bookselling that has survived all those things, and is incredibly vibrant and tough. There’s a small-business acumen among booksellers in the US today that is unmatched.”

Simon (a former colleague of this reporter, it should be disclosed) welcomed the advent of Amazon Books.

“It’s such a dynamic time now in the marketplace of books that on one side, another sort of bookstore is a good thing, plain and simply,” he said. “We want more physical bookstores.

“On the other side, it’s important to note that these stores are pretty small. Four thousand square feet – it’s not tiny, but the superstores were like 25,000, 30,000 square feet. So this is a small store. It’s not going to have a wide selection.”

About one-quarter of the retail floor is given over to sales of non-books.

 About one-quarter of the retail floor is given over to sales of non-books. Photograph: Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Official Amazon verbiage says the bookstore “is all about discovery” and offers readers a connection “to a community of millions of booklovers” whose reviews of the books on sale are displayed in the store. But like everything else in the store, you don’t have to leave home to get that: those reviews are available – and more readily – online.

Meanwhile, Amazon is in a battle of giants, vying with Google and Apple for markets such as consumer technology that dwarf the market for books. The brick-and-mortar retail experience is central to Apple’s strategy. Google has opened pop-up stores and is increasingly focused on physical stores.

It’s hard to miss how much the stores are also an advertisement for Amazon Prime, with their technology stands as unnecessarily staged revelations for consumers of how much they might be “saving” if they signed up.

“Our goal of Amazon Books is to help customers and readers discover great books,” an Amazon spokesperson said.

Among all the hundreds of millions of products Amazon sells, Simon said, there are good reasons the company would choose to sell books in physical stores. The stores strengthen the company’s hold on the growing self-publishing market, ensuring a physical retail outlet for those titles, he said. Books were Amazon’s original product. And books are unique.

“The store points up one of the great truths of this historical moment in books, which is, even though Amazon is probably selling about half the books that are being sold, the online experience is not really a good one for books,” he said. “Plenty of people buy everything online, but not books. Because you want to touch them, you want to open them up. You want to hold them in your hand. You want to discover things that you aren’t looking for.”

Reid, the drop-in customer, said there was no second-guessing Amazon’s decision.

“I love the bookstore,” she said. “You can actually touch the book.”

Source: This article was published theguardian.com By Tom

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