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Apple has issued an emergency patch to fix a vulnerability that left iOS devices at risk of being attacked via WiFi.

Just days after the release of iOS 10.3, Apple has pushed out an update for iOS 10.3.1 in order to fix a significant security issue that made iOS devices vulnerable to attacks sent via Wi-Fi.

The emergency patch addresses a vulnerability that would allow an attacker within range of an at-risk device to exploit a flaw in the operating system that would allow for arbitrary code execution that could attack the Wi-Fi chip in the device.

The issue appears to be the residual effect of a similar vulnerability that was supposedly patched with iOS 10.3. That version of the exploit allowed an attacker to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges, meaning it could affect the entire operating system.

The vulnerability patched by the update to iOS 10.3.1 affected devices with a Wi-Fi chip. That includes the iPhone 5 and later, iPad 4th generation and later and iPod touch 6th generation and later.

In a support documentation for the update, Apple credited Google Project Zero —Google’s team of security researchers—for spotting the issue.

The patch to iOS 10.3.1 also fixes an apparent issue that kept old iOS devices from downloading iOS 10.3 as an over-the-air update. 32-bit devices including the iPhone 5, 5C and fourth-generation iPad were affected, but will now be able to download the update normally.

How To Update To iOS 10.3.1

iOS 10.3.1 can be downloaded directly to your iOS device if you are connected to a Wi-Fi connection. This can be done by going to the Settings app, tapping “General” and tapping “Software Update.” An option to download and install should appear.

However, given the primary issue iOS 10.3.1 fixes has to do with potential security threats for iOS devices connected to Wi-Fi, you may choose to install the update via iTunes. Make sure your iTunes is up to date, then connect your iOS device to your computer via USB.

In iTunes, select your device’s icon from the upper left bar. Click on the Summary tab and click “check for update.” Click “Download” and iTunes will begin downloading the update. A guide of on-screen prompts will lead you through the process to complete the update.

Source : Yahoo.com
 
Categorized in Others

It seems that the number of scams spreading through the messaging app WhatsApp keeps on increasing, with deceptive campaigns coming up with with novel ways of luring in victims. Today we will show you a new example of this.

This particular WhatsApp scam promises users a free internet service, without needing to use Wi-Fi. Despite being complete nonsense from a technical point of view, the offer may nevertheless appear tempting to those unaware of the realities. And it’s also selling something pretty amazing …

Imagine being able to navigate with your smartphone wherever you are, without mobile data from your carrier or a Wi-Fi network. Who wouldn’t like that while on holiday abroad? It’s like magic … because it’s not real. Clicking on this scam won’t change that.

The decoy

As usual, the message spreads via WhatsApp groups or comes from a friend who “recommends” the service – often unaware of it. In this case, you receive a special invitation with a link:

1-whatsapp-free-internet

Once you click on the link, the page will detect the device’s language and show the following images, with the intention of making the scheme credible and leading the victim to share the content with at least 13 people. Thus, the scam keeps spreading:

2-whatsapp-scam-spreading

On the bottom of the screenshot you can see some comments from people who supposedly tried the service, stating that it works. This is a ruse. Clearly these messages and the profiles associated with them are fake – they aren’t on Facebook at all, so this is all part of the fraud.

As you can see in the image below, the scam can also be seen in Spanish (you will be automatically redirected to their default language depending on their browser settings). All of this goes on without you even noticing:

3-whatsapp-scam-spanish

This behavior is widely used nowadays, mostly because it allows cybercriminals to create different scams using the same pattern, in order to make them credible for users in multiple countries. This way, they don’t depend on a single country or language and they can target different nationalities all at once.

What happens after you share?

Having overcome the barrier of sharing, unwary users looking for free internet end up on sites where different actions may occur, ranging from subscription to premium and costly SMS services, to installation of third party apps, always with the goal of granting an economic return to the scammer.

Unfortunately, victims will only see offers, but no trace of free internet.

Tips to avoid falling in these campaigns

We have to keep in mind that education and security solutions are still the main tools users need to be safe online. Awareness about these scams should become viral faster than the scams themselves; however, we keep seeing an alarming rate of propagation.

If you know a victim, you can help by alerting their contacts to avoid hitting sour note. In case you want to report the fraud, you can flag it in your browser as is usually done in phishing campaigns.

Source : welivesecurity.com

Categorized in Science & Tech

Google has released an update that helps parents limit their children’s internet use.

Now with the Google Wi-Fi router, parents can schedule an 'internet pause' for specific times during the day.

Parents simply schedule shutdown, for times like dinner, bedtime or homework, using the app and the internet will pause for just the devices you selected.

Scroll down for video 

Google has revealed a new update that will help parents limit their children’s internet use
Now with the Google Wi-Fi router, parents can schedule an 'internet pause' for specific times during the day
Parents simply schedule shutdown, for times like dinner, bedtime or homework, using the app and the internet will pause for just the devices you selected
 
Google has revealed a new update that will help parents limit their children’s internet use. parents can schedule an 'internet pause' for specific times during the day. Parents simply schedule shutdown using the app and the internet will pause for just the devices you selected

SCHEDULED PAUSE  

Parents begin by selecting a suggested schedule such as bedtime or family time and choose a time frame for which the internet will pause on that person’s device.Parents then select specific days in which the pause will occur – this way they do not have to input the information every day. 

Parents begin by selecting a suggested schedule such as bedtime or family time and choose a time frame for which the internet will pause on that person’s device.

Parents then select specific days in which the pause will occur – this way they do not have to input the information every day. 

‘Scheduled Pause’ is the brainchild of Edith Chao, produce manage at Google, who was inspired while search for new tools for families.

‘I noticed that I was having trouble falling asleep. I’d check emails and surf the web late into the night,’ Chao explained.

‘Experimenting with options, I started using a timer on my computer to turn the internet off at 11 p.m.’

‘The first night was a shock, but after a few nights I was ready to shut down earlier.

‘And I was more refreshed and rejuvenated in the morning.’ 

After speaking with other parents who worked with Google and friends who didn’t, she found that many parents faced the challenge of prying the device from their children at certain times in the day.

The new upgrade follows less than a month of another parent friendly tool released by Google, called Family Link.

The new app provides parents with weekly and monthly activity reports and lets them set timers for how long their kid can use the device.

Parents also have the power to remotely lock the smartphone and check its location in order to see their child's whereabouts.

The new upgrade follows less than a month of another parent friendly tool released by Google, called Family Link.

The new app provides parents with weekly and monthly activity reports and lets them set timers for how long their kid can use the device
 
Parents can also limit how much time their child uses their device and set a bedtime so it shuts down completely


The new upgrade follows less than a month of another parent friendly tool released by Google, called Family Link. The new app provides parents with weekly and monthly activity reports and lets them set timers for how long their kid can use the device 

WHAT CAN FAMILY LINK CONTROL

Family Link provides parents with weekly and monthly activity reports and limit how much time they can use the device. 

Parents have the power to remotely lock your kid’s device when it’s time to play, study, or sleep.

They can set limits for how long kids can  sue the device and bedtimes for when the phone completely shuts down.

The parent friendly app also lets adults block and approve apps not suitable for children before they are downloaded from the Google Play Store.

‘When your child is ready for their first Android device, Family Link lets you create a Google Account for them, which is like your own account, and also helps you set certain digital ground rules that work for your family - like managing the apps your kid can use, keeping an eye on screen time, and setting a bedtime on your kid’s device,’ Pavini Diwanji, VP engineer at Google, said in the announcement.

To use Family Link, parents will have to purchase a device for their child that runs Android Nougat (7.0) or higher.

Then, download the app and create a Google Account for their kid.

Finally, sign them into their new device, and parents can then use Family Link as well.

The parent friendly app also lets them block and approve apps not suitable for children before they are downloaded from the Google Play Store.

You can also see how much your child spends playing with their favorite apps with weekly or monthly activity reports – and you can also set daily screen time limits on their handset.

Parents also have the power to remotely lock your kid’s device when it’s time to play, study, or sleep - and can set limits and bedtimes for when the phone completely shuts down.

The parent friendly app also lets them block and approve apps not suitable for children downloaded from the Google Play Store. You can also see how much your child spends playing with their favorite apps with weekly or monthly activity reports

‘Starting today, parents across the U.S. can request an invite to the Family Link early access program,’ Diwanji shared.

‘After receiving an invite, parents with kids under 13 years old can download and try the Family Link app.’

‘We’re just getting started, and we’ll be asking parents using Family Link for feedback about how to improve the experience before we make the app broadly available.’

HOW MUCH SCREEN TIME SHOULD YOUR CHILD HAVE? 

0-5 years old 

1. For children younger than 24 months, avoid any digital media use with the exception of video-chatting 

2. For children 18 to 24 months of age, you can introduce digital media, but use it together with your child and avoid allowing the child to consume it alone 

3. For children 2 to 5 years old, limit screen time to one hour per day of high-quality programming; watch with your children and help them understand what they are seeing how to apply it 

4. No screen time one hour before bedtime 

5. Avoid using screen time as the only method to soothe the child (the concern is that the child might not develop the ability to regulate emotion on their own) 

6. Avoid fast-paced programs or apps with distracting or violent content 

7. Monitor children’s media content; test apps before using them and ask the child what he or she thinks about the app 

8. Bedrooms, meal times and playtimes with parents should be screen-free for both parents and child 9. See recommended hours of sleep and physical activity for your child with this 24-hour calculator. 

School-age children (5-18 years old) 

Too much screen time has been found to cause health problems among children - and Google is helping parents monitor their usage

1. Develop and be consistent in following family guidelines for media use; assess the types of media and how much is being consumed, and what is appropriate for the child

2. Place consistent limits on hours or type of media that can be used per day Promote one hour of daily physical activity and eight to 12 hours of sleep, depending on age 

3. Try to not let children sleep with TVs, computers and smartphones in their bedrooms 

4. Avoid media use in the hour leading up to bedtime 

5. Have media-free times, like during family dinner, or create media-free areas at home 

6. Relay these guidelines to babysitters or other caregivers 

7. Have ongoing conversations with the child about online safety, whether it’s about cyberbullying, sexting, solicitations or compromising privacy 

8. Have a network of trusted adults who will engage with the child through social media.

Family Link appears to be a result of studies that warn parents about the dangers of too much screen time.

And the obsession seems to be fed by parents, with four in five believing that gadgets aid development – in contrast to growing concern among medical experts. 

The American Society of Paediatrics produced detailed guidelines linking screen time to the risk of a child becoming overweight for life, sleep disturbance and developmental problems. And the more time parents spent in front of a screen, the more their children did.

A growing body of evidence suggests all this is having a devastating effect on mental and physical health.

Health bodies in the US now recommend that children under two should have no.

Source : dailymail.co.uk

Categorized in Search Engine

You don’t need to worry anymore about internet at the airport. A brilliant single map can ease your pain.

Travel blogger Anil Polat perhaps knows the pain of wheeling a suitcase around an airport, hunting for Wi-Fi.

To combat this nightmare, he’s devised an interactive, regularly updated map of Wi-Fi passwords in airports around the world.

HERE IT IS

 

map

Simply click on the plane that corresponds with the airport you’re going to, and the map will tell you if there’s Wi-Fi there and what’s its password. ENJOY

Author: Azhar Khan
Source: http://arynews.tv/en/this-map-tells-you-wi-fi-passwords-for-airports-around-the-world

Categorized in Others

The Internet of Shit is a column about all the shitty things we try to connect to the internet, and what can be done about it. It’s from the anonymous creator of the Internet of Shit Twitter account.If you pay any attention at all to technology news right now, you might be led to believe that "smart" devices are here to liberate you from your old, dumb objects around your home. Over the last few years the Internet of Things craze has slowly but surely taken hold — and every company you can imagine wants to bring your stuff into a Jetsons-esque future.

I started the Internet of Shit Twitter account a year ago, sensing a trend in the rush to desperately add Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to everything: nobody really knew why any of this stuff was being put online.

The future, when bins need instruction

Not only are the customers buying smart devices cluelessly roped in, if you ask the companies behind the devices you’ll almost always get a vague pipe dream that doesn’t match the reality of connecting your home’s most crucial devices.

Fridges, washing machines, ovens, thermostats, mattresses, light bulbs, shoes, and even umbrellas: our glorious future of flying cars and convenience was somehow switched out for umbrellas that tweet us when it’s going to rain, and a fridge that live streams its contents. How did the Jetsons become so lame?

When put on a store shelf in front of you, the IoT trap is obvious. If you’re shopping for a thermostat you’ll see two choices: the boring but reliable Honeywell that doesn’t do much more than turn on your heaters, or the slick, shiny iPhone-esque Nest that promises to change the way your home is heated forever by just connecting to the internet.

HOW DID THE JETSONS BECOME SO LAME?

What would you choose? I can almost guarantee that you’ll end up with a Nest, or at least something similar. It’s only logical, but therein lies the trap: the unsaid things that come hand-in-hand with an internet-connected widget. They weren’t written on the shiny box and you won’t know about them until years down the track.

Consider this: when you bought your humble "dumb" thermostat 10 years ago, you connected it to the wall, programmed it and probably forgot about it. Sure, it was inefficient since it’d sometimes heat your house when you weren’t there, but it worked. Now imagine that same thermostat suddenly stopped working after five years, the LED display blinking back at you "thermostat no longer compatible." So you sit in the cold.

Wifi's down so the cat is stuck outsideInternet of Shit added,

It's a WiFi pet door that will only open if your dog/cat has a passport key... 

That’s a reality that will unfold one day with internet-connected versions of everything. You’ve heard the horror stories about Samsung Smart TVs slowing down to uselessness with every update, or suddenly getting ads all across the menus before obsolescence, but what happens when it’s actually part of your house?

Well, for one, it means things are less reliable. More than once I’ve come home to an icy house because the internet had gone down, then spent hours trying to fix it only to have the thermostat jammed on 86 degrees until tech support reset my account.

Say Google someday decides that Nest’s drama is a little bit too much for the company to deal with and it offloads it to a company without such deep pockets. That company’s going to look for ways to either reduce costs or extract more money from you — and with smart devices there are plenty of ways to do that.

CHANGE THE AD-PERSONALIZATION GAME AND TAILOR SOME INCREDIBLY SPECIFIC ADVERTISING ON FACEBOOK

Firstly, that company could cut support for older devices — turn off the servers that keep those old thermostats running, or simply change the endpoint it connects to so it doesn’t function anymore. Alternatively, the new owner could try to monetize you further by selling what your thermostat knows about you to an advertiser.

You probably think that data is meaningless, but it’s enough to make an advertising network salivate: knowing how warm or cold your house is and how often you’re home is enough information to change the ad-personalization game and tailor some incredibly specific advertising on Facebook.

These scenarios aren’t some far-fetched fantasy, it already happened when Nest acquired a home automation company called Revolv, then decided to quietly leave its customers out in the cold when it couldn’t be bothered servicing its devices anymore.

The hidden costs of running these operations are immense. There are servers to rent, bandwidth to pay for, and salaries to pay. But none of that is mentioned when you buy a gadget off a shelf, and in the majority of cases there’s no way to actually pay for your ongoing use of the product. How are those costs going to be recaptured when you’re paying a one-time fee for the hardware? I can’t wait until my Nest starts asking for an in-app purchase to heat my house one day.

When household gadget makers discover in-app purchases

When you’re sitting in front of a computer and find yourself signing up to a free new service, clicking past some long-winded terms and conditions screen, it’s easy to at least understand the implicit contract: I’m giving something about myself away for free in exchange for this, and this service might eventually just go away.

Unlike that scenario, buying something that’s attached to your wall, in your light sockets, or even on your person is far more intimate and you expect longevity, but there’s almost no chance it’ll work for as long as your offline gadget did. The tech world moves so fast it’ll be forgotten before the decade is out.

I’m no saint. I run a parody account that pokes fun at the ever-escalating hilarity of these devices, yet I’ve bought into them frivolously. I have smart speakers, online lightbulbs that need firmware updates, an internet-connected thermostat that’s repeatedly left me freezing in the winter, and smart plugs that apparently can’t figure out how to turn themselves on.

Embarrassingly, as a result, a good chunk of my grown-up life has been spent standing in my living room, cursing at my lights as they refuse to update (or even turn on) while trying to show people who visit just how cool my internet house is.

What we really need from those building the Internet of Things is commitment. Companies should step up and guarantee the longevity of their products, no matter the cost or bind it might put them in. If I buy a thermostat, it should last at least five years — at least enough time for me to start lusting after something else.

Unfortunately so far nobody’s made any such claim. No promises that your Nest, Sonos, Philips Hue, or Amazon Echo will work any longer than Myspace was in fashion, and that’s the biggest concern. When everything’s connected and nobody’s responsible for the consequences, what happens? I can’t wait for awkward sex ads to start appearing on Facebook because of what my connected mattress company sold to some other business.

WHAT WE REALLY NEED FROM THOSE BUILDING THE INTERNET OF THINGS IS COMMITMENT

The lure of these devices when presented against the backdrop of old, offline devices is obvious: they could change your whole life and in some ways for me, they have, but the headaches are only beginning, and selling them as life-changers without commitment is irresponsible, and there’s no transparency about how they could change in the future.

My old devices were so dumb, but in hindsight, that was kind of charming. They didn’t do much, and perhaps that simplicity is really what we need.As we face the bold new world of every inanimate object coming online, ask yourself this: do you need this now, or can it wait? Until there are commitments or infrastructure to keep it working forever, it’s nothing more than a fad, with bad actors and those seeking short-term profit piling on endlessly.

 

With time, things will improve and the market will shake out, just as it did with cellular networks and FM radio, but right now the Internet of Things is an awkward teenager, and the simple fact is this: everything you buy is no longer your own.

Source:  http://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2016/7/12/12159766/internet-of-things-iot-internet-of-shit-twitter

Categorized in Internet of Things

The “Internet of Things” is here and has more data on you than you may know. The significant cultural and technological shift of this deep embedment into our lives, bodies, homes and almost everything else we touch has allowed for efficiency, flexibility and convenience with our day-to-day lives. That connectivity is an incredible thing, but one major question remains within the burgeoning IoT industry: how do companies secure the data collected on you?

Consider the information at stake. Your Wi-Fi-enabled security cameras can give real-time information about when and if you’re home. Same with your Internet-connected alarm system. Even a smart TV has valuable information; it’s connected to your Netflix or Amazon account. Any account information on these accounts can lead to a credit card or identity details. Of course, the mother of all identity concerns comes from the smartphone: it’s a centralized resource of account information that can connect with almost all smart devices, your smart home and even your car — something that becomes even more vulnerable as the age of self-driving cars approaches.

Recently, a CBS 60 Minutes story demonstrated the multitude of capabilities of a hacker that only has a person’s phone number.It’s clear that the IoT age presents security concerns in ways that seemed unthinkable just a decade ago. The solution, though, may stem from one of the most unique innovations of the digital era: the blockchain.

Originally developed as part of the Bitcoin digital currency platform, the open blockchain model has inherent transparency and permanence. These are essential to creating a secure means of direct authentication between smart devices. The model currently used for Bitcoin can be propagated into other applications — any industry that requires archival integrity can adopt the blockchain. For the IoT industry, a blockchain can be created to manage device identity to prevent a spoofing attack where a malicious party impersonates another device to launch an attack to steal data or cause some other mayhem. Blockchain identity chains will enable two or more devices to be able to communicate directly without going through a third-party intermediary and in effect make spoofing more cost prohibitive.

Regarding this type of authentication, the model allows users to synchronize multiple devices against a single system of authority that is distributed and censorship resistant. This would apply to an open blockchain, not permissioned or private. The identity chain, created for each device is a permanent record. Through cryptography, only validated devices receive access. As new devices are added, their identity records become part of the blockchain for permanent reference. Any change to a device configuration will be registered and authenticated in the context of the blockchain validation model, ensuring that any falsified records can be caught and ignored.

This is a new technology and will take some time to move from testing into our everyday lives. Many industry leaders and governments will begin testing this year. Beyond whether or not the tech works, many stakeholders will need to get on board. An industry conglomerate that agrees on a blockchain design would be helpful. Having all the IoT devices write to the same source or have systems that are interoperable will be critical. It’s not necessarily that every IoT device manufacturer or software developer write data to the same blockchain; instead, it could go further upstream and be an agreement between OEM manufacturers of essential components that are used in the authentication process flow.

In addition to baseline authentication (device model, serial number, etc.), the blockchain can create records of any data it generates — for example, a smart front door lock can have a transaction log of video activation when someone exits/enters the home or unlocks it remotely. Each item in the history creates another historical link in its respective identity chain that can provide further data to use for authentication matching. If someone with malicious intent was to try and change the protocol of the door lock without the correct credentials or there was a change in the configuration, the blockchain validation model would not allow for the door lock to be changed.

An important component of the blockchain’s effectiveness comes from its standing as a public record, with user nodes all auditing the same record. Of course, with a public record, there will always be privacy concerns over sensitive data. However, the blockchain protects against this through the use of one-way hashes. In the blockchain world, a cryptographic hash function is a mathematical algorithm that maps data and shortens its size to a bit string, “a hash function,” which is also designed to be one-way and infeasible to invert. This means it is nearly and practically impossible to obtain the content of a hash without the source data.

The Internet of Things is still a new industry, one that will become more pervasive and significant as our technological innovations turn science fiction into our everyday lives. At this early stage, it’s critical to establish a scalable solution that will push the industry forward as the volume of connected devices grows exponentially. The blockchain represents a unique type of solution, one that is established as a secure means of protecting financial data but flexible enough to be applied to any high-stakes record keeping. With the IoT age demonstrating the ability to connect just about every aspect of a person’s life, it truly doesn’t get any more high stakes than that.

Source:  http://internetofthingsagenda.techtarget.com/blog/IoT-Agenda/Blockchain-Defender-of-the-Internet-of-Things

Categorized in Internet of Things

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