Personally, I’m amazed at the technology we have available to us. It’s astounding to have the power to retrieve almost any information and communicate in a thousand different ways using a device that fits in your pocket.

There’s always something new on the horizon, and we can’t help but wait and wonder what technological marvels are coming next.

The way I see it, there are seven major tech trends we’re in store for in 2017. If you’re eyeing a sector in which to start a business, any of these is a pretty good bet. If you’re already an entrepreneur, think about how you can leverage these technologies to reach your target audience in new ways.

1. IoT and Smart Home Tech.

We’ve been hearing about the forthcoming revolution of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) and resulting interconnectedness of smart home technology for years. So what’s the holdup? Why aren’t we all living in smart, connected homes by now? Part of the problem is too much competition, with not enough collaboration—there are tons of individual appliances and apps on the market, but few solutions to tie everything together into a single, seamless user experience. Now that bigger companies already well-versed in uniform user experiences (like Google, Amazon, and Apple) are getting involved, I expect we’ll see some major advancements on this front in the coming year.

2. AR and VR.

We’ve already seen some major steps forward for augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) technology in 2016. Oculus Rift was released, to positive reception, and thousands of VR apps and games followed. We also saw Pokémon Go, an AR game, explode with over 100 million downloads. The market is ready for AR and VR, and we’ve already got some early-stage devices and tech for these applications, but it’s going to be next year before we see things really take off. Once they do, you’ll need to be ready for AR and VR versions of practically everything—and ample marketing opportunities to follow.

3. Machine Learning.

Machine learning has taken some massive strides forward in the past few years, even emerging to assist and enhance Google’s core search engine algorithm. But again, we’ve only seen it in a limited range of applications. Throughout 2017, I expect to see machine learning updates emerge across the board, entering almost any type of consumer application you can think of, from offering better recommended products based on prior purchase history to gradually improving the user experience of an analytics app. It won’t be long before machine learning becomes a kind of “new normal,” with people expecting this type of artificial intelligence as a component of every form of technology.

4. Automation.

Marketers will be (mostly) pleased to learn that automation will become a bigger mainstay in and throughout 2017, with advanced technology enabling the automation of previously human-exclusive tasks. We’ve had robotic journalists in circulation for a couple of years now, and I expect it won’t be long before they make another leap into more practical types of articles. It’s likely that we’ll start seeing productivity skyrocket in a number of white-collar type jobs—and we’ll start seeing some jobs disappear altogether. When automation is combined with machine learning, everything can improve even faster, so 2017 has the potential to be a truly landmark year.

5. Humanized Big Data. (visual, empathetic, qualitative)

Big data has been a big topic for the past five years or so, when it started making headlines as a buzzword. The idea is that mass quantities of gathered data—which we now have access to—can help us in everything from planning better medical treatments to executing better marketing campaigns. But big data’s greatest strength—its quantitative, numerical foundation—is also a weakness. In 2017, I expect we’ll see advancements to humanize big data, seeking more empathetic and qualitative bits of data and projecting it in a more visualized, accessible way.

6. Physical-Digital Integrations.

Mobile devices have been slowly adding technology into our daily lives. It’s rare to see anyone without a smartphone at any given time, giving us access to practically infinite information in the real-world. We already have things like site-to-store purchasing, enabling online customers to buy and pick up products in a physical retail location, but the next level will be even further integrations between physical and digital realities. Online brands like Amazon will start having more physical products, like Dash Buttons, and physical brands like Walmart will start having more digital features, like store maps and product trials.

7. Everything On-Demand.

Thanks to brands like Uber (and the resulting madness of startups built on the premise of being the “Uber of ____”), people are getting used to having everything on demand via phone apps. In 2017, I expect this to see this develop even further. We have thousands of apps available to us to get rides, food deliveries, and even a place to stay for the night, but soon we’ll see this evolve into even stranger territory.

Anyone in the tech industry knows that making predictions about the course of technology’s future, even a year out, is an exercise in futility. Surprises can come from a number of different directions, and announced developments rarely release as they’re intended.

Still, it pays to forecast what’s coming next so you can prepare your marketing strategies (or your budget) accordingly. Whatever the case may be, it’s still fun to think about everything that’s coming next.

Author:  Jayson DeMers

Source:  http://www.forbes.com/

Categorized in Future Trends

Dubai is in a far corner of the world to set up shop for a business that allows Americans to track their representatives back home.

When you stop and think about it, it’s an equally large feat building an international search engine optimization company after you decide selling scented candles wasn’t showcasing your entire skillset.

Those are just two of the examples of the kinds of things that people who are switching gears and starting new careers online are doing every day.

The Internet isn’t just all about gaming and updating your followers on social media for these forward thinkers; entrepreneurs all across the United States and the world have seen the benefits of panhandling in cyberspace for the online gold that’s waiting there.

They’re making money and satisfying dreams by taking their visions global and many of them have locked the door to a brick-and-mortar store to do it.

A Trend That’s Growing

So the question is, how and why do they do it? First, some numbers that point to the fact those who are moving toward cyberspace to make money belong to a trend that’s growing.

Released last month by the United States Census Bureau, E-Stats 2014: Measuring The Electronic Economy takes an interesting snapshot of all the major sector sales numbers including wholesale trade, manufacturing, and selected service industries. According to these government number crunchers, E-commerce accounted for $3,584.0 billion in 2014, and that’s up 8.1% from the previous year. Statista reports that E-commerce is expected to reach 554.81 billion U.S. in sales this year.

When you consider these same experts say the gross domestic product (GDP) of the USA for 2016 is projected at $18,558.13 billion, it’s easy to see why people like Dana Buchawiecki saw cyberspace as a great platform to start a new business.

Tracks Congress

4US.com is a website that tracks and compares users’ votes with their representatives in Congress. The notion is the brainchild of CEO and Founder Buchawiecki, who’s dissatisfaction with his position at FEMA during Hurricane Katrina prompted him to build a website to track congress. He started the business after leaving the United States for a position in Dubai. Buchawiecki underlined his motivations for starting the enterprise which allows users to track their representatives’ activities and the status of bills.

“The command and control system that was in place for Hurricane Katrina lit the fuse for something bigger,” he said. “It was 2005 in the United States and it took weeks to get things going.”

Quite often, the people who make a go of it online are looking for an outlet for a wider vision or bolder enterprise. Still, they need to put a hodgepodge together of the things that made more traditional businesses work and what clicks online.

Eyes Bigger Than Your Stomach


Making sure your eyes aren’t bigger than your stomach means understanding you still need to have a target market to appeal to. Just because finding the right SEO/Internet marketing company will help you to cast the net wide in cyberspace doesn’t mean you want to.

Knowing where to direct your marketing efforts by finding schools of interested buyers online is done with social media and analytics these days, but you’re still trying to accomplish the same goals those radio and newspaper ads strove for. Finding the folks who will buy what you’ve got to sell is still job one.

Tracking using analytics doesn’t need to be complicated but the reports will help to define the folks who are looking at your site and buying your products. Clicking on the links for the Traffic Report, Keyword Analysis Report, and several others can help flesh out your target market.

Surveying any paying clients you have works wonders too. Asking them who they are and what problem your product helps them to address fills in some blanks.

When you remember that everyone has access to the same technology as you do, you’ll see some of the differences between the old and new ways of doing business aren’t just about hiring online marketers that can flush out your target market.

Whereas having a solid safe and alarm system back in the day let you sleep soundly at night, the modern version of bars on the windows are good cybersecurity practices. If you think keeping your data safe and secure should take a back seat to other more flashy parts of putting together an online empire like building a website and social media presence, consider:

Deloitte’s CFO Insights just struck an ominous chord by publishing the Seven hidden costs of cyber attacks. Loss of revenue and customer relationships are mentioned prominently and those are the very lynchpins of small businesses.

Even the big names in security are aware of how prominent cyber security issues need to be. The FBI has a whole section of their website detailing what they’re doing to combat this evolving threat. In fact, there’s even a Cyber Division at FBI headquarters.

However, no lowly criminal can throw a real entrepreneur off the scent of commercial success. John King is the CEO at Placement SEO and, like a lot of other folks who have taken the road less traveled, he started his career surrounded by four walls working in marketing in a brick-and-mortar store called Bare Necessities.

As someone who’s brought his ability to learn and adapt quickly to the online world, King understands the importance of battening down the hatches with good cybersecurity practices. Beyond making sure everyone uses the most recent in antivirus software and spyware that’s constantly updated, he knows how important it is to make sure all internet connections are properly encrypted with the proper firewalls. All good practices you should follow too if you’re looking to launch in cyberspace.

Pencil and Paper

A Wi-Fi network is as common as a pencil and paper once were for getting things done today, but these modern tools need to have password protected access to their routers. All of these modern day Henry Fords like King and Buchawiecki understand that at least in some ways, the more things change, the more they stay the same. That’s why , while King strongly suggests multifactor authentication that requires more than a password as another piece of a good cybersecurity package, he knows how to foster real wealth online in other ways too.

“I’m a believer that it's important to hire employees smarter than yourself so that you have a continuous stream of new opportunities,” says the SEO guru whose career course has veered abruptly from those early days working to market scented Yankee Candles.

Source : http://www.business.com/careers/changing-gears-how-the-internet-allows-you-to-start-new-careers/ 

Categorized in Others

 

We may first see them on the runway, but the trends that truly stick with us all live in one place: our Google search bar. It's where we ask our deepest, darkest fashion questions — "Are cropped flares really a thing?," "Does anyone actually like baby bags?" — and hope to find answers.

Last year, the search engine finally recognized the power that lies in its records, introducing a fashion report that documents which trends are in and out, according to search volume. In 2015, we saw the popularity of one-shoulder and peplum dresses fall, making way for tulle skirts and jogger pants. (This was the year of athleisure, after all.) For 2016, Google's calling out items we've already seen pop up in our closets — and those we could already sense falling to the back shelves. 

This time around, the company expanded the scope of its research to include the U.S. and the U.K., looking into the top searched-for apparel categories between May 2014 and May 2016. In a somewhat surprising turn, some early-aughts trends appear to be on the way out, even though the '90s are very much in the zeitgeist right now (the two are close cousins, after all, and had been trending together). Google observed a steady decline in interest in drop-crotch pants, see-through clothes, acid-wash jeans, and babydoll dresses. It predicts asymmetrical skirts and waist trainers will experience a similar drop (despite constant Kardashian endorsement) over the next few years — something to maybe keep in mind during your next closet purge.

The search engine grouped its findings into three main stories: military-inspired (think bomber jackets and biker pants), free-spirited (in line with the easy-going nature of off-the-shoulder tops), and ready-to-go (think one-pieces and rompers). Then, there are the specifics: Google identified a set of trends it calls "rising stars," which have seen a spike in interest over the past few months but might not have staying power. These include off-the-shoulder topsbodysuits, and bralettes. The lace-up top was also highlighted in this category for the U.S. market; for the U.K., it was the co-ord. On the opposite end of the spectrum are the "falling stars" — pieces that have enjoyed their moment and are now losing steam when it comes to Google searches. (Suede skirts, we're looking at you.)

Google does point to certain categories it considers "safe bets" — both because they've seen more user interest and because they have seasonal potential to come back. In 2016, biker pants (skinny-fit trousers with ribbed and moto elements) and ripped jeans are looking to be a pretty solid choice, if you trust American and British Google users. The search engine also predicts bomber jackets, coatigans (a coat/cardigan hybrid), and shirt dresses will become even more ubiquitous as the year rolls on. (It's no surprise, then, that these trends are already featured prominently in Zara's fall '16 offering.) 

The report, which you can read in full here, details the rise of each trend and corresponding item down to the color, fabric, and pattern that's proven to be most popular. Here's to going about your fall shopping in the most informed way, ever.

Source : http://www.refinery29.com/2016/08/121264/fall-clothing-trends-bomber-jackets-2016

 

Categorized in Future Trends

In addition to launching a hub for the Olympics, Google Trends has released new tools for viewing and exporting search data. 

Last week, Google Trends announced a refresh to its site, in addition to the launch of a new hub for Olympic trends.

According to a Google spokesperson, the Google Trends refresh came with a few new tools, including the ability to compare search trends by geographic location and view historical data by day.

Google-trends-data-by-day-800x386

Google Trends has also added search term filtering, a new mobile embed option for graphs, and an export-to-excel feature — both of which can be found by clicking the menu in the right-hand corner of a trends graph.

Google-Trends-mobile-export-800x406

Source : http://searchengineland.com/google-trends-refresh-includes-geographic-comparisons-export-excel-feature-256519 

Categorized in Search Engine
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