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Ever Google search for your own name? Even if you haven’t, there’s a good chance that a friend, family member or potential employer will at some point. And when they do, do you know everything that they’ll find?

Google is chock full of personal information you may not always want public. Whether it’s gathered by the search engine itself or scummy people-search websites, you have a right to know what kind of data other people can access when they look up your name. Tap or click here to see how to remove yourself from people search sites.

 

What others see about you online can mean the difference in landing a job or spending more time looking for one. If you want to take control of your reputation online, here’s why you need to start searching for yourself before others beat you to it.

Use exact phrases to find more than mentions

To get started with searching yourself on Google, it’s important to know how to search for exact phrases. This means telling Google you want to look up the words you typed exactly as you typed them — with no splitting terms or looking up one word while ignoring others.

To do this, simply search for your name (or any term) in quotation marks. As an example, look up “Kim Komando” and include quotation marks. Now, Google won’t show results for Kim Kardashian along with Komando.com.

Using exact phrases will weed out results for other people with similar names to yours. If you have a more common name, you may have to go through several pages before finding yourself.

If you aren’t finding anything or your name is very common, use your name plus modifiers like the city or state you live in, the names of your school(s), the name of the company you work for or other details. Make note of anything that you don’t feel comfortable with others finding and either write down the web addresses or bookmark them.

A picture says a thousand words

After you’ve saved the websites you want to go over, switch over to Google’s Image Search and scan through any pictures of you. It’s much easier to look through hundreds of images quickly versus hundreds of links, and you might be surprised at the images and websites you find.

If you find an image that concerns you, you can run a reverse image search to see where it’s hosted. To do this, follow these steps:

  • Open Google Image Search and click the Camera icon in the search bar
  • Paste a link to the image or upload the image you want to search for.
  • Your results will be shown as a combination of images and relevant websites. If an exact match is found, it will populate at the top of your results.

If the image has no text on it or any identifying information, don’t worry. Your image can turn up even if it only has your face.

Where you are and where you’ve been

Next, you’ll want to run a search for your past and current email addresses and phone numbers. This helps you see which sites have access to this personal data and will also show you what others can find if they look this information up.

 

If you’ve ever signed up for a discussion board or forum with your personal email address, your post history could easily show up if someone Googles you. The same can be said for social media pages and blogs. Find and make note of any posts or content that you’d prefer to make private.

Finally, run a search for your social media account usernames. Try to remember any usernames you may have used online and look those up. For example, if you search for the username “kimkomando,” you’ll turn up Kim’s Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram accounts.

If you can’t remember, try searching for your name (as an exact phrase in quotation marks) plus the social network you want to look up. This might reveal accounts that you forgot about or that are less private than you think. If your real name is visible anywhere, it probably falls into this category.

Keep track going forward

If you want to stay on top of information that pops up about you on social media (or the rest of the web), you can set up a free Google Alert for your name. It’s an easy way to keep tabs on your online reputation.

Here’s how to set up a Google Alert for your name:

  • Visit Google.com/alerts and type what you want Google to alert you about in the search bar.
  • Click Show options to change settings for frequency, sources, language and region. You can also specify how many results you want and where you want them delivered.
  • Click Create Alert to start receiving alerts on yourself or other search topics you’re interested in.

Bonus: What does Google know about me?

And last but not least, let’s take a moment to address data that Google itself keeps on you. By default, Google records every search you enter, your location (if you use Google Maps), video-watching history and searches from YouTube, and much more.

Anyone who knows your Google Account email and digs deep enough can learn plenty about your online activities. If you haven’t visited your Google Account and privacy settings in a while, now’s the time to do it.

Now that you’ve searched for yourself and taken note of content that people can see if they look you up, it’s time to take things a step further and actually remove any data that you don’t want public. Want to know how? Just follow along for part two of our guide to Google-searching yourself.

[Source: This article was published in komando.com By KOMANDO STAFF - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

Bug causes search UI to display random Bing results

We’ve known for a while that integrating the web search in the default Windows 10 search experience isn’t necessarily the best way to go, but here’s more evidence in this regard if you still needed it.

Some users are now seeing random web results in the search box whenever they search for a specific keyword. By the looks of things, the displayed Bing results have nothing to do with the keyword that was provided in the search box.

Several Windows 10 users have confirmed in this reddit thread that the bug happens on their devices too, and some say that a simple reboot of the computer fixes the whole thing.

 

In one case, simply searching for “S” in the Windows 10 search UI indeed provides a link to the Settings app, but the web search returns results that have nothing to with such a term. One of the results is a Wikipedia link for the “W” keyword.

Just disable Bing results

At this point, it’s not exactly clear what’s happening, but if a system reboot doesn’t bring things to normal, you can just disable Bing results from the Windows 10 search experience completely.

To do this, just launch the Registry Editor and look for the following path:

Computer\HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Explorer

Just create a new DWORD (if it’s not there already) that is called DisableSearchBoxSuggestions and then set its value to 1. Reboot your computer and the web search results should no longer be offered in the Windows 10 search experience.

The aforementioned bug seems to be happening on all Windows 10 versions, including the May 2020 Update whose rollout is still under way. There’s a chance that the bug is caused by a server problem, as the recent cumulative updates are unlikely to be the ones to blame for the whole thing.

 

[Source: This article was published in news.softpedia.com By Bogdan Popa - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dorothy Allen]

Categorized in Internet Search

Google accounts for nearly 96% of the market share of serps globally, in line with Statista. They’re adopted by far, Bing (2.7%) and Yahoo! (1.14%). Though they’re complicated serps, a few of their strategies are related to people who Archie started utilizing 30 years in the past, which is taken into account the primary search engine on the Web. It was developed even earlier than the World Broad Internet existed and was supposed to find information saved on FTP (file switch protocol) servers.

“Archie’s principal distinction with different serps like Google or Yahoo! is that it was not an online search engine. It was a search engine for FTP servers, that’s, servers the place there have been information ”, explains Fernando Suárez, president of the Council of Official Colleges of Computer Engineering (CCII). Its creation was some of the excellent advances within the subject of computing in 2020. That is the way it considers it the School of Computer Engineering of the University of Oviedo, which explains that earlier than 1990 customers may solely entry the net utilizing the FTP protocols: “This made searching extraordinarily difficult as we perceive it at the moment, since to entry a website you needed to know the server on which it was positioned ”.

 

Due to this fact, in line with Suárez recollects, till then it was “virtually unimaginable” to find a file if one didn’t know precisely the place it was. Archie, which allowed information to be discovered by identify, was used primarily “in universities and academia.” The fundamental operation was just like that of the various search engines which might be used at the moment, however not an identical: “It’s not in regards to the titles of FTP information, however in regards to the world Broad Internet. Now the various search engines undergo all of the webs in quest of content material, not solely in search of the identify of the web page ”.

Behind this search engine, was Alan Emtage. He’s a founding member of the Web Society, is a part of the Internet Hall of Fame and is a associate in a New York-based internet improvement firm known as Mediapolis. Again then, about 30 years in the past, I used to be a younger man from Barbados finding out Laptop Science on the McGill University in Montreal (Canada). Whereas finding out, he created Archie, whose identify derives from the phrase archive. It consisted of a set of packages that searched the repositories of software program of the Web and created a sort of index of the obtainable software program. That’s, a database through which the identify of a file might be positioned.

Emtage wasn’t the one particular person engaged on an Web search engine within the late Eighties, however Archie was the primary to be publicly distributed, in line with McGill College. And it laid the inspiration for future seekers. “Archie developed the rules on which these serps work, that are principally going out, retrieving data, indexing it and permitting folks to go looking,” explains Emtage within the Web of the College.

Suárez says that entry to the Web at the moment was very restricted. However, amongst those that may entry, it signifies that it was widespread to make use of Archie. He himself used it when he was finding out Laptop Engineering at college to seek out information with data on the right way to apply for internships or work. “It was attainable to do international searches however all you discovered was textual content, there weren’t the graphical environments that we’ve got at the moment and lots of instances you downloaded paperwork that weren’t what you needed,” he provides.

The altruistic web

On the time, in line with the engineer, Archie was “an ideal revolution.” “One thing nearly science fiction. Looking for documentation virtually on a common stage was like magic, “he says. However later “it stopped making sense when the net appeared and there started to be different kinds of serps.” Each the Web and serps have modified since then. Emtage is anxious about privateness points and the rise in customized searches with which corporations try to interpret what a person may need. “Google can take away complete elements of the search area that it might suppose you do not need to see, however [esas partes] They may comprise beneficial data that you just won’t be able to acquire now. And they’ll do it with out your data ”, explains the creator of Archie.

However there are some points of the Web and serps that you just do like, and a few of them nonetheless stay. Emtage, in a speech he gave in 2017 Upon becoming a member of the Web Corridor of Fame, he underscored that a part of the spirit of altruism that was outstanding 30 years in the past nonetheless exists. “The Web as we all know it at the moment wouldn’t exist if it weren’t for the truth that most of the organizations and individuals who labored on it at the moment freely allowed the fruit of their work to be distributed without spending a dime,” he mentioned. And he careworn that at the moment there may be nonetheless a lot of the Web that runs on open supply software program to which programmers and engineers from everywhere in the world freely contribute.

As well as, he recalled a dialog about 30 years in the past with engineer Vinton Cerf, thought of one of many fathers of the Web: “He jokingly mentioned to me: Why do not you patent the strategies you might be utilizing in Archie for the search engine? We thought of it fastidiously and got here to the conclusion that if we did, we’d prohibit folks’s capability to make use of what we had created and increase it. “

 

[Source: This article was published in pledgetimes.com By Bhavi Mandalia - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine
Although both the deep web and dark web are the hidden sections of the internet, they are not synonymous and should not be confused with each other

The terms ‘dark web’ and ‘deep web’ are often interchangeably used to describe the section of the internet that is home to criminal activities. To understand the difference between the dark web and the deep web, we must understand the different layers of the internet, as detailed below.

Surface web: The first layer of the World Wide Web is the surface web, which is also known as the visible web or the clear web. It comprises websites that are indexed by common search engines such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and so on. These websites are available for public access without requiring permissions. It is believed that the surface web constitutes only 3-4% of the entire World Wide Web; however, according to Wikipedia, the figure stands at 10%. This means the millions of search results conducted every second are but a minuscule percentage of the overall internet!

 

Deep web: A step further below the surface web is the deep web. The deep web is estimated to be nearly 500 times the size of the surface web or 90% of the entire internet. This section of the internet comprises websites and data that are not indexed. They are protected from search engines and crawlers by way of encryption.

Any data behind a firewall, be it data servers, organizational intranets, or archives, belong to the deep web. A website in the deep web would require you to enter your unique username and password combination to access. Probably, the simplest examples of a website in the deep web can be web-based email, social media platform, online banking, or web-based subscription service. That brings us to the question – whether the deep web is illegal to foray into? The answer is No.

Dark web: The deepest layer of the World Wide Web is called the dark web. Although a part of the deep web, dark web goes further deep. It is a subset of the deep web and the key difference between the two is that the deep web can be home to both good and bad data, whereas the dark web is mostly illicit.

As per some estimates, the dark web probably constitutes only 0.1% of the entire internet but is the hotbed for many illegal activities. The dark web can be termed the underbelly of the internet, as it facilitates crimes such as sale/purchase of stolen data, fake identity proofs, porn, drug trafficking, contract killers, sale of arms and ammunition, and so forth.

It is the infamous part of the internet where data is intentionally hidden and criminal activities are rampant. It requires special software – such as The Onion Browser (Tor), Freenet, or I2P (Invisible Internet Project) – to access the dark web. This is because the dark web can be accessed only by anonymous users, which common browsers do not allow. Common browsers track the IP address of the users and hence enable identification of the user – something which is undesirable in the dark web.

Access to the dark web is not illegal but is fraught with numerous risks. Therefore, it is recommended to stay away from the dark web, as it can be highly dangerous.

[Source: This article was published in dqindia.com By Neetu Katyal - Uploaded by the Association Member: Deborah Tannen]

Categorized in Deep Web

Searching online has many educational benefits. For instance, one study found students who used advanced online search strategies also had higher grades at university.

But spending more time online does not guarantee better online skills. Instead, a student’s ability to successfully search online increases with guidance and explicit instruction.

Young people tend to assume they are already competent searchers. Their teachers and parents often assume this too. This assumption, and the misguided belief that searching always results in learning, means much classroom practice focuses on searching to learn, rarely on learning to search.

Many teachers don’t explictly teach students how to search online. Instead, students often teach themselves and are reluctant to ask for assistance. This does not result in students obtaining the skills they need.

 

For six years, I studied how young Australians use search engines. Both school students and home-schoolers (the nation’s fastest-growing educational cohort) showed some traits of online searching that aren’t beneficial. For instance, both groups spent greater time on irrelevant websites than relevant ones and regularly quit searches before finding their desired information.

Here are three things young people should keep in mind to get the full benefits of searching online.

1. Search for more than just isolated facts

Young people should explore, synthesise and question information on the internet, rather than just locating one thing and moving on.

Search engines offer endless educational opportunities but many students typically only search for isolated facts. This means they are no better off than they were 40 years ago with a print encyclopedia.

It’s important for searchers to use different keywords and queries, multiple sites and search tabs (such as news and images).

Part of my (as yet unpublished) PhD research involved observing young people and their parents using a search engine for 20 minutes. In one (typical) observation, a home-school family type “How many endangered Sumatran Tigers are there” into Google. They enter a single website where they read a single sentence.

The parent writes this “answer” down and they begin the next (unrelated) topic – growing seeds.

The student could have learned much more had they also searched for

  • where Sumatra is
  • why the tigers are endangered
  • how people can help them.

I searched Google using the keywords “Sumatran tigers” in quotation marks instead. The returned results offered me the ability to view National Geographic footage of the tigers and to chat live with an expert from the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) about them.

Clicking the “news” tab with this same query provided current media stories, including on two tigers coming to an Australian wildlife park and on the effect of palm oil on the species. Small changes to search techniques can make a big difference to the educational benefits made available online.

More can be learnt about Sumatran tigers with better search techniques. Source: Shutterstock

2. Slow down

All too often we presume search can be a fast process. The home-school families in my study spent 90 seconds or less, on average, viewing each website and searched a new topic every four minutes.

Searching so quickly can mean students don’t write effective search queries or get the information they need. They may also not have enough time to consider search results and evaluate websites for accuracy and relevance.

 

My research confirmed young searchers frequently click on only the most prominent links and first websites returned, possibly trying to save time. This is problematic given the commercial environment where such positions can be bought and given children tend to take the accuracy of everything online for granted.

Fast search is not always problematic. Quickly locating facts means students can spend time on more challenging educational follow-up tasks – like analysing or categorising the facts. But this is only true if they first persist until they find the right information.

3. You’re in charge of the search, not Google

Young searchers frequently rely on search tools like Google’s “Did you mean” function.

While students feel confident as searchers, my PhD research found they were more confident in Google itself. One Year Eight student explained: “I’m used to Google making the changes to look for me”.

Such attitudes can mean students dismiss relevant keywords by automatically agreeing with the (sometimes incorrect) auto-correct or going on irrelevant tangents unknowingly.

Teaching students to choose websites based on domain name extensions can also help ensure they are in charge, not the search engine. The easily purchasable “.com”, for example, denotes a commercial site while information on websites with a “.gov”(government) or “.edu” (education) domain name extension better assure quality information.

Search engines have great potential to provide new educational benefits, but we should be cautious of presuming this potential is actually a guarantee.

[Source: This article was published in studyinternational.com By The Conversation - Uploaded by the Association Member: Bridget Miller]

Categorized in Search Techniques

Sourcing great candidates is half the battle of recruiting. In order to hire the best person for the job, you need to identify, interview and pique the interest of the right people. It’s no easy feat, either — recruiters spend 13 hours on average sourcing candidates for a single role.

Using Boolean search in recruitment can to save time and improve the quality of your candidate pool, ultimately increasing the quality of your next hire. In this article, we’ll cover 11 essential Boolean search operators and five tips to success.

Boolean search is a query methodology that is used to broaden, narrow or refine search results. It was invented by George Boole, an English mathematician and author of The Mathematical Analysis of Logic (1847) and it has significantly influenced the evolution of the search-engine giant, Google. 

In recruitment, Boolean search helps to quickly and effectively locate ideal candidates for open roles. Similar to an “Advanced Search” function, Boolean search operators — words and symbols — allow you to include, exclude and tag specific keywords to carefully refine your search results. Ultimately, the goal of using Boolean search in recruitment is to hone in on broad topics — such as job titles or requirements — to identify a desirable, niche candidate pool. 

Ultimately, the goal of using Boolean search in recruitment is to hone in on broad topics — such as job titles or requirements — to identify a desirable, niche candidate pool.

Using Boolean search operators to create a complex search string, recruiters can locate a range of relevant candidates. In doing so, you minimize sourcing needs and improve the efficiency of your recruitment process

ADVANTAGES OF BOOLEAN SEARCH IN RECRUITMENT

We understand that as a tech recruiter in a highly competitive industry, your bandwidth is already at or quickly approaching capacity. So before you dedicate the time to learning new sourcing techniques, let’s review some of the advantages of Boolean search in recruitment.

  • Faster. It’s estimated that recruiters can identify 20-60 well-suited candidates for a given role per hour
  • Cost-effective. Job boards are great for networking, but they don’t always cater to a specific field or industry and can cost a pretty penny. This means recruiters have to individually sift through unqualified or irrelevant resumes to find the right candidates. Boolean search makes it easier to hone in on a specific set of candidates without having to pay a monthly subscription fee. 
  • More control. With a conceivably unlimited number of Boolean search string possibilities, recruiters can carefully customize how they source candidates and control the results.
  • Active recruiting method. While you can’t necessarily get away from posting job openings, it is somewhat of a passive recruitment tactic. You’re assuming that the right candidate will come to you, which is ideal, but less attainable for young companies just getting started. Boolean search allows recruiters to actively source candidates without draining their resources.

6 BASIC BOOLEAN SEARCH OPERATORS RECRUITERS SHOULD KNOW

To start creating complex Boolean search strings to improve your sourcing tactics, there are six essential operators you need to know. These can be used as many times as necessary in a search string and should be written in all-caps. Otherwise, they will be interpreted as part of your search string keywords, not as a Boolean search operator.

OPERATOR #1: AND

boolean-search-in-recruitment-and-operator
Image via Built In

Functionality: Includes multiple criteria in search results

When to Use It: Use the AND operator to narrow search results based on multiple requirements. 

 

Explanation: If you’re looking to hire a new software engineer, you’d use the AND operator to search for software AND engineer. The results you receive will include both “software” and “engineer.”  

Boolean Search Example

  • software AND engineer
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example01
Boolean Search Example: AND operator

OPERATOR #2: OR

boolean-search-in-recruitment-or-operator
Image via Built In

Functionality: Includes one or more criteria in search results

When to Use It: Use the OR operator to expand your search results. 

Explanation: Your developer role is still vacant. You’re familiar with the software engineer vs. developer debate, so you broaden your search results by using the OR operator to search for engineer OR developer. This will generate a results list that includes either “engineer” or “developer.”

Boolean Search Example

  • engineer OR developer
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example02
Boolean Search Example: OR operator

OPERATOR #3: NOT OR (-)

boolean-search-in-recruitment-not-operator
Image via Built In

Functionality: Excludes unwanted criteria from search results 

When to Use It: Use the NOT or (-) operator to narrow your search results by omitting unwanted criteria.

Explanation: Perhaps one of the most common and practical uses of Boolean search in recruitment is including the NOT operator to eliminate job postings; you’re looking for candidates to fill open roles, not a job seeker looking for a new position. To eliminate job postings and descriptions from your search results, include one or more of the following operators in your search string:

  • NOT job; -job
  • NOT jobs; -jobs
  • NOT hire; -hire
  • NOT hiring; -hiring

Use the (-) operator when searching on Google or LinkedIn, removing a space between the minus symbol and the keyword. 

Boolean Search Example

  • software engineer NOT job
  • software engineer -job
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example03
Boolean Search Example: NOT / - operator

When searching in Google using this Boolean search string, you may notice a jobs widget. Scroll past the widget to find the results that match your Boolean search criteria.

OPERATOR #4: BRACKETS ()

Functionality: Group search phrases and prioritize operators 

When to Use It: Use the brackets operator to include multiple operators without changing the search query. 

Explanation: Brackets maintain groupings and indicate priority. Let’s say we’re looking for either a software engineer or developer. Since engineers specialize in various disciplines — chemical, mechanical, biomechanical, etc. — and developers are often associated with construction, it’s important we include software in our search string. 

Without the brackets operator, the search string would look like this: software AND engineer OR developer NOT jobs. In this example, the search engine does not know which search to prioritize. Including brackets around engineer OR developer signals to the search engine to perform the engineer OR developer query first, then eliminate all results that do not include “software,” and all results relating to job, jobs, hire or hiring.

Boolean Search Example

  • software AND (engineer OR developer) -job -jobs -hire -hiring
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example04
Boolean Search Example: Brackets () operator

OPERATOR #5: QUOTATIONS “”

Functionality: Search for exact phrase

When to Use It: Use the quotations operator when you want results that include an exact phrase. 

Explanation: This is probably the search operator you’re most familiar with. We often use it when we’ve lost track of the source for a quote we like or when we need to find the name of a song we only remember a line or two of. 

However, when performing a Boolean search in recruitment, only use the quotations operator when you are confident in the exact phrase you’re looking for. Otherwise, you’ll unintentionally exclude a large pool of viable results. 

Boolean Search Example

Your team has decided that they are looking for a software engineer, not developer. To refine your search results, update your search query to the following: 

  • “software engineer” -job -jobs -hire -hiring
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example05
Boolean Search Example: Quotations "" operator

OPERATOR #6: ASTERISK *

Functionality: Search for variations of a root word

When to Use It: Use the asterisk operator to broaden your search results when you know there are multiple variations of a root word.

Example: To vastly expand your search results for a manager, searching for manag* will pull results like: manager, managed, managing, manages, management, managerial, etc.

Pay careful attention to where you truncate the root word as including an extra letter will modify your results. For example, searching for manage* will eliminate managing from the original list.  

Boolean Search Example

  • software AND (engineer OR developer) -job -jobs -hire -hiring AND manag*

boolean-search-in-recruitment-example06
Boolean Search Example: Asterisk * operator

SAMPLE STRING: BOOLEAN SEARCH IN RECRUITMENT

Now, let’s put these six operators to use and work backward to decode this search string.

  • software AND (engineer OR developer) -job -jobs -hire -hiring AND manag* AND (“Ruby on Rails” OR Ruby)
sample-string-boolean-search-in-recruitment
Sample String: Boolean Search in Recruitment

Our first two operators — software AND (engineer OR developer) — describe the role we’re looking for: a software engineer or software developer. We want individuals who meet this main requirement and who: 

 

  • Have management experience, but do not necessarily have “manager” in their title: AND manag*
  • Have experience working with Ruby languages: (“Ruby on Rails” OR Ruby)

We also want to eliminate all job postings for similar roles: -job -jobs -hire -hiring

boolean-search-in-recruitment-basic-operators
Image via Built In

5 ADVANCED BOOLEAN SEARCH OPERATORS

Once you feel confident in your ability to perform recruitment searches using the six basic Boolean operators, expand your skills using the following five advanced search functions. Note that unless the operator is shown in all-caps, it does not need to be capitalized in your search string.

ADVANCED OPERATOR #1: TILDE ~

Functionality: Search for synonyms of a word

When to Use It: Use the tilde (~) operator to expand your search results when including criteria that may be described in multiple ways.

Explanation: When sourcing candidates, you’re interested in resumes, not job descriptions. However, you don’t necessarily want to exclude candidates who have a CV or curriculum vitae. Add the tilde operator to your search string to include all three application documents within your search results.

Boolean Search Example

  • software AND (engineer OR developer) AND ~resume -job -jobs -hire -hiring AND manag* AND (“Ruby on Rails” OR Ruby)

boolean-search-in-recruitment-example07
Boolean Search Example: Tilde ~ operator

Just by adding the tilde (~) operator, we already see more applicable, candidate-driven results.

ADVANCED OPERATOR #2: NEAR

Functionality: Search for two words that appear within 1-10 words of each other in results

When to Use It: Use the NEAR operator to include a broader topic in your search results without unfavorably limiting them to an exact phrase. 

Explanation: If you want your software engineer candidates to have experience in web development, use the NEAR operator to include results that discuss web development and are not limited to “web development” exactly. 

 

As we discussed earlier, “develop” has many variations. To include results such as “web developer” or “developed multiple web pages,” use the asterisk operator on develop*. Include brackets to ensure the NEAR operator is interpreted properly.

Boolean Search Example

  • software AND (engineer OR developer) AND ~resume -job -jobs -hire -hiring AND manag* AND (“Ruby on Rails” OR Ruby) AND (web NEAR develop*)

boolean-search-in-recruitment-example08
Boolean Search Example: NEAR operator

ADVANCED OPERATOR #3: FILETYPE:

Functionality: Search for results in specific file formats

When to Use It: Use the filetype: operator when searching your ATS or the web for resume or CV documents.

Explanation: Include a filetype: operator in your search string to limit results to only those with a specified file attachment that contains the other operator criteria. Since resumes can be linked online in various formats, we’ll also use the OR operator to avoid excluding other qualified resumes that may be in a different file type.

Boolean Search Example

  • software AND (engineer OR developer) AND ~resume (filetype:pdf OR filetype:doc OR filetype:txt OR filetype:docx) -job -jobs -hire -hiring AND manag* AND (“Ruby on Rails” OR Ruby) AND (web NEAR develop*) 
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example09
Boolean Search Example: filetype: operator

ADVANCED OPERATOR #4: URL: AND SITE:

Functionality: Search for results within a specific website

When to Use It: Use either the URL: or site: operator to narrow your search results to websites that are home to your target candidates, such as social media platforms or networking sites. Do not include a space between the operator and domain, as in: site:google.com.

Explanation: Since you’re looking for a software engineer, you can narrow your search results to only resumes from known developer websites, such as GitHub.com. 

When sourcing across the entire internet, you’re sure to find candidates who meet your stated criteria. However, when searching a specific website, you will likely need to pare down your search string to just the basics to start. Then, add operators back on one at a time in order of priority to whittle down your list of results.

Boolean Search Example

  • site:github.com software AND (engineer OR developer) AND ~resume -job -jobs -hire -hiring
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example10
Boolean Search Example: site: operator

ADVANCED OPERATOR #5: INTITLE: / INTEXT: / INURL:

Functionality: Search for results with keywords within the title (intitle:) or body text (intext:) of a web page, or within the URL (inurl:).

When to Use It: As an alternative to the filetype: operator, use the intitle: or intext: operators to search for resume pages or links within a website, or use the inurl: operator to find a relevant URL. 

Explanation: Often, job seekers create online portfolios with links to all their work and application documents. While there is usually the opportunity to download a file, resumes and CVs are often uploaded as a web page with “resume” or “CV” in the title. 

Using the intext: operator performs the same function as intitle:, but within the body text of a web page, just as the inurl: operator searches within the URL. 

Boolean Search Example

  • site:github.com (inurl:resume OR inurl:CV) software AND (engineer OR developer) -job -jobs -hire -hiring
boolean-search-in-recruitment-example11
Boolean Search Example: inurl: operator

 

As you can see from the photo above, our most refined search string has yielded only resume results that meet our specified criteria. Now, we can evaluate each resume with confidence, knowing that these candidates will be relevant to our search.

boolean-search-in-recruitment-advanced-operators
Image via Shutterstock

5 TIPS FOR USING BOOLEAN SEARCH IN RECRUITMENT

Creating and testing new search strings is key to hone your skills and make the most of Boolean search techniques in recruitment. As you familiarize yourself with the operators we’ve discussed, use the following five tips to improve your results.

1. USE CANDIDATE PERSONAS

Creating a custom candidate persona for every open role gives you the information you need to recruit the right people. Work with hiring managers to distinguish job must-haves from nice-to-haves. Doing so will help you refine your Boolean search strings and accurately narrow your results. 

2. REGULARLY MODIFY YOUR SEARCH STRING

Know that the more operators you add to your search string, the narrower your results become. While complex search strings will quickly help you identify your ideal candidate, you may unintentionally eliminate qualified individuals from your talent pool. Cut or add operators as needed to adjust your search results.

3. RECORD SUCCESSFUL SEARCH STRINGS

As you continue to use Boolean search methods, make note of search strings you use most frequently and that yield high-quality results. Keep these strings on hand to save time on future searches. 

4. KEEP A LIST OF SPELLING VARIATIONS

The more results you review, the more readily you’ll recognize spelling variations in your keywords. For example, candidates may write “Power Point” instead of “PowerPoint.” Keep track of spelling variations you notice and use the OR operator to include all known variations within your results. 

5. BE AWARE OF FALSE POSITIVES

False positives — results that look accurate but aren’t — are common in Boolean search. No matter how specific and complex your search string is, an irrelevant result may find its way into the mix. Carefully consult each result and verify it meets your requirements.

Using Boolean search in recruitment is a low-cost, highly effective approach to sourcing candidates. The more experience you have crafting Boolean search strings the better your results will be. Minimizing your time spent sourcing candidates can drastically cut down on your cost-per-hire and reduce the cost-of-vacancy for open positions, so it’s worth your time to master Boolean search methods.

 

 [Source: This article was published in builtin.co By Kate Heinz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jay Harris]

Categorized in Search Techniques

Google has launched a new update in its Search Term report data explanations. Users are reporting that they are witnessing some not clear warning in their accounts alert section. If you click on the option of Learn More then you will be redirected on a Google support article about Search Terms. The article about search terms was present there for a long time. Although, users are now reporting that they are also witnessing a warning which is placed underneath the article. There is no explanation on the warning by the concerned authorities of Google. They also have launched a special statement but it is unclear as to why the warning is appearing.

 

As per the statement made by Google, they have updated their privacy and maintain changes in their Search Term reports. The statement clearly stated that the Search Term Report will only include terms that a significant number of users searched for. Although, the statement does not shed any light on the warning which has been witnessed by the users. The statement launched by the concerned authorities also said that they are always investing in new and effective ways to share insights on topics. In this statement, it is clearly said that Google takes care of the advertisers so that they can make crucial business decisions.

Paid search managers are not taking the decision very sportingly. Managers will now have fewer controls over their accounts and very less relative information from Google. Some of the researchers also shared that people were getting money on clicks for a query totally irrelevant from the webpage. Many of the managers have also stated that this change is inevitable. They just have to adapt their website according to the new rules. Last week also some managers were reportedly facing issues in the Ad creative section.

[Source: This article was published in flipweb.org By Abhishek - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dana W. Jimenez]

Categorized in Search Engine

Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff.

Stock photos have become a homestead of content creation, but finding the right image can be a hassle — and sometimes a legal liability.

Well, you’ll be delighted to know Google has updated Image Search to make it easier to discover free-to-use images — and how to license the ones you can’t use for free.

Here’s how to take advantage of the new changes:

  • Search for the image you want as you normally would, then head to the Images section.
  • Click on “Tools” to expand the filter menu.
  • Under “Usage Rights,” you’ll find the option to sort images by their license — Creative Commons or commercial use.
  • That’s it.

Final_1800sq_Licensable_SRP_and_Viewer_sha.max-1000x1000.png

One nifty addition is that Google now surfaces information on how you can obtain the rights for a licensed image directly in the description.

If you don’t tick off any of the “Usage Rights” options, Google will simply show all images that fit your search criteria. Images that lack licensing data will be marked with a warning, noting “images may be subject to copyright.”

It’s worth noting Google only highlights licensing details for images if a creator or a publisher has already provided this information, so your best bet to avoid unknowingly using a copyrighted pic is to filter out photos lacking this information.

If you can’t find the right image on Google, you can always try trawling through copyrights-free stock photo sites. We’ve put together a shortlist of some of our favorite options here. Those won’t match the sheer volume and diversity of choice Google offers, but the quality tends to be consistently higher.

 

[Source: This article was published in thenextweb.com By MIX - Uploaded by the Association Member: Martin Grossner]

Categorized in Search Engine

A recent research paper has reaffirmed that our internet history can be reliably used to identify us. The research was conducted by Sarah Bird, Ilana Segall, and Martin Lopatka from Mozilla and is titled: Replication: Why We Still Can’t Browse in Peace:On the Uniqueness and Reidentifiability of Web Browsing Histories. The paper was released at the Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security and is a continuation of a 2012 paper which highlighted the same reidentifiability problem.

Just your internet history can be used to reidentify you on the internet

Using data from 52,000 consenting Firefox users, the researchers were able to identify 48,919 distinct browsing profiles which had 99% uniqueness.

This is especially concerning because internet history is routinely sold by your internet service provider (ISP) and mobile data provider to third party advertising and marketing firms which are demonstrably able to tie a list of sites back to an individual they already have a profile on – even if the ISP claims to be “anonymizing” the data being sold. This is legally sanctioned activity ever since 2017 when Congress voted to get rid of broadband privacy and allow the monetization of this type of data collection.

 

This type of “history based profiling” is undoubtedly being used to build ad profiles on internet users around the world. Previous studies have shown that an IP address usually stays static for about a month – which the researchers noted “is more than enough time to build reidentifiable browsing profiles.”

It isn’t just our ISPs and mobile data providers that are siphoning up browsing history and using it for fingerprinting purposes, though. The authors noted in the abstract:

“[…] we observe numerous third parties pervasive enough to gather web histories sufficient to leverage browsing history as an identifier.”

These third parties include obvious players with a lot of insight into internet traffic such as Facebook and Google. All hope is not lost, though. In their user-facing recommendations section, the researchers commented:

“Until the state of the web has improved, the onus of ensuring privacy often falls on the user.”

Reidentification is a provable, real problem on the internet that internet users need to prepare for. It’s unfortunate that the internet infrastructure isn’t set up to respect privacy, and it’s unclear if it ever will be.

[Source: This article was published in privateinternetaccess.com By Caleb Chen - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jasper Solander]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

WhatsApp recently added a 'Search the Web' feature that can be used to check the veracity of information shared via the instant messaging platform.

users can now search the veracity of forwarded messages using a new 'Search the web' feature. When users receive a message they can forward it to up to five chats at a time. When a message has been forwarded more than five times from its original sender, or through a chain of over five chats, then WhatsApp will label it with a double arrow icon. WhatsApp messages labeled with double arrows can only be forwarded to one person at a time. The double arrow label lets you know the message did not come from a close contact. These restrictions on forwarded messages or forward limits are an effort to preserve WhatsApp’s intent to keep conversation intimate and private, as well as to drastically reduce the rate at which fake news spreads.

Everyone has received a forwarded message that makes outlandish claims. Those messages are received a lot more now because of the global health crisis, and at at time when the world is heavily relying on instant messaging apps to keep in touch with loved ones, as well as their doctors, teachers, employers, and so on. Useful information can be forwarded via WhatsApp, but so can a lot of misinformation as well.

WhatsApp recently debuted a simple method to check the veracity of messages labeled with double arrows. The feature is called 'Search the Web' and results in messages appearing with a magnifying glass icon next to them. When recipients of the message tap on the magnifying glass, they are able to send the message to their web browser and search for related news sources and information. The messages uploaded to the browser through this feature will never be seen by WhatsApp as all messages in the app are end-to-end encrypted. Users will then be able to debunk myths and fake news on their own by reading related information online.

How To Use WhatsApp’s ‘Search The Web’ Feature

'Search the web’ is only available in the following territories: Brazil, Italy, Ireland, Mexico, Spain, the UK, and the US. Once a user has made sure that the feature is available where they are, they need to make sure they have the latest version of WhatsApp for iOS or Android. The feature can only be tested if a WhatsApp user receives a message labeled with a double arrow icon. A search on their browser will be initiated when they tap on the magnifying glass that is displayed next to the message. In April, WhatsApp's efforts to limit the spread of misinformation had seen a 25 percent drop in forwarded messages globally, which is a clear sign that the steps it has taken thus far are working successfully to curb the spread of fake news.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, earlier this year, WhatsApp introduced a new WhatsApp hub which encouraged its users to trust only reputable sources, like the World Health Organization or the health ministry in a user's locality; and, to stop the spread of rumors by fact-checking information before forwarding a link/message. At the time, the concern was that WhatsApp was not doing enough to combat the spread of misinformation on its instant messaging platform. Now, finally, myths, misinformation, and fake news can be busted at the tap of a button. Most people don't want to be the source of fake news and in some countries, it is a punishable offense. By using 'Search the web' users can be more prudent about the messages they share with their contacts thus preserving WhatsApp's desire to stop the viral spread of misinformation.

 

[Source: This article was published in screenrant.com By BASEGO SEGAETSHO - Uploaded by the Association Member: Alex Gray]

Categorized in Internet Search
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