Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Contributed by Member: Jennifer Levin

Google’s John Mueller revealed that the company is looking into simplifying the process of adding multiple properties to Search Console.

Currently, site owners are required to add multiple versions of the same domain separately. That means individually adding the WWW, non-WWW, HTTP, and HTTPS versions and verifying each one.

A simplified process would involve adding just the root of a website to Search Console, and then Google would automatically add all different versions to the same listing.

This is a topic that came up during a recent Google Webmaster Central hangout. A site owner was looking for confirmation that it’s still necessary to add the WWW and non-WWW versions of a domain to Search Console.

Mueller confirmed that is still required for the time being. However, Google is looking into ways to make the process easier. The company is even open to hearing ideas from webmasters about how to do this.

The full response from Mueller is as follows:

“We’re currently looking into ways to make that process a little bit easier.

So we’ll probably ask around for input from, I don’t know, on Twitter or somewhere else, to see what your ideas are there. Where basically you just add the root of your website and then we automatically include the dub-dub-dub, non-dub-dub-dub, HTTP, HTTPS versions in the same listing. So that you have all of the data in one place.

Maybe it would even make sense to include subdomains there. I don’t know, we’d probably like to get your feedback on that. So probably we will ask around for more tips from your side in that regard.

But at the moment if you want to make sure you have all of the data I definitely recommend adding all of those variations, even though it clutters things up a little bit.“

You can see Mueller give this answer in the video below, starting at the 11:15 mark.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published business2community.com - Contributed by Member: Patrick Moore

In order to get more exposure for your personal brand, it’s important to know exactly what your target audience is seeking after. With the right research strategies in place, your business can attract more leads to your products or services.

LinkedIn is a premier networking resource as well as a warm lead generator. This large social network is an ideal platform for gathering information and conducting research for your niche. There are several ways your brand can attract the right leads for your business.

  • Connect with the right people – It’s important to be specific when gaining insights. Only seek after those who are in a related or similar field of interest, have influencer status, and are active both online and offline. Many times you can network at events, webinars, social media groups, Twitter chats, ect., which can open the doors to find targeted leads.
  • Take advantage of advanced search options – Use LinkedIn’s expanded queries to set up specific criteria – this includes people, jobs, content, companies, groups, and schools. Another method is to take a look at specific content that relates to your brand and conduct research on the author.
  • Create the new business or work opportunities – LinkedIn is an online portal to not only find jobs but also qualified candidates and new clients for your business. You can also see what your competitors are looking for inside your target market as it relates specifically to their skills and knowledge.
  • Become a trusted source through groups – Once you become a member of an active, professional group within your niche your brand can gain valuable feedback through asking and answering questions, sharing valuable insights and content, and posting videos and images that can add value to your community. This also applies to those who want to create their own professional group for even more networking opportunities.

LinkedIn is an ideal place for personal brands to link up with professionals in their industry as well as attract new leads. By being helpful, professional, and consistent your network will grow and attract more loyal followers to your brand. This is one of the few resources left where you can to gather insights and information on your industry and potential customers for free without the need to pay for advertising.

Categorized in How to

Source: This article was published emergingedtech.com Kelly Walsh - Contributed by Member: Edna Thomas

There are so many different tools and technologies available on the internet today, and so many associated terms and concepts. As I think about topics to focus on here in the coming months, I want to make sure we're touching on the most important ones. What are the most important internet technologies for educators to be aware of, and informed about?

I'm sure many people would probably come up with a slightly different list, but based on my observations and experiences, and feedback from faculty at my institution, I have selected the following technologies. I do not mean to imply that every educator should be expected to use all of these technologies in the classroom, but rather that every educator should understand what these are, the potential they have in the classroom, and how their students may already be using them.

1. Video and Podcasting – One of the most widely adopted internet technologies for use in instructional settings is video streaming. Between YouTubeTeacherTubeEduTube, and many other video hosting sites, there are an abundance of lectures, how-to videos, and supporting materials available in the form of web based video. Podcasting has also been used to provide similar offerings of audio materials through popular sites like iTunes. [Click here to learn more about video hosting for education, or here to learn more about podcasting for education.]

2. Presentation Tools – This category is vast and rich. There are hundreds (perhaps thousands) of tools on the Internet that can be used to create and share presentations, from simple Powerpoint slide players like Slideshare to multimedia timeline tools like Vuvox and OneTrueMedia. These tools can be used to support classroom teaching or distance learning, or for student reports and presentations.

Have you considered outsourcing your call center?

3. Collaboration & Brainstorming Tools – This is another wide ranging category, including thought-organizing tools like mindmap and bubbl.us, and collaborative tools like web based interactive whiteboards and Google Documents. Additionally, some of the other tools in this list, such as wikis and virtual worlds, also serve as collaboration tools.

4. Blogs & Blogging – Bloggers and many other regular Internet users are well aware of blogs and blogging, but there are many other professionals who really are not frequenters of the “blogosphere”. In addition to a basic familiarity with this technology, educators should be aware of sites like Blogger and WordPress, where users can quickly and easily create their own blogs for free.

5. Wikis – The use of Wikis in educational settings is growing every day. Sites like Wetpaint and others allow users to create free wiki web sites and are a great way to get started with using wikis for educational applications. [Click here to learn more about the use of Wikis in education].

6. Social Networking – All educators should have a basic understanding of sites like Facebook and MySpace and how they are used. This doesn't mean they need accounts on these sites (and many educators would recommend against using these sites to communicate with their students), but they should understand what they are and how they are being used. Educators should also be aware of the professional social networking site LinkedIn.

7. IM – A large percentage of students use IM regularly, via Aim, IM aggregator site Meebo (Meebo allows users to combine messaging from Aim, Yahoo, MySpace, Facebook, and other sites), or other tools. It behooves educators to be aware of this, and I have even come across various articles about using IM within the classroom setting (such as this one from Educause).

8. Twitter – This listing is really focused on technologies, not specific applications, but this application is currently just too popular to ignore. You should at least understand what it is and the fundamentals of how it is used. [Click here for some insight into how Twitter can be used in education.]

9. Virtual Worlds – This technology has received a lot of press, with SecondLife being the clear leader thus far in this application area. In my experience, the use of SecondLife has been somewhat constrained by high bandwidth and processing power requirements, but this also means that there is still considerable room for increased adoption of the application as systems continue to become more powerful and higher speed bandwidth more prevalant. Active Worlds is one of a number of competitive technologies, and provides a “universe” dedicated to education that has been popular with educators.

10. RSS Feeds – RSS allows users to create their own “push” data streams (that is, define data flows you want coming to you automatically, rather than having to go and “pull” the information with a Google search or other browsing effort). RSS feeds enable you to take advantage of streams of published content that will be sitting in your In Box, or in an RSS reader, when you want them. There are RSS feeds available for many topics and many web sites.

While many readers may have their own interpretation of which technologies are essential for educators to be aware of, I think this is a great list to get started with. Of course, this list will require updating over time, as technologies change, and as educator's uses of these technologies evolve. As always, reader input is welcomed. What do you think? Is this a good top 10? Would you like to see some other technologies listed here? Feel free to comment and offer your insights, please. Thanks!

Categorized in Science & Tech

This is the age of influence and networking. The success of a brand or an individual highly depends on the amount of influence earned as well as the level of networks created in the meantime. Today, the best place to power up influence and build network is social media and just like web search engines, there are number of cool social media search engines that can help you or your brand to find real people, build networks, and share or gain useful information required to raise influence within your niche market.

Yes, you heard it right. There are many specific social media search engines out there designed to help you find real people and user profiles across major social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and many others.

The more people you can manage to add to your network from the same industry, your influence resultantly improves in the industry. And, there’s no better way to find people on the web other than looking for them via social media search engines.

Today, we bring you a cool list of top social media search engines that can help you find people within your industry nearby to grow your influence, reach, as well as network within the industry.

Best Social Media Search Engines to Find Real People across Top Social Networks

There is no doubt that Google is the most popular search engine on the web to find almost anything on the internet. However, even Google fails or is not up to the mark when finding people or profiles on popular social media channels.

Today, we will share some of the best social media search engines that would help you find real people as follows:

Social Mention

The first on our list is Social Mention. This web tool is systematically designed for people looking for social media contents that include blogs, microblogs, comments, bookmarks, videos, and more. With Social Mention, you can also set alerts and receive emails based on your searches for specific brands, celebrities, or company related updates. The tool is quite helpful for bloggers, who can install its real-time buzz widget on their blogs for maximum benefits.

WhosTalkin

WhosTalkin is another social media search engine that lets you explore conversations relevant to the topics that interest you. You can find updates about your favorite sport, favorite food, celebrity, or a company. With WhosTalkin, you can engage in conversations that are most relevant to the topics you like. This internet-based social media search engine tool is able to search through a number of social media networks and blogs for your favorite trending topics and conversations related your favorite celebrity, sports, food, places, videos, etc.

YoName

As the name of the search engine suggests, YoName lets you find people across different social media platforms by name. With YoName, you can search people on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, Blogger blogs, and several others using the search form. Simply enter people’s name, email address, or phone number and then hit “Yo” to get the results. Besides social media search, YoName also supports web search, business search as well as public records search.

Anoox

Well, Anoox is not exactly a social media search engine but it allows you to get information via multiple social media websites as well as find answers to your queries from real people. At Anoox, you can share & discuss with real people for the best answer, truth, and in turn more traffic to your website or profile.

BoardReader

Unlike other social media search engines, BoardReader is a search tool for community forums and boards. With BoredReader, you can easily explore popular content spread across the internet including news, articles, videos, press releases, etc.

Bing Social

After Google, Bing is the 2nd most popular search engine on the web and its social arm known as Bing Social is designed to find the latest news and trending topics shared across popular social networking channels like Facebook, Twitter, and other social media networks.

Addictomatic

Addictomatic is yet another social search tool to explore the latest news, trending topics, attractive blog posts, viral videos, and interesting pictures. This tool searches the best live sites on the internet to find the latest news, blog posts, videos, and images for you. With this tool, you can easily keep up with the latest updates on the hot trending topics, and keep up to date with the latest social media sensation on the web.

Twazzup

Twitter is a strong social media platform with lots of viral and trending news surfacing on this microblogging tool every single second as you are reading this article. Twazzup lets you search these trending news and topics across Twitter and lets you keep up with the social media buzz around the globe.

Snitch Name

Snitch Name is a white pages service for social networks. This amazing search tool is designed to search people’s profile over popular social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, and other networks.

Blinkx

Videos are now an integral part of the social media world and Blinkx is a social media search engine dedicated to videos medium. One of the best social media search engines on the web, Blinkx is a search engine for videos with over million hours of regularly indexed online videos. This video search engine enables you to watch videos ranging from a wide variety of different categories including but not limited to news & politics, celebrity, technology, business, gaming, food, sports, and more assorted from all the major news portals and video sharing platforms.

Flickr Advanced Search

Flickr, as everyone knows, is one of the largest photo and video sharing platforms on the internet. While it lets you upload and view photos and videos on it, Flickr also lets you search for images or videos based on your topic using its advanced search tool embed with smart filters and variety of options designed to deliver accurate and effective results.

Source: This article was published geekdashboard.com By Rajeesh Nair

Categorized in Search Engine

The Twitter Archiver and Twitter Bots app fire each time a new tweet is found that match your search query. You can write simple search queries (like #Oscars) or more complex query (like obama min_retweets:10 filter:news) that uses one or more Twitter search operators.

Twitter SearchHow to Search Twitter Like a Pro

Here’s a complete list of Twitter search operators that can help you perform more accurate searches on Twitter:

from:BarackObama

All tweets sent by a particular Twitter user

filter:verified cool OR amazing

Only show tweets from verified Twitter accounts (with the blue tick)

gangnam style filter:replies

Only show tweets that are replies. You can use exclude:replies to remove @reply tweets from search results.

gangnam style filter:retweets

Only show tweets that are retweets. You can use exclude:retweets to remove RTs from search results.

to:BarackObama -filter:links

Tweets sent to @BarackObama but not containing any links

elections list:TIME/time-staff

Search for tweets from users who belong to a particular Twitter list

youtube.com min_faves:100

Tweets containing YouTube videos that are favorited by at least 100 users

iPhone near:NY within:10mi

Tweets sent by users within the 10 mile radius of New York containing iPhone

#foodrecipe lang:en

Tweets sent in particular language (en = English)

iPhone Reviews since:2016-04-01 until:2016-04-09

Tweets sent in a particular time range (may not work with Twitter APIs)

YouTube good OR amazing OR awesome filter:links

Tweets containing YouTube videos that are described as awesome or amazing

#Emmys filter:images

Show tweets for a particular hashtag but containing images

Barack Obama filter:news

Show only tweets that mention a keyword and contain links to news websites

from:john to:peter -RT

Tweets from user @John that @mention user @Peter but exclude Retweets

family games filter:safe

Filter tweets containing adult or potentially sensitive content

tornado filter:media

Show tornado tweets containing images or videos

music concert filter:native_video

Show tweets that contain native video (uploaded inside tweet)

twitter search tricks

How to Find the Most Popular Tweets

The engagement filter inside Tweetdeck surfaces the best tweets and removes the noise from Twitter search results but the most surprising part is that Twitter has not made this filter available outside Tweetdeck. You don’t even have it inside the official Twitter app.

Well, here’s the trick. You can actually filter tweets by engagement level on the Twitter website or inside any Twitter app using an undocumented search operator that Twitter doesn’t want us to know about.

Go to the Twitter search box, type any search term and append the operator min_retweets:[number] or min_faves:[number] to filter your search results. For instance, here’s a sample search that will only show tweets pointing to the labnol.org domain that has been favorited or retweeted at least 5 times.

 Source: This article was published labnol.org By Amit Agarwal

Categorized in Social

Do you use hashtags for marketing campaigns on Twitter?

Looking for hashtag tools to help improve your use of hashtags?

In this article, you’ll find seven hashtag tools for researching and reporting on Twitter hashtags.

Why Is Researching Twitter Hashtags Important?

Twitter users often follow hashtags that pertain to their interests, so social media marketers can use targeted hashtags to improve their reach among users with specific interests. However, with only 280 characters in which to squeeze both your message and hashtags, you need to choose the hashtags you target carefully.

When you set aside time to research what hashtags are the most popular with your customer personas, you’re better able to target users who reflect your ideal audience. Luckily, several tools available can help you identify and track the best hashtags for your industry.

Each tool has its own strengths. However, generally speaking, a research tool can help you monitor hashtags, improve influencer outreach, discover demographic and geographic information, and gauge sentiment. With the right toolbox, you can simplify social marketing on Twitter.

#1: Discover Hashtag Popularity With RiteTag

RiteTag helps you find new hashtags and track your current hashtags. In addition to showing important hashtag data, this tool helps you find the best possible hashtags for your text and images. With the handy Chrome extension, you can highlight text or right-click an image (as shown below) and instantly get hashtag suggestions for it.

RiteTag hashtag suggestions

The RiteTag hashtag search feature organizes results so you can see at a glance which related hashtags will help your tweet visibility now or over time. The results also indicate which related hashtags are less popular.

RiteTag hashtag search results

For $49 per year, you can use RiteTag for up to 1,000 queries a month for both images and text. Other plans are available if you’re looking for help crafting, publishing, or enhancing posts; these plans range from $7.50 to $15 per month.

#2: Purchase In-Depth Hashtag Reports With ExportTweet

With ExportTweet, you can track hashtags, keywords, and accounts. This tool also helps you find top tweets, related hashtags, influencer data, device source, geographic location, and more. The free tool (accessed via the Try Now button) gives information on the last 100 tweets, but the paid searches offer unlimited tracking time and unlimited report downloads.

ExportTweet hashtag search results

With the pay-as-you-go pricing options, ExportTweet is a great option for new hashtag trackers or those who want to focus on only a few hashtags. You can purchase reports for both real-time hashtag tracking (25,000+ tweets) and hashtag historical data(2,000+ tweets), which include CSV spreadsheets of top related hashtags and all images, videos, and URLs. Real-time reports start at $19.99, and historical data reports start at $16.99.

#3: Reveal Top Hashtags and Influencers With Hashtagify

If you’re not sure where to start with your hashtags and prefer a more visual interface, check out the Hashtagify search tool. Like other search tools, it helps you find relevant hashtags. In addition to data about a hashtag’s popularity over time, you can see which influencers use the hashtag and get details about the hashtag’s reach in different languages and geographic areas.

Hashtagify hashtag search results

The search tool is free to use. You can purchase a Hashtagify plan starting at $9 per month to add hashtag trackers, two months of data storage, full access to the top ranking hashtags, and a bookmark feature to save any favorite hashtags.

#4: Get Day-Of Hashtag Data With Tweet Archivist

Tweet Archivist is another free search tool for hashtags. Other search tools give you a range of several days, but with Tweet Archivist, you get real-time data from the day of your search with the number of tweets and impressions for the day, as shown in this result for the #socialmedia hashtag:

Tweet Archivist hashtag search results

With the free report, you’ll see the top associated words, top URLs associated with the hashtag, the source of the top tweets, top languages used, user mentions, associated hashtags, and an influencer index.

Tweet Archivist hashtag search results

For $14.99 per month, you gain the ability to download data and receive three archives that are updated every hour. If you don’t want a recurring monthly payment plan, other pricing options are also available.

#5: Discover Local Trending Hashtags With Trendsmap

For a local business, Trendsmap is an amazing tool for finding trending hashtags in your area. This tool will reveal the most popular trending topics on Twitter based on geographic data. Yes, you can use Twitter itself for this, but you get only a few trending topics compared to the many you’ll see via Trendsmap.

This tool will show local trending hashtags, users, and words. For example, here you see trending words, hashtags, and users in the Houston area during an uncharacteristic ice storm:

Trendsmap hashtag search results

Trendsmap has a free search feature and pricing options that start at $25 per month. The free search feature provides only real-time hashtag data, whereas the paid plans offer longer historical data.

With the free search, you’ll have to find your location and zoom in to see the top hashtags, users, and words. With the paid plan, you can narrow your search by your physical location, city, or region and customize whether you see hashtags, users, or words.

#6: Track Campaign Hashtags With Socialert

Socialert is a budget-friendly tool, making it perfect for individual users or small businesses. You can do a free search before the tool asks you to upgrade to a paid plan. The free search will analyze 300 tweets over a 7-day period to give you a snapshot of relevant data. You’ll see the hashtag reach and impression rate along with geographic data and overall sentiment.

If you upgrade to a paid plan, you can get in-depth analytics, historical data, search filters, and influencer tracking. The paid plans start at $9.95 per month for two campaigns, and you can upgrade your plan as required to track more campaigns. Here you see a report on the hashtag #smm:

Socialert hashtag search results

#7: Follow Hashtags in Real Time With Keyhole

Keyhole has a free search function for surface-level analytics. Enter a hashtag you want to research. In the results, you’ll see data that’s useful for quickly gathering general information on a hashtag. Get real-time data on the number of posts, users, impressions, reach, demographics, sentiment, and top sources.

For instance, here you see a section of Keyhole results for a search on the hashtag #marketing:

Keyhole hashtag search results

For additional features, upgrade to one of the paid plans.

Conclusion

With Facebook’s new algorithm change, you may need to focus more on your Twitter marketing. Hashtag usage is incredibly important for Twitter, and many tools can help you track hashtags for Twitter optimization. However, some tools may be more useful to you than others.

Every social media campaign has its own strategy, so the level of data you need for each will vary. The free search functions will help you gather initial data, but you might want to dig deeper in other cases.

What do you think? Have you used any of these hashtag tracking resources? What tools have you found most useful? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

 Source: This article was published socialmediaexaminer.com By Lindsay

Categorized in Online Research

Social networks have expanded popularity contests beyond the schoolyard, where users vie to become the next Instagram celebrity or at least have enough followers to be considered an “influencer.” 

But, unlike the schoolyard, anyone can buy popularity on social networks. Richard Roeper, the film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, was suspended on Tuesday for buying 25,000 followers after a New York Times investigation revealed the practice was widespread.

The New York Times claimed that Roeper and others such as actor John Leguizamo, motivational speaker Eric Kaplan and British baking star Paul Hollywood purchased followers from a website called Devumi, which charges a mere $50 for 5,000 followers. 

Buying followers or paying for any type of interaction is against Twitter’s terms of service and may result in suspension. If a company buys more users to make itself seem more popular than it actually is, or a journalist buys them to meet a standard of followers that an employer has set, it’s also, as the Times noted, potentially fraud. 

Spotting fake Twitter uses is generally fairly easy, though fakers have gotten better at it over time. 

TwitterAudit

Tools like TwitterAudit can automatically scan your followers, revealing the number of fake followers (for free) and allowing you to delete and block them (for $5 a month). Use Luca Hammer’s Account Analysis tool to look at accounts individually. Consistent daily rhythms and constant retweeting of spammy handles or accounts are a good sign the user is a bot.

The quickest way to manually spot obvious fakers is to look at their profiles. Many advertise spammy links or use excessive hashtags. To look over many at once, click “followers” below your own profile image. Stop users from following you by clicking the three vertical dots above and to the right of their usernames, then click “block.”

Another quick way is to look for offset followers-to-following ratios, particularly if the following count is maxed out around 5,000. Twitter puts a limit on the number of accounts a user can follow until he or she has more followers. A user who has 171 followers and who is following 5,001 people is usually fake. 

It’s easier to do this with a third-party tool, as Twitter doesn’t list these counts on users’ following pages. StatusBrew is free, lists these numbers, and allows sorting based on followers and following. 

If the ratio is unclear, look at the user’s followers. Many of them may be obviously fake, as well. Just note that many Twitter users, especially large accounts, attract “fake” followers on their own. 

To really sniff out fakers, try right-clicking their profile images on Chrome and searching the web for their images. The Times reported that some of Devumi’s accounts appeared to be close approximations of actual people. The real accounts will often appear when you search for their images.

Why do fake followers even matter? With hundreds of millions of monthly active users, including the president of the United States and other important heads of state, Twitter has truly morphed from a microblogging platform into a method of communication that’s as accepted as a telephone. A user who inflates his or her follower count can leverage outsize impact on the outside world.

As the Times notes, they can “help sway advertising audiences and reshape political debates. They can defraud businesses and ruin reputations.”

Source: This article was published poynter.org By Ren LaForme

Categorized in How to

What are your most effective sources for finding talent? Do you leverage job postings? Ask for employee referrals?

These are both successful ways to fill a position. In fact, each one can play an integral role in your recruiting.

The only downside is that they’re reactive. You have to wait for the talent to come to you, in hopes that the right candidate is among them.

What you need is the ability to aggressively seek and go after ideal candidates. You need to build an active pipeline to fill today’s requisitions, make connections for hard-to-fill roles, and prepare for future needs.

You need to be proactive.

Luckily, there are several sourcing techniques you can start leveraging right now:

Boolean Sourcing for Google

Boolean sourcing allows recruiters to search for candidate information from all over the web.

You can find resumes and cover letters that are stored within personal websites, job boards and social platforms by using a unique set of search commands.

These commands tell search engines exactly what you’re looking for, and help drill down your search results to reveal the candidates who truly align with your requisition.

Getting started with boolean sourcing is as simple as learning some basic commands. The following operators work best when used within Google.

OR The command OR will return results containing at least one of your specified keywords or phrases. For example, entering programmer OR developer OR engineer would produce results containing any of these terms but not necessarily all of them.
"" Use quotations to return sites containing the exact phrase you’re searching for. For example, the senior manager would return pages containing either of these keywords, but "senior manager" would only return pages containing that exact phrase.
- Use the minus or dash command "-" before a keyword to return pages that exclude that word. For example, if you searched "marketing -manager" your results would exclude any pages that contain the word manager.
* Use the asterisk (*) within your query to identify a placeholder or wildcard terms. For example "Master's degree in *" would return pages containing the phrase "Master's degree in Marketing," "Master's degree in Computer Science, " etc.
() Brackets are for grouping Boolean phrases, and are generally used in more complex search strings. For example, if you searched for (Engineer or "Software Developer")(CISCO OR Microsoft OR HP), your results would show pages containing any of your job title keywords that also contain one of the company keywords. This is a great combination for finding talent who has worked for one of your target competitors.
site: Use the command site: to search pages within a specific website. For example, search for Facebook profiles by entering site:facebook.com. Searching for site:facebook.com "web designers" Phoenix would return Facebook profiles containing both keywords Web Designer and Phoenix.


Use these basic commands to create more elaborate search strings and effectively find candidates through Google. By adding more criteria to your search queries, you can produce more relevant results and ultimately find the best candidates who align with your job.

Job Board Sourcing

You can also leverage most online job boards to proactively source your candidates. Look for the option to search or source the job board's resume database by using common keywords your prospects would use.

Social Sourcing

Leverage the social platforms where your prospects already spend a lot of their time. Sites like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook offer unique tools to proactively find your next great hire.

In March 2013, Facebook released Graph Search. It’s a free tool that allows anyone to use specific queries to search for individuals. Find people who work for a specific industry, near a special location or for a particular company.

Here is an example of a common Facebook Graph query:
Facebook Graph

Twitter is also a great tool for sourcing candidates. Use its search engine to identify professionals by specific keywords, phrases, and locations. The best part is that Twitter is an open network, so you’re free to connect with anyone.

You can also find candidates on LinkedIn by using the Boolean logic you’ve already learned. After you replace the italicized words with your keywords, enter this powerful search string into Google to return precise LinkedIn profiles:
site:linkedin.com "web designer" "location * Greater Phoenix Area"

Go After Your Talent

Identifying qualified candidates is the most critical part of the recruiting process. It can also be the most difficult—especially if you're waiting around for the right job seekers to apply. Instead, set yourself up for success by proactively finding them yourself.

But before you get started with methods like Boolean, job board, and social sourcing, make sure you have a clear understanding of the job you’re recruiting for and the keywords your prospects may use during their job search.

Knowing how your candidates describe themselves and which terms resonate with them will give you a head start on your proactive search for talent.

Initiate Conversation

When you finally find the candidates you’re looking for, connect with them! Send them a message about your available position and ask if they would be interested in the opportunity. For more tips on reaching out to candidates, read Candidate Sourcing: Get More Replies to Your Contact Emails.

Categorized in Research Methods

Give me someone's name, and I'll find their personal email address. Sure, it may take some extensive digging and sleuthing, but I'll find you eventually. And I'm not paying to root you out or buying your private info from a lead gen company (though sometimes that would be easier). This is just good old fashioned, organic searching, scanning and scouring the Internet like a Web gumshoe. And not stopping until I ferret out that personal email.

How to find someone's email address [Summary]:

  1. Google Name + "Email"
  2. Google Name + Place of Work
  3. Search LinkedIn
  4. Search their company website
  5. Use Google's site search operator
  6. Use advanced Google search operators
  7. Try some "kitchen sink" queries
  8. Check social media profiles
  9. Check their personal blog
  10. Check Whois
  11. Check people search sites
  12. Message via Twitter or LinkedIn

We'll look at each of these methods in a little more detail, but first:

Why is it important to use someone's personal email address?

If you're sending out an important email that you really want to be taken seriously and improve your chances of getting an actual response, you need to go directly to the source. Sending an important, personal email to the info[at]companyX.com, or dumping it into a "Contact Us" form is a virtual black hole.

This is especially true if you're trying to get in touch with someone you don't know or you've never contacted before. Primary examples of this include:

  • Applying for a job
  • Any form of outreach, like a link request, interview request for your blog, if you're seeking media coverage for a story, etc.

What's more, by taking this extra step and getting directly to the source, you show real initiative and will distinguish yourself from the candidates applying for that same job or requesting that same link.

12 Tips and Tricks to Find Anyone's Email Address

Now, when I say "personal" email address, I'm not talking about a Gmail, Hotmail or AOL account exclusively. I'm also referring to their personal company email address, Web hosting domain email, blogger mail account, or any Web property email address I can find. Because of the depth and breadth and ubiquity of content sources on the Web, you can find contact information for pretty much anyone who has an email address, even if they don't actively promote it on their website. All you have to do is search and keep refining your searches until you strike pay dirt.

Let the Hunt Begin

1) Basic Name Queries by Googling Emails

You can start your sleuthing by running a generic search query for someone's name. But understand that this approach probably won't get you very far, unless the person you're seeking has a unique name, like say Jets WR Jerricho Cotchery. However, if that person's name is at all common, you'll need to add some distinguishing modifiers. Think of it as engaging in the long tail of name searching.

Some initial modifiers you should incorporate to narrow and refine your search are:

  • [name] + email (or) email address
  • [name] + contact (or) contact information (or) contact me

2) Name Queries with Personal Modifiers

Now, if that doesn't work, get even more granular and add any personal information you may have already or uncovered about this person in your initial search, such as:

  • [name] + "home town"
  • [name] + "company they work for"

You can even mix and match all the above modifiers. If you succeed here, terrific. Mission accomplished. But all too often, this is only the initial stage of your research, as this method yields results less than 10 % of the time. To really find who you're looking for, you'll need to go corporate.

Hunting for Company Email Addresses

3) Business Networking Search Queries

One of the best resources for finding direct contact information is through a company email network. Anyone working for an organization has an in-house email. Now, typically if you're searching for someone's direct email for a job interview, link outreach or media coverage, you likely know where they work or conduct business already. But if you're still in the dark, ZoomInfo and LinkedIn are pretty fertile grounds for harvesting personal information.

You can either search the websites internal engine or run queries in Google, like so:

  • [name] + LinkedIn
  • [name] + ZoomInfo

Notice the quick success I had with a probe of ZoomInfo.

4) Basic Company Name Queries

Now, once you get a place of business from their profile, you should visit the company website and start running queries, using the person's name in the hope that you'll find any indexed document with their email address. Most times, generic name searches yield citations (like so-and-so pitched a gem for the company softball team), not actual email addresses. So again, get more specific with modifiers.

  • [name] + email
  • [name] + contact

Adding these modifiers will really boost your chances of finding your target.

5) Basic Company Search Operators

However, if you're still coming up short, you'll need to roll up your sleeves. This is when I break out my super-sleuth hat and get creative with Google search operators. In the majority of cases, Google information retrieval yields more results than a company's internal search. If you're not familiar with search operators, read this.

So what you'll do now is search Google, using the Google Search Operator Query "site:companywebsite.com" as your root and sprinkle in modifiers, like so:

  • site:companywebsite.com + [name] + email
  • site:companywebsite.com + [name] + contact

6) Advanced Company Search Operators

Pretty much every organization has a unique, yet uniform company email addresses structure, which you can leverage in your search efforts, using advanced search operators. For example, at WordStream our email structure is “first initial + This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.." But since each company has their own format, you'll need to play around with a host of possible email address structures using the root search operator.

Note: Use the standard format here "@," I'm using [at] so as not to activate hyperlinks.

  • site:companywebsite.com + ken.lyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + kenlyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + klyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + ken [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + ken_lyons [at] companyname.com

It's important to mention here that the information you're seeking with these queries will be bolded in the meta tags text snippets, like so:

Find anyone's email site search operators

An example search engine results page (SERP) with results displayed
for site-search operation results 

I'd say this method yeilds results 80% of the time for me.

7) Random Kitchen Sink Queries

However, if you're still coming up short, you can drop the company search operator root and pound away with random combinations of the above suggestions. 99% of the time, this is very effective. For example, here's a random query I ran for a faculty member at Boston University (note: name is blurred for privacy):

Find anyone's email search by email domain

Notice my query: "BU [person's name] @bu.edu." It's kind of nonsensical, but nevertheless this query combination succeeded where the other techniques failed, yielding this person's email address. Point being, at this stage, I throw everything at the wall to see what sticks.

Even More Options to Find an Email Address

8) Social Networking Profile Queries

Another avenue you can explore for personal information are social media profiles. I've had the most success with social sites like Twitter. And chances are that employing the original basic queries that I mentioned above will display if this person has a Twitter profile.

  • [name] + Twitter

9) Personal Website or Blog Search Operators

Very often, my Web sleuthing reveals a personal website that I didn't know existed. Also, people include their personal websites or their blogs on their Twitter or LinkedIn profiles. This provides you a whole new channel to explore to find contact info for them. If you do find a personal site or blog, there's often have a contact page or even their email address listed right on the site somewhere. Even still, I prefer a direct line to that person. So if you've explored the site and come up short, navigate back out to Google and run some advanced search operators.

  • site:personalblog.com + [name] + email
  • site:personalblog.com + [name] + contact
  • site:personalblog.com + ken.lyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + kenlyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + klyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + ken [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + ken_lyons [at] personalblog.com

10) Whois Search

If you're still coming up empty after a deep dive of their personal website or blog, go to Network Solutions and run a Whois search for their domain registration data for an email address. 60% of the time, you'll find a personal email address here.

11) People Search Sites

Another resource for finding personal contact information are websites such as 123PeopleSearch, Intelius, and PeopleSmart. I've had great luck in the past using this type of free people search to locate the hard-to-find, and some sites allow you to search across multiple countries for personal contact info.

However, your mileage may vary from one search provider to another, and these days, it's getting harder and harder to find reliable, up-to-date information on these sites. As the Web has matured, many of these sites have either gone out of business or offer sub-par results. Sure, you might luck out, but be prepared for a mixed bag in terms of results.

It's always worth checking free people search sites as part of your research, but relying solely on sites like this is a mistake. 

12) If All Else Fails

Okay, if all else fails, you may have to resort to alternative, less "direct" methods like emailing your target through LinkedIn, or @-ting them on Twitter and asking them to follow you back so you can DM them and ask for contact information (if they're willing). For me, these are usually last-ditch efforts, which I've resorted to only a handful of times after if I've exhausted all of the other options I detailed in this post. But even though I prefer to send an email to someone's personal account, shooting them an unsolicited LinkedIn message to me is still far better than an info[at]companyX.com black hole.

Point being, 99% of the time if you're dogged, persistent, relentless and love the thrill of the chase like me, then ain't nothing gonna' stop you from finding the personal contact information you seek.

Happy email hunting!

Source: This article was published wordstream.com By Ken Lyons

Categorized in Research Methods

Snapchat Stories kicked off a new trend for listing friends that have viewed your updates / Getty

LinkedIn is probably the most generous social network of them all for online lurkers

Lots of us would love to know which of our friends and connections are secretly looking at our social media updates without engaging with them but, more often than not, networks deliberately make this information either difficult or impossible to access.

Users can openly express interest with likes, comments and retweets, but we’ll always be curious about the unknown. 

Fortunately, there are a number of straightforward ways to dig up telltale “stalking” signs across the biggest social networks, with some providing a little more insight than others.

 

Facebook

The sheer number of dodgy-looking ‘Who Viewed My Profile?’ type apps that are available to download show just how desperate a lot of Facebook users are to identify potential secret admirers. 

While the site doesn’t allow you to find out who’s visited your profile, it keeps track of the friends who’ve checked out your ephemeral Facebook Stories updates, gathering their names in a list that only you can see.

Assuming that your privacy settings allow people to follow you, you can find a complete list of the people who don't want to be your friend but do want to know what you get up to by clicking the Friends tab on your profile and selecting Followers. 

Somewhat unnervingly, Facebook also allows users to create secret lists of friends. As of yet there’s no way to find out if you’re on somebody’s list, but if you are, its creator will get a notification each time you post something.  

Twitter

As a social network built more heavily around news and opinions rather than personal pictures and activities, Twitter-stalking doesn’t appear to be quite as much of a thing.   

There’s still a way to find out more information about who’s viewing your updates, but it’s not particularly precise. 

The microblogging site’s Analytics Dashboard offers up a number of useful insights, including tweet impressions, link clicks, detail expands and the gender, location, age and interests of the people interacting with your posts, but you’re ultimately unlikely to identify a stalker this way.   

Instagram

As is the case with Facebook, it’s Instagram’s Stories feature that gives the game away. It works in a similar manner, to Facebook Stories listing the names of the people who’ve viewed your 24-hour posts.

However, making your account public allows people who don’t follow you to watch your Instagram Stories posts too. Only in their case, you’ll know that they went out of their way to see what you've been getting up to. Just like your friends, their names will be included in a list that only you can see. 

Making your account private will cut off Stories access for non-followers, and you can also hide your Story from people who actually do follow you.

Snapchat

As most people are aware, both Facebook Stories and Instagram Stories are ripped from Snapchat, which has something of a reputation for being one of the raciest social networks.

Snapchat Stories kicked off the trend for displaying all of the friends that have viewed your pictures and videos, but it goes a step further by also notifying you when any of them screenshot your updates. 

LinkedIn

At the opposite end of the spectrum is LinkedIn, but the professional network is arguably the most generous of the bunch for online stalkers. ‘Who’s Viewed Your Profile’ is a core feature, with the site notifying you whenever a fellow user visits your page, and vice versa.

However, you can't view the names of members who've chosen to visit your profile in private mode, even if you’ve paid for a Premium account.

You can try to turn the tables on your stalkers – without coughing up for advanced features – by selecting Anonymous LinkedIn Member under Profile Viewing Options in the privacy menu, though this also hides the identity of every single person who visits your profile.

Source : This article was published independent.co.uk By AATIF SULLEYMAN

Categorized in Social
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