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An NYC area IT consultant and MSP reviews the dangers of the dark web and how to stay safe online in a new article from eMazzanti Technologies.

The informative article first clarifies common misconceptions about the dark web then lists steps to protect personal data and business assets. Readers are urged to work with data security professionals to achieve the best results.

“Understanding the dark web is helpful in protecting valuable business data,”

stated Jennifer Mazzanti, CEO, eMazzanti Technologies. “Modern cyber-security technology and best practices are designed to keep sensitive information from falling into the hands of the bad actors lurking there.”

Dark Web vs. Deep Web

“Contrary to some reports, the dark web does not include over 90 percent of the internet. This common misconception arises from confusion between two related terms. In reality, the internet includes several layers.”

“Deep web – Also known as the invisible web, this is by far the largest layer of the internet, with over 90 percent of all internet content. The bulk of this information involves perfectly legal content that is not indexed by the standard search engines. Your medical records, banking information and other member-only websites live here.”

“Dark web – Sites on the dark web are accessible only with special software that allows users to communicate and transact business anonymously. While this creates a haven for criminals, it also serves a legitimate purpose for whistleblowers, activists, and victims who need to remain anonymous.”

Identity Theft and the Dark Web

“If the dark web includes only about three percent of the internet, do I need to be concerned? Yes. Remember Equifax and Target? Whenever a website experiences a data breach involving personally identifiable information, that information will almost certainly appear for sale on the dark web, likely within hours.”

Navigate the Web with Expert Guides

Business leaders should keep in mind that a breach of company systems means not only data loss but also potentially a loss of reputation. To guard critical data, employ multi-layer security. For merchants, if EMV chip technology not already been implemented for point of sale (POS) systems, they should do that now.

As with any potentially dangerous territory, the internet is a much safer place when working with an experienced guide. The experts at eMazzanti build strategies to keep personal and business data safe. Whether implementing secure cloud solutions or tapping into eMazzanti’s considerable retail security expertise, business leaders can count on getting the protection they need.

About eMazzanti Technologies

eMazzanti’s team of trained, certified IT experts rapidly deliver retail and payment technology, digital marketing services, cloud and mobile solutions, multi-site implementations, 24×7 outsourced network management, remote monitoring and support to increase productivity, data security and revenue growth for clients ranging from law firms to high-end global retailers.

eMazzanti has made the Inc. 5000 list eight years running, is a 2015, 2013 and 2012 Microsoft Partner of the Year, 2016 NJ Business of the Year, 5X WatchGuard Partner of the Year and one of the TOP 200 U.S. Microsoft Partners! Contact: 1-866-362-9926, info(at)emazzanti.net or http://www.emazzanti.net Twitter: @emazzanti Facebook: Facebook.com/emazzantitechnologies.

 Source: This article was published prweb.com

Published in Deep Web

LONDON - Smartphones rule our lives. Having information at our fingertips is the height of convenience. They tell us all sorts of things, but the information we see and receive on our smartphones is just a fraction of the data they generate. By tracking and monitoring our behavior and activities, smartphones build a digital profile of shockingly intimate information about our personal lives.

These records aren’t just a log of our activities. The digital profiles they create are traded between companies and used to make inferences and decisions that affect the opportunities open to us and our lives. What’s more, this typically happens without our knowledge, consent or control.

New and sophisticated methods built into smartphones make it easy to track and monitor our behavior. A vast amount of information can be collected from our smartphones, both when being actively used and while running in the background. This information can include our location, internet search history, communications, social media activity, finances and biometric data such as fingerprints or facial features. It can also include metadata – information about the data – such as the time and recipient of a text message.

Your emails can reveal your social network. David Glance

Each type of data can reveal something about our interests and preferences, views, hobbies and social interactions. For example, a study conducted by MIT demonstrated how email metadata can be used to map our lives, showing the changing dynamics of our professional and personal networks. This data can be used to infer personal information including a person’s background, religion or beliefs, political views, sexual orientation and gender identity, social connections, or health. For example, it is possible to deduce our specific health conditions simply by connecting the dots between a series of phone calls.

Different types of data can be consolidated and linked to build a comprehensive profile of us. Companies that buy and sell data – data brokers – already do this. They collect and combine billions of data elements about people to make inferences about them. These inferences may seem innocuous but can reveal sensitive information such as ethnicity, income levels, educational attainment, marital status, and family composition.

A recent study found that seven in ten smartphone apps share data with third-party tracking companies like Google Analytics. Data from numerous apps can be linked within a smartphone to build this more detailed picture of us, even if permissions for individual apps are granted separately. Effectively, smartphones can be converted into surveillance devices.

The result is the creation and amalgamation of digital footprints that provide in-depth knowledge about your life. The most obvious reason for companies collecting information about individuals is for profit, to deliver targeted advertising and personalized services. Some targeted ads, while perhaps creepy, aren’t necessarily a problem, such as an ad for the new trainers you have been eyeing up.

Payday load ads. UpturnCC BY

But targeted advertising based on our smartphone data can have real impacts on livelihoods and well-being, beyond influencing purchasing habits. For example, people in financial difficulty might be targeted for ads for payday loans. They might use these loans to pay for unexpected expenses, such as medical bills, car maintenance or court fees, but could also rely on them for recurring living costs such as rent and utility bills. People in financially vulnerable situations can then become trapped in spiraling debt as they struggle to repay loans due to the high cost of credit.

Targeted advertising can also enable companies to discriminate against people and deny them an equal chance of accessing basic human rights, such as housing and employment. Race is not explicitly included in Facebook’s basic profile information, but a user’s “ethnic affinity” can be worked out based on pages they have liked or engaged with. Investigative journalists from ProPublica found that it is possible to exclude those who match certain ethnic affinities from housing ads, and certain age groups from job ads.

This is different to traditional advertising in print and broadcast media, which although targeted is not exclusive. Anyone can still buy a copy of a newspaper, even if they are not the typical reader. Targeted online advertising can completely exclude some people from information without them ever knowing. This is a particular problem because the internet, and social media especially, is now such a common source of information.

Social media data can also be used to calculate creditworthiness, despite its dubious relevance. Indicators such as the level of sophistication in a user’s language on social media and their friends’ loan repayment histories can now be used for credit checks. This can have a direct impact on the fees and interest rates charged on loans, the ability to buy a house, and even employment prospects.

There’s a similar risk with payment and shopping apps. In China, the government has announced plans to combine data about personal expenditure with official records, such as tax returns and driving offenses. This initiative, which is being led by both the government and companies, is currently in the pilot stage. When fully operational, it will produce a social credit score that rates an individual citizen’s trustworthiness. These ratings can then be used to issue rewards or penalties, such as privileges in loan applications or limits on career progression.

These possibilities are not distant or hypothetical – they exist now. Smartphones are effectively surveillance devices, and everyone who uses them is exposed to these risks. What’s more, it is impossible to anticipate and detect the full range of ways smartphone data is collected and used and to demonstrate the full scale of its impact. What we know could be just the beginning.

Source: This article was published enca.com

Published in Science & Tech

Pipl has raised $19 million from IGP. Founder and CEO Matthew Hertz tells "Globes" about the search engine's ability to find people.

On November 15, 2016, the Detroit Police Department was notified that Savannah Rayford, an 11 month-old baby suffering from life-threatening anemia, had been kidnapped. The kidnapper was known: Marquita Dupree, her biological mother, who was deprived of custody because of her mental state. Dupree got on line to see the doctor to whom Savannah's adoptive mother had taken him, and took advantage of the car stopping on the return journey to grab the infant and escape.

The Detroit police were in a race against the clock. The main clue for finding the mother quickly was the mobile telephone number that she used from time to time, but it was not registered in her name. The police investigators fed the number into Thomson Reuters Clear online investigative computer program, and located several addresses linked to the owner of the telephone number. The mother and baby were found within a few hours at one of these addresses.

The event in Detroit is one of many that has made Clear very popular with the FBI, many US police units, the tax authorities, and other government agencies. Feeding an item of information into the program, such as a telephone number, accesses a full portrait of the person linked to it: residential addresses, e-mail addresses, businesses, relatives, social network profiles, and criminal records. In 2015, the program helped bring about the arrest of a former member of the armed forces who threatened to shoot up a school in San Bernardino, California, and a wanted sex offender in Vermont was caught by using the program.

US law enforcement authorities are probably unaware that a large proportion of Clear's database was created in the Petah Tikva industrial zone at a company named Pipl. Company founder and CEO Matthew Hertz have taken great care to stay under the radar since founding the company in 2005. "I like anonymity," he explains in his first Israeli media interview.

"I agreed to this interview only because I realized that the company is paying a price for its anonymity. Most of our customers in Israel didn't know that we were here before they started working with us. Now that we are trying to recruit employees here in competition with companies like Google and Facebook, we need people to know who and what we are; otherwise, it will be hard for us."

"Google doesn't know how to find people"

Anyone who has tried using Google to search for particulars about another person through a telephone number or e-mail address knows how useless the effort is. Hertz spotted this weak point already in 2005 and decided to build a search engine that would do more thorough work. He was only 27 years old at the time but was already an experienced entrepreneur who had sold two companies. "This was a difficult development project. I took my time at first. After two exits, I thought that I would work part-time - only 30% - but it quickly became interesting, and since then, I have been working time and a half."

Pipl's main asset is a focused identities search engine that has generated profiles to date for over three billion people with some online presence. In addition to the information gathered from open online sources, the profiles are enriched with billions of information items from offline sources, such as telephone directories and lists of professionals. "We thought that we would make a depth engine for everything that Google doesn't find, but we very quickly realized that the product was excellent mainly in finding people. We were far beyond the technology that people expected at the time, and we found things that no other engine found. Google has made no progress in this area, called deep web, or in searching for people, for the past 10 years. You will never be able to get such profiles on Google."

The beginning was modest. "We started as three people, and simply sat down and concentrated on development. Once we came out with the product, we very rapidly reached millions of users. We didn't spend a shekel on marketing, but there was exposure through TechCrunch, and things spread by word of mouth. In late 2007, less than a year after we came out with the product, we were breaking even financially. It turned out it not only worked, but that a lot of people wanted it, and as soon as you have five million users, advertisements generate a significant amount of money," Hertz recalls.

Over the years, the company continued to attract relatively little public interest. Pipl yesterday announced that it had completed a $19 million financing round from the Israel Growth Partners (IGP) fund, which invests in companies with at least $10 million in revenue. Following this investment, IGP general partner Moshe Lichtman and partner Assaf Harel will join Pipl's board of directors. This is the first substantial investment in Pipl, which Hertz has financing almost by himself to date, with a little help from family members. Hertz plans to leverage the money raised in order to increase the number of the company's customers from 1,000 to 5,000 this year, and to diversify its products. As of now, Pipl has 75 employees in its development center in Petah Tikva and 30 more in Idaho, where Piple is incorporated for tax reasons. Hertz, who still interviews every new employee, plans to reach 300 employees within a year and close to 1,000 within two or three years.

"How we discovered jewelry fraud"

Like other companies in its sector, Piple's model raises quite a few troublesome questions about privacy. Not everyone wants strangers to know where they live, their telephone number, and their children's names, even if this information is circulating on the web. The combination of such databases with government agencies, despite its contribution to crime prevention, is likely to make people shudder. Many people are unaware of the existence of Pipl and services of this type, and in the post-Edward Snowden era, with Facebook and Google having to deal with the question of their effect on privacy, Pipl's product may be effective, but it is also causing alarm.

Hertz, of course, tries to soothe the criticism. He says that he has refrained from selling advanced functions of systems to dictatorial regimes, carefully selects his company's business customers in order to prevent misuse, and adds that the company refrains from displaying especially sensitive information, such as criminal records that do not appear on the Internet. "We're very aware of the fact that despite all the open sources, in the end, this is information about people, and there has to control over it. If someone wants to remove information, we'll do it, for example, to disconnect a Facebook account from his profile. We explain, however, that such removal has a price. If a risk management company or a company that wants to prevent financial fraud uses our services, certain deals you make are liable not to pass," he warns.

"Globes": How many people ask you to remove information?

Hertz: "Maybe 10 a day."

Up until 2014, the company generated most of its revenue from the version of its search engine open for public use, which includes only basic profiles. Since then, however, it has accumulated nearly 1,000 business customers that generate over 95% of its revenue. The customers use Pipl's engine to verify identities, prevent eCommerce fraud, enrich information in customer relations management (CRM) systems, conduct inquiries, provide financial services, and recruit personnel. In addition to the US government, many other governments use the system, among other things through the company's strategic partnership with Verint Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: VRNT) (when we asked about the Israeli government, Hertz refused to answer). In the business sphere, nearly 200 online websites use the product, in addition to companies such as Microsoft, IBM, Walmart, eBay, Twitter, BBC, and Oracle.

"In the past, when you ordered a delivery from overseas, and the address you gave was different from the credit card company's address, the delivery was stopped in most cases. They had to call you or the credit card company in order to add the address - a complicated process that caused a huge loss. This almost never happens now, for a simple reason: as soon as you type in your telephone number, they know who you are, and realize that the address is your work address or your mother's address. All of this takes place behind the scenes. An enormous number of transactions went through us on Black Friday," Hertz says.

The use of the system to prevent fraud is not confined to verifying the purchaser's identify on the web. Hertz mentions cases in which swindlers saying that their credit cards were used without their permission and demanding a refund were caught by cross-referencing information. In one case, customers claimed that the jewelry that they bought had not reached them, but the program found a photograph of the jewelry on one of the social networks. In another case, a person was photographed in the Caribbean Islands who claimed that someone else had used his card to order a plane ticket.

Another use of Pipl is in customer management systems. Companies like American Airlines and Oracle use the system in order to discover whether a new customer is a young student or an employee of a large company, to whom an experienced salesperson should be assigned. Among other things, Twitter uses Pipl's technology to obtain information about users behaving like trolls or threatening their friends.

"I studied in yeshiva, and then I cooked shrimp"

Throughout the conversation, Hertz tries to avoid talking about himself but gives in after several attempts. "I come from a haredi family in Bnei Brak. We are nine brothers and sisters. I'm the middle one. Several of my siblings are no longer religiously observant. My older brother is a brain surgeon. My younger brother worked at Pipl when he was a student at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology, and built the previous version of the search engine. I'm not concealing this. Everyone around me knows where I came from, but it is very easy to make this the main story, and I don't want that."

Hertz left the yeshiva (Jewish religious seminary) and religion when he was 17. He moved to Tel Aviv and studied for his matriculation exams. "I learned nothing in the haredi education system, but my mother was an enlightened type - one of the few haredi women with a degree at that time, and I learned a lot by myself from books with her help. I was exposed to geography and mathematics. I became a child who asked questions. She taught me to think. My first job after I left yeshiva was an assistant chef in a French restaurant because I knew how to cook. I spent time in the kitchen with my mother since I was nine years old."

Was the restaurant kosher?

"It wasn't. They had shrimps and steak in cream sauce. It was the Tamara restaurant."

That is a big change.

"It was something that I had been thinking about for a long time. At age 12, I already had questions and doubts. And you know, there is no answer. You can put it off again and again, but in the end, a point will come when you can stand on your own two feet. While I was still at the yeshiva, the IDF decided not to draft me. They considered me to have only four years of schooling, and considered putting me in a unit for dropouts."

Just before his 19th birthday, Hertz decided to study computer science at the Open University and to work as a salesperson for human resources management software. At one of his work meetings at Flying Cargo, when then represented FedEx in Israel, he thought about founding an e-commerce website for deliveries in Israel, on which the delivery companies would compete for offering the best price. He managed to get to the global IT manager at UPS and raised a little money from the companies, but gave it back after he discovered that there was not enough activity to justify the website's existence. "Keep in mind that this was in 1999. Internet then was like bitcoin is now - you got money right away. When I look at this now, it really wasn't logical to give a 20-year-old entrepreneur money on his first attempt."

In that same period, during which he spent a large part of his time in the US, he changed his name from Moti to Matthew. While going back and forth between Israel and the US, he completed his degree in computer science at Tel Aviv University. He founded his first mature startup, Ombek when he was 23. The company developed a service for transmitting SMS messages between different networks at a time when it was not yet taken for granted. "The exit was a merger into WSC, and it later underwent more mergers and acquisitions. We succeeded in reaching three mobile providers in the US three or four months after launching the product. When I left, it was installed in Sprint, Nextel, and other companies."

He founded his second startup, Mail-Info, together with former ICQ CEO Ariel Yarnitsky. The company developed a product capable of determining whether an e-mail sent was received or rejected as spam. The company was acquired by Speedbit in 2005.

You said that you couldn't be an employee. Why is that?

"Being an entrepreneur is not being a soloist. I'm still in a company, and I can't things by myself. But if things have to move, then they move. If you have a dream and you want something to happen, you don't have to persuade a great many people who may or may not agree. You simply go to the end with your vision and make things happen, even if they laugh at you and tell you to stop smoking whatever you're smoking."

 Source: This article was published globes.co.il By Nati Yefet

Published in Search Engine

The photo suggests website selling IT products "on consignment" for international joint ventures.

A North Korean agency has launched an updated search engine for the country’s intranet, equipped with an online store selling specialized goods for scientists and technicians, state-run outlet DPRK Today reported on Tuesday.

The Central Information Agency for Science and Technology reportedly developed the “information retrieval and management system ‘Kwangmyong’” — which can be translated into light or bright future — to meet the demands of the country’s growing knowledge economy.

“Kwangmyong is greatly favorably received from scientists and technicians due to the abundance of data, speed of search, and accuracy rate of searching literature,” the DPRK Today reported.

“The project of providing technical information for science research institutes, factories, and industrial establishments through Kwangmyong substantially.”

The website features “hundreds of millions” of scientific and technological articles translated from various languages, according to the report, in fields including basic and applied science, biotechnology, and medical science.

A photo of the homepage provided by DPRK Today suggested that membership is required to use the website

The navigation bars are comprised of eight sections: homepage, new technology news, periodicals, “distribution of science and technology,” a database, the online shop, and the Kwangmyong card.

A photo obtained by NK News in September 2017, which appears to be taken before the website redesign, suggested that visitors can purchase IT products on the website.

The photo particularly suggested that website could be selling IT products on behalf of international joint ventures and other companies.

“We inform about the sale of the information technology by an agent and on consignment,” one notice, published on July 13, 2016, read.

Joint ventures — which included the Korea Kwangmyong Joint Venture (JV) Company and the Achim Computer JV Company  — were listed in the section “introducing new products.”

Products from an “agent branch” of the company from Hong Kong were also on sale at the website, thought the name of the corporation was unclear.

New IT goods developed by the Central Information Agency for Science and Technology are also promoted in the same section, with another part of the website suggesting that customers could purchase products online using the “Kwangmyong” card.

Photo of Kwangmyong website before redesign

Among the IT products visible in the photo is software including a “handbook of healthy food, picture encyclopedia on science and technology,” a Chinese – Korean language translation program, and various sports games.

It also provides “new tech news” including updates on “techniques for cultivating papaya tree… in a greenhouse.”

Information on scientific techniques such as “development trends in recent machine manufacturing technology” and “techniques for breeding mudfish” is also offered to users.

The DPRK Today reported on Tuesday that a scientific institute was able to complete the research on the protection and proliferation of forest resources “within a short period of time without using a large amount of reagent and expensive equipment” thanks to the resources.

The photo was taken at an e-library in Chongjin city last year, with a North Korean who used the library “at least twice a week” telling the photographer that it features “books from all over the world.”

The source reported being unable to find any publications by Indian authors, however. 

The two-story library —  used by both students and military personnel —  is open to the public during on weekdays between 10 am and 5 pm.

“I was told that it is connected via the intranet to Pyongyang, so what is available there is also available in this library,” the photographer, who asked to remain anonymous, told NK News.

“Long distance learning opportunities with Pyongyang is also available,” they added. “In one classroom, students attended a CAD / Photoshop course.”

They also said there are “approximately 300 computers in the library” using the Windows platform, adding some computers are manufactured by the U.S. corporation Dell and others were produced by the AOC  headquartered in Taipei.

North Korea’s e-commerce industry has visibly grown in the past year. December saw the Arirang-Mearireport on the online store “Abnal” (앞날), which can reportedly deliver goods within 24 hours.

The Manmulsang website also provides the platform for the North’s businesspersons so that they can promote their products online to customers.

Source: This article was published nknews.org By Dagyum Ji

Published in Search Engine

Networking can feel like a bit of a minefield, especially online. Thankfully, Hays’ Jane McNeill is here to share her top tips.

Not so long ago, networking used to be fairly straightforward. It simply involved navigating a crowded room, business card in hand, while scoping out the best people to speak to and then attempting to start a meaningful conversation.

Of course, this face-to-face networking is still important, and always will be, but there’s also a new kid in town.

The rise of online networks has created real, focused, commercial opportunities to network – but there are rules to this new world, particularly when it comes to leveraging your online connections.

Maximise your presence on LinkedIn

While networking events remain important, most networks are grown today on LinkedIn. But, before you start to network online, start with the basics: optimise your LinkedIn profile.

Add keywords to your headline, summary and experience sections as they are searchable by others; add your LinkedIn URL to your email signature; review LinkedIn’s suggested connections regularly, and join relevant LinkedIn groups. Be proactive in writing recommendations and endorsing skills where appropriate.

If you’re wondering if it matters how many relevant first-degree connections you have, the answer is yes because second- and third-degree connections mean you can be one connection away from potentially millions of people. The key is to make sure your connections are relevant – quality not quantity is vital when building your network.

Get an introduction

This doesn’t mean you can automatically interact with your second- and third-degree connections. If you’d like to touch base with a second-degree connection on LinkedIn, email your first-degree contact to ask for an introduction.

Do not reach out to the second-degree contact independently; not only is it considered poor form, but people are far more likely to respond when being introduced by a mutual connection.

It’s also good etiquette to say thank you to every person who makes an introduction or helps you in some way. A brief InMail, email or phone call takes one minute.

Timing

So, you’ve just met someone who would be a great addition to your network, but you aren’t sure when to send a connection request.

How soon is too soon? Rest assured, it’s perfectly acceptable to send a request once you are back in the office after meeting the person, or immediately following a telephone or email exchange. Be sure to always personalize your connection requests, too.

Just don’t wait too long – it is standard etiquette to follow up within two days. Similarly, if you make a commitment to someone, such as sending a link or making an introduction, delivered within two days. Remember to also accept invitations in a timely manner, and send a follow-up thank you.

It’s not all one-way

Don’t pitch to new contacts as soon as you connect, though. Offer something of value first, such as a link to a relevant article.

When it comes to networking, the general rule is that you should give more than you take. As my colleague, Yvonne Smyth wrote: “Before you need them, help others get what they want first.”

Be active

Effective networking involves staying in touch, so share relevant and engaging content, like and share updates from your connections, and join and contribute to industry groups. If you have a lot of expertise in certain areas, start your own LinkedIn blog.

Be genuine, insightful and authentic; show interest in others; ask questions, and be respectful of people’s time. But don’t over-post, otherwise, your communications could be too diluted.

Finally, introductions via technology can be a good starting point, but professional relationships are usually cemented in person. Take the time to get to know people by attending industry events and joining an association or professional group.

With these online networking etiquette tips, you’re ready to build and leverage your connections in a thoughtful, effective and professional manner.

Jane McNeill is managing director of both New South Wales and Western Australia at Hays Recruitment.

A version of this article previously appeared on Hays’ Viewpoint blogBy Jane McNeill

Published in Others

Searching video surveillance streaming for relevant information is a time-consuming mission that does not always convey accurate results. A new cloud-based deep-learning search engine augments surveillance systems with natural language search capabilities across recorded video footage.

The Ella search engine, developed by IC Realtime, uses both algorithmic and deep learning tools to give any surveillance or security camera the ability to recognize objects, colors, people, vehicles, animals and more.

It was designed with the technology backbone of Camio, a startup founded by ex-Googlers who realized there could be a way to apply search to streaming video feeds. Ella makes every nanosecond of video searchable instantly, letting users type in queries like “white truck” to find every relevant clip instead of searching through hours of footage. Ella quite simply creates a Google for video.

Traditional systems only allow the user to search for events by date, time, and camera type and to return very broad results that still require sifting, according to businesswire.com. The average surveillance camera sees less than two minutes of interesting video each day despite streaming and recording 24/7.

Ella instead does the work for users to highlight the interesting events and to enable fast searches of their surveillance and security footage. From the moment Ella comes online and is connected, it begins learning and tagging objects the cameras see.

The deep learning engine lives in the cloud and comes preloaded with recognition of thousands of objects like makes and models of cars; within the first minute of being online, users can start to search their footage.

Hardware agnostic, the technology also solves the issue of limited bandwidth for any HD streaming camera or NVR. Rather than push every second of recorded video to the cloud, Ella features interest-based video compression. Based on machine learning algorithms that recognize patterns of motion in each camera scene to recognize what is interesting within each scene, Ella will only record in HD when it recognizes something important. The uninteresting events are still stored in a low-resolution time-lapse format, so they provide 24×7 continuous security coverage without using up valuable bandwidth.

Ella works with both existing DIY and professionally installed surveillance and security cameras and is comprised of an on-premise video gateway device and the cloud platform subscription.

Source: This article was published i-hls.com

Published in Search Engine

After decades of unbridled enthusiasm — bordering on addiction — about all things digital, the public may be losing trust in technologyOnline information isn’t reliable, whether it appears in the form of news, search results or user reviews. Social media, in particular, is vulnerable to manipulation by hackers or foreign powers. Personal data isn’t necessarily private. And people are increasingly worried about automation and artificial intelligence taking humans’ jobs.

Yet, around the world, people are both increasingly dependent on, and distrustful of, digital technology. They don’t behave as if they mistrust technology. Instead, people are using technological tools more intensively in all aspects of daily life. In recent research on digital trust in 42 countries (a collaboration between Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, where I work, and Mastercard), my colleagues and I found that this paradox is a global phenomenon.

If today’s technology giants don’t do anything to address this unease in an environment of growing dependence, people might start looking for more trustworthy companies and systems to use. Then Silicon Valley’s powerhouses could see their business boom go bust.

Economic power

Some of the concerns have to do with how big a role the technology companies and their products play in people’s lives. U.S. residents already spend 10 hours a day in front of a screen of some kind. One in 5 Americans says they are online “almost constantly.” The tech companies have enormous reach and power. More than 2 billion people use Facebook every month.

Ninety percent of search queries worldwide go through Google. Chinese e-retailer, Alibaba, organizes the biggest shopping event worldwide every year on Nov. 11, which this year brought in US$25.3 billion in revenue, more than twice what U.S. retailers sold between Thanksgiving and Cyber Monday last year.

This results in enormous wealth. All six companies in the world worth more than $500 billion are tech firms. The top six most sought-after companies to work for are also in tech. Tech stocks are booming, in ways reminiscent of the giddy days of the dot-com bubble of 1997 to 2001. With emerging technologies, including the “internet of things,” self-driving carsblockchain systems and artificial intelligence, tempting investors and entrepreneurs, the reach and power of the industry is only likely to grow.

This is particularly true because half the world’s population is still not online. But networking giant Cisco projects that 58 percent of the world will be online by 2021, and the volume of internet traffic per month per user will grow 150 percent from 2016 to 2021.

All these users will be deciding on how much to trust digital technologies.

Data, democracy, and the day job

Even now, the reasons for collective unease about technology are piling up. Consumers are learning to be worried about the security of their personal information: News about a data breach involving 57 million Uber accounts follows on top of reports of a breach of the 145.5 million consumer data records on Equifax and every Yahoo account — 3 billion in all.

Russia was able to meddle with Facebook, Google, and Twitter during the 2016 election campaign. That has raised concerns about whether the openness and reach of digital media is a threat to the functioning of democracies.

Another technological threat to society comes from workplace automation. The management consulting firm, McKinsey, estimates that it could displace one-third of the U.S. workforce by 2030, even if a different set of technologies create new “gig” opportunities.

The challenge for tech companies is that they operate in global markets and the extent to which these concerns affect behaviors online varies significantly around the world.

Mature markets differ from emerging ones

Our research uncovers some interesting differences in behaviors across geographies. In areas of the world with smaller digital economies and where technology use is still growing rapidly, users tend to exhibit more trusting behaviors online. These users are more likely to stick with a website even if it loads slowly, is hard to use or requires many steps for making an online purchase. This could be because the experience is still novel and there are fewer convenient alternatives either online or offline.

In the mature digital markets of Western Europe, North America, Japan and South Korea, however, people have been using the internet, mobile phones, social media and smartphone apps for many years. Users in those locations are less trusting, prone to switching away from sites that don’t load rapidly or are hard to use, and abandoning online shopping carts if the purchase process is too complex.

Because people in more mature markets have less trust, I would expect tech companies to invest in trust-building in more mature digital markets. For instance, they might speed up and streamline the processing of e-commerce transactions and payments, or more clearly label the sources of information presented on social media sites, as the Trust Project is doing, helping to identify authenticated and reliable news sources.

Consider Facebook’s situation. In response to criticism for allowing fake Russian accounts to distribute fake news on its site, CEO Mark Zuckerberg boldly declared that “Protecting our community is more important than maximizing our profits.” However, according to the company’s chief financial officer, Facebook’s 2018 operating expenses could increase by 45 to 60 percent if it were to invest significantly in building trust, such as hiring more humans to review posts and developing artificial intelligence systems to help them. Those costs would lower Facebook’s profits.

To strike a balance between profitability and trustworthiness, Facebook will have to set priorities and deploy advanced trust-building technologies (e.g. vetting locally generated news and ads) in only some geographic markets.

The future of digital distrust

As the boundaries of the digital world expand, and more people become familiar with internet technologies and systems, their distrust will grow. As a result, companies seeking to enjoy consumer trust will need to invest in becoming more trustworthy more widely around the globe. Those that do will likely see a competitive advantage, winning more loyalty from customers.

This risks creating a new type of digital divide. Even as one global inequality disappears — more people have an opportunity to go online — some countries or regions may have significantly more trustworthy online communities than others. Especially in the less-trustworthy regions, users will need governments to enact strong digital policies to protect people from fake news and fraudulent scams, as well as regulatory oversight to protect consumers’ data privacy and human rights.

All consumers will need to remain on guard against overreach by heavy-handed authorities or autocratic governments, particularly in parts of the world where consumers are new to using technology and, therefore, more trusting. And they’ll need to keep an eye on companies, to make sure they invest in trust-building more evenly around the world, even in less mature markets. Fortunately, digital technology makes watchdogs’ work easier, and also can serve as a megaphone — such as on social media — to issue alerts, warnings or praise.

Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean, International Business & Finance, Tufts University

Source: This article was published salon.com By BHASKAR CHAKRAVORTI,

Published in Online Research

Today, blockchain technology is still at an early stage of its development and will be used in new interesting projects in the future, according to cryptocurrency expert Bogdan Shelygin.

"It’s difficult to predict what will happen to Bitcoin in the future, but I can say with full confidence that Bitcoin is more than just super profits. It has introduced to the world a new technology which is as revolutionary as the Internet," Bogdan Shelygin, an analyst with DeCenter, Russia’s largest blockchain, and cryptocurrency-related community, told Sputnik.

Bitcoin, the world’s most popular cryptocurrency, has shown a meteoric rise in the outgoing year. Its value grew from below $1,000 in the beginning of the year and hit the historic milestone of $20,000 earlier in December. For some financial experts and economists, however, Bitcoin is a reason for concern as another possible bubble.

According to Shelygin, despite the fact that there are those predicting an imminent collapse of Bitcoin, it is impossible to say whether it is a bubble or not.

"Let’s get to the facts. Once the price of Bitcoin already fell, but it remains valuable for the global community as an alternative to the traditional financial system," the analyst pointed out, adding that the main feature of Bitcoin is its decentralized nature.

Shelygin also said that the phenomenon of Bitcoin is that it is the first cryptocurrency the global community has believed in for already 10 years.

"This means that the most interesting things are yet to come. A similar situation was with the Internet. Google was founded in 1998, but today the company is a pioneer in web and other technologies," he said.

Commenting further, Shelygin also suggested that even if Bitcoin collapses the entire cryptocurrencies market will not fall.

"Bitcoin is only the most popular example of the use of the blockchain technology, but it’s not the most outstanding one. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies will contribute to the future improvement of the blockchain. Today, the industry is still too young," the analyst said, adding that there a number of other interesting blockchain-based projects to watch in 2018, including Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash, and Ripple.

Source: This article was published sputniknews.com

Published in Science & Tech

A “CATASTROPHIC” collision between space debris which could irradiate satellite-reliant technology on Earth is now extremely probable.

There is now believed to be an astonishing 170 million pieces of space debris floating in Earth’s upper atmosphere, but only 22,000 are being tracked.

The problem now appears to be out of control, and experts fear that a catastrophic collision could be on the way.

Technologies such as mobile phones, television, GPS and weather related services rely on satellites, so a cataclysmic series of crashes could pose a threat to our already over-reliant need for satellites.

Ben Greene, chief executive of Canberra’s Space Environment Research Centre (SERC) said: “There is so much debris that it is colliding with itself, and creating more debris.

debris 1
Earth's atmosphere is littered with debris

“A catastrophic avalanche of collisions which could quickly destroy all orbiting satellites is now possible.”

Professor Moribah Jah, an expert on space debris from the University of Texas, likened the lack of information on space debris to the meteoric rise of drones.

debris
NASA's map of known space debris

He said: "The availability of drones in people's hands has outpaced the Government's ability to really regulate these things — I think we are facing the possibility of that with space.”

Professor Jah added that if action is not taken swiftly, a devastating collision is “inevitable”.

junk
Experts hope to use lasers to push debris outwards

One potential solution that has been offered would be to gently shove satellite debris into outer space using laser technology.

Australian National University professor Matthew Colless said: “If we increase the power of the lasers that we have to actually gently push small bits of space junk, that makes them fall back to Earth more rapidly and burn up harmlessly in the atmosphere.”

Source: This article was published express.co.uk By SEAN MARTIN

Published in Science & Tech

Following Mirai, the Persirai botnet is the latest to take over connected devices and use them to launch denial-of-service attacks

Researchers have uncovered a new botnet that takes over Internet-connected cameras in order to launch denial-of-service attacks, following in the footsteps of the notorious Mirai botnet.

The new malware, called Persirai, appears to be controlled by Iranian nationals, since the addresses of its command servers use the controlled .ir domain and special Persian characters were used in its code, according to Trend Micro.

120,000 vulnerable devices

Persirai targets more than 1,000 models of IP cameras and Trend found more than 120,000 vulnerable devices listed on the Shodan Internet of Things (IoT) search engine.

“Many of these vulnerable users are unaware that their IP Cameras are exposed to the internet,” Trend said in an advisory. “This makes it significantly easier for the perpetrators behind the malware to gain access to the IP Camera web interface via TCP Port 81.”ENISA botnet report, Mirai


The IP cameras use a connection standard called Universal Plug and Play (UPnP), which allows them to open a port on the network’s router and connect to the external Internet as a server without any action on the user’s part, making them vulnerable to malware.

Persirai attacks cameras using a security bug made public several months ago, and installs code that causes the device to automatically begin attacking other cameras using the same vulnerability.

While running the malware code blocks other attacks that make use of the same bug.Since it runs in memory only, the malware is disabled when the device is rebooted – but the device then also becomes vulnerable to attacks once again.

Infected cameras receive commands from the attacker’s servers that can direct distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against other systems, Trend said.

The company said the manufacturer of the device it tested said it had released a firmware update fixing the vulnerability used by Persirai, but Trend wasn’t able to find a more recent firmware version.

Botnet disruption

The security firm advised users to change the default passwords on their Internet-connected devices, if they haven’t already done so.

“Users should also disable UPnP on their routers to prevent devices within the network from opening ports to the external Internet without any warning,” Trend advised.

HSBC, security


DDoS attacks by Mirai and other IoT botnets prompted a similar warning from the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in October of last year.

In March, researchers said a Mirai variant had been used to carry out a 54-hour-long attack on a US college, and in April IBM uncovered another variant that used devices’ processing power to mine Bitcoins.

Mirai uses open source code that has been released to the public, making it simpler for attackers to create their own customised versions.

Last month the developer of BrickerBot, which aims to render vulnerable gadgets inoperable so that they can’t be used by botnets, said the tool had disabled two million devices to date.

Source: This article was published on silicon.co.uk by Matthew Broersma

Published in Science & Tech
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