This piece originally appeared on Travel + Leisure.

Planes have changed a lot since the days of the Wright Brothers (or, perhaps more accurately, Brazilian inventor Alberto Santos). Those first wood-and-cloth contraptions are an entirely different species than the sleek Boeing Dreamliners of today.W

ith the continual advancements in aerospace technology, it's hard to keep up with all the amazing things planes today are capable of doing (and withstanding). Below, 11 things you didn’t know about airplanes and air travel.

© Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Airplanes are designed to withstand lightning strikes

Planes are designed to be struck by lightning—and they regularly are hit. It’s estimated lightning strikes each aircraft once a year—or once per every 1,000 hours of flight time. Yet, lighting hasn’t brought down a plane since 1963, due to careful engineering that lets the electric charge of a lightning bolt run through the plane and out of it, typically without causing damage to the plane.

© Image Source/Getty Images

There is no safest seat on the plane

The FAA says there is no safest seat on the plane, though a TIME study of plane accidents found that the middle seats in the back of the plane had the lowest fatality rate in a crash. Their research revealed that, during plane crashes, “the seats in the back third of the aircraft had a 32 percent fatality rate, compared with 39 percent in the middle third and 38 percent in the front third.”

However, there are so many variables at play that it’s impossible to know where to sit to survive a crash. Oh, and plane crashes are incredibly rare.

© Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Some airplanes have secret bedrooms for flight crew

On long-haul flights, cabin crew can work 16-hour days. To help combat fatigue, some planes, like the Boeing 777 and 787 Dreamliners, are outfitted with tiny bedrooms where the flight crew can get a little shut-eye. The bedrooms are typically accessed via a hidden staircase that leads up to a small, low-ceilinged room with 6 to 10 beds, a bathroom, and sometimes in-flight entertainment.

© Felbert+Eickenberg/Getty Images/Stock4B Creative

The tires are designed not to pop on landing

The tires on an airplane are designed to withstand incredible weight loads (38 tons!) and can hit the ground at 170 miles per hour more than 500 times before ever needing to get a retread. Additionally, airplane tires are inflated to 200 psi, which is about six times the pressure used in a car tire. If an airplane does need new tires, ground crew simply jack up the plane like you would a car.

© danr13/Getty Image

Why cabin crew dims the light when a plane is landing

When a plane lands at night, cabin crews will dim the interior lights. Why? In the unlikely event that the plane landing goes badly and passengers need to evacuate, their eyes will already be adjusted to the darkness. As pilot Chris Cooke explained to T+L: “Imagine being in an unfamiliar bright room filled with obstacles when someone turns off the lights and asks you to exit quickly.”

Similarly, flight attendants have passengers raise their window shades during landing, so they can see outside in an emergency and assess if one side of the plane is better for an evacuation.

© Flightlevel80/Getty Images

You don’t need both engines to fly

The idea of an engine giving out mid-flight sounds frightening, but every commercial airplane can safely fly with just one engine. Operating with half the engine power can make a plane less fuel-efficient and may reduce its range, but planes are designed and tested for such situations, as Popular Mechanics reported. Any plane scheduled on a long-distance route, especially those that fly over oceans or through uninhabited areas like the Arctic, must be certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for Extended-range Twin Operations (ETOPS), which is basically how long it can fly with one engine. The Boeing Dreamliner is certified for ETOPS-330, which means it can fly for 330 minutes (that’s five and a half hours) with just one engine.

In fact, most airplanes can fly for a surprisingly long distance with no engine at all, thanks to something called glide ratio. Due to careful aeronautical engineering, a Boeing 747 can glide for two miles for every 1,000 feet they are above the ground, which is usually more than enough time to get everyone safely to the ground.

© Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Why there are ashtrays in the bathrooms

The FAA banned smoking on planes years ago, but eagle-eyed passengers know that airplane lavatories still have ashtrays in them. As Business Insider reported, the reason is that airlines—and the people who design planes—figure that despite the no-smoking policy and myriad no-smoking signs prominently posted on the plane, at some point a smoker will decide to light up a cigarette on the plane. The hope is that if someone violates the smoking policy, they will do so in the relatively confined space of the bathroom and dispose of the cigarette butt in a safe place—the ashtray, not a trash can where it could theoretically cause a fire. If you do smoke in the bathroom, expect a massive fine.

© Jorge Villalba/Getty Images

What that tiny hole in the airplane window does

It’s to regulate cabin pressure. Most airplane windows are made up of three panels of acrylic. The exterior window works as you would expect—keeping the elements out and maintaining cabin pressure. In the unlikely event that something happens to the exterior pane, the second pane acts as a fail-safe option. The tiny hole in the interior window is there to regulate air pressure so the middle pane remains intact and uncompromised until it is called into duty.

e© assalve/Getty Images

Why airplane food tastes so bad

Airplane food has a bad reputation, but the food itself isn’t entirely to blame—the real fault lies with the plane. A 2015 Cornell University study, reported by Time, found that the environment inside an airplane actually alters the way food and drink tastes—sweet items tasted less sweet, while salty flavors were heightened. The dry recycled air inside the plane cabin doesn’t help either as low humidity can further dull taste and smell making everything in a plane seem bland. According to a 2010 study from the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics in Germany, it’s about 30 percent more difficult to detect sweet and salty tastes when you’re up in the air. Next time you fly, skip the meal, and maybe try a glass of tomato juice instead.

© Jupiterimages/Getty Images

About those oxygen masks

The safety instructions on most flight include how to use the oxygen masks that are deployed when the plane experiences a sudden loss in cabin pressure. However, one that thing that the flight attendants don’t tell you is that oxygen masks only have about 15-minutes worth of oxygen. That sounds like a frighteningly short amount of time, but in reality that should be more than sufficient. Remember, oxygen masks drop when the airplane cabin loses pressure, which means the plane is also losing altitude. According to Gizmodo, a pilot will respond to that situation by donning an oxygen mask and moving the plane to an altitude below 10,000 feet, where passengers can simply breathe normally, no extra oxygen required. That rapid descent usually takes way less than 15 minutes, meaning those oxygen masks have more than enough air to protect passengers.

© Richard Newstead/Getty Images

Why planes leave trails in the sky

Those white lines that planes leave in the sky are simply trails of condensation, hence their technical name of “contrails.” Plane engines release water vapor as part of the combustion process. When that hot water vapor is pumped out of the exhaust and hits the cooler air of the upper atmosphere, it creates those puffy white lines in the sky. It’s basically the same reaction as when you see your breath when it’s cold outside.

Source: This article was published on foodandwine.com by MELISSA LOCKER

Categorized in Others

The Internet of Things and big data technologies have progressed enormously in 2016 – and 2017 is set to be a year when more enterprise use cases come to fruition

1. Rise of the Internet of Things architect

The IoT architect role will eclipse the data scientist as the most valuable unicorn for HR departments. The surge in IoT will produce a surge in edge computing and IoT operational design.

“Thousands of resumes will be updated overnight,” says Dan Graham, Internet of Things technical marketing specialist at Teradata. “Additionally, fewer than 10% of companies realise they need an IoT analytics architect, a distinct species from IoT system architect. Software architects who can design both distributed and central analytics for IoT will soar in value.”

2. Significant increase in the move to hybrid architectures

“Test/dev and disaster recovery will be the main components of a company’s environment that will be moved to the cloud, and production continuing to remain on premises,” says Marc Clark, director of cloud strategy and deployment at Teradata.

3. Deep learning moves out of the hype zone and into reality

Deep learning is getting massive buzz recently. Unfortunately, many people are once again making the mistake of thinking that is a magic, cure-all bullet for all things analytics, according to Bill Franks, chief analytics officer at Teradata.

“The fact is that deep learning is amazingly powerful for some areas such as image recognition,” says Franks. “However, that doesn’t mean it can apply everywhere. While deep learning will be in place at a large number of companies in the coming year, the market will start to recognise where it really makes sense and where it does not.”

By better defining where deep learning plays, it will increase focus on the right areas and speed the delivery of value.

4. More augmented reality-based products

Waze and PokemonGo are just the start. Imagine leaving breadcrumbs across your life journey.

“You leave a breadcrumb at the grocery store so next time you buy some taco shells,” says John Thuma, director at Teradata. “You walk into the store two days later, and an alarm goes off telling you to buy taco mix. Augmented reminders, augmented notation and augmented journey maps.

5. The battle for low power, wide area (LPWAN) networking will be fought

A research study from Business Insider estimates that 700 million IoT devices will be connected over LPWAN standards by 2021. Why? Because LPWANs will help IoT to take off.

“2016 was a year of big hype and little progress,” says Zach Supalla, CEO at Particle. “There’s a clear barrier of cost and power consumption when it comes to IoT products and if we can get these two pain points down, IoT will explode. LPWANs connect devices over a larger geographic area and use less power and those companies who can leverage these assets the best, will win out.”

6. Greater consolidation in the IoT market

The IoT market will see more consolidation as technology and processes improve.

Much like natural selection, the strongest ones will survive while the smaller players are gobbled up to build out more robust portfolios.

SAP just acquired an enterprise-grade IoT solution last month and Cisco made waves in February when it purchased Jasper Technologies for $1.4 billion.

“The rate at which these tech giants purchase startups will only increase as they continue to thirst for the innovation so many of these young companies are born from,” says Supalla.

7. A year of honing IoT talent

2017 will be a “team-building year” for many in the IoT space, says Supalla. Investments will be made in fostering internal talent and attracting the right external hires to address the complex needs of launching a connected product.

8. Striving for integration and security

Companies will continue to strive for integration while maintaining security – connecting business units and vertical industries such as marketing, healthcare and financial services, instead of restricting access to a handful of data scientists.

“Enterprises will finally be able to speak about big data in terms of ROI,” says Sushil Thomas, co-founder and CEO, Arcadia Data, “and not be limited to a TCO-only conversation that has surrounded it thus far.”

9. More businesses turn to Hadoop to scale

Organisations trying to scale their existing BI platforms to big data size will hit a brick wall with legacy analytics tools.

Research firms like Forrester have seen increasing interest from enterprises not only moving their data to Hadoop, but also running analytical applications on Hadoop clusters.

“Running BI natively on Hadoop allows analysts and business users to drill down into raw data, run faster reports and make informed decisions based on real-time data instead of abstracts,” says Sushil Thomas, co-founder and CEO at Arcadia Data.

10. New BI use cases will become the norm

“These will include city traffic services reacting to sensors in cars, bringing real-time and streaming data to the forefront in enterprises,” says Thomas.

Author:  Ben Rossi

Source:  http://www.information-age.com/10-predictions-internet-things-big-data-2017-123463379

Categorized in Internet of Things

OULOUSE, France — Before talking about the future of search, one of Google’s top researchers wants you to understand just how dramatically search has changed in the past two years.

Speaking at the Futurapolis conference in Toulouse, Behshad Behzadi, director of search innovation at Google’s Zurich lab, pointed out that the majority of searches now happen on mobile devices.

And with Google’s cloud auto-tagging photos, searching images has become more effective. In addition, Google’s search will now even look into other apps on your smartphone for answers, he said, and open those apps that have the best info.

However, all of this is moving toward a larger goal.

“The future of search is to try to build the ultimate personal assistant,” he said.

To that end, there are four aspects of search that, according to Behzadi, will continue to be dramatically changed and reinvented in the coming years:

Voice: Google’s natural language processing has taken major leaps forward. Just two years ago, Google was noting a one-in-four error rate on spoken-word queries. Now that’s down to one in sixteen, Behzadi said. That, in turn, is driving voice searches that can sound as natural as most conversations with other people. It’s not quite “Her” quality, but Behzadi said that the kind of natural back-and-forth between human and computer seen in that movie is not as far away as we might think.

Context: Increasingly, Google’s search engine is linking your searches to understand what you’re trying to find or figure out. So, if you search using the word “castle,” for instance, you could get an infinite number of hits from around the world. But if you search first for “London,” and then for “castle,” the search engine remembers that you’re looking at London and automatically narrows the search field for you.

Also, on Android phones, if you’re looking at a Facebook post, for instance, and hold down the home button while making a voice query, Google will scan the contents of that app (or other apps) and find relevant information without your having to copy and paste things between apps to do a search.

Location: You can argue that this is also a type of context. But of course, location-based searches can also be quite specific to mobile. If you’re out and about taking a hike, you can ask Google, “What’s that lake” or “What’s that store?” and it will give you results just based on knowing where you are at that moment. Behzadi said this location awareness is growing more powerful and will become more proactive in alerting you to things that are nearby that might be of interest.

Personal information: Potentially transformative, but also potentially the most controversial, especially in Europe where privacy is a hot-button issue. As Google learns more about you, it continues to provide more and more reminders, or suggestions. If you’re using Gmail and Google Calendar, you’ve seen this feature gradually develop, as more of your info triggers alerts. Google has been tailoring search results to users for years. But as it collects more data, expect those results to become even more specialized, Behzadi said.

Finally, here’s a short clip of Behzadi being interviewed by Le Point, the news organization that hosted Futurapolis:

Author:  CHRIS O'BRIEN

Source:  http://venturebeat.com/

Categorized in News & Politics

Some everyday innovations as varied as a solid golf club and a high-quality selfie owe their existence to NASA technologies.

 

NASA published its 2017 edition of "Spinoff" — a profile of 50 commercial technologies originally designed for NASA missions and research.

 

Since 1976, NASA has published an annual document introducing run-of-the-mill items inspired by NASA innovations.

 

Here are seven of the most common objects on this year's list.

 

1. Crash-test cameras

 

1. Crash-test cameras

NASA needed high-speed, rugged cameras to record parachute testing for its landing systems.

 

The agency reached out to the California-based company Integrated Design Tools, which built a camera that could record 1,000 frames a second and immediately store the data.

 

That same technology is used in cameras that record vehicle crash tests.

 

2. Laser imaging: from space to underneath soil

 

2. Laser imaging: from space to underneath soil

 

NASA uses laser-imaging technology, known as LIDAR, on missions in outer space. LIDAR, which measures distances using laser light, can be used to develop high-resolution maps, among many other things.

 

 

 

 

NASA helped design smaller versions that are used on the ground. Archaeologists use them to help unearth artifacts. LIDAR is also being used in autonomous-driving technology.

 

3. From a screw thread to golf clubs

 

3. From a screw thread to golf clubs


It turns out that spacecraft design and golf-club engineering have some similarities.An innovation called the "Spiralock" is an advanced screw thread designed by the Holmes Tool Company.

 

NASA sought the company out because it needed an advanced screw that could withstand the rigors of a space launch.It is being used in golf clubs, too.

 

4. Brain-surgery tools

 

4. Brain-surgery tools

 

Neurosurgeons employ bipolar forceps, which use electricity to cut and cauterize tissue. But electricity in the forceps generates extra heat that must be dissipated to avoid damaging healthy brain tissue.

 

A company called Thermacore has a solution that NASA had been using since the early days of space flight. Heat pipes. A scaled-down version was created for bipolar forceps, helping to ensure the safety and effectiveness of neurosurgery.

 

5. Earthquake protection

 

5. Earthquake protection


A NASA-developed technology that used liquid fuel to prevent vibrations in the Ares 1 rocket was adapted to help stabilize buildings and bridges during earthquakes.

 

 

 

 

Now the NASA-derived technology, licensed by the engineering firm Thornton Tomasetti for commercial use, has been installed on a new building in Brooklyn, New York.

 

6. Fertilizer

 

6. Fertilizer

 

NASA helped Florikan, a fertilizer company in Florida, develop a fertilizer that doesn't dissolve too quickly, ensuring that plants get the right amount of nutrients from the fertilizer at the right time.

 

That fertilizer is now being used around the world — and in space.

 

7. From space photography to selfies

 

7. From space photography to selfies

You are using NASA-derived technology when you take a picture with your smartphone.A sensor adapted from complementary metal-oxide semiconductors was developed by NASA engineer Eric Fossum in the 1990s.

 

Though the semiconductors have been used in computers for years, NASA says Fossum was the first person to successfully adapt it for picture-taking.

 

 

Author:  Louise Liu

Source:  http://www.businessinsider.com/

Categorized in Others

9 Things Successful People Wish They Knew Earlier

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 2.54.16 PM

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 3.01.07 PM

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 3.05.28 PM

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 2.56.53 PM

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 2.59.18 PM

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 3.04.32 PM

Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 3.03.29 PM

Author: CHLOE CHONG

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/

Categorized in News & Politics

Actually taking those steps to starting your own business is far different than just saying you want to be a business owner. Not everyone can do it, there are extreme highs and lows that you’ll experience and there are certain things that only entrepreneurs can understand.

1. You are always thinking about work. Even on holiday

You are so passionate about your business that you’ll never switch off. Every sign you walk past, every conversation you hold there’ll be an idea buzzing around your head.

2. You understand that there is no reward without risk

Leaving behind a steady job to pursue life as an entrepreneur is a risk in itself and you understand that you’ll have to take more risks along the way to experience the considerable rewards.

3. You feel that people are always there to second guess your success

No matter how successful you are there will always be people who second guess your success and try to pull you down.

4. You understand that your loved ones share the load

The life of an entrepreneur is unpredictable and comes with a certain amount of stress. Your loved ones share these feelings and experience the same ups and downs as you.

5. You understand that you have to become a leader

Whether to lead yourself, employees or suppliers, you understand that you need to become a strong leader. The way to achieve this is through effective leadership development.

6. You’ll constantly be faced with people who just don’t get you

Entrepreneurs are unique. Our drive and determination isn’t something people will always understand.

7. You will never find it easy to fire someone

You understand more than anyone how important a regular income is. This is why you’ll never find it easy to fire someone, even if they deserve it!

8. You think that nothing ever happens fast enough

You want things done now and it can feel like suppliers and employees are just slowing you down.

9. You hate tax time

You never want to have to pay tax and getting your books in order is an unwanted task.

10. You will grow to love your accountant

You want to spend as little time on paperwork as possible and your accountant will help.

11. You are involved in every area of the business

You are the sales, marketing, finance and operations teams all rolled into one.

12. You know when a risk is worth taking

It can be scary but you know that a calculated risk could result in immense reward.

13. You are never ill enough not to work

Time is money and you don’t have time to be sick and take time off.

14. You will always think of wacky ways to motivate staff

A happy workforce is a productive workforce and you’ll work you hardest to motivate your staff.

15. You sometimes question your life

When things are tough you’ll think about going back to employment. 10 minutes later you’ll be an entrepreneur again.

16. You don’t have regular working hours

What’s a 9 to 5?

17. You always want to move onto the next big thing

Ideas are constantly flowing through your mind and you want to put them into practice ASAP.

18. You accept that some ideas are crazy

You’ll have 99 crazy ideas but understand that just one needs to be perfect.

19. You don’t do later. You want things done now!

Why would you put things off until later? You can wake up a little earlier and get extra work done now.

20. You constantly write down ideas

Whether it’s on an iPad or the napkin in a restaurant. If you have an idea you are going to make a note of it.

21. You never stop being an entrepreneur

Wherever you go, somehow you think about work.

22. You constantly promote yourself

Every new person you meet is a potential business contact and you’ll take advantage of that.

23. You never have enough money

Even if you are making millions, you’ll never have enough funding. Your next idea is always bigger than the last.

24. Your personal social media accounts are packed full of business stuff

You are so proud of your achievements that you’ll turn to social media to keep everyone informed.

25. You don’t fear failure

Failures just brings you closer to success and you are never afraid to fail. It’s the inner drive and sheer determination that sees you through and those are attributes that never leave.

26. You have no greater feeling than success

The chance to succeed and make something of yourself is what gets you out of bed in the morning. Furthermore, you visualise what you could become in the short/long term therefore that encourages you to accomplish great things.

27. You feel like you can conquer the world

When you achieve something you feel like you can do anything and that next achievement will always be bigger. The ambition is what focuses you and it’s the constant target that ensures you progress in your project and strive toward success.

28. You can struggle with love

Work will always come first and some people don’t get that, which can make it hard to find love. Prioritization can hurt other factors in your life –  but if you don’t prioritize then you’re not disciplined enough to succeed as an entrepreneur.

29. You are restless

You don’t sleep as much as you used to and if you take a few days away from work you are itching to get back. With the constant focus on success it’s very hard to switch off from work. Taking your work back home is also not an unusual thing for entrepreneurs.

30. You are determined

Entrepreneurs have something in their blood and even when times are tough, they wouldn’t be defeated.

Author: James Timpson
Source: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1zkqNa/www.lifehack.org/articles/work/30-things-only-entrepreneurs-would-understand.html/?_notoolbar&_nospa=true

Categorized in Business Research

 

CatholicGoogle, a new site based on Google’s custom search, is “striving to provide an easy to use resource to anyone wanting to learn more about Catholicism and provide a safer way for good Catholics to surf the web.” The site uses a permanently-on Google SafeSearch to filter out profanity and pornography, along with a filter for specific topics that floats Catholic-related sites to the top. For example, a search for “birth control” serves up pages on why birth control is viewed as a sin in the Catholic Church as its first results.

The search engine might appeal to some devout Catholics if it actually worked. However, it seems that when it comes to filtering topics beyond the standard “offensive” categories (swear words and sex) , CatholicGoogle only serves to make queries potentially more offensive. A search for “drunk” yields a video of “Drunk Catholic Kids”. Perhaps even more bizarre: a search for “sex” offers an article bashing the Church’s stance on sexuality (they may have included this in the results for a balanced alternative perspective, but I doubt it). It’s as if the site just appends the word “Catholic” to whatever you’re searching for and crosses its fingers.

If this is your sort of thing, you might also be interested in GodTube, the YouTube for Christians or Gospelr (you guessed it – the Twitter for Christians).

https://techcrunch.com/2009/01/02/catholicgoogle-your-search-engine-for-all-things-catholic/

 

Categorized in Search Engine

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

airs logo

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Newsletter Subscription

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

Follow Us on Social Media

Book Your Seat for Webinar GET FREE REGISTRATION FOR MEMBERS ONLY      Register Now