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Firefox announced the launch of its Firefox Focus browser for iOS users. Firefox claims that it is a private browser designed to not leave behind traces of internet browsing on the device. Firefox Focus aims to protect online privacy by blocking web trackers and analytics, the company said.

Firefox reports that users can browse content with the knowledge that ‘browsing history, passwords, cookies’ can be deleted with a tap of the “Erase” button, which is located next to the search bar. The company claims that browsing on Firefox Focus is faster compared to other browsers thanks to default blocking of trackers and advertisements that slow down page loading times.

“For the times when you don’t want to leave a record on your phone. You may be looking for information that in certain situations is sensitive – searches for engagement rings, flights to Las Vegas or expensive cigars, for example. And sometimes you just want a super simple, super fast Web experience – no tabs, no menus, no pop-ups,” Firefox said in a blog post.

The browser is bare-boned with a single input box for entering the URL and search functionality using Google(UK) or Yahoo (US). Firefox Focus however, lacks features such as ‘Tabs’, ‘Menus’, and other features, reports The Guardian. There is also no option to change the default search engine from Yahoo, as of yet.

Customising tracking information is found under ‘Settings’. The following trackers can be blocked- ‘advertisements’, ‘analytics’, ‘social’ and others.

Apple’s decision to allow developers write Safari integrations resulted in Firefox initially launching the ‘Focus by Firefox’ in December 2015 as a content blocker for Safari. The new app can still integrate with Safari for blocking tracking information, Firefox added.

Mozilla told Engadget that depending on how the iOS app is received, it’ll consider building an Android version of Firefox Focus. The app is currently available for free on Apple’s App Store.

Author:  Tech Desk

Source:  http://indianexpress.com/

Categorized in News & Politics

It’s easy to find text on a page with a desktop browser, with just a keyboard shortcut you’ll have a search field. This is a bit different in the world of smaller mobile screens though, and if you need to find text on a current web page with Safari for iPhone or iPod touch you’ll need to do the following instead:

This is the same with Safari for iOS 6 and iOS 5:

  • While on the page you wish to search, type the phrase or text you want to search for in the upper right corners Search box
  • With the suggestions populated, swipe down to the bottom of the suggestion list to find “On This Page (x matches) and tap on ‘Find “search text”‘

Search on Page in Safari for iPhone and iPod touch

After you type “Find” the matched search terms will be highlighted in yellow, just like in Safari on Mac OS X or Windows. When finished tap on the blue “Done” button and the search phrase will no longer be highlighted.

Find on Page in Safari for iPhone

This is the same for iPhone and iPod touch, though it’s a bit easier on the iPad, where the Find On Page item is attached to the top of the onscreen iOS keyboard.

With Apple simplifying the Safari UI within OS X Mountain Lion to include an omnibar, we should probably expect this feature in iOS to change slightly with it and adopt the same omnibar. If that happens, chances are you’ll just tap in the universal bar to perform the same functionality.

Source:  osxdaily.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Have you ever noticed that when you launch Safari on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, before you can really use the app it often has to refresh the last active web page? This slows down your browsing, and while on newer hardware it doesn’t happen too often and it’s not a terribly long delay, on the iPhone 3G and older iPod touch it’s dreadfully slow.

A simple solution to speed up Safari in iOS is to load a blank page by bookmarking one, here’s how to do 

launch-safari-faster-iphone1

  • Tap on Safari to launch the app
  • Tap onto the URL field and type “about:blank” and then choose “Open” – this loads a blank page in Safari
  • Now tap on the bottom Share arrow icon and select “Add to Home Screen” to create a bookmark
  • Label this something like “New Safari” and tap on “Add”

You’ll now find a blank white Safari icon on your iOS home screen, drag this to where ever you’ll use it (even the iOS dock to replace Safari if you want), and now when you tap on that white bookmark, Safari will load almost instantly since it no longer has to refresh the last visited page and instead it just loads a blank white page.

As I mentioned earlier, this is a great tip for older hardware in particular, especially anyone coping with the painfully slow experience of iOS 4+ on an iPhone 3G or an older iPod touch.

The only real downside is that the white icon isn’t as attractive as the Safari default icon, this can’t be changed unless you’re jailbroken.

This tip comes from MacWorld via Carlos, thanks for the submission!

Source:  osxdaily.com

Categorized in Science & Tech

Apple's Safari is a great web browser, but there are many reasons why you may want to use another one on your iPhone or iPad (or even on your Mac). You may use Google services a lot, and find that Chrome helps you be more efficient; or you might want to use another browser because it's faster, or because it offers more privacy.

It's easy to switch browsers on OS X, but it's not that simple on iOS. You can't change the default web browser on Apple's iPhone or iPad devices, so any links you tap will open in Safari. But you can use another browser when you manually search, enter addresses, use bookmarks, or by copying links instead of tapping them, and then pasting them into the browser of your choice.

Here's a look at seven web browsers for iOS. I compare their specific features, and review why you might want to use one of these alternatives instead of Safari. Try them out and see which one works best for you!

Google Chrome

chrome


If you're an inveterate Google user, then you may want to switch to Google Chrome on your iPhone or iPad. Chrome syncs across your devices, so, if you sign into your Google account, you can access your bookmarks, and open tabs you've opened on other devices, including your Mac, PC, iPhone, or iPad. Its Incognito Mode lets you surf privately, without saving your browsing history. You can also use Google voice search.

The feature I like best is the Data Saver. If you turn this on, Chrome compresses web pages before loading them. If you use your iOS device on cell networks a lot, this will save time downloading data, and save money (or make your data plan last longer). Chrome is fast and easy to use, and free.

iCab Mobile

icab

 

The $2 iCab Mobile is chock full of interesting features. In fact, at first glance, it seems like it has a bit too many options. It has URL filters to block web ads (which can save you time and data), has a download manager, supports multiple users, private browsing, fullscreen reading, and tabs. It has a built-in RSS reader, cookie manager, and you can save web pages for offline reading. It's stable and reliable, and is regularly updated. It also installs a share service, so you can view a web page in Safari, tap the Share button, and choose to open that page in iCab.

iCab Mobile can be a bit complex to get used to, and its buttons and settings can be a bit off-putting. But it's definitely a browser for power users. If that's you, then iCab Mobile might be the browser you need.

Opera Mini

opera-mini

 

The free Opera Mini is probably the only web browser that works on all mobile phones. There are iOS, Android, and Windows Phone versions, and it even works on "basic phones." You can create an Opera Link account and sync bookmarks across your devices. One of this browser's marquee features is its Video Boost feature, which compresses videos, saving you time and data. It also compresses web pages, making slow connections a lot faster, with one of two settings: Opera Mini and Opera Turbo.

Opera Mini also has a Discover feature, which is a built-in selection of news articles by topic. It's not as detailed as, say, Flipboard or Google News, but you may find that it gives you the news you need.

Opera Coast

opera-coast

Opera also has another iOS browser, Opera Coast. It does away with all the widgets other browsers have: there's no address bar, there are no buttons (you swipe to move around), and you save your favorites sites as tiles on its home screen. You can search using Google, of course, but the power of this browser lies in the way it gives you easy access to the sites you visit most. Opera Coast is uncluttered, and, if you only visit a handful of sites, it's a great way to access the web.

Ghostery

ghostery

Ghostery, a free browser, is for users who are annoyed by how much they're tracked on the web. When you load a web page in Ghostery, you tap the app's ghost icon to see a list of trackers on that page. You can turn off tracking for any of the specific trackers, web bugs, pixels, and beacons, then reload the page. Over time, Ghostery develops a list of the trackers you don't like and prevents them from loading.

Turning off trackers not only protects your privacy, but it can also make web pages load more quickly. When you load a page, your browser has to contact every server that provides content to the page. If there are a couple dozen trackers, you need to connect to that many servers. Ghostery isn't the most feature-laden browser; it does one thing, and does it well.

Intego Rook

rook

If you've got kids, you might not want them to be able to browse just any website, and you may want to monitor their browsing activity. These days, it's common for parents to control what their children can see online, only allowing content that's age-appropriate by limiting access to sites you've approved. Rook, part of Intego's Family Protector parental controls for iOS, lets you choose exactly what your kids can access on the web. You can configure it on a website, from any computer or mobile device, and you can see where your kids have been browsing.

Intego Rook filters web content, blocks web pages you don't want your kids to see, and lets you even turn off web access when your kids should be doing their homework. And, with Intego Family Protector, you can do much more to control what your kids can do with their iOS devices.

Source : intego

Categorized in Search Engine

From video glitches to memory leaks, today’s browser bugs are harder to pin down, even as they slow the web to a crawl

Web browsers are amazing. If it weren’t for browsers, we wouldn’t be able to connect nearly as well with users and customers by pouring our data and documents into their desktops, tablets, and phones. Alas, all of the wonderful content delivered by the web browser makes us that much more frustrated when the rendering isn’t as elegant or bug-free as we would like.

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When it comes to developing websites, we’re as much at the mercy of browsers as we are in debt to them. Any glitch on any platform jumps out, especially when it crashes our users’ machines. And with design as such a premium for standing out or fitting in, any fat line or misapplied touch of color destroys the aesthetic experience we’ve labored to create. Even the tiniest mistake, like adding an extra pixel to the width of a line or misaligning a table by a bit, can result in a frustrating user experience, not to mention the cost of discovering, vetting, and working around it.

Of course, it used to be worse. The vast differences between browsers have been largely erased by allegiance to W3C web standards. And the differences that remain can be generally ignored, thanks to the proliferation of libraries like jQuery, which not only make JavaScript hacking easier but also paper over the ways that browsers aren’t the same.

These libraries have a habit of freezing browser bugs in place. If browser companies fix some of their worst bugs, the new “fixes” can disrupt old patches and work-arounds. Suddenly the “fix” becomes the problem that’s disrupting the old stability we’ve jerry-rigged around the bug. Programmers can’t win.

The stability brought by libraries like jQuery has also encouraged browser builders to speed up and automate their browser updating processes. Mozilla is committedto pushing out a new version of Firefox every few months. In the past, each version would be a stable target for web developers, and we could put a little GIF on our sites claiming that they work best in, say, IE5. Now the odometer turns so quickly that a new version of Firefox will be released in the time it takes the HTML to travel from the server to the client.

Meanwhile, we ask the browsers to do so much more. My local newspaper’s website brings my machine to its knees -- expanding popover ads, video snippets that autoplay, code to customize ads to my recent browsing history. If my daughter looks at a doll website, the JavaScript is frantically trying to find a doll ad to show me. All this magic gums up the CPU.

All of this means that today’s browser bugs are rarer but harder to pin down. Here’s a look at the latest genres of browser bugs plaguing -- or in many cases, simply nagging -- web designers and developers.

Layout

The most visible browser bugs are layout glitches. Mozilla’s Bugzilla database of bugs has 10 sections for layout problems, and that doesn’t include layout issues categorized as being related to the DOM, CSS, or Canvas. The browser’s most important job is to arrange the text and images, and getting it right is often hard. 

Many layout bugs can seem small to the point of being almost esoteric. Bugzilla bug 1303580, for instance, calls out Firefox for using the italic version of a font when CSS tags call for oblique. Perhaps only a font addict would notice that. Meanwhile Bugzilla bug 1296269 reports that parts of the letters in Comic Sans are chopped off, at least on Windows. Font designers make a distinction, and it matters to them. When they can’t get the exact right look and feel across all browsers, web designers can become perhaps a bit overly frustrated.

There are hundreds, thousands, perhaps even millions of these bugs. At InfoWorld, we’ve encountered issues with images disappearing in our CMS editor and span tags that appear in only the DOM.

Memory leaks

It’s often hard to notice the memory leaks. By definition, they don’t change any visible properties. The website is rendered correctly, but the browser doesn’t clean up after the fact. A few too many trips to websites that trigger the leak and your machine slows to a crawl because all the RAM is locked up holding a data structure that will never be repurposed. Thus, the OS frantically swaps blocks of virtual memory to disk and you spend your time waiting. The best choice is to reboot your machine. 

The details of memory leak bugs can be maddeningly arcane, and we’re lucky that some programmers take the time to fix them. Consider issue 640578 from the Chronium browser stack. Changing a part of the DOM by fiddling with the innerHTMLproperty leaks memory. A sample piece of code with a tight repeated loop calling requestAnimationFrame will duplicate the problem. There are dozens of issues like this.

Of course, it’s not always the browser’s fault. Chromium issue 640922, for instance, also details a memory leak and provides an example. Further analysis, though, shows that the example code was creating Date() objects along the way to test the time, and they were probably the source of the problem.

Flash

It’s pretty much official. Everyone has forgotten about the wonderful anti-aliased artwork and web videos that Adobe Flash brought to the web. We instead blame it for all of the crashes that may or may not have been its fault. Now it’s officially being retired, but it’s not going quickly. Even some of the most forward-thinking companies pushing web standards still seem to have Flash code in their pages. I’m surprised how often I find Flash code outside of MySpace and GeoCities websites.

Touches and clicks

It’s not easy to juggle the various types of input, especially now that tablets and phones generate touches that may or may not act like a mouse click. It shouldn’t be surprising then to find there are plenty of bugs in this area. The Bootstrap JavaScript framework keeps a hit list of its most infuriating bugs, and some of the worst fall in this category.

Safari, for instance, will sometimes miss finger taps on the text in the <body> tag (151933). Sometimes the <select> menus don’t work on the iPad because the browser has shifted the rectangle for looking for input (150079). Sometimes the clicks trigger a weird wiggle in the item -- which might even look like it was done on purpose by an edgy designer (158276). All of these lead to confusion when the text or images on the screen don’t react the way we expect.

Video

The plan has always been to simplify the delivery of audio and video by moving the responsibility inside the browser and out of the world of plugins. This has eliminated interface issues, but it hasn’t removed all the problems. The list of video bugs is long, and many of them are all too visible. Bugzilla entry 754753 describes “mostly red and green splotches that contain various ghost images,” and Bugzilla entry 1302991 “’stutters’ for lack of a better word.” 

Some of the most complex issues are emerging as the browsers integrate the various encryption mechanisms designed to prevent piracy. Bug 1304899 suggests that Firefox isn’t automatically downloading the right encryption mechanism (EME) from Adobe. Is it Firefox’s fault? Adobe’s? Or maybe a weird proxy?

Video bugs are going to continue to dominate. Integrating web video with other forms of content by adding video tags to HTML5 has opened up many new possibilities for designers, but each new possibility means new opportunities for bugs and inconsistencies to appear.

Hovering

The ability for the web page to follow the mouse moving across the page helps web designers give users hints about what features might be hidden behind an image or word. Alas, hovering events don’t always make their way up the chain as quickly as they could.

The new Microsoft Edge browser, for instance, doesn’t hide the cursor when the mouse is hovering over some <select> input items (817822). Sometimes the hovering doesn’t end (5381673). Sometimes the hover event is linked to the wrong item (7787318). All of this leads to confusion and discourages the use of a pretty neat effect.

Malware

While it’s tempting to lay all of the blame for browser bugs on browser developers, it’s often unfair. Many of the problems are caused by malware designed to pose as useful extensions or plugins. In many cases, the malware does something truly useful while secretly stealing clicks or commerce in the background.

The problem is that the extension interface is pretty powerful. An extension can insert arbitrary tags and code into all websites. In the right hands, this is very cool, but it’s easy to see how the new code from the extension can bump into the code from the website. What? You didn’t want to redefine the behavior of the $ function?

This isn’t so much a bug as a deep, philosophical problem with a very cool feature. But with great power comes great responsibility -- perhaps greater than any extension programmer can muster. The best way to look at this issue is to realize it’s the one area where we, the users, have control. We can turn off extensions and limit them to only a few websites where there are no issues. The API is a bit too powerful for everyday use -- so powerful that it’s tempting to call extensions APIs the biggest bugs of all. But that would deny everything it does for us.

Source : infoworld

Categorized in Search Engine

Tor Browser 6.0.5

Tor Browser 6.0.5 is now available for download. The latest release of the Tor dark web browser comes with a number of improvements, one of which is a crucial security update.

Tor Browser 6.0.5 Addresses Mozilla Vulnerability

tor-browser-fixes-certificate-pinning-issue-but-bug-remains-in-firefox

Users will be glad to see that the new version comes with a bug fix in Mozilla Firefox – recently discovered extension update vulnerability.

There was a security loophole that allowed attackers with valid addons.mozilla.org certificates to masquerade as legit Mozilla servers in an effort to spread malicious updates – something that could potentially cause arbitrary code execution and also cause problems in Firefox’s default methods of handling certificate pinning.

Certificate pinning is a crucial HTTPS feature that protects the user’s SSL certificates from attacks by accepting only a specific certificate key per domain or subdomain and rejecting the rest.

Independent security researcher Ryan Duff posted a report which pointed out the vulnerability in most of the Firefox stable versions save for one nightly build that was released on the 4th of September 2016.

His report also indicates that the security vulnerabilities on Firefox stem from the use of a static key instead of the more secure HPKP method.

Access to a legit Mozilla certificate is hard to gain for the ordinary hacker.

According to security expert @movrcx, who stumbled upon the vulnerability, an attacker would need a minimum of $100,000 to pull off a successful man-in-the-middle attack.

Resourceful parties such as nation states can still carry out MITM attacks and compromise the anonymity of the Tor network.

New Upgrades

tor-browser-6-0-5

Apart from fixing the vulnerabilities discovered on Firefox, Tor Browser 6.0.5 also includes a stable version (0.2.8.7) and an update of the HTTPS-Everywhere (5.2.4).

The new version of the browser also fixes a number of other minor bugs such as site security clearing during New Identity, the storage of browser data in the home directory and the bug that caused the “Maximizing Tor Browser” notification to appear severally.

Alpha and Hardened Bundles to Follow Soon

Currently underway is the building of the alpha (6.5a3) and the hardened (6.5a3-hardened) bundles for alpha and hardened channel users.

Available for Windows, Mac, and Linux OS

The Tor Project has made significant steps to tackle its existing security loopholes and various administrative road bumps. It remains the most sought after means of obtaining anonymity.

The latest release is currently available for Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux platforms. To enhance user anonymity, it is well capable of running off a portable USB flash drive.

Source : https://darkwebnews.com

Categorized in Deep Web

Since 2010, Microsoft has been running the Bing Rewards program: Just do your searches with Microsoft's Bing search engine, and you can earn points towards Starbucks and Amazon gift cards, Hulu subscriptions, and other such prizes.

Earn some extra cash using Edge

Now, Microsoft is rebranding the program to Microsoft Rewards, and instead of just Bing, Microsoft wants to reward you for using Microsoft Edge - the web browser that comes Windows 10, and the successor to Internet Explorer.

So long as you're actively using Microsoft Edge - characterized as having the Edge window open and actually using it to browse the web, not simply having it open in the background - you'll accumulate points that can be redeemed for prizes, up to 30 hours' worth a month.

While Windows 10 is on more than 350 million active devices, the Edge browser hasn't quite made the success that Microsoft had hoped for. Current numbers place Edge usage at a just over 4.2% of the overall browser market. So now, Microsoft wants to give users a little incentive every time they use Edge.

The catch

There's one major proviso here, too. Despite the rebranding, you need to use Microsoft Bing as your default search engine in order to reap Microsoft Rewards points. If you change your default to Google, Yahoo, or any other search engine, your points won't accumulate. If you want points, you require Bing.

Don't worry about your privacy

Finally, Microsoft says that they're only tracking your activities when Edge is open, and not what websites you're visiting or any information you're entering. Microsoft Rewards will also ask before it begins tracking Edge usage, so it won't activate without your authorization. Your privacy matters more to them than anything else, it seems.

It's all up to you!

If that's still too much for you, especially in light of past Windows 10 privacy scandals, well, you can carry on browsing the way you've been browsing. But Microsoft's aspiration to make Edge into a noteworthy market force could make it a lot easier for you to fill your pockets. Besides, Microsoft Edge may just be the best way to watch Netflix on a laptop.

Source : http://www.itechpost.com/articles/29628/20160914/microsoft-paying-people-use-edge-web-browser.htm

Categorized in Search Engine

As far as the most users are concerned, privacy on the web is an important consideration. Iridium is a free Chromium-based web browser which focuses more on the privacy and identity protection of the user and also provides all the features of Google Chrome. The modifications made here make sure that you always are protected and secure and there is no loop holes to your privacy while you browse the web.

Iridium browser for Windows PC

Iridium-browser-for-Windows-PC

If you go deep down to settings, you will notice a CryptoTokenExtension. The details about that extension are not really specified but it seems to be something concerned with encrypting the information sent through the browser. You can view the permissions granted to this extension under the settings tab.

All the basic functionalities and support system remains the same as that of Google Chrome browser. You can sign in with your Google account and sync bookmarks and other settings easily over other instances of Google Chrome or Iridium.

There are several other policy changes and modifications that are privacy and security based. To view them all you need to access the Git repository.

Windows-PC

 

Iridium changes the default search engine from Google to Qwant, which is again a privacy based search engine that lets you search the web without leaving out on privacy.

In short, Iridium is Google Chrome with privacy features. The entire project is open sourced and the public Git repository lets you view all the changes made to the code over time. If you are a geek and an enthusiast, you can check out the entire code of the project to clearly understand how the modifications have been made and how this alternative browser really works.

Source : http://www.thewindowsclub.com/iridium-browser-windows 

Categorized in Search Engine

Say goodbye to Flash and hello to a pure HTML5 experience when Google rolls out the next update to its Chrome browser. In September Google will release Chrome 53, which will be designed to block Flash.

Most Flash on the web today is never even seen, as Google points out 90% of it is loaded behind the scenes. However, this type of Flash can slow down your web browsing experience, which is the reason behind Google’s decision to block it.

In Google’s words:

HTML5 is much lighter and faster, and publishers are switching over to speed up page loading and save you more battery life. You’ll see an improvement in responsiveness and efficiency for many sites.

Google began to de-emphasize Flash last September, when Flash content started being served on a click-to-play basis, rather than autoplaying in the browser. Following the positive effect of that change, Google appears to be all but removing Flash from its browser completely.

The company even announced a future update coming this December where HTML5 will become the default experience on Chrome. Sites that only support Flash will still be accessible in Chrome, but users will first be prompted to enable it.

What was once synonymous with in-browser gaming, entertainment, and cutting edge web design, Adobe Flash has been outshone by competing technologies which are lighter, faster, and easier on your device’s battery life.

The two companies will continue to work together, with Adobe said to be assisting Google with its efforts to transition the web to HTML5.

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/googles-chrome-browser-block-flash-starting-september/170548/ 

Categorized in Search Engine

TinEye and Google Image Search are both good for doing reverse image searches, and the two websites are different enough to be complementary. But there are other options including browser extensions and smartphone apps....

There are lots of reasons for using reverse image search - see my earlier post, Here's why you and your business should use reverse image search - and quite a few ways to do it. The main ones are the TinEye and Google Image Search websites, both of which are free. Depending on your location, needs and personal preferences, you might also want to try Baidu, Yandex, Bing Image Match, Image Raider or some other service.

But if you're new to reverse image searching, I suggest you start with TinEye and Google. I use both, because they are different enough to complement one another. TinEye has better features. Google Image Search generally has a bigger, fresher database, though it doesn't find all the images that TinEye knows about.

Basically, TineEye has the smart guys while Google has the web crawlers.

TinEye wins mainly on sorting features. You can order TinEye's results by newest first or oldest first, by size, by the best match, or by the most changed. I'm often trying to find the oldest version posted, to authenticate a particular photograph.

TinEye's results often show a variety of closely related images, because some versions have been edited or adapted. Sometimes you find your searched-for picture is a small part of a larger image, which is very useful: you can switch to searching for the whole thing. TinEye is also good at finding versions of images that haven't had logos added, which is another step closer to the original.

The main drawback with TinEye is that some of the search results are a couple of years old, and when you follow the link, either the image or the page or even the whole website has disappeared. In such cases, I use the TinEye result to run a Google Image search.

Google Image Search finds web pages rather than images. If you're doing a reverse image search, it's usually more useful to look for the link that says "Find other sizes of this image" and click on "All sizes".

By default, Google displays the most exact matches in descending order of size, and the links to the sources are hidden until you click an image. You can try to make it work more like TinEye by selecting "Visually similar" from the drop-down menu, but this includes images that have nothing at all to do with the original. For most purposes, this is a waste of time.

Worse, Google can't sort images by date. As with text searches, you get options such as "Past week" and "Custom range", but these are tedious to use, and don't seem very reliable.

However, Google does some very good things that TinEye doesn't. The key features are search by type (Face, Photo, Line drawing etc) and search by usage rights. It's very useful to be able to search for images that are "labelled for reuse with modification" or "labelled for non-commercial reuse" or whatever. Handled with care, this could be a money-saver.

With a bit of experiment, some combination of TinEye and Google Image Search should meet most of your needs. If not, there are other options.

I generally use the browser extensions for TinEye and Google. These perform a reverse image search when you right-click an online image and select "search [service] with this image" or something similar. This is quicker than uploading an image from a hard drive or pasting in a web link, though you can do those things too.

Browser extensions include Google's Search by Image for Google (Chrome, Firefox), TinEye Reverse Image Search (Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, Internet Explorer), and Bing Image Match (Chrome). Third-party options include Google Reverse Image Search (Firefox, not written by Google), Search Image by Bing (Firefox, not written by Microsoft) and Who stole my pictures? (Firefox). You may be able to find more. I haven't tried all of them.

Apple iPhone users can do reverse image searches with apps such as Veracity and Microsoft's official Bing app. There's also a Search By Image app for Android. Of course, you can also use Google Image Search in the Chrome browser on a smartphone. Press and hold the image, and when the box appears, touch "Search Google for this image".

Finally, there's a useful image search engine for Reddit, called Karma Decay. If you use Reddit, you will know that some amusing images are reposted on a regular basis. Karma Decay finds them all.

This is more useful than it sounds. Redditors comment on most of these images, and their comments often include links to sources and sometimes explanations. If you are, like me, trying to authenticate images, these links and comments can save quite a lot of work.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/reverse-image-searching-made-easy/

Categorized in Search Engine
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