Source: This article was Published gizmodo.com By Brent Rose - Contributed by Member: Deborah Tannen

So, Chrome is ten years old. Officially in the double-digits. Soon it’ll be getting wispy chin-hairs and its voice will be cracking. That said, Google’s browser has accomplished a lot in the ten years that it’s been around. It went from a latecomer in the Browser Wars, with just a 1-percent market share early on launch, and now it’s the most-used browser in the world, with around 60-percent market share. We thought we’d take a look back at the few of the ways it became so dominant.

The Omnibox.png

1. The Omnibox

Children, you will not believe it, but once in web browsers, there was a field for entering the web address and a very different field for the search! Can you believe that? What a bunch of dirty animals we were then. However, when Chrome launched in 2008, it really tried to emphasize a "clean, simple, and efficient interface," and one of the options was to combine the URL box and the search box into one. Suddenly, users could enter a web address or simply switch off the search terms in the same place. It has saved a lot of clicks from the start and has only been improved by additional auto-complete capabilities. It's even able to answer questions and solve math problems before pressing Enter. "The Omnibox handles more than just URLs," Google said in its comic announcement to the world. "It also offers suggestions for search queries, top pages you've visited before, pages you've not visited yet but are popular, and more … you'll have a full-text search of your history You will not have to bookmark this page for digital cameras, just enter "digital camera" and quickly come back to it. "Ten years later, and it's amazing how much I still rely on these features, It's worth noting that all of this information went back to Google by default, but you could use other search engines (Yahoo, Ask, etc.) if you wanted.

2. Incognito mode

Google did not invent the concept of private (or more private) surfing. Apple's Safari actually had a privacy mode before Chrome, but that just shows what a good name can do. Incognito mode has become one of the Q tips of … well, there's a reason why some people still refer to it as a "porn mode". However, it can be used for much more, including checking out websites and profiles through the eyes of an anonymous third party or getting around the paywalls of news organizations.

3rd speed

You may forget that the biggest initial benefit of Chrome was not just that it was fast, but also that stupid fast, Thanks to very intelligent programming, Google claimed that Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine could work ten times faster than Safari or Firefox, and approximately 56 times faster than Microsoft's IE7 (then the dominant browser). This kind of speed paved the way for better in-browser applications like email, calendars and spreadsheets, which of course Google would do

Speed.jpg

4. Each tab is a separate process

This is one of those situations that you take away. Chrome has taken the revolutionary approach of making every open tab its own process. This meant that if a website had a berth code that would simply crash one tab and the other 19 open tabs would stay quiet and function normally. As a result, fewer browsers were completely reset, and as long as your computer had sufficient RAM, each tab was much less prone to delays than other browsers at the time. The other side of this coin is that Chrome can make a metric shit sound out of your computer's memory, especially if you tend to have many tabs open at the same time as I am. In the last few years, much has been done in favor of Google to minimize the amount of background tabs that can impact your system and battery life, but there are still many rivers crossing at this front. Other browsers, such as For example, Opera now has this approach, "Every tab is a process," but most are based on the open source Chromium architecture.

5. Make the web less annoying

It's easy to say how much the web sucks today, but the truth is that it used to suck a lot worse. How do you remember videos that automatically hunted stupidities into your eardrum for 30 seconds before you even found out which tab they came from? Chrome has set it up to mute these videos by default for an entire domain. Or how about extremely annoying popup and banner ads? Maybe fake play buttons that have taken you to a sketchy website? Google gave the sites 30 days to settle for a set of web standards. If it did not, Chrome automatically blocked the offensive content. In this way, 60 percent market share can choose to use their influence to get people to change their evil ways.

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6. It is the first browser to become an operating system

What is the claim to fame? This small web browser became the basis for a whole operating system. Firefox, IE, Safari, Opera … none of them can claim the same. It is not an insignificant operating system either. Chrome OS runs Chromebooks, which account for approximately 60 percent of all mobile devices shipped to K-12 schools in the United States (as of Q4 2017). This will be a first computer experience for many of these children at a very formative time in their lives. Whether this will pay off for Google, remains to be seen.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins - Contributed by Member: Barbara Larson

One of the most popular ways to use the web is to simply search for images. People love to search for images online, and there are many sites and search engines dedicated just to chasing down all sorts of images. We use them as part of a project, to decorate our websites, blogs, or social networking profiles, and for so much more. Here is a collection of just a few of the best sites for finding images online.

Image Search Engines

  • Google Image Search: Google's huge database will help you find pretty much any image on any topic that you can think of. It's easy to use, and indexes literally millions of images. Filters are also available here to narrow your search by size, color, resolution, and much more.  You can also use Google to search for an image by actually using that image in your search query; this is what is called a reverse image search. 
  • Picsearch: Find images, photos, animations; the "Most Popular Pictures" feature is especially useful.
  • Yahoo Image Search: Use Yahoo's Advanced Image Search to really narrow down your searches. You can filter by size, coloration, site/domain, and more.

Image Search Sites

  • Flickr is a great place to go to find a huge array of different photos. Make sure you check if the photo you want to use is available to use on other sites, as not all Flickr users give this kind of permission. If you're just looking for fantastic photo galleries from talented photographers worldwide, Flickr can also be a useful source to utilize. 
  • Fabfotos.com: High-quality photography collection; includes only sites with high-quality submissions.
  • Getty Images: Huge database of searchable images from various leading brands. You can narrow your search to include only royalty-free images. This site offers different levels of image access.
  • Hubble's Greatest Hits: Amazing pictures of space objects as collected by the Hubble telescope from 1990-1995.
  • University of Colorado Garst Photographic Collection: Amazing collection of over 20,000 images put together by the Garsts as they were filming for Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom television series.
  • American Memory Collections: Photos and Prints: From the Library of Congress. Collections include Ansel Adams photography, Civil War, and Presidents and First Ladies.
  • The Smithsonian Institution Archive Collections: Search or browse through selected images from Smithsonian collections.
  • Classroom Clipart: A source for free downloadable clipart, searchable by topic.
  • Eastman Museum: Search through a wide variety of photo and image collections, including motion picture and technology collections.
  • The LIFE Picture Collection: Powered by Getty Images. A fascinating collection of photos and images included in both Time and Life magazines.
  • National Geographic Photography Collection: Includes photo galleries from this acclaimed magazine, gorgeous wallpapers, a photo of the day, and more.
  • NASA Image and Video Library: Search among thousands of NASA press release photos, videos and audio recording spanning American manned space programs from the Mercury program to the STS-79 Shuttle mission.
  • NYPL Digital Gallery: The New York Public Library's collection of free digital images. NYPL Digital Gallery provides access to over 337,000 images digitized from primary sources and printed rarities in the collections of The New York Public Library, including illuminated manuscripts, historical maps, vintage posters, rare prints and photographs, illustrated books, printed ephemera, and more. 

Reverse Image Search

Ever wonder where an image you see on the Web actually came from, how it is being used, if modified versions of the image exist, or to find higher resolution versions?

Google offers a very easy way to do a quick reverse image search. For example, you can use a general Google search query, locate an image, then simply drag and drop that image to the search bar to indicate you'd like to search using that actual image to find out where other instances of it might be on the web. If you have the direct URL of where the image resides, you can also search using that as a start. 

You can also use TinEye as a reverse image search engine to get more information on where that image originated from. Here's how it works:

  • Upload an image from your computer, or copy and paste an URL that has the image you're investigating.
  • TinEye comes back with a list of possible sources for that image.

TinEye has all sorts of interesting possibilities. For example:

  • See how the Mona Lisa has been used all over the globe

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published techworm.net By DION DASSANAYAKE - Contributed by Member: Logan Hochstetler

GOOGLE Chrome users can now download a new update which could make surfing the web on the market-leading browser faster than ever before.

Google Chrome is undoubtedly the world’s most popular browser - and it doesn’t look like it will be giving up that crown anytime soon.

Latest figures from NetMarketShare analyzing web browser usage for the first seven months of 2018 put Google Chrome in a hugely commanding lead.

Their stats give Google Chrome a massive 62.43 percent slice of the web browser market.

Chrome’s nearest rival, Internet Explorer, languishes behind on 11.90 percent with Firefox is not far off on 10.30 percent.

Microsoft’s newer Edge browser, which is bundled in with Windows 10, has just a 4.38 percent share of the web browser market.

But despite having such a huge lead over the competition, Google isn’t resting on its laurels.

The search engine giant has just pushed out an update for Google Chrome which could make web browsing faster than ever before.

Chrome version 68 was rolled out recently and brings with it a number of improvements to the browser.

And one of the update’s most eye-catching features was revealed by a programmer working on Chrome.

The new feature, revealed by Philip Walton, is called Page Lifecycle API.

But while it doesn’t have the catchiest of names, the update could bring a big performance improvement to Chrome users.

The new feature helps with RAM usage, suspending web pages which Chrome is not using so the browser doesn’t take up memory unnecessarily.

On Twitter, the Google engineer posted: “I just published a massive article on the new Page Lifecycle API, which allows browsers to better manage resources if you have a zillion tabs open!

“It's full advice + best practices that's the result of months of research & cross-browser testing”.

Google Chrome extensions explained

In a post online, Walton added: “Modern browsers today will sometimes suspend pages or discard them entirely when system resources are constrained.

“In the future, browsers want to do this proactively, so they consume less power and memory.

“The Page Lifecycle API, shipping in Chrome 68, provides lifecycle hooks so your pages can safely handle these browser interventions without affecting the user experience.”

The catch, however, is that web developers have to enable this as well on their end for Google Chrome to help free up RAM resources.

In other Chrome news, Express.co.uk recently reported on how the browser has been given a hidden new redesign.

However, it is only available to users that navigate through some simple tricks.

Google has been busy at work on the huge new look for Chrome and now iPhone users can get their hands on an early version.

Chrome has now moved the tab button to the bottom of the screen in addition to the forward and back buttons on the iOS app.

Google Chrome

Google Chrome - Latest update includes the feature to help free-up RAM (Image: GOOGLE)

A search feature also sits in the middle of the two for quick Google queries.

While the top of the screen stays mostly clear when browsing and is only disrupted to bring down the URL bar.

And Incognito mode is easily accessed from the top of the tab page while a large blue button exists at the bottom to open a new web page.

Apple users need to head to a special URL to access the redesign.

If you’re wondering how to access the new look Chrome on your iPhone then click here.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was published wired.com By LILY HAY NEWMAN - Contributed by Member: David J. Redcliff

IN THE BEGINNING, there was phone phreaking and worms. Then came spam and pop-ups. And none of it was good. But in the nascent decades of the internet, digital networks were detached and isolated enough that the average user could mostly avoid the nastiest stuff. By the early 2000s, though, those walls started coming down, and digital crime boomed.

Google, which will turn 20 in September, grew up during this transition. And as its search platform spawned interconnected products like ad distribution and email hosting, the company realized its users and everyone on the web faced an escalation of online scams and abuse. So in 2005, a small team within Google started a project aimed at flagging possible social engineering attacks—warning users when a webpage might be trying to trick them into doing something detrimental.

A year later, the group expanded its scope, working to flag links and sites that might be distributing malware. Google began incorporating these anti-abuse tools into its own products, but also made them available to outside developers. By 2007, the service had a name: Safe Browsing. And what began as a shot in the dark would go on to fundamentally change security on the internet.

You've been protected by Safe Browsing even if you haven't realized it. When you load a page in most popular browsers or choose an app from the Google Play Store, Safe Browsing is working behind the scenes to check for malicious behavior and notify you of anything that might be amiss. But setting up such a massive vetting system at the scale of the web isn't easy. And Safe Browsing has always grappled with a core security challenge—how to flag and block bad things without mislabeling legitimate activity or letting anything malicious slip through. While that problem isn’t completely solved, Safe Browsing has become a stalwart of the web. It underlies user security in all of Google’s major platforms—including Chrome, Android, AdSense, and Gmail—and runs on more than 3 billion devices worldwide.

In the words of nine Google engineers who have worked on Safe Browsing, from original team members to recent additions, here’s the story of how the product was built, and how it became such a ubiquitous protective force online.

Niels Provos, a distinguished engineer at Google and one of the founding members of Safe Browsing: I first started working on denial of service defense for Google in 2003, and then late in 2005 there was this other engineer at Google called Fritz Schneider who was actually one of the very first people on the security team. He was saying, ‘Hey Niels, this phishing is really becoming a problem, we should be doing something about it.’ He had started to get one or two engineers interested part-time, and we figured out that the first problem that we should be solving was not actually trying to figure out what is a phishing page, but rather how do we present this to the user in a way that makes sense to them? So that started the very early phishing team.

One of the trends that we had observed was the bad guys figured out that just compromising other web servers actually doesn’t really give you all that much. What they were getting was essentially bandwidth, but not a lot of interesting data. So then they turned to their compromised web servers that got lots and lots of visitors, and it was like, ‘How about we compromise those people with downloads?’ So there was a change in malicious behavior.

We were already working on phishing, and I thought, you know, the malware thing maybe even a larger problem. And we’re sort of uniquely positioned because with the Google search crawler we have all this visibility into the web. So then we started with phishing and malware, and Safe Browsing came together that way.

Panos Mavrommatis, Engineering Director of Safe Browsing: Safe Browsing started as an anti-phishing plugin for Mozilla Firefox since this was 2005 and Google didn’t have its own browser then. When I joined in 2006, the team lead at the time was Niels, and he wanted us to expand and protect users not just from phishing but also from malware. So that was my initial project—which I haven’t finished yet.

'But we did not really conceive that 10 years later we would be on 3 billion devices. That’s actually a little bit scary.'

NIELS PROVOS, GOOGLE

The goal was to crawl the web and protect users of Google’s main product, which was Search, from links that could point them to sites that could harm their computer. So that was the second product of Safe Browsing after the anti-phishing plugin, and the user would see labels on malicious search results. Then if you did click on it you would get an additional warning from the search experience that would tell you that this site might harm your computer.

One interesting thing that happened was related to how we communicated with webmasters who were affected by Safe Browsing alerts. Because very quickly when we started looking into the problem of how users might be exposed to malware on the web, we realized that a lot of it came from websites that were actually benign, but were compromised and started delivering malware via exploits. The site owners or administrators typically did not realize that this was happening.

In our first interactions with webmasters, they would often be surprised. So we started building tools dedicated to webmasters, now called Search Console. The basic feature was that we would try to guide the webmaster to the reason that their website was infected, or if we didn’t know the exact reason we would at least tell them which pages on their server were distributing malware, or we would show them a snippet of code that was injected into their site.

Provos: We got a lot of skepticism, like ‘Niels, you can’t tell me that you’re just doing this for the benefit of web users, right? There must be an angle for Google as well.’ Then we articulated this narrative that if the web is safer for our users, then that will benefit Google because people will use our products more often.

But we did not really conceive that 10 years later we would be on 3 billion devices. That’s actually a little bit scary. There’s a sense of huge responsibility that billions of people rely on the service we provide, and if we don’t do a good job at detection then they get exposed to malicious content.

Mavrommatis: Around 2008 we started building an engine that ran every page Google already fetched, to evaluate how the page behaved. This was only possible because of Google’s internal cloud infrastructure. That was part of why Google was able to do a lot of innovation at the time, we had this extremely open infrastructure internally where you could use any unused resources, and do things like run a malicious detection engine on the full web.

Moheeb Abu Rajab, Principal Engineer at Safe Browsing: Coming from graduate school, I had been trying to build this type of system on a couple of machines, so I was spending lots of time trying to set that up. And it’s just the minimum effort at Google to run on a huge scale.

Mavrommatis: The other thing we developed at the same time was a slower but deeper scanner that loaded web pages in a real browser, which is more resource-intensive than the other work we had been doing that just tested each component of a site. And having those two systems allowed us to build our first machine learning classifier. The deeper crawling service would provide training data for the lightweight engine, so it could learn to identify which sites are the most likely to be malicious and need a deep scan. Because even at Google-scale we could not crawl the whole search index with a real browser.

Noé Lutz, Google AI engineer, formerly Safe Browsing: Around the same time, in 2009, we worked on machine learning for phishing as well. And this was a pretty scary moment for the team because up until then we used machine learning as a filtering function, to figure out where to focus this heavy weight computing resource, but this was the first time we actually decided something was phishing or malicious or harmful or not harmful in a fully automated way.

I remember the day we flipped the switch it was like, now the machine is responsible. That was a big day. And nothing bad happened. But what I do remember is it took extremely long for us to turn that tool on. I think we all expected that it would take a couple of weeks, but it took actually several months to make sure that we were very confident in what we were doing. We were very conscious from the get-go how disruptive it can be if we make a mistake.

Provos: The moments that stand out do tend to be the more traumatic ones. There was a large production issue we had in 2009, it was a Saturday morning. We had a number of bugs that came together and we ended up doing a bad configuration push. We labeled every single Google search result as malicious.

Even in 2009, Google was already a prevalent search engine, so this had a fairly major impact on the world. Fortunately, our site reliability engineering teams are super on top of these things and the problem got resolved within 15 minutes. But that caused a lot of soul searching and a lot of extra guards and defenses to be put in place, so nothing like that would happen again. But luckily by then, we were already at a point where people within Google had realized that Safe Browsing was actually a really important service, which is why we had integrated it into Search in the first place.

Nav Jagpal, Google Software Engineer: In 2008 we integrated Safe Browsing into Chrome, and Chrome represented a big shift because before with browsers like Internet Explorer, you could easily be on an old version. And there were drive-by downloads exploiting that, where you could go to a website, not click on anything, and walk away with an infection on your computer. But then over time, everyone got better at building software. The weakest link was the browser; now it’s the user. Now to get code running on people’s machines, you just ask them. So that’s why Safe Browsing is so crucial.

Mavrommatis: Around 2011 and 2012 we started building even deeper integrations for Google’s platforms, particularly Android and Chrome Extensions and Google Play. And we created unique, distinct teams to go focus on each product integration and work together with the main teams that provided the platforms.

Allison Miller, former Safe Browsing product manager, now at Bank of America (interviewed by WIRED in 2017): Safe Browsing is really behind the scenes. We build infrastructure. We take that information and we push it out to all the products across Google that have any place where there is the potential for the user to stumble across something malicious. People don’t necessarily see that that goes on. We’re a little too quiet about it sometimes.

Fabrice Jaubert, software development manager of Safe Browsing: There were challenges in branching out outside of the web, but there were advantages, too, because we had a little bit more control over the ecosystem, so we could guide it toward safer practices. You can’t dictate what people do with their web pages, but we could say what we thought was acceptable or not in Chrome extensions or in Android apps.

Lutz: There were also some non-technical challenges. Google is a big company, and it can be challenging to collaborate effectively across teams. It’s sometimes hard to realize from the outside, but Chrome is written in a language that is different from a lot of other parts of Google, and they have release processes that are very different. And the same is true for Android, they have a different process of releasing software. So getting everybody aligned and understanding each other, I perceived it as a big hurdle to overcome.

'We are really behind the scenes. We build infrastructure.'

ALLISON MILLER, GOOGLE

Stephan Somogyi, Google AI product manager, formerly Safe Browsing: This is a very hackneyed cliché so please don’t use it against me, but the whole 'rising tide lifts all boats' thing actually really holds true for Safe Browsing. There wasn’t ever any debate that we wanted to expand its reach onto mobile, but we had a profound dilemma because the amount of data that Safe Browsing used for desktop was an intractable amount for mobile. And we knew that everything that we push down to the mobile device costs the user money because they're paying for their data plans. So we wanted to use compression to take the data we already had and make it smaller. And we didn’t want the users to get hosed by five apps each having their own Safe Browsing implementation and all downloading the same data five times. So we said let’s bake it into Android and take the heavy lifting onto ourselves all in one place. It’s been a system service since the fall of 2015.

So we built a dead simple API so developers can just say, ‘Hey Android Local System Service, is this URL good or bad?’ We also wanted to write this thing so it wouldn’t unnecessarily spin up the cell modem and eat battery life because that’s just not nice. So if the network isn’t up anyway, don’t call it up. We just spent an awful lot of effort on implementation for Android. It turned out to be a lot more subtle and nuanced than we first anticipated.

Mavrommatis: The other big effort that our team was involved in around 2013 and 2014 was what we call “unwanted software.” It’s primarily for desktop users, and it’s sort of an adaptation from actors who may have in the past been using just malware techniques, but now they would find that it’s possible to hide malware within software that seems focused on a legitimate function. It was unclear how antivirus companies should label this, and how big companies and browsers should deal with this. But what we focused on was what is the impact on the user?

Around 2014, our data showed that over 40 percent of the complaints that Chrome users reported were related to some sort of software that was running on their device that would impact their browsing experience. It might inject more ads or come bundled with other software they didn't need, but it was a potentially unwanted program. These practices were causing a lot of problems and we would see a lot of Chrome users downloading these kinds of apps. So we refined our download protection service and also found ways to start warning users about potentially unwanted downloads.

Jagpal: It’s a large responsibility, but it also feels very abstract. You get a warning or alert and you think, ‘Wait a minute, am I protecting myself here?’ But it’s so abstract that if we write code for something concrete, like turning on a light switch at home, it’s like, ‘Whoa, that is so cool. I can see that.’

Jaubert: My 14-year-old definitely takes Safe Browsing for granted. He got a phishing message as an SMS text, so it didn’t go through our systems, and he was shocked. He asked me, ‘Why aren’t you protecting me? I thought this couldn’t happen!’ So I think people are starting to take it for granted in a good way.

Emily Schechter, Chrome Security product manager (former Safe Browsing program manager): You can tell people that they’re secure when they’re on a secure site, but what really matters is that you tell them when they’re not secure when they’re on a site that is actively doing something wrong.

People should expect that the web is safe and easy to use by default. You shouldn’t have to be a security expert to browse the web, you shouldn’t have to know what phishing is, you shouldn’t have to know what malware is. You should just expect that software is going to tell you when something has gone wrong. That’s what Safe Browsing is trying to do.

Categorized in Search Engine

Need to find a job? These are the best job search engines on the web

If you're in the market for a new job, you'll want to check out this list of the best eight job search engines on the web. All of these job search tools offer unique features and can streamline your employment search efforts so your efforts are more productive. Each one is an incredibly useful tool that will help you localize your search, find interesting new positions that correlate to your experience and interests, and help you to find employment in a wide variety of genres. 

1- Monster.com

Monster Logo
Monster

Newly redesigned Monster.com is one of the oldest job search engines on the Web. While some of its usefulness has been diminished in recent years due to a lack of good filtering and too many posts by spammy recruiters, it's still an important site on which to conduct a job search. You can narrow your search by location, keywords, and employer; plus, Monster has plenty of job search extras: networking boards, job search alerts, and online resume posting.

Employers can also use Monster.com to find employees for a nominal fee, a useful tool for those looking to expand their hiring repertoire, find a new full-time or contract employee, or gather a pool of potential applicants for an upcoming position.  More »

Indeed logo
Indeed

Indeed.com is a very solid job search engine, with the ability to compile a resume and submit it onsite for employer searches of keywords, jobs, niches, and more. Indeed uncovers a wide variety of jobs and fields that you wouldn't normally find on most job search sites, and they do a good job of making their job search features as easy to use as possible. You can subscribe to job alerts via email; you can set these up for a certain keyword, geolocation, salary, and much more. 

In addition, Indeed makes it as simple as possible to keep track of jobs you've applied for; all you need to do is create a login (free) and every job you've applied for from within Indeed.com or that you've just expressed interest in will be saved to your profile. 

Daily and weekly alerts can be created with notifications going to your inbox; criteria include job title, location, salary requirements, and skill sets.  More »

USAJobs
USA Jobs

Think of USAjobs as your gateway into the huge world of US government jobs. Navigate to the USAjobs.gov home page, and you'll be able to narrow your search by keyword, job title, control number, agency skills, or location. One particularly interesting feature is the ability to search worldwide within any country that currently is advertising a vacancy. 

Just like many other job search engines on this list, you can create a user account (free) on USAjobs.gov, making the application process for government jobs extremely streamlined and easy.  More »

CareerBuilder Logo
Career Builder

CareerBuilder offers job searchers the ability to find a job, post a resume, create job alerts, get job advice and job resources, look up job fairs, and much more. This is a truly massive job search engine that offers a lot of good resources to the job searcher; I especially appreciate the list of job search communities. 

According to the CareerBuilder website, more than 24 million unique visitors a month visit CareerBuilder to find new jobs and obtain career advice, and offers job searches in over 60 different countries worldwide.  More »

5- Dice

DiceLogo
Dice

Dice.com is a job search engine dedicated to only finding technology jobs. It offers a targeted niche space for finding exactly the technology position you might be looking for.

One of the most appealing features that Dice offers is the ability to drill down to extremely specialized tech positions, giving job seekers the opportunity to find the niche tech jobs that are sometimes elusive on other job search engines.  More »

6- SimplyHired

SimplyHired Screenshot
Simply Hired

SimplyHired also offers a unique job search experience; the user trains the job search engine by rating jobs he or she is interested in. SimplyHired also gives you the ability to research salaries, add jobs to a job map, and view pretty detailed profiles of various companies.

If you're looking for a good job search engine that focuses on local job listings, SimplyHired can be a good choice. You can browse by town, by zip code, or by state to find the job that might be right for you.   More »

7- LinkedIn

linked in logo
LinkedIN

LinkedIn.com combines the best of two worlds: the ability to scour the Internet for jobs with its job search engine, and the opportunity to network with like-minded friends and individuals to deepen your job search.

LinkedIn's job postings are of the highest quality, and if you are connected to someone who already knows about that particular job, you've got a way in before you even hand in your resume.  More »

8- Craigslist

Craigslist logo
Craigslist

There are all sorts of interesting jobs on Craigslist. Just find your city, look under Jobs, then look under your job category. Non-profit, systems, government, writing, etc. jobs are all represented here.

You can also set up various RSS feeds that pertain to whatever job you might be looking for, in whatever location.

Caution: Craigslist this is a free marketplace and some of the jobs posted at on this site could be scams. Use caution and common sense when replying to job listings on Craigslist.  More »

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Categorized in Search Engine

Searches for events will now surface a list of activities that include location and date details.

Google announced a new search feature today that will make it easier to find events.

Google app and mobile web searches for events will now surface a listing of activities pulled from Eventbrite, Meetup and other sites across the web.

Google product manager Nishant Ranka writes:

To try it, type in a quick search like, “jazz concerts in Austin,” or “art events this weekend” on your phone. With a single tap, you’ll see at-a-glance details about various options, like the event title, date and time, and location. You can tap “more events” to see additional options. Once you find one that’s up your alley, tap it to find more details or buy tickets directly from the website.

Rolled out today in the US, Google shared the following image highlighting how its latest search feature works:

Event results include filters that let you drill down by dates or look for specific events happening “today,” “tomorrow” or “next week.”

Google provided the following link to its developer guidelines for creators so that they can make sure their event listings show up in within the new search feature: Google Search Events guide.

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Amy Gesenhues

Categorized in Search Engine

Global Research Library Inc., announces the launch of www.edu.global, a revolutionary research optimized search engine, programmed to maximize efficiency for the education sector and beyond.

Designed for organizations including libraries, colleges and universities that realize the importance of providing their community a technological advantage, the edu.global search engine has been developed by a team of professional researchers to automatically refine search criteria. This refinement accelerates and streamlines access to its over 52 million eResources in one location.

One subscription to edu.global is the gateway for your organization to economically retrieve and/or download millions of books, maps and journal articles in 200 languages from 196 countries. Accessibility to new information increases daily as the platform expands.

Global Research Library Inc.’s founder Noel Montgomery Elliot commented “edu.global’s key advantage is enabled by re-indexing topics, tags, subjects and sub-categories, increasing our user’s ability to search at speeds never before possible while gaining access to materials that may be impossible to locate using traditional search engines.”

The Re-indexing Advantage:
Many resources online are indexed incorrectly, while others have no index at all, or don’t have a title to enable it to be categorized - rendering old classification systems ineffective.

Edu.global’s unique approach corrects errors, creates new indexes and re-categorizes eResources using proprietary methodologies. The end result is faster and easier searching, capable of narrowing-down millions of search results to the few specific items a researcher is looking for.

Whether you are looking to strengthen your organization’s database, or are an independent researcher looking for information about any person, place or thing, edu.global is the most powerful, easy to use “research engine” available.

About Global Research Library Inc.
Since the Company incorporated in 1981, Global Research Library’s print publications have been purchased and trusted by thousands of researchers, libraries and institutions across the globe. These were published under the company’s original name, The Genealogical Research Library, Inc.

To better meet the demands of its users and reflect its global mission, in 2014 the Company changed its name to Global Research Library Inc., which revealed for the first time its global mandate for academic and research purposes.

Visit: https://edu.global/

View source version on businesswire.com: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170427005126/en/

Categorized in Search Engine

Researchers introduce 'Splinter,' a system to quickly search databases without showing the server what's being searched for

When you search for something on the internet, it’s always been a given that your request will be recorded and stored — whether it’s a stock price, medical symptoms, or the cheapest air fare to Hawaii.

But there might be a better way — a way to quickly search large data without identifying a user’s query — a group of MIT researchers says.

Normally, in order to perform a basic search, you need to communicate with a server, which in turn needs to know what you’re looking for in order to find the appropriate results in its database. The downside is that each search you make reveals a huge amount of information about you, and that data is frequently mined to build user profiles and target ads around some of your most private interests, thoughts, and activities.

In a paper due to be presented at the 14th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation, the researchers introduce a system called Splinter, which they say would allow completely private searches.

Essentially, the system hides the user’s queries by breaking them up into encrypted pieces, each processed by a separate server. It then uses a technique called “function secret sharing,” which performs a mathematical function on every record in the databases and returns a matching result to the user. That result can’t be understood by the server — instead, it can only be read by the user once all the pieces are re-assembled on their local device.

“The canonical example behind this line of work was public patent databases. When people were searching for certain kinds of patents, they gave away the research they were working on,” said Frank Wang, an MIT graduate student and the paper’s lead author, in a press statement sent to Vocativ. “Another example is maps: When you’re searching for where you are and where you’re going to go, it reveals a wealth of information about you.”

Wang says the paper comes amid increasing demand for private web searches. He notes the popularity of search engines like DuckDuckGo, which gets search results from other sites like Google but claims it doesn’t store any information about users’ queries. Companies like Least Authority and SpiderOak offer something similar for cloud storage, using “zero knowledge” systems that ensure only the user can read their stored data.

“We see a shift toward people wanting private queries,” Wang said. “We can imagine a model in which other services scrape a travel site, and maybe they volunteer to host the information for you, or maybe you subscribe to them. Or maybe in the future, travel sites realize that these services are becoming more popular and they volunteer the data. But right now, we’re trusting that third-party sites have adequate protections, and with Splinter we try to make that more of a guarantee.”

The paper’s authors concede that it might be a while before something like Splinter becomes implemented into real-world services. But the researchers say that their function secret sharing technique greatly improves on previous experiments with hidden database queries, allowing searches to be run up to ten times faster.

“There’s always this gap between something being proposed on paper and actually implementing it,” said Wang. “We do a lot of optimization to get it to work, and we have to do a lot of tricks to get it to support actual database queries.”

Author : Joshua Kopstein

Source : vocativ.com

Categorized in Online Research

Over the past year, Pew Research Center conducted an experiment to see if the mode by which someone was surveyed – in this case, a telephone survey with an interviewer versus a self-administered survey on the Web – would have any effect on the answers people gave. We used two randomly selected groups from our American Trends Panel to do this, asking both groups the same set of 60 questions.

Respondents can give different answers on web-based surveys than in phone interviews.

The result? Overall, our study found that it was fairly common to see differences in responses between those who took the survey with an interviewer by phone and those who took the survey on their own (self-administered) online, but typically the differences were not large. There was a mean difference of 5.5 percentage points and a median difference of 5 points across the 60 questions.

But there were three broad types of questions that produced larger differences (known as mode effects) between the responses of those interviewed by phone vs. Web. These differences are noteworthy given that many pollsters, market research firms and political organizations are increasingly turning to online surveys which, compared with phone surveys, are generally less expensive to produce and faster in yielding results.

Here are three of the areas that showed the biggest mode gaps in responses from the phone and Web groups in our study:

People express more negative views of politicians in web surveys than in phone surveys.1People expressed more negative views of politicians in Web surveys than in phone surveys. 

Those who took Web surveys were far more likely than those interviewed on the phone to give various political figures a “very unfavorable” rating. This tendency was especially concentrated among members of the opposite party of each figure rated. Hillary Clinton’s ratings are a good example of this pattern. When asked on the phone, 36% of Republicans and those who lean Republican told interviewers they had a “very unfavorable” opinion of Clinton, but that number jumped to 53% on the Web. However, as with most of the political figures, Clinton’s positive ratings varied only modestly by mode – 53% rated her positively on the Web, compared with 57% on the phone.

The same patterns seen with Clinton were also evident for Republican political figures. Web respondents were 13 points more likely than phone respondents to have a “very unfavorable” view of Sarah Palin. Among Democrats and Democratic leaners, 63% expressed a very unfavorable view of Palin on the Web, compared with only 44% on the phone.

2People who took phone surveys were more likely than those who took Web surveys to say that certain groups of people – such as gays and lesbians, Hispanics, and blacks – faced “a lot” of discrimination.

Here, the impact of the mode of interview varied by the race and ethnicity of the respondents.

Sizeable differences between web surveys and phone surveys on views of discrimination.When asked about discrimination against gays and lesbians, 62% of respondents on the phone said they faced “a lot” of discrimination, but only 48% gave the same answer on the Web. The mode effect on this question appeared among both Democrats and Republicans.

Telephone survey respondents were also more likely than Web respondents to say that Hispanics faced “a lot” of discrimination (54% in the phone survey, 42% in the Web survey). There was also a difference in response by mode among Hispanics questioned for this study: 41% on the Web said they faced discrimination, while 61% on the phone said this. The mode difference for white respondents was 14 points. But among black respondents, there was no significant mode effect: 66% of blacks interviewed by phone said Hispanics face a lot of discrimination, while 61% of those interviewed on the Web said the same.

When asked about discrimination against blacks, more phone respondents (54%) than Web respondents (44%) said they faced a lot of discrimination. This pattern was clear among whites, where 50% on the phone and just 37% on the Web said blacks faced a lot of discrimination. But among blacks, the pattern was reversed: 71% of black respondents interviewed by phone say they faced “a lot” of discrimination, while on the Web 86% gave this answer.

3People were more likely to say they are happy with their family and social life when asked by a person over the phone than when answering questions on the Web.

Among phone survey respondents, 62% said they were “very satisfied” with their family life, while just 44% of Web respondents said this. Asked about their social life, 43% of phone respondents said they were very satisfied, while just 29% of Web respondents gave that answer. These sizable differences are evident among most social and demographic groups in the survey.

Respondents were also asked how satisfied they were with their local community as a place to live. Phone respondents were again more positive, with 37% rating their community as an excellent place to live, compared with 30% of Web respondents. But there was no significant difference by mode in the percentage who gave a negative rating of their community (“only fair” or “poor”).

So, what’s going on here? These examples are consistent with the theory that when people are interacting with an interviewer, they are more likely to give answers that paint themselves or their communities in a positive light, and less likely to portray themselves negatively. This appears to be the case with the questions presenting the largest differences in the study – satisfaction with family and social life, as well as questions about the ability to pay for food and medical care. These findings are consistent with other research that has found that when there is a human interviewer, respondents tend to give answers that would be considered more socially desirable – a phenomenon known as the “social desirability bias.”

On the political questions, however, other recent research has suggested that when interviewers are presenting the questions, respondents may choose answers that are less likely to produce an uncomfortable interaction with the interviewer. This dynamic may also be in effect among black respondents on the phone who – compared with those surveyed on the Web – are less likely to tell an interviewer that blacks face a lot of discrimination. In the interest of maintaining rapport with an interviewer, respondents may self-censor or moderate their views in ways that they would not online.

Altogether, our findings suggest that there may be advantages to online surveys, particularly if the survey seeks to measure topics that are sensitive or subject to social desirability because of the willingness of respondents to express more negative attitudes about their personal lives or toward political figures on the Web.

That said, researchers need to carefully consider the trade-offs between the two survey modes. This study only looked at differences in how people answer questions differently online and over the phone. But the survey mode can affect what kinds of people are included in the survey as well. Telephone surveys continue to provide access to survey samples that are broadly representative of the general public, even in the face of declining response rates. Many Americans still lack reliable access to the internet, and traditional phone surveys have been found to perform better than many probability-based Web surveys among some respondents, including financially struggling individuals, those with low levels of education, and minorities with low language proficiency. Given these trade-offs, we are continuously working to make our traditional methods even more robust in addition to exploring new methods for understanding public opinion.

Author : SCOTT KEETER

Source : http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/05/14/where-web-surveys-produce-different-results-than-phone-interviews/

Categorized in Others

YESTERDAY, THE 46-YEAR-OLD Google veteran who oversees the company’s search engine, Amit Singhal, announced his retirement. And in short order, Google revealed that Singhal’s rather enormous shoes would be filled by a man named John Giannandrea. On one level, these are just two guys doing something new with their lives. But you can also view the pair as the ideal metaphor for a momentous shift in the way things work inside Google—and across the tech world as a whole.

Giannandrea, you see, oversees Google’s work in artificial intelligence. This includes deep neural networks, networks of hardware and software that approximate the web of neurons in the human brain. By analyzing vast amounts of digital data, these neural nets can learn all sorts of useful tasks, like identifying photos, recognizing commands spoken into a smartphone, and, as it turns out, responding to Internet search queries. In some cases, they can learn a task so well that they outperform humans. They can do it better. They can do it faster. And they can do it at a much larger scale.

If AI is the future of Google Search, it’s the future of so much more.

This approach, called deep learning, is rapidly reinventing so many of the Internet’s most popular services, from Facebook to Twitter to Skype. Over the past year, it has also reinvented Google Search, where the company generates most of its revenue. Early in 2015, as Bloomberg recently reported, Google began rolling out a deep learning system called RankBrain that helps generate responses to search queries. As of October, RankBrain played a role in “a very large fraction” of the millions of queries that go through the search engine with each passing second.

As Bloomberg says, it was Singhal who approved the roll-out of RankBrain. And before that, he and his team may have explored other, simpler forms of machine learning. But for a time, some say, he represented a steadfast resistance to the use of machine learning inside Google Search. In the past, Google relied mostly on algorithms that followed a strict set of rules set by humans. The concern—as described by some former Google employees—was that it was more difficult to understand why neural nets behaved the way it did, and more difficult to tweak their behavior.

These concerns still hover over the world of machine learning. The truth is that even the experts don’t completely understand how neural nets work. But they do work. If you feed enough photos of a platypus into a neural net, it can learn to identify a platypus. If you show it enough computer malware code, it can learn to recognize a virus. If you give it enough raw language—words or phrases that people might type into a search engine—it can learn to understand search queries and help respond to them. In some cases, it can handle queries better than algorithmic rules hand-coded by human engineers. Artificial intelligence is the future of Google Search, and if it’s the future of Google Search, it’s the future of so much more.

Sticking to the Rules

This past fall, I sat down with a former Googler who asked that I withhold his name because he wasn’t authorized to talk about the company’s inner workings, and we discussed the role of neural networks inside the company’s search engine. At one point, he said, the Google ads team had adopted neural nets to help target ads, but the “organic search” team was reluctant to use this technology. Indeed, over the years, discussions of this dynamic have popped up every now and again on Quora, the popular question-and-answer site.

These technologies may sacrifice some control. But the benefits outweigh the sacrifice.

Edmond Lau, who worked on Google’s search team and is the author of the book The Effective Engineer, wrote in a Quora post that Singhal carried a philosophical bias against machine learning. With machine learning, he wrote, the trouble was that “it’s hard to explain and ascertain why a particular search result ranks more highly than another result for a given query.” And, he added: “It’s difficult to directly tweak a machine learning-based system to boost the importance of certain signals over others.” Other ex-Googlers agreed with this characterization.

Yes, Google’s search engine was always driven by algorithms that automatically generate a response to each query. But these algorithms amounted to a set of definite rules. Google engineers could readily change and refine these rules. And unlike neural nets, these algorithms didn’t learn on their own. As Lau put it: “Rule-based scoring metrics, while still complex, provide a greater opportunity for engineers to directly tweak weights in specific situations.”

But now, Google has incorporated deep learning into its search engine. And with its head of AI taking over search, the company seems to believe this is the way forward.

Losing Control

It’s true that with neural nets, you lose some control. But you don’t lose all of it, says Chris Nicholson, the founder of the deep learning startup Skymind. Neural networks are really just math—linear algebra—and engineers can certainly trace how the numbers behave inside these multi-layered creations. The trouble is that it’s hard to understand why a neural net classifies a photo or spoken word or snippet of natural language in a certain way.

“People understand the linear algebra behind deep learning. But the models it produces are less human-readable. They’re machine-readable,” Nicholson says. “They can retrieve very accurate results, but we can’t always explain, on an individual basis, what led them to those accurate results.”

Ways do exist to trace what is happening inside these multi-layered creations.

What this means is that, in order to tweak the behavior of these neural nets, you must adjust the math through intuition, trial, and error. You must retrain them on new data, with still more trial and error. That’s doable, but complicated. And as Google moves search to this AI model, it’s unclear how the move will affect its ability to defend its search results against claims of unfairness or change the results in the face of complaints.

These concerns aren’t trivial. Today, Google is facing an European anti-trust investigation into whether it unfairly demoted the pages of certain competitors. What happens when it’s really the machines making these decisions, and their rationale is indecipherable? Humans will still guide these machines, but not in the same way they were guided in the past.

In any event, deep learning has arrived on Google Search. And the company may have used other forms of machine learning in recent years, as well. Though these technologies sacrifice some control, Google believes, the benefits outweigh that sacrifice.

Deep Learnings

To be sure, deep learning is still just a part of how Google Search works. According to Bloomberg, RankBrain helps Google deal with about 15 percent of its daily queries—the queries the system hasn’t seen in the past. Basically, this machine learning engine is adept at analyzing the words and phrases that make up a search query and deciding what other words and phrases carry much the same meaning. As a result, it’s better than the old rules-based system when handling brand new queries—queries Google Search has never seen before.

But over time, systems like this will play an even greater role inside Internet services like Google Search. At one point, Google ran a test that pitted its search engineers against RankBrain. Both were asked to look at various web pages and predict which would rank highest on a Google search results page. RankBrain was right 80 percent of the time. The engineers were right 70 percent of the time.

This doesn’t detract from Singhal’s work. He joined Google in 2000, and a year later was named a Google Fellow, the highest honor Google bestows on its engineers. For most of Google’s history, he has ruled the company’s search engine, and that search engine pretty much ruled the Internet.

But machine learning is rapidly changing that landscape. “By building learning systems, we don’t have to write these rules anymore,” John Giannandrea told a room full of reporters inside Google headquarters this fall. “Increasingly, we’re discovering that if we can learn things rather than writing code, we can scale these things much better.”

Author : CADE METZ

Source : https://www.wired.com/2016/02/ai-is-changing-the-technology-behind-google-searches/

Categorized in Search Engine
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